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  • 1.
    Assenova, Daniela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    “Fyra män och en kvinna – svenska tolkningar av en bulgarisk poetessa”2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 18-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Men and a Woman – Swedish Interpretations of a Bulgarian Poet This article considers the work of the Bulgarian poet Elisaveta Bagrjana (1893–1991) and her reception in Sweden. Her work provides an example of how poetry can be received and interpreted differently over time within one and the same literary context (in this case Swedish). Bagrjana’s reception in Sweden covers a period of almost 30 years, from 1943, when she was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature, to 1970, when a selection of her poetry was translated into Swedish. Different interpretations by four Swedish men, Anton Karlgren, Józef Trypućko, Artur Lundkvist and Nils Åke Nilsson, all of whom were involved in various ways with the Nobel Prize in Literature, place Bagrjana’s poetical world between two opposite poles – ranging from a view of her poetry as limited by her personal life to an emphasis on its universal significance.

  • 2.
    Birgegård, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    En ständig huvudvärk i relationerna mellan Sverige och Ryssland: Tsarens och kungens titlar.2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problems for translators and interpreters in conveying the titles of the Swedish king and the Russian tsar respectively (17th century) 

  • 3. Crnković, Denis
    Time and the Vanities of Existence in Antun Šoljan’s Fiction2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 60-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the theme of hope and hopelessness in a selection of Antun Šoljan’s stories and novels and how the author creates in his heroes an interior atmosphere of inquiry that is paradoxically laden with uncertainty and the human instinct to move forward. A “parabolic moralist” (as Davor Kapetanić has called him), Šoljan depicts the world as more than a simple continuity of events, political, personal, private or public. His major concern is to make sense of man’s existence in a universe that confronts him with both linear time and a repetitive or circular series of events. Examining the apparent contradictions of linear vs. circular existence, the author often places his characters “out of time” and analyzes any given life by finding its important events, actions and desires. While Šoljan’s heroes often conclude that temporal things are of little lasting value, he leaves his philosophically and psychologically battered heroes with at least a small possibility of hope. 

  • 4. Gutiérrez Rubio, Enrique
    A Diachronic Study of the Dative in the Written Czech Language2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 8-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper deals with the study of the semantics of the dative case in the written Czech language from the point of view of cognitive semantics. Its aim is to apply the semantic configuration of the Czech dative – mainly provided by Janda’s A Geography of Case Semantics (1993) and Janda and Clancy’s The Case Book for Czech (2006) – to a large corpus composed of 8,355 datives belonging to four significant periods in the history of Czech written language: old Czech, middle Czech, new Czech, and contemporary Czech. 

  • 5.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Transplanting Pushkin: A Symposium on Reading, Translating and Adapting Eugene Onegin2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 97-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Hedin, Tora
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för slaviska och baltiska språk, finska, nederländska och tyska.
    The Czech Particle : Some Semantic Aspects2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 57, p. 24-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study analyzes the semantics of the Czech polyfunctional word už in comparison with the Russian words уже and уж. Over the last decades, these words have become easier to study because researchers can check hypotheses on the basis of a huge body of data in text corpora. Using relevant lexicographic information, theoretical investigations and corpus data, the study aims to identify and describe additional distinctive features of už that should be included in its lexicographic description. The empirical data have been collected from the Czech National Corpus (CNK), subcorpus SYN2010. I have considered the temporal and metatextual uses of už, as well as certain uses in which there is no temporal or metatextual meaning.

  • 7.
    Jansson, Olena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages. Department of Modern Languages.
    News from Uppsala2017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 58, p. 86-89Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Jansson, Olena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 95-98Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Jansson, Olena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Maier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Historical Narrative in East Slavic Writing2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 59, p. 95-98Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Jansson, Olena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Maier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    ”Ruriks stamträd” –: en av de ryska skatterna på Carolina Rediviva2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 7-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the treasures in the university library in Uppsala (Sweden) is an extraordinary genealogical tree of Russia’s Rurikid rulers, beginning with the legendary Rurik and ending with Tsar Fedor Ivanovič, who died in 1598. Up to now it has not been known where it was produced, when it came into being, and who could have been the scribe of the Russian names. In this paper we argue that the genealogical tree was produced in Sweden and that the scribe for the Russian names was Aleksej Mankiev, who helped the Swedish scholar Johan Gabriel Sparwenfeld by producing fair copies of the latter’s manuscripts. Mankiev’s sojourn in Sweden from 1700 to 1718 gives us a first approximation for the date of the drawing. We think that this can be narrowed down to “around 1715”, given the close relationship between the “Uppsala tree” and the Rurikid genealogy presented in Jadro rossijskoj istorii, a manuscript which was finished in Sweden in 1715, most probably also by “our scribe”, Mankiev.

