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  • 1.
    Ershova, Victoria B.
    et al.
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.; St Petersburg State Univ, Inst Earth Sci, Univ Skaya Nab 7-9 St, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Lorenz, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Prokopiev, Andrei V.
    Russian Acad Sci, Siberian Branch, Diamond & Precious Met Geol Inst, Lenin Prospect 39, Yakutsk 677980, Russia.
    Sobolev, Nikolay N.
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.
    Khudoley, Andrei K.
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.; St Petersburg State Univ, Inst Earth Sci, Univ Skaya Nab 7-9 St, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Petrov, Eugeny O.
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.
    Estrada, Solveig
    Fed Inst Geosci & Nat Resources BGR, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany.
    Sergeev, Sergey
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.; St Petersburg State Univ, Inst Earth Sci, Univ Skaya Nab 7-9 St, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Larionov, Alexander N.
    All Russian Geol Inst, Sredniy Prospect 74, St Petersburg 199106, Russia.
    Thomsen, Tonny B.
    Geol Survey Denmark & Greenland GEUS, Dept Petr & Econ Geol, Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    The De Long Islands: A missing link in unraveling the Paleozoic paleogeography of the Arctic2016In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 35, p. 305-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vast Laptev and East Siberian shelves in the eastern Russian Arctic, largely covered by a shallow sea and buried beneath sea ice for 9 months of the year, remain one of the least studied parts of continental crust of the Earth and represent a big unknown when performing pre-Cenozoic geodynamic reconstructions of the Arctic. The De Long islands provide a vitally important window into the geology of this area and are a key for [1] understanding  the Early Paleozoic history of the Amerasian Arctic. Four of them (Jeanette, Henrietta, Bennett and Zhokhov islands) were studied using structural data, petrographic and geochemical analyses and U-Pb zircon age dating to offer the following new constraints for the Early Paleozoic paleogeography of the Arctic realm. The basement beneath the De Long Islands is of Late Neoproterozoic to earliest Cambrian age, about 670-535 Ma. In the Early Paleozoic, the De Long Islands were located along the broad Timanian margin of Baltica, with a clastic sediment provenance from the Timanian, Grenville-Sveconorwegian, and Baltic Shield domains. The Cambro-Ordovician volcaniclastic successions on Jeannette and Henrietta islands formed part of a continental margin volcanic arc with a corresponding back-arc basin located to the south (in present co-ordinates). On the continent-ward side of the back-arc basin, shallow marine shelf clastic and carbonate rocks were deposited, which are exposed today on Bennett Island in the south-west of the archipelago (in modern coordinates). The De Long Islands together with other continental blocks, such as Severnaya Zemlya, Arctic Alaska-Chukotka, and the Alexander Terrane, formed the contiguous active continental margin of Baltica during the Early Paleozoic. Today however, these terranes are spread out over a distance of 5000 km across the Arctic and eastern Pacific margins due to the subsequent opening of a series of Late Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic oceanic basins.

