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  • 1. Barrett, Paul M.
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Benson, Roger B. J.
    Opalized archosaur remains from the Bulldog Shale (Aptian: Lower Cretaceous) of South Australia2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 293-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terrestrial reptile remains are very rare in the Lower Cretaceous of South Australia, but include the holotype of the small theropod Kakuru. Here, we review this taxon and other archosaur specimens collected from the Bulldog Shale (Aptian) of Andamooka and Coober Pedy. Kakuru possesses no unique characters or character state combinations and is regarded as a nomen dubium, representing an indeterminate tetanuran theropod. Two other specimens (a left metatarsal and astragalus) can be referred to Dinosauria, but the identity of several other specimens (phalanges and a centrum) can only be resolved to the level of an indeterminate archosaur.

  • 2. Barrett, Paul M.
    et al.
    Rich, Thomas H.
    Vickers-Rich, Patricia
    Tumanova, Tat'yana A.
    Inglis, Matthew
    Pickering, David
    Kool, Lesley
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ankylosaurian dinosaur remains from the Lower Cretaceous of southeastern Australia2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 205-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Eumeralla and Wonthaggi formations (Otway and Strzelecki groups, respectively: late Hauterivian to Albian) of Victoria, Australia, have yielded diverse dinosaur faunas. Here we report a set of unassociated isolated specimens from these units including teeth, dorsal vertebrae, ribs and osteoderms of an indeterminate ankylosaurian dinosaur.

  • 3. Hamilton-bruce, Robert J.
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A possible succineid land snail from the Lower Cretaceous non-marine deposits of the Griman Creek Formation at Lightning Ridge, New South Wales2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 325-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse non-marine molluscan fauna has been recorded from the Lower Cretaceous (middle-upper Albian), low-energy, fluvial sediments of the Griman Creek Formation at Lightning Ridge in northern New South Wales. We describe a novel addition to this assemblagea probable pulmonate gastropod that manifests features (including shell with an inflated body whorl, expansive aperture, and reduced spire/whorl count) consistent with Succineidae, an extant cosmopolitan family of terrestrial snails. The fossils are assigned to a new genus and species (Suratia marilynae), distinguishable from existing taxa by a combination of traits: shell with sculpturing limited to fine growth lines only, lunate body whorl with a rounded periphery, markedly flattened spire (comprising up to two whorls), which is almost flush with the apical surface and delineated by a deeply impressed sutural 'gutter,' and presence of both a broad columellar plait and distinct columellar fold. The new taxon apparently constitutes the oldest pulmonate remains recorded from Australasia, and extends the known stratigraphical range of succineids back to the Lower Cretaceous in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • 4.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Deacon, Geoff L.
    Siverson, Mikael
    Remains of a Late Cretaceous pterosaur from the Molecap Greensand of Western Australia2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pterosaur remains are very rare in Australasia and especially in Upper Cretaceous strata. Thus, the discovery of a jaw fragment from the Cenomanian-Coniacian Molecap Greensand near Gingin in Western Australia represents an important new stratigraphical occurrence for the region. Although the teeth are not preserved, the presence of labio-lingually compressed alveoli that are anterolaterally oriented, variable in shape/size (inferring heterodonty) and very widely spaced is reminiscent of ornithocheiridsa geographically cosmopolitan clade of predominantly Early Cretaceous pterodactyloids. If correct, this identification could extend the known range of Ornithocheiridae through to the Late Cretaceous in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • 5.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Siverson, Mikael
    First evidence of a Late Cretaceous sea turtle from Australia2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The isolated scapula of a chelonioid sea turtle is described from the Upper Cretaceous (upper Maastrichtian) Miria Formation of the Giralia Ranges in Western Australia. Character states including the wide angle of divergence between the scapular processes (possibly reaching 140 degrees), projection of the glenoid on a constricted scapular neck, and highly vascular glenoid articular surfaces suggest affinity with dermochelyoidsthe most diverse and geographically widespread clade of Mesozoic chelonioids. The Miria Formation chelonioid scapula constitutes the first definitive record of a Late Cretaceous sea turtle from Australia and is one of the few occurrences thus far documented from Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene deposits in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • 6. Kellner, Alexander W. A.
    et al.
    Rich, Thomas H.
    Costa, Fabiana R.
    Vickers-Rich, Patricia
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Walters, Mary
    Kool, Lesley
    New isolated pterodactyloid bones from the Albian Toolebuc Formation (western Queensland, Australia) with comments on the Australian pterosaur fauna2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New isolated pterodactyloid bones from the Toolebuc Formation are described. The first one consists of a complete wing metacarpal 212mm long, representing an individual with an estimated wing span of 4m. Small depressions on the anterior surface are present and represent tooth marks showing that this specimen was subjected to scavenging prior to fossilization. The other bone consists of a three-dimensionally preserved cervical vertebra lacking most of the neural arch. The specimens are clearly referable to the derived pterosaur clade Pterodactyloidea. Based on several features such as the position of the pneumatic foramen and the particular shape and proportions of those elements, they possibly are members of, or closely related to, the Anhangueridae. The record of the Australian pterosaurs is reviewed here and represents the known southern distributional limit for Cretaceous pterosaurs, arguing against some older ideas of a more geographically restricted range for these flying reptiles.