  • 11. Kapustina, Elena
    et al.
    Björklund, Martina
    Лексические средства экспрессивного и эмоционального воздействия в повести Астрид Линдгрен «Эмиль из Лённеберги» и её переводах на русский язык2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 40-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several of Astrid Lindgren’s most famous children’s books exist in two Russian translations: one by Lilianna Lungina and one by Ludmila Braude (often in cooperation with other translators). It is intriguing that Lungina’s translations are generally more popular among readers than those by Braude, even though the latter may seem more true to the original in several respects. In this article we look into the first book of the Emil of Lönneberga series and its two Russian translations (by Lungina and Braude & Paklina), concentrating on the use of emotive vocabulary and words and phrases with expressive and/or emotional connotations. The results of a quantitative analysis show that the utilization of these types of expressions in Braude & Paklina’s translation substantially exceeds their use in Lungina’s translation and the Swedish original text. Lungina’s translation does not essentially differ from the original as to the total number of emotionally loaded expressions, but the relative weight of different types varies. Lungina uses more emotionally loaded and colloquial words and Lindgren more idiomatic expressions and phraseological constructions. In another quantitative analysis we demonstrate how the number of emotionally loaded words is increased in both translations through reduction of repetition, a proposed universal of translation. In a comparative analysis three recurring types of correlation between the original text and its translations are discussed using illustrative examples. Emotionally loaded Swedish words are generally translated with Russian analogues in both translations. However there are instances of utilization of neutral vocabulary in Lungina’s text. Cases of neutralization in both translations are extremely rare. Translation of neutral Swedish words with emotionally loaded or expressive words is far more frequent in Braude & Paklina’s translation than in Lungina’s. The more moderate use of emotive and expressive language makes Lungina’s translation stylistically closer to contemporary readers’ immediate linguistic reality, while Braude & Paklina’s translation might be felt to be stylistically heavy and unnatural.

  • 12. Karlsohn, Irina
    Review. Andrea Gullotta. Intellectual Life and Literature at Solovki 1923-1930: The Paris of the Northern Concentration Camps. Cambridge: Legenda 2018. x + 370 pp.2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 93-94Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Kuzmić, Boris
    O fonološkim i morfološkim osobitostima Habdelićeva Zrcala Marijanskoga (1662)2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 24-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the phonological and morphological features of Juraj Habdelić’s (1609–1678) work Zarczalo Marianzko (1662) in order to demonstrate that its language is predominantly based on the literary Croatian Kajkavian dialect. Moreover, the author sheds light on the impact of Štokavian and Čakavian authors on Habdelić's language. Special attention is paid to those language features which can be viewed as Kajkavian, but which were included in the body of literary Kajkavian as a whole at a time when the Kajkavian literary tradition still existed. The study shows that there were non-Kajkavian elements at a phonological level, such as the reflex of šva, denotation of syllabic r̥ as ar, reflex of *ď as đ, and the actualization of the Second Palatalisation of velars. As for morphology, the following features are encountered: voc. sg. m. - e, the interrogative-relative pronoun što including its derivatives, the use of the future tense, and the particle neka in the imperative 3. pers. sg. Of the overall Kajkavian dialectal features throughout its existence as a literary tradition, other divergences are also encountered: the change of e >, o loss of the negative form of the verb moći in 1. pers. pl., the forms of the numerals štiri and dvajseti, and the short, contracted forms of the perfective present tense form of the auxiliary verb biti. 