  • 2.
    Fu, Dongjing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Zhang, Xingliang
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Liu, Wei
    Pan, Xiaoyun
    Ontogeny and dimorphism of Isoxys auritus (Arthropoda) from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, South China2014In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 975-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphology of Isoxys auritus Jiang, 1982 is reinterpreted in the light of abundant new specimens from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, South China. I. auritus was a bivalved arthropod, its shield armed with two cardinal spines sub-equal in length. Two morphotypes (shield with and without ornamentation) which are of several original differences were interpreted as sexual dimorphs. 81 specimens examined here, which range between 4.8 mm and 47.0 mm, represent a successive developmental sequence. The earliest stages were characterized by short cardinal spines, large spherical eyes, a pair of elongated antennulae, and seven pairs of post-antennular appendages. The slim antennula is uniramous, consisting of nine articles, each armed with short spines. It differs from that of great appendage and lacks any grasping function. During the ontogeny, the body length increases, accompanied by addition of trunk somites and appearance of primary reticulated ornaments, and both cardinal spines become evident. In the fully grown adult, there are up to 11 pairs of post-antennular appendages, equipped with the stout endopod composed of 6 or 7 podomeres lacking endites, and a terminal claw; the paddle shaped exopod is fringed with long setae along its posterior margin. Secondary reticulation of the shield has developed inside each primary one; the cardinal spines more elongated; and the ratio of length to height of shield increases. However, the size of eye and antennula relative to the body length significantly decreases. Accordingly, intraspecific variation, including sexual dimorphs and developmental change, is evident in I. auritus. Recognizing such differences is important for detecting possible synonymies in the genus. Furthermore, the ontogenetic changes of I. auritus described here, particularly the postembryonic segment addition and possible allometric growth may also improve our understanding of development of Cambrian arthropods in Burgess-shale type preservation, especially those possessing such a large shield. (C) 2013 International Association for Gondwana Research. Published by Elsevier ay. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Janák, Marian
    et al.
    eological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislav, Slovak Republic.
    van Roermund, Herman
    Structural Geology and Tectonics, Department of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Majka, Jaroslaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Gee, David G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    UHP metamorphism recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite in the Seve Nappe Complex of northern Jämtland, Swedish Caledonides2013In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 865-879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first evidence for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism in the Seve Nappe Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides is recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite, found in a basic dyke within a garnet peridotite body exposed close to the lake Friningen in northern Jämtland (central Sweden). UHP metamorphic conditions of ~ 3 GPa and 800 °C, within the stability field of coesite, are constrained from geothermobarometry and calculated phase equilibria for the peak-pressure assemblage garnet + omphacite + kyanite + phengite. A prograde metamorphic evolution from a lower P–T (1.5–1.7 GPa and 700–750 °C) stage during subduction is inferred from inclusions of pargasitic amphibole, zoisite and kyanite in garnet cores. The post-UHP evolution is constrained from breakdown textures, such as exsolutions of kyanite and silica from the Ca-Eskola clinopyroxene. Near isothermal decompression of eclogite to lower crustal levels (~ 0.8–1.0 GPa ) led to formation of sapphirine, spinel, orthopyroxene and diopside at granulite facies conditions. Published age data suggest a Late Ordovician (460–445 Ma) age of the UHP metamorphism, interpreted to be related to subduction of Baltoscandian continental margin underneath an outboard terrane, possibly outermost Laurentia, during the final stages of closure of the Iapetus Ocean. The UHP rocks were emplaced from the hinterland collision zone during Scandian thrusting of the nappes onto the Baltoscandian foreland basin and platform. The record of P–T conditions and geochonological data from UHP rocks occurring within the allochthonous units of the Scandinavian Caledonides indicate that Ordovician UHP events may have affected much wider parts of the orogen than previously thought, involving deep subduction of the continental crust prior to final Scandian collision between Baltica and Laurentia.

  • 4.
    Japsen, Peter
    et al.
    Geol Survey Denmark & Greenland GEUS, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Green, Paul F.
    Geotrack Int, 37 Melville Rd, Brunswick West, Vic 3055, Australia.
    Chalmers, James A.
    Geol Survey Denmark & Greenland GEUS, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Duddy, Ian
    Geotrack Int, 37 Melville Rd, Brunswick West, Vic 3055, Australia.
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Geovisiona AB, SE-19792 Bro, Sweden.
    Elevated passive continental margins: Numerical modeling vs observations. A comment on Braun (2018)2019In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 65, p. 172-173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. McLoughlin, Stephen
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gondwanan Mesozoic biotas and bioevents2015In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 905-910Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Popov, Leonid E.
    et al.
    Department of Geology, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Bassett, G
    Department of Geology, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Pour, Mansoureh Ghobadi
    Department of Geology, Faculty of Sciences, Golestan University, Gorgan, Iran.
    Early ontogeny and soft tissue preservation in siphonotretide brachiopods: New data from the Cambrian-Ordovician of Iran2009In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New Late Cambrian (Furongian) to Early Ordovician (Tremadocian) assemblages of micromorphic organo-phosphatic (linguliformean) brachiopods from Iran are characterised by the presence of exceptionally well preserved material of the Order Siphonotretida, a small, phylogenetically important group with a very poorly documented Cambrian history. Unlike other known Cambrian siphonotretides, which generally lack true spines, the new Iranian taxa preserve the constant presence of hollow spines from as early as the mid Late Cambrian. Early siphonotretide ontogeny remains poorly known, but new data from the Iranian faunas demonstrate that the dorsal larval shell had two pairs of lobes, indicative probably of the presence of larval setal sacs and possibly a rudiment of the embryonic shell. Morphology of the ventral brephic shell. previously unknown in siphonotretides, confirms earlier observations that the adult siphonotretide pedicle attachment was related entirely to the ventral mantle, and it may not be homologous with the pedicle of other lingulates. Phosphatised setae emerging from hollow spines are described for the first time in siphonotretides, most probably representing a retained primitive character. Siphonobolus priscus and Siphonobolus kalshanehensis are established as new species. (C) 2009 International Association for Gondwana Research. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Poropat, Stephen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Colin, Jean-Paul
    Early Cretaceous ostracod biostratigraphy of eastern Brazil and western Africa: an overview2012In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 772-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Petroleum exploration in the offshore basins of eastern Brazil and western Africa has been aided for the last fifty years by an understanding of the Early Cretaceous ostracod biostratigraphy of the proto-South Atlantic. This review charts the development of the presently accepted zonation from its early development in the Recôncavo–Tucano Basin and recognition as palaeontological evidence for continental drift in the 1960s, to its application over the following five decades in the Brazilian Sergipe–Alagoas, Araripe and Campos basins and the western African Congo, Gabon and Kwanza basins. The distribution of ostracod species in the lakes which formed during the early stages of the opening of the Atlantic during the Early Cretaceous was often extensive, and this has resulted in effectively South Atlantic-wide application for many species, and certainly for the zonation as a whole. Indeed, petroleum companies continue to exploit the predictability of the ostracods in South Atlantic operations due to the fact that they are often able to provide accurate constraints on stratigraphic position for a relatively low cost. However, the ostracod biozonations of the pre-Salt section for several eastern Brazilian basins, such as the Recôncavo–Tucano, Sergipe–Alagoas and Campos, have not been thoroughly revised since the 1980s, and the taxonomy of these remains somewhat outdated. Furthermore, ostracod biozonations for many basins on both coasts (e.g. the Brazilian Espírito Santo and the western African Namibe basins) have never been published. An updated and revised taxonomy of the ostracods of the basins of eastern Brazil and western Africa is presented (Appendix I), as well as a revision of the biozonation on both sides of the modern day Atlantic Ocean. It is hoped that this paper will act as a catalyst for further work in the basins surrounding the modern day South Atlantic, which hold much interest for petroleum companies and micropalaeontologists alike.