  • 7. Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Clausen, Sebastien
    Gubanov, Alexander
    Malinky, John M.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A middle Cambrian fauna of skeletal fossils from the Kuonamka Formation, northern Siberia2011In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 123-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of mineralized skeletal fossils containing molluscs, hyoliths, chancelloriids, protoconodonts, lobopods, paleoscolecids, bradoriids, echinoderms and hexactinellid sponges is described from the middle Cambrian part of the Kuonamka Formation, exposed along the Malaya Kuonamka and Bol'shaya Kuonamka rivers, northern Siberian Platform. The sampled succession is attributed to the Kuonamkites and lower Tomagnostus fissus-Paradoxides sacheri biozones of the Amgan Stage of Siberia, correlated with Series 3, Stage 5lower Drumian Stage of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian. This work complements descriptions of molluscs from the same samples published by Gubanov et al. (2004) with additional material. It contains forms in common with coeval faunas from Australia, China, Western Gondwana, Avalonia, Laurentia and Baltica, increasing potential for global biostratigraphic correlation and understanding of palaeogeographic connections.

  • 8. McLoughlin, Stephen
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    The Australasian Cretaceous scene2010In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cretaceous saw dramatic changes in the tectonic setting, landscape and biodiversity of Australasia. Continental fragmentation, marine transgression, the rise of 'modern' faunas and floras, and the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction represent key events that set the stage for future evolution of this region's insular Cenozoic biotas. Australasia's rich but scattered Cretaceous fossil record also provides a rare glimpse into austral high-latitude life and environments throughout the breakup phase of southeastern Gondwana.

  • 9.
    Pan, Zhaohui
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Vertebrate Paleontol & Paleoanthropol, Key Lab Vertebrate Evolut & Human Origins, POB 643, Beijing 100044, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Min
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Vertebrate Paleontol & Paleoanthropol, Key Lab Vertebrate Evolut & Human Origins, POB 643, Beijing 100044, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, You-an
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Vertebrate Paleontol & Paleoanthropol, Key Lab Vertebrate Evolut & Human Origins, POB 643, Beijing 100044, Peoples R China.
    Jia, Liantao
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Vertebrate Paleontol & Paleoanthropol, Key Lab Vertebrate Evolut & Human Origins, POB 643, Beijing 100044, Peoples R China..
    A new antiarch placoderm from the Emsian (Early Devonian) of Wuding, Yunnan, China2018In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 10-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wufengshania magniforaminis, a new genus and species of the Euantiarcha (Placodermi: Antiarcha), is described from the late Emsian (Early Devonian) of Wuding, Yunnan, southwestern China. The referred specimens were three-dimensionally preserved in black shales, allowing a high-resolution computed tomography reconstruction of anatomical details. The new euantiarch is characterized by a large orbital fenestra, an arched exoskeletal band around the orbital fenestra and a developed obtected nuchal area of the skull roof. Maximum parsimony analysis, using a revised data-set of antiarchs with 44 taxa and 66 characters, resolves Wufengshania gen. nov. as a member of the Bothriolepididae, which is characterized by the presence of the infraorbital sensory canal diverging on the lateral plate, and the nuchal plate with orbital facets. New analysis supports a sister group relationship between Dianolepis and the Bothriolepididae. Luquanolepis, a coeval euantiarch from the neighboring site of the new form, is referred to the Asterolepidoidei and represents the basalmost and earliest member of the Asterolepidoidei.