  • 14.
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Finska lånord och dåligt öl2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of Finnish loan words in Swedish is very limited, in spite of the long-standing contacts between the languages. The existing loan words were taken over during a long period of time, with the oldest ones appearing already in the late Middle Ages, and the later ones appearing in the early 20th century. It is important to elucidate where and when these words have been borrowed. Due to extensive geographical contact areas, however, this is no easy task. Earlier research probably exaggerated the role of Stockholm, whereas the importance of, for example, the provinces of Gästrikland and Ångermanland was underestimated. During the 17th century, these areas formed bridge-heads in the large-scale Finnish migration to present- day Sweden. Old mining centres, like Arboga, also seem to have been of importance as contact areas. There are indications that quite a few Finnish loan words were borrowed in that area. If Swedish rappakalja ’bad beer’ (< Finnish rapakalja) was also one of those, that could perhaps help to explain the Swedish expression, “to suffer the after-effects of Arboga beer”. 

  • 15.
    Lysén, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Editorial2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16. Lönngren, Tamara
    Архив профессора Олафа Брока в Норвежской Национальной Библиотеке2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ru]

    The present article, "Professor Olaf Broch’s archive in the National Library of Norway," provides a preliminary description of the archive of the Norwegian professor of Slavic languages Olaf Broch (1867-1961), whose heritage is represented not only by well-known works in the field of Slavic phonetics but also by abundant correspondence held in archives of various countries. The greater part of this correspondence is deposited in the archive of the Norwegian National Library. There is currently no description of this archive, but according to a preliminary evaluation, the epistolary section of Broch’s archive comprises letters from approximately 500 correspondents, of whom approximately 140 wrote in Russian. Correspondence with academician Alexey A. Shakhmatov holds a special place within Broch’s correspondence with philologists. Broch was in communication with many Russian linguists, historians, literary scholars, writers and poets, as well as with diplomats and politicians: there are letters written to him by S. V. Arsen’ev, V. A. Bereznikov, K. N. Gulkevch, A. M. Kollontay and A. V. Lunacharskiy. Of special significance is his correspondence with Ukrainian scholars and politicians, through which a previously unknown Ukrainian chapter in the biography of Norwegian Slavist has been discovered. In addition to the epistolary legacy, many other materials have been discovered in Broch’s archive, including a manuscript containing previously unknown memoirs by E. A. Masal'skaja-Surina and poems-in-prose by S. Šil'. 

  • 17. Lönngren, Tamara
    «... прошу не забыть, что есть у Вас друг»: Олаф Брок и Алексей Александрович Шахматов2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 37-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article “... please do not forget that you have a friend”: Olaf Broch and Aleksej Aleksandrovič Šachmatov is based on archivе materials containing hitherto unknown facts from the life of the Norwegian Slavist Olaf Broch. The article focuses primarily on aspects of Broch’s biography after the death of his colleague and friend, the Russian Academy member Aleksej Šachmatov. Fragments of the long-standing correspondence between Šachmatov's elder sister Evgeniya Masalskaya-Surina and Professor Broch are published here for the first time. The article concludes with the entire text of Olaf Broch’s “From the memories of A. A. Šachmatov.” 

  • 18. Maciejewski, Witold
    Czasowniki plurakcyjne w języku polskim?2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pluractionality is a syntactic, morphological and semantic category, which originally referred to verbs in the Chadic languages of Africa. Pluractional verbs prefer plural subjects and/or plural objects. Are there any traces of pluractivity in Polish? Most probably, some of frequentative and distributive verbs (like the prototypical pozagryzać ‘to bite’, on several objects, poprzyjeżdżać ‘to come’, performed by several agents) are pluractional, as they prefer plural agents or patients. 

  • 19.
    Maier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Grigorij Kotošichin – inte bara ”svensk spion”, utan även rysklärarkollega?: Nytt ljus på en gammal kändis2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 118-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grigorii Kotoshikhin – Not just a "Swedish Spy" but also a Russian-language Teaching Partner? New Light on a Familiar Figure.

