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  • 1.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    Kulturgeografiska inst, Lunds universitet.
    Back to the city: internal return migration to metropolitan regions in Sweden2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 2477-2494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal microdata on the Swedish population, 1990-2006, are used to examine the numbers and characteristics of internal return migrants, emphasizing Sweden's three largest cities. Our study indicates that metropolitan regions are gaining population from net return migration, which thus carries people in the same direction as does most internal migration. Evidence also indicates that returnees to metropolitan regions are more likely to stay permanently than are migrants returning elsewhere. Furthermore, return migrants to metropolitan regions are distinguished from other return migrants in ways that emphasize the advantages of these regions, higher incomes and levels of education being among the pronounced attributes. However, metro-bound returnees do not have as many children as do other return migrants.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Ethnic segregation and performance inequality in the Swedish school system: a regional perspective2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 2674-2686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is today an immigrant country with more than 14% foreign born. An increasing share of the immigrants comes from non-European countries. This implies that Sweden has been transformed from an ethnically homogenous country into a country with a large visible minority. In this paper we survey the effect of this change on school segregation. Building on Schelling's model for residential segregation, we argue that establishment of a visible minority has triggered a process of school segregation that in some respects can be compared with the developments in the United States. In order to test the validity of a Schelling-type process in Swedish schools we compare segregation levels in regions with different shares of visible minority students.We use data from the PISA 2003 survey in combination with register data on the ethnic composition of student population in different parts of Sweden. We find that school segregation is higher in regions with a large visible-minority population.We also find that, controlling for student background, there are smaller differences in performance across schools in regions with low shares of minority students.

  • 3. Ansell, Nicola
    et al.
    van Blerk, Lorraine
    Hajdu, Flora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development.
    Robson, Elsbeth
    Spaces, times, and critical moments: a relational time-space analysis of the impacts of AIDS on rural youth in Malawi and Lesotho2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 525-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Southern Africa's AIDS epidemic is profoundly spatially and temporally structured; so too are the lives of the young people whose families it blights. In this paper we draw on qualitative research with AIDS-affected young people in Malawi and Lesotho, and recent work theorising time space in human geography, to examine how time spaces of AIDS-related sickness and death intersect with the time spaces of young people and, importantly, those of their relations with others to produce differentiated outcomes for young people. We also explore the time spaces of those outcomes and of young people's responses to them. We conclude that a relational time space analysis of the impacts of AIDS on young people helps explain the diversity of those young people's experiences and allows AIDS to be contextualised more adequately in relation to everyday life and young people's wider lifecourses and their relationships with others. Moreover, the research points to the significance of the time space structuring of society in shaping the outcomes of familial sickness and death for young people.

  • 4.
    Baeten, Guy
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Dept Urban Studies, Bassanggatan 2, S-21119 Malmo, Sweden..
    Westin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Pull, Emil
    Malmo Univ, Dept Urban Studies, Bassanggatan 2, S-21119 Malmo, Sweden.; Roskilde Univ, Dept People & Technol, Roskilde, Denmark..
    Molina, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Pressure and violence: Housing renovation and displacement in Sweden2017In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 631-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on interview material relating to the current wave of housing renovation in Swedish cities,this article will analyse the profit-driven, traumatic and violent displacement in the wake ofcontemporary large-scale renovation processes of the so-called Million Program housingestates from the 1960s and 1970s. We maintain that the current form of displacement(through renovation) has become a regularized profit strategy, for both public and privatehousing companies in Sweden. We will pay special attention to Marcuse’s notion of‘displacement pressure’ which refers not only to actual displacement but also to the anxieties,uncertainties, insecurities and temporalities that arise from possible displacement due tosignificant rent increases after renovation and from the course of events preceding the actualrent increase. Examples of the many insidious forms in which this pressure manifests itself will begiven – examples that illustrate the hypocritical nature of much planning discourse and rhetoric ofurban renewal. We illustrate how seemingly unspectacular measures and tactics deployed in therenovation processes have far-reaching consequences for tenants exposed to actual or potentialdisplacement. Displacement and displacement pressure due to significant rent increases (which isprofit-driven but justified by invoking the ‘technical necessity’ of renovation) undermines the ‘rightto dwell’ and the right to exert a reasonable level of power over one’s basic living conditions, withall the physical and mental benefits that entails – regardless of whether displacement fearsmaterialize in actual displacement or not.