  • 8.
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Colin, Jean-Paul
    Early Cretaceous ostracod biostratigraphy of eastern Brazil and western Africa: an overview2012In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 772-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Petroleum exploration in the offshore basins of eastern Brazil and western Africa has been aided for the last fifty years by an understanding of the Early Cretaceous ostracod biostratigraphy of the proto-South Atlantic. This review charts the development of the presently accepted zonation from its early development in the Recôncavo–Tucano Basin and recognition as palaeontological evidence for continental drift in the 1960s, to its application over the following five decades in the Brazilian Sergipe–Alagoas, Araripe and Campos basins and the western African Congo, Gabon and Kwanza basins. The distribution of ostracod species in the lakes which formed during the early stages of the opening of the Atlantic during the Early Cretaceous was often extensive, and this has resulted in effectively South Atlantic-wide application for many species, and certainly for the zonation as a whole. Indeed, petroleum companies continue to exploit the predictability of the ostracods in South Atlantic operations due to the fact that they are often able to provide accurate constraints on stratigraphic position for a relatively low cost. However, the ostracod biozonations of the pre-Salt section for several eastern Brazilian basins, such as the Recôncavo–Tucano, Sergipe–Alagoas and Campos, have not been thoroughly revised since the 1980s, and the taxonomy of these remains somewhat outdated. Furthermore, ostracod biozonations for many basins on both coasts (e.g. the Brazilian Espírito Santo and the western African Namibe basins) have never been published. An updated and revised taxonomy of the ostracods of the basins of eastern Brazil and western Africa is presented (Appendix I), as well as a revision of the biozonation on both sides of the modern day Atlantic Ocean. It is hoped that this paper will act as a catalyst for further work in the basins surrounding the modern day South Atlantic, which hold much interest for petroleum companies and micropalaeontologists alike.

  • 9.
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Upchurch, Paul
    Mannion, Philip D.
    Hocknull, Scott A.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Sloan, Trish
    Sinapius, George H. K.
    Elliott, David A.
    Revision of the sauropod dinosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae Hocknull et al. 2009 from the mid-Cretaceous of Australia: Implications for Gondwanan titanosauriform dispersal2015In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 995-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The osteology of Diamantinasaurus matildae, the most complete Cretaceous sauropod described from Australia to date, is comprehensively reassessed. The preparation of additional material from the type locality, pertaining to the same individual as the holotype, sheds light on the morphology of the axial skeleton and provides additional information on the appendicular skeleton. The new material comprises two dorsal vertebrae, an incomplete sacrum (including four partial coalesced vertebrae), the right coracoid, the right radius, an additional manual phalanx, and a previously missing portion of the right fibula. In this study we identify thirteen autapomorphic characters of Diamantinasaurus, and an additional five characters that are locally autapomorphic within Titanosauriformes. This work provided an opportunity to revisit the phylogenetic placement of Diamantinasaurus. In two independent data matrices, Diamantinasaurus was recovered within Lithostrotia. One analysis resolved Diamantinasaurus as the sister taxon to the approximately coeval Tapuiasaurus from Brazil, whereas the second analysis recovered Diamantinasaurus as the sister taxon to Opisthocoelicaudia from the latest Cretaceous of Mongolia. The characters supporting the recovered relationships are analysed, and the palaeobiogeographical implications of the lithostrotian status of Diamantinasaurus are explored. A brief review of the body fossil record of Australian Cretaceous terrestrial vertebrates suggests close ties to South America in particular, and to Gondwana more generally.