    Grigorii Kotoshikhin is known primarily for his description of Muscovy during the reign of Tsar Aleksei Mikhajlovich (in a manuscript book at Uppsala University Library). He began his career as a secretary at the tsar’s Diplomatic Chancery, where he cultivated relationships with Swedish diplomats. He defected from Russia in 1664 and eventually came to Stockholm in 1666, where he wrote his famous book. In August 1667 Kotoshikhin killed his landlord in a drunken quarrel; he was executed, and his body was brought to Uppsala for dissection by the university’s most famous professor, Olof Rudbeck. This article begins with an overview of his life, followed by a discussion of a manuscript, at the National Archives in Stockholm, which can be attributed to Kotoshikhin. This document shows that Kotosshikhin not only suggested that he could teach Russian to Swedish students (as earlier scholars have mentioned), but that he even produced a small Russian textbook, using as a prototype the booklet "Alfabetum Rutenorum" (Stockholm, printed around 1640). The appendix presents the first complete facsimile edition of this handwritten textbook.

  • 20.
    Maier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Известия о чудотворных источниках в русском переводе (1646 г.):: вновь найденные оригиналы к Вестям-Курантам2017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 58, p. 7-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1646, the village of Hornhausen in Saxony became famous in many parts of Europe. When the snow had melted after the winter, it occurred to some of the inhabitants that the water remaining in a water hole could be a “healing source”, inspired by their knowledge about similar water holes in earlier times that had been interpreted in this way. Eventually more water holes were discovered, and at the peak of the pilgrimages, in the summer of 1646, Hornhausen allegedly had 20 “healing springs”, and thousands of people were staying at this “Lutheran Lourdes”. After the summer of 1647, the water disappeared. During the peak of the mass psychosis, more than 50 different pamphlets and broadsides were printed, containing news about the miraculous healings, eyewitness reports, drawings, etc. Some of these imprints were sent to Moscow, where they were translated at the Ambassadorial Chancery (Posol ́skij prikaz), and eventually they were published in the Vesti- Kuranty series. The present paper contains a historical and cultural background to the miraculous sources of Hornhausen as well as a description of the German pamphlets and the Russian translations. A parallel Russian-German list comprising more than 200 alleged healings is given in the appendix (the German equivalents are quoted from the very same edition of the pamphlet that was translated in Moscow). 

  • 21.
    Mikhaylov, Nikita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 92-94Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22. Molvarec, Lana
    Predodžbe Skandinavije u suvremenom hrvatskom i postjugoslovenskom medijskom i književnom diskursu2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 58-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to examine primarily Croatian, but also Bosnian and Serbian media and literary discourse on representations of Scandinavia as a constructed sociocultural space. Analysis of media discourse was conducted by examining journalistic texts published on various web portals over the past few years. The majority of these representations are very positive, constructing Scandinavia as a social utopia. I argue that these representations are more narratives that “we tell ourselves about ourselves” (Geertz) than objective reflections of reality. I discuss the importance of popular culture and brands in reinforcing positive representations. Furthermore, literary texts by A. Mešković, B. Sejranović and D. Špišić construct representations of Scandinavia from an immigrant perspective. These are potentially politically subversive because they address questions about the power of those in the position of the Other in Scandinavian societies. 

  • 23.
    Muskala, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Bibliography for 20132014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 55, p. 218-223Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Muskala, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Bibliography for 20142015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 56, p. 108-114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Muskala, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Bibliography for 20152016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 95-99Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Muskala, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Bibliography for 20162017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 58, p. 90-95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Muskala, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Bibliography for 20172018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 102-107Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Nesset, Tore
    When a single word is enough: Norwegian compounds and their Russian counterparts2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I undertake an empirical analysis of Norwegian compounds with special focus on those that correspond to single words in Russian that are not compounds. Although in many cases the Russian single words have the same meaning as the Norwegian compounds, we frequently encounter semantic shifts of two types, which I refer to as “hyponymy” and “metonymy”. I argue that hyponymy is the default option, but that metonymy is preferred for certain types of compounds, e.g. those where the head represents a part of the non-head (e.g. kirkegolv ‘church floor’) or the head denotes a quantity of the non-head (e.g. melkedråpe ‘drop of milk’). It is furthermore suggested that the choice between hyponymy and metonymy is motivated by the desire to minimize loss of information; while hyponymy normally involves a smaller loss of information, metonymy appears to minimize information loss for certain types of compounds. Finally, I relate my findings to the trade-off between informativeness and economy in language and hypothesize that this trade-off is treated differently in languages like Norwegian, where compounding is a central word-formation mechanism, and Russian, where compounding plays a more modest role in word-formation.