  • 10.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    First records from Laurentia of some middle Cambrian (Series 3) sponge spicules2017In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 306-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spicules of the sponges Silicunculus Bengtson, Australispongia Dong & Knoll and Thoracospongia Mehl are described from the middle Cambrian (Cambrian Series 3) of North Greenland. The occurrences document the first records from the Cambrian of Laurentia of spicules initially reported from Australia. Obese spicules of Thoracospongia are now known to occur in strata of Cambrian Series 2 (Stage 4, Botoman) to Cambrian Series 3 (Stage 5 and Drumian) age in Australia, northern and southeastern Siberia and in the uppermost Henson Gletscher Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5) of western Peary Land. Morphologically similar obese spicules from the USA, Jordan, Iran and Sweden suggest an evolutionary trend towards armouring of the outer sponge surface during the middle and late Cambrian. New species described are Silicunculus saaqqutit sp. nov., Thoracospongia lacrimiformis sp. nov.

  • 11.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Failed predation, commensalism and parasitism on lower Cambrian linguliformean brachiopods2015In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 149-163Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disarticulated valves of the linguliformean brachiopod Botsfordia from the early Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Kap Troedsson Formation of North Greenland preserve repaired injuries resulting from failed predatory attacks. Durophagous strategies include peeling and crushing of the shells; rare borings also occur. Premortem commensal epibionts etched circular attachment scars on the shell exterior near the margins. Parasitic epibionts attached inside the commissure produced globose callosities and V-shaped invaginations in the growing margin. Comparison with epibiont-bearing assemblages of the brachiopod Diandongia from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Lagerstatten of China promotes recognition of a widely distributed Botsfordiid Community in soft-bottom environments during the early Cambrian.

  • 12.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    The coral Cothonion from the lower Cambrian of North Greenland2011In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Originally described from the Coonigan Formation of New South Wales, Australia, a second occurrence of the operculate coral Cothonion sympomatum is here described from the Paralledal Formation of North Greenland. Both finds are of late early Cambrian age, Series 2, Stage 4 in the emerging fourfold classification of the Cambrian. The new find supports widespread distribution patterns seen in early Cambrian Small Shelly Fossils, although associated trilobites belong to traditional redlichiid (Australia) and olenellid (Greenland) realms, respectively.

  • 13. Rich, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Sinclair, Robert
    Chinnery, Brenda
    Carpenter, Kenneth
    McHugh, Mary L.
    Vickers-Rich, Patricia
    Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei Rich & Vickers-Rich, 2003 is an Australian Early Cretaceous ceratopsian2014In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 456-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rich, T.H., Kear, B.P., Sinclair, R., Chinnery, B., Carpenter, K., McHugh, M.L. & Vickers-Rich, P., 2014. Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei Rich & Vickers-Rich, 2003 is an Australian Early Cretaceous ceratopsian. Alcheringa 38, 456-479. ISSN 0311-5518.Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei is one of Australia's most enigmatic dinosaur taxa. Based on a single ulna recovered from Early Cretaceous high-latitude deposits in southeastern Australia, the fossil was originally classified as a neoceratopsian, but subsequently reassigned to Genasauria indet. because of comparisons with atypical thyreophorans. However, a morphometric and structural re-examination of the holotype indicates that it is proportionally distinguishable among dinosaurians and, indeed, manifests decisive statistical compatibility with ceratopsians. Statistical assessment similarly yields a synapomorphy that places the taxon robustly within Ceratopsia. Most certainly, identification of a unique differential character state combination renders S. arthurcclarkei as valid. Its affinity with ceratopsians concurs with proliferating records of other Laurasian dinosaur lineages from the Southern Hemisphere, and may reflect ancient Pangaean dispersals into or out of Gondwana.