  • 10.
    Skovsted, C. B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Brock, A
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia.
    Holmer, L. E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Paterson, R
    Division of Earth Sciences, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia.
    First report of the early Cambrian stem group brachiopod Mickwitzia from East Gondwana2009In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 145-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first mickwitziid brachiopod, Mickwitzia sp.. from East Gondwana is described from the lower Cambrian Ajax Limestone, Mt Scott Range in South Australia. The shells are fragmentary, but preserve sufficient details of morphology and micro-structure to allow positive identification to genus. The morphology of the dorsal valve apex and the extended cones on the internal surface indicate a close affinity with Mickwitzia muralensis Walcott, 1913 from the early Cambrian of British Columbia, but Scarcity of material precludes detailed comparison. This find extends the known range of the pivotal stem group brachiopod Mickwitzia to East Gondwana. (C) 2009 International Association for Gondwana Research. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Topper, Timothy P.
    First occurrence of a new Ocruranus-like helcionelloid mollusc from the lower Cambrian of East Gondwana2012In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new cap-shaped mollusc, Emargimantus angulatus gen. et sp. nov. is described from the Arrowie Basin of South Australia. The new species is closely comparable to mollusc species from South China and North-East Greenland previously described under the generic name Ocruranus Liu, a genus recently reinterpreted as a multiplated, possibly polyplacophoran mollusc. Emargimantus is interpreted as a univalved helcionelloid mollusc and differs from Ocruranus in both morphology and function. E. angulatus represents the first discovery of Ocruranus-like helcionelloids in the lower Cambrian of eastern Gondwana and demonstrates that these molluscs had a global distribution during the early Cambrian.

  • 12.
    Slater, Ben
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Hilton, Jason
    A high-latitude Gondwanan Lagerstätten: The Permian permineralised peat biota of the Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica2015In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 27, p. 1446-1473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Toploje Member chert is a Roadian to Wordian autochthonous–parautochthonous silicified peat preserved within the Lambert Graben, East Antarctica. It preserves a remarkable sample of terrestrial life from high-latitude central Gondwana prior to the Capitanian mass extinction event from both mega- and microfossil evidence that includes cryptic components rarely seen in other fossil assemblages. The peat layer is dominated by glossopterid and cordaitalean gymnosperms and contains moderately common herbaceous lycophytes, together with a broad array of dispersed organs of ferns and other gymnosperms. Rare arthropod–plant and fungal–plant interactions are preserved in detail, together with a plethora of fungal morphotypes, Peronosporomycetes, arthropod remains and a diverse coprolite assemblage. Comparisons to other Palaeozoic ecosystems show that the macroflora is of low diversity. The fungal and invertebrate–plant associations demonstrate that a multitude of ecological interactions were well developed by the Middle Permian in high-latitude forest mires that contributed to the dominant coal deposits of the Southern Hemisphere. Quantitative analysis of the constituents of the silicified peat and of macerals within adjacent coal seams reveals that whilst silicified peats provide an unparalleled sample of the organisms forming Permian coals, they do not necessarily reflect the volumetric proportions of constituents within the derived coal. The Toploje Member chert Lagerstätte provides a snapshot of a rapidly entombed mire climax ecosystem in the closing stages of the Palaeozoic, but prior to the onset of the protracted crisis that engulfed and overthrew these ecosystems at the close of the Permian.

  • 13. Topper, Timothy P.
    et al.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Paterson, John R.
    The oldest bivalved arthropods from the early Cambrian of East Gondwana: Systematics, biostratigraphy and biogeography2011In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oldest bradoriid fauna from Australia, occurring in the lower Cambrian Ajax and Wirrapowie limestones of the Hinders Ranges, South Australia consists of eleven taxa, including one new genus and species, Quadricona madonnae gen. et sp. nov. and two new species, Liangshanella circumbolina sp. nov. and Zepaera jagoi sp. nov. In the Ajax Limestone, Liangshanella circumbolina sp. nov. occurs c. 20 m below the FAD of the zonal trilobite Abadiella huoi. This pre-trilobitic occurrence represents the oldest bivalved arthropod hitherto known from East Gondwana and suggests a lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 3) age for the assemblage. The recognition of distinct bradoriid assemblages associated with the Abadiella huoi (Atdabanian). Pararaia tatei, P. bunyerooensis and P. janeae (all Botoman) trilobite biozones in South Australia indicates great potential for future regional biostratigraphic correlation. Quantitative biogeographic analysis including new taxonomic data from the lower Cambrian of South Australia, highlights the strong endemism displayed by early Cambrian bradoriid communities and strengthens the close faunal affinities with South China and Antarctica.

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