  • 29. Norberg, Madlena
    Sorberna år 2014 – om minoritetspolitik i Tyskland2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with European minority policy in general and German minority policy in particular. The four officially recognised minorities in Germany are presented alongside Low German, a regional language. Following an overview of the European minority conventions signed by Germany, a presentation is made of European minority policy which, for the most part, is implemented by the European minority organisation FUEN (Federal Union of European Nations). The initial part of the article ends with a presentation of the bodies, established in Germany during the last decade, concerned with minority issues. In the second part of the article, the focus is moved to a cursory description of the specific situations of each individual minority group in Germany, including the current situation facing the Sorbian people in Saxony and Brandenburg. Reference is made both to the coal-mining industry, which continues to threaten Sorbian villages with physical destruction, and to the establishment of the WITAJ-Language Centre (WITAJ-Sprachzentrum), an instrument of the linguistic revitalisation movement in Lusatia. 

  • 30.
    Nuorluoto, Jussi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Slavic Languages.
    A New Generation of Historical Linguists from Brno: Three Different profiles2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 86-91Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Nuorluoto, Jussi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Editorial2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 7-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Nuorluoto, Jussi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 105-107Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Packalén, Malgorzata Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    ”Somliga gillar poesi…” – om fenomenet Szymborska i Sverige2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 55, p. 149-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first spontaneous reaction by Swedish society when Wisława Szymborska was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature was great collective surprise. In spite of the fact that never before had so much been written about the laureate - dealing with literary aspects as well as personal character traits - a majority of the Swedish public was still relatively ignorant of the laureate. Nevertheless, among Swedish Slavists, she had her loyal adherents. Already in the beginning of the 1960s, Nils-Åke Nilsson published an anthology of Polish poetry, Det nakna ansiktet (“The Naked Face”). In 1980, the first Swedish anthology of poems by Szymborska was published, interpreted by Per-Arne Bodin and Roger Fjellström: Aldrig två gånger (“Never twice”). Among those who discovered and appreciated Szymborska’s poetry at an early stage was undoubtedly Professor Sven Gustavsson. Already in 1980, he organized a conference on contemporary Polish poetry at the Department of Slavic Languages at Uppsala University and, in 1984, a symposium devoted exclusively to the poetry of Wisława Szymborska. In 1993, she visited Stockholm University and Uppsala University, attending meetings with students and other interested participants. Today, Szymborska’s poems are still very popular and appreciated, a fact that explains the great demand for renewed editions of her works. The reasons for this popularity are to be found in the complex picture of Szymborska’s literary and non-literary qualities, whose common denominator is simplicity. This is not just a keyword in relation to her poetry, but also in relation to the poet's psychological characteristics. It also forms the basis for what I call “the Szymborska phenomenon in Sweden.” In my article, beyond the reactions of society to Szymborska’s Nobel Prize, I discuss Sven Gustavsson’s lifelong commitment and involvement in the dissemination of Szymborska’s poetry in Sweden. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor Gustavsson.

  • 34.
    Packalén Parkman, Malgorzata Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    I mörkrets skugga…: Om Edith Södergrans och Halina Poświatowskas poetiska världar2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 73-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two young women, two extremely talented poets, two distant cultures and one convergent fate marked by living with an incurable illness – this is how one could briefly summarize two of the most fascinating poetic personalities of the 20th century: Edith Södergran and Halina Poświatowska. Both poets died at the age of just over thirty, leaving behind works which testify not only to their great talent and poetic potential, but also to their extraordinary female sensitivity and maturity. Although they came from different cultures and times, and wrote in two different languages (Swedish and Polish), it is hard not to see a stunning affinity between their powerful poetic visions. The article explores these thematic similarities by focusing on their understanding of human fate, female sensuality and desire for existential freedom in expressing their own thoughts and their being in the world.