  • 14. Skovsted, Christian B.
    et al.
    Topper, Timothy P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Betts, Marissa J.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Associated conchs and opercula of Triplicatella disdoma (Hyolitha) from the early Cambrian of South Australia2014In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 148-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal moulds of complete shells, including conch and associated opercula, of the hyolith Triplicatella disdoma from Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3-4 of South Australia are described. The conch of T. disdoma is shown to be narrow and cone-shaped, and with a rounded triangular cross-section. The conch shows a gentle dorsal curvature in lateral view. The fossils lack evidence of helens, and the operculum was smaller than the apertural diameter of the conch and could be withdrawn a short distance into the conch. Triplicatella was probably closely related to orthothecid hyoliths.

  • 15.
    Tolmacheva, T.Ju.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Degatyarev, K.E.
    Samuelsson, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Holmer, L. E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician faunas from the Chingiz Mountain Range, central Kazakhstan2008In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 443-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician back-arc sedimentary succession studied in the Kol'denen River and in the Zerbkyzyl Mountains of the central Chingiz Mountain Range is composed predominantly of siltstones, sandstones and volcaniclastic rocks with rare beds of micritic carbonates, black shales and cherts. Fossil assemblages including conodonts, lingulate brachiopods, arthropods, sponges and probable Tasmanites cysts were recorded both from the carbonate and chert beds showing that richly diverse marine environments existed directly adjacent to the volcanic arcs. The Kol'denen River localities contain a diverse upper Cambrian paraconodont assemblage of the open-sea affinity. The representatives of Rossodus, Cordylodus, Drepanodus and Variabiloconus, having an almost pandemic distribution and characteristic of basinal facies, dominate the Lower Ordovician conodont fauna. The Cambrian-Ordovician boundary transition is characterized by chert production that was more likely caused by a local productivity increase than by general changes in palaeooceanographic and palaeogeographical conditions.

  • 16. Topper, Timothy P.
    et al.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Paterson, John R.
    Microdictyon plates from the lower Cambrian Ajax Limestone of South Australia: Implications for species taxonomy and diversity2011In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 427-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A small assemblage of isolated Microdictyon plates is described from the lower Cambrian Ajax Limestone, Mt Scott Range (Flinders Ranges), South Australia. Microdictyon plates are primarily known from single, isolated, perforated phosphatic sclerites; only one species (M. sinicum) from the Chengjiang Lagerstatte is known from soft-bodied preservation of the complete organism. The isolated plates from South Australia display a wide range of morphologies potentially reflecting: 1, considerable diversification within the group at this time; 2, extensive intraspecific morphological variation; 3, different plate morphotypes along the trunk of the animal; or 4, significant ontogenetic variation in successive growth stages. The South Australian specimens are similar to several individual sclerites described from other Cambrian palaeocontinents, but appear closest to faunas described from South China. Problems associated with the taxonomy of isolated Microdictyon plates are discussed, including the lack of knowledge associated with intraspecific and/or ontogenetic variability and how individual plate morphology may relate to size or relative position along the length of the complete organism.

  • 17.
    Wretman, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Bite marks on an ichthyodectiform fish from Australia: possible evidence of trophic interaction in an Early Cretaceous marine ecosystem2014In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 170-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-preserved fish skull from late Albian deposits of the Allaru Mudstone near Richmond in Queensland displays a conspicuous V-shaped pattern of indentations, punctures and depression fractures consistent with a vertebrate bite trace. This is the first direct evidence of trophic interaction between vertebrates within an Early Cretaceous marine ecosystem from Australia. The specimen is taxonomically referable to the largebodied (ca 1m snouttail length) ichthyodectiform Cooyoo australis, but the size and spacing of the tooth marks is incompatible with attack by a conspecific individual. The lack of osseous growths concordant with healing also suggests that the bite occurred shortly before or after the animals death. Comparison with the dentitions of other coeval vertebrates indicates compatible tooth arrangements in longirostrine amniote predators such as polycotylid plesiosaurians, ornithocheiroid pterosaurs and especially the ichthyosaurian Platypterygius. The implications of this as a potential predatorprey association are that Early Cretaceous actinopterygians occupied middle-level trophic niches and were in turn consumed by higher-level amniote carnivores, similar to many extant marine vertebrate communities of today.

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