  • 5.
    Bull, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Encountering fish, flows, and waterscapes through angling2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 2267-2284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the material intertwinings of fish and water. It discusses how the presence of water and fish is simultaneously material and immaterial and examines how the processes and tensions between narratives of fish and water are caught up and inform human encounters with waterscapes. In particular, the paper does three things: first, it highlights the tensions between the angling literature and the practices and performances of angling. Second, it examines how fish embody the material and imaginative aspects of waterscapes, highlighting how fish are shaped to fit in or adapt to 'environmental quality' and human expectations. Third, it examines how water may be thought through as 'fishy' as made animate by the creatures that dwell there.

  • 6.
    Bull, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Encountering fish, flows, and waterscapes through angling2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 2267-2284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the material intertwinings of fish and water. It discusses how thepresence of water and fish is simultaneously material and immaterial and examines how the processesand tensions between narratives of fish and water are caught up and inform human encounters withwaterscapes.In particular, the paper does three things: first, it highlights the tensions between theangling literature and the practices and performances of angling. Second, it examines how fishembody the material and imaginative aspects of waterscapes, highlighting how fish are shaped to fitin or adapt to `environmental quality' and human expectations. Third, it examines how water may bethought through as `fishy' as made animate by the creatures that dwell there.

  • 7.
    Böhm, Steffen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Dabhi, S
    Bryant, G
    Fixing’ the climate crisis: Capital, states and carbon offsetting in India2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Constructing and deconstructing markets: making space for capital2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1859-1865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Games and prizes in the economic (and geographical?) performance of markets: Nobel, Shapley and Roth2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 2542-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Genres of the credit economy: mediating value in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2033-2034Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Geographical knowledges and neoliberal tensions: compulsory land purchase in the context of contemporary urban redevelopment2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 856-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author examines the materialization of geographical knowledges in relation to the ongoing neoliberalization of urban space where the latter is based on processes of compulsory land purchase. The specific context for the study is two recently planned commercial redevelopments for the south London borough of Croydon in the United Kingdom, and the arguments mustered in support of these proposals. The author identifies and discusses three principal sets of geographical knowledges, which he examines under the headings symbolic, biopolitical, and scalar. In each case, he shows that the knowledges have strong modernist overtones. The paper seeks both to understand and contextualize these historical connections, and to consider the contemporary political work performed by the knowledges in question.

  • 12.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Is finance productive (and other important questions)?: A response to Block, Blyth, and Engelen2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Is finance productive (and other important questions)?: A response to Block, Blyth, and Engelen2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, no 46, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Liquidated: an ethnography of Wall Street2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 506-508Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The BBC, the creative class, and neoliberal urbanism in the north of England2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 2313-2329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author examines the BBC’s plans to move some of its key activities to Salford in the northwest of England. He develops a critique not so much of the plan to move, but of the specific proposals for that move (particularly as advanced by local parties in Salford) and of the economic-geographical claims assembled around them. To make these arguments, the author first identifies parallels between the proposals and Richard Florida’s ‘creative class’ formulations. He then draws on a range of critiques of the ‘creative class’ concept to contest the substance of the BBC-Salford plan—which, he argues, reproduces an entrenched neoliberal urban development agenda—and to question the premise that the move will create regional economic value more broadly. Framed against international research into creativity-led development agendas which has typically privileged metropolitan or regional actors, the author argues that, ultimately, the BBC’s proposals, while locally situated, are tightly bound up with national economics and politics.

  • 16.
    Christophers, Brett
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala Univ, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Niedt, Christopher
    Hofstra Univ, Hempstead, NY 11550 USA..
    Resisting devaluation: Foreclosure, eminent domain law, and the geographical political economy of risk2016In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 485-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines recent plans for US municipalities to use the state legal power of eminent domain to forcibly acquire underwater mortgages (i.e. those with negative equity), and to refinance them on terms more favorable to the homeowners in question, as a way of addressing in a socially progressive way the nation's ongoing foreclosure crisis. The article makes three main arguments. The first is that insofar as the plan threatens to disrupt prevailing norms of value distribution and risk bearing, it represents a fundamental challenge to the existing political economy of urban financial capitalism in the US and the law's mediation thereof. The second is that value, risk, and their mediation through law must be understood in the context of geographical unevenness and shifting scales of legal governance. The third is that the geographical political economy associated with the eminent domain plan is about discoursesof risk, of markets, and indeed of law per seno less than materialities; and that the two are indelibly linked, with discourses having material effects when, through law, they structure value and risk for the manifold actors who operate within the sphere of housing finance.