  • 35.
    Packalén Parkman, Malgorzata Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    ”Moderskapet utan glasyr”: Omvärdering av Moder-Polen-symbolen i polska nutida litterära texter och bloggar2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 57, p. 48-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ”Motherhood without icing.” The Re-evaluation of the ‘Polish Mother’ icon in contemporary literature, media texts and blogs Polish woman-centred symbolism contains a specific dimension which is depicted as the icon of the “Polish Mother” (Matka Polka). This iconic image is deeply rooted in Polish history and culture, and it often refers to the mother of Jesus, as she is expected to sacrifice her children for the motherland. As a woman, she realizes herself not only through motherhood but also in service to her nation, and as such, she becomes a highly charged metaphor for both motherly love and patriotism. The “Polish Mother” is a myth and stereotype that has shaped the thinking of the nation for more than two centuries and is still largely in force. However, in contemporary literature (and also various media texts and blogs), one can identify obvious attempts to re-evaluate this very traditional iconic image. Motherhood in particular has gained a new dimension in contemporary Poland. I investigate some of the most characteristic aspects of the selected texts, focusing on the discrepancy between the old clichés and expectations and the subversion of traditionally defined motherhood in a modern society which no longer takes the “Polish Mother” at face value.

  • 36.
    Packalén Parkman, Malgorzata Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    "Niektórzy lubią poezję" – ale czy koniecznie polską i w Szwecji?...2017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, no 58, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Some People Like Poetry“– but why just Polish and in Sweden?... 

    Among the contemporary Polish poetry that has been translated into Swedish, it is easy to distinguish two groups: postwar poetry by the older generation and poems by the middle generation. Poets who debuted in the 1990s and later are not very well represented in Swedish translation. The factor which has most strongly colored the image of Polish literature in Sweden is undoubtedly the political one. Hence, more recent Polish poetry, especially after the watershed year of 1989, was until recently only minimally represented in the Swedish literary market. This article examines the current situation in order to address the following questions: Has the Swedish reception of Polish poetry undergone revision and re-evaluation? Can we speak of a generational change of guard? And is there a need in Sweden for translations of modern poetry from the geographically close but otherwise quite distant socio-cultural sphere of Poland?

  • 37.
    Rassokhina, Elena
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Translating Culture-Specific Items: the Legal Terminology of Shakespeare's Sonnet 46 in Russian Translations2016In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 57, p. 60-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of how to translate words with cultural implications from the source language into the target language text has been ongoing for a long time. It is well established within Shakespeare commentary that the culture-specific items used by Shakespeare in the Sonnets reflect the range of social institutions in Elizabethan England, for example, the legal system. Legal terminology is used especially frequently by Shakespeare in the sonnet cycle and plays an important role in its imagery. In translations of the sonnets, this particular feature presents Russian translators with specific difficulties. This paper aims to examine those difficulties and looks at the translation strategies applied within eleven Russian translations of Sonnet 46, which employs a great amount of legal terminology.

  • 38.
    Rosén, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Editorial2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 7-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Rå Hauge, Kjetil
    ”Tooth Money” – A Small Clash of Civilisations2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 160-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An exquisitely polite Turkish phrase, traditionally used by generous hosts at Ramadan celebrations, has through literal misunderstanding become an emblematic symbol for excesses in the Ottoman exploitation of the peoples of the empire. It is well entrenched in Bulgarian usage, but also found in the writings of Western travellers in the Ottoman Empire. 

  • 40.
    Slyk, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Terminologia prawna w przekładzie ustnym i pisemnym: Wybrane przykłady tłumaczeń w języku polskim i szwedzkim2017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 58, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in the work of interpreters and translators are obvious and depend on different recipients of these services. The article highlightsin particular the characteristics of legal interpretationbetween Polish and Swedish, as well as literary translations of Swedish crime novels to Polish. Emphasis is placed on some problem areas,such as translation of namesof criminal offences, police ranks andcourt names. Theseproblem areas are applicable to both interpreters and translators, but are handled differently. Knowledge of criminal law and legal terms among interpreters and translators also differs, which may be the result of the requirement for relevant education to dialog interpreters, while translators need to acquire relevant knowledge on their own.