  • 17.
    Forsberg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Educated to be global: Transnational horizons of middle class students in Kerala, India2017In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 2099-2115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Uppsala University. Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Partner choice in Sweden: How distance still matters2019In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 440-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial homogamy, or the geographical closeness of life partners, has received little attention in recent decades. Theoretically, partners may be found anywhere in the world, as increases in educational participation, affluence, mobility and internet access have reduced the meaning of geographical distance in general. This paper examines whether geography still matters in the Swedish partner market, by examining distances between partners before co-residence over time. Register data are used to track the residential histories (1990-2008) of couples who married or had a child in 1996, 2002 or 2008 (N = 292,652). With the couple as the unit of analysis, the distance between partners before co-residence is explained by geographical, socio-economic and demographic indicators. I find that although the distance between partners has increased over time, it is still the case that half of all partners lived within 9 kilometres of each other before moving in together. Demographic and socio-economic characteristics explain some of the variation in spatial homogamy, but geographical factors, such as previous place of residence, spatial mobility, degree of urbanization and nearness of parents, are crucial. Even in a globalized society, most people still find their partners very close by. The findings are relevant to the family migration literature, where residential mobility at the beginning of co-residence has received little attention, despite long-lasting consequences of partner choice on social ties and people's socioeconomic careers. The results exemplify the importance of short geographical distances for intimate relationships.

  • 19.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Fransson, Urban
    Leisure home ownership, access to nature, and health: A longitudinal study of urban residents in Sweden2009In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 82-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can societies ensure urban residents' access to health-promoting green spaces while also pursuing the benefits of densification? Evidence of a relationship between leisure home ownership and health can inform efforts to resolve this dilemma. Using longitudinal register data, we assessed the prospective association between ownership of a leisure home and early retirement for health reasons among 42 588 adults residing in high-density Swedish urban municipalities. The research design included controls for 'drift' of unhealthy people into particular residential circumstances, and other potential alternative explanations for the association of focal interest. After adjustment for age, socioeconomic position, and type of primary housing, logistic regression analysis revealed that men with a leisure home had lower odds of early retirement for health reasons than men who did not own a leisure home. Among women, leisure home ownership interacted with socioeconomic position; in contrast to nonowners, women who owned a leisure home had higher odds of early retirement for health reasons if they also had higher levels of education and employment income. The associations we have uncovered provide additional insight on the relationship between access to natural environments and health, and they warrant consideration in efforts to resolve the densification dilemma.

  • 20.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    van Ham, Maarten
    Delft University of Technology, OTB Research Institute for the Built Environment, The Netherlands .
    Manley, David
    University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.
    Neighbourhood choice and neighbourhood reproduction2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1381-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although we know a lot about why households choose certain dwellings, we know relatively little about the mechanisms behind their choice of neighbourhood. Most studies of neighbourhood choice focus only on one or two dimensions of neighbourhoods: typically poverty and ethnicity. In this paper we argue that neighbourhoods have multiple dimensions and that models of neighbourhood choice should take these dimensions into account. We propose the use of a conditional logit model. From this approach we can gain insight into the interaction between individual and neighbourhood characteristics which lead to the choice of a particular neighbourhood over alternative destinations. We use Swedish register data to model neighbourhood choice for all households which moved in the city of Uppsala between 1997 and 2006. Our results show that neighbourhood sorting is a highly structured process where households are very likely to choose neighbourhoods where the neighbourhood population matches their own characteristics. We find that income is the most important driver of the sorting process, although ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic characteristics play important roles as well.

  • 21.
    Hierofani, Patricia Yocie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Gender, work and migration: Reflections on feminist geography contributions and challenges2016In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 2076-2080Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hracs, Brian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Jakob, Doreen
    Hauge, Atle
    Standing out in the crowd: the rise of exclusivity-based strategies to compete in the contemporary marketplace for music and fashion2013In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1144-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geographers have studied the complex relationships between cultural production, consumption, and space for some time, but the marketplace for cultural products is being reconfigured by digital technologies and broader societal trends. For producers of fashion and music the contemporary marketplace is a double-edged sword featuring lower entry barriers and fierce competition from an unprecedented number of producers and ubiquitous substitutes. Global firms and local entrepreneurs struggle to stand out in the crowd and command monopoly rents for their unique goods and services. This paper examines how independent cultural producers use ‘exclusivity’ to generate attention and distinction. Drawing on qualitative research with independent musicians and fashion designers in Toronto, Stockholm, Berlin, and New York it presents three mechanisms through which exclusivity can be created. These include exploiting consumer demand for uniqueness, enrolling consumers into the production and promotion process, and manipulating physical and virtual space. 