  • 41. Sutcliffe, Benjamin M.
    «Правды не хватает». «Обитель» З. Прилепина: документальность и роман воспитания2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 191-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zakhar Prilepin’s novel The Мonastery (Obitel’, 2014) combines traits of the novel of development (Bildungsroman), camp prose (lagernaia proza), and other genres to depict the life of Artem Goriainov, a prisoner in the Solovki Islands labor camp in the late 1920s. The Monastery purports to be based on the reminiscences of the author’s great-grandfather, yet the narrative’s subtle structure and references to artistry reveal that the author’s representation of material is more important than the factual recording of events. 

  • 42. Swoboda, Bartosz
    Ekfrazy modernistyczne i „mowa dzieła sztuki”2015In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 56, p. 90-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Greek noun ekphrasis is connected to the verb ekphrazein, which means ‘to speak out’, or ‘tell in full’. Jean Hagstrum and other influential critics define this term as a special quality of giving voice and language to otherwise mute artworks. The aim of this article is to discuss and interpret the theoretical views concerning ekphrasis formulated by Jean Hagstrum, John Hollander, James A. W. Heffernan, and W. J. T. Mitchell. It also comprises a practical application of these theoretical postulates. Poems which actualize the ekphrastic principle, defined as “to give a voice to mute artworks,” are considered in light of theoretical considerations. 

  • 43.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 215-217Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44. West, James
    Blue Geese or Self-Serving Relatives: Translation Across a Major Cultural Divide2017In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 58, p. 75-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-war Soviet Union, works by the leading literary figures of the non-Russian republics enjoyed a wide and enthusiastic readership. Many of these authors chose to write in the lingua franca of the Soviet empire, but some wrote in their native languages and were translated into Russian. The nature of these translations raises interesting issues, not only those one would expect in a translation over the significant linguistic distance between a non- Indo-European and an Indo-European language, but others that are due to differences between broader cultural traditions, written or oral. One such issue is: what constitutes a ‘language’ for the purpose of literary translation in situations where a whole genre might not have an equivalent in the culture of the target language? A striking example is a novel by the distinguished Buriat writer Chimit Tsydendambaev which became quite widely known following its appearance in Moscow in 1977 with the title Okhotniki za golubymi gusiami. Satiricheskii roman v novellakh, in an authorized translation into Russian by L. Parfenov, with a second edition in 1987. The novel appeared in the original Buriat only in 1989, with the title Kholo oiryn türelnüüd [Distant and Close Relatives], and a comparison of this text with the “authorized translation” is fascinating and puzzling. It appears that the author himself must have worked with his Russian collaborator to create a version couched not only in the Russian language, but in the communicative currency of a Russian genre. Detailed comparison of the texts reveals that while the literary devices of the original depend on the structures and rhetoric of Buriat-Mongolian, those of the Russian version are wholly Russian- based, resulting effectively in the telling of a somewhat different story. As a result, the very successful “translation” can at best be described as an “adaptation” of the original. Analogous genre problems have been noted with the Russian reception of Buriat drama, and the case of Tsydendambaev’s novel is unlikely to be unique in the history of Russian translations from literatures of the minority languages of the empire. The way we examine translations beween remote languages needs more sophisticated treatment. 

  • 45.
    Åkerman Sarkisian, Karine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    In memoriam: Professor Andrei Zalizniak2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 99-101Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Åkerman Sarkisian, Karine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Visiting Professor at Faculty of Languages 2018-20202018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 95-96Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47. Šamin, Stepan
    et al.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Вымышленный «Указ турецкого султана»: европейская традиция и русский перевод 1697 г.2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 169-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the centuries of conflict between the Ottoman Empire and various European states, polemical manuscripts, pamphlets and books on Turkish topics were common in Europe. Some texts reappeared at intervals, adapted to different circumstances. A certain category consisted of texts that were allegedly written by the Ottoman sultan himself. This paper deals with one such text, which proclaims to be an instruction from the sultan to his subjects on ceremonies and processions to be performed in order to please Allah. Variations of this text appeared in 1686–87, 1697–98 and 1716–17, in manuscripts and printed pamphlets in different languages. It was translated into Russian twice: in 1697 and 1716. The 1697 translation was only recently discovered among documents from Peter I’s Grand Embassy. This paper examines the textual relationships between the versions that appeared in different decades and their historical contexts, and contains an edition of the previously unpublished 1697 Russian translation.

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