  • 23.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hracs, Brian
    University of Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Conceptualizing curation in the age of abundance: The case of recorded music2018In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1602-1625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary marketplace for cultural products, such as music, fashion and film, features anabundance of goods, services and experiences. While producers struggle to differentiate and monetizetheir offerings, some consumers are overwhelmed by the amount of choice and informationavailable to them. As a result, many consumers are turning to a range of intermediaries who helpthem make sense of the marketplace.While intermediation is nothing new, its value is increasing andthere has been a shift in relative importance from those who create products to those who curateproducts. As curation remains a ‘fuzzy concept’ – with definitions and connotations that vary byindustry and occupation – this paper aims to contribute to existing conceptualizations by focusing onthe case of recorded music. Based on interviews and observation with a subset of curators, includingrecord shops and music writers, the paper provides a typology of curation-related activitiesand highlights the range of economic and non-economic rewards that motivate different actors toperform curation. It also interrogates the importance and role of space by identifying physical,temporary and virtual spaces where curation is performed and relationships between specific spatialdynamics and curation-related processes.

  • 24.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Waxell, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Quality and regional competitiveness2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 2237-2252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent literature on competitiveness has focused on innovation and industrial dynamics.In this paper it is argued that innovation is not enough when competing on global markets, at least incertain types of industries where performance, standards, and perceptions of the product are at theforefront. In addition to existing theory,we focus on the role of `quality' in creating and sustaining regionalcompetitive advantage. A theoretical framework for identifying and analyzing processes creating andrecreating understandings, perceptions, and experiences of quality, that is, a quality promise, is presented.In the framework, the quality process is divided into three dimensions, labelled performance, projection,and protection. Regional competitiveness is arguably achieved when: (a) a good or a service is wellrepresented in one or more of the quality dimensions; (b) quality perception and knowledge permeateall actors and their activities and are inherent throughout the value chain; and (c) space is an integralpart of these processes in that it facilitates (i) localized learning/localization economies, and(ii) place-based branding. It is argued that `quality' should be viewed as deeply embedded in spaceand that quality processes have both homogeneous and heterogeneous characteristics.

  • 25.
    John, Östh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Super-local spatial variations in fertility2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    John, Östh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Super-local spatial variations in fertilityIn: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Malmberg, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Andersson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Subramanian, S.V.
    Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health.
    Links between ill health and regional economic performance: Evidence from Swedish longitudinal data2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1210-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While poor health has been associated with economic outcomes at the national level, its effect on economic outcomes at the individual and local level remains less well known. Using nationally representative longitudinal data from Sweden, we examined the extent to which an individual’s poor health leads to poor economic outcomes for that individual. In order to understand the effects of poor health at a regional level, we also examined the spillover effects of the individual’s poor health on the economic outcomes of the people linked to the individual. We report an association between an individual’s poor health and both that individual’s subsequent adverse economic outcomes and adverse economic outcomes of the individual’s network. Our study highlights the importance of the association between health and economic well-being as well as potential adverse spillover effects of poor health on local economies.

  • 28.
    Mitchell, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    People's Park Again: on the End and Ends of Public Space2017In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 49, p. 503-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses three recent struggles over public space in California’s East Bay (Berkeley and Oakland) to critically interrogate the ‘end of public space’ thesis. Developing a historical analysis of the discourse of the ‘end of public space’ over the past two and a half decades, the paper shows that dismissal of arguments about the end of public space both ignores the dialectical nature of the original interventions and comes at a real political and scholarly cost. The paper concludes that the tendency towards the end of public space in capitalism is closely related to the necessity for capitalism to produce abstract space. Both this tendency and this necessity are struggled over and contradictory, and it is out of these struggles and contradictions that actually-existing public space is produced.

  • 29. Musterd, Sako
    et al.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Galster, George
    Kauppinen, Timo M.
    Are immigrants' earnings influenced by the characteristics of their neighbours?2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 785-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in immigrant economic trajectories have been attributed to a wide variety of factors. One of these is the local spatial context where immigrants reside. This spatial context assumes special salience in light of expanding public exposure to and scholarly interest in the potential impacts of spatial concentrations of immigrants. A crucial question is whether immigrants' opportunities are influenced by their neighbours. In this paper we contribute statistical evidence relevant to answering this vital question. We develop multiple measures of the spatial context in which immigrants reside and assess their contribution to the average earnings of immigrant individuals in the three large Swedish metropolitan areas, controlling for individual and regional labour-market characteristics. We use unusually rich longitudinal information about Swedish immigrants during the 1995-2002 period. We find evidence that immigrant men and women paid a substantial penalty during 1999-2002 if in 1999 they resided in areas where a substantial number of their neighbours were members of the same ethnic group. The evidence suggests that own-group concentrations can initially pay dividends for immigrants, but these benefits quickly turn into net disadvantages over time.

  • 30.
    Musterd, Sako
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Institute of Geography and Planning.
    Galster, George
    Wayne State of University.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Temporal dimensions and the measurement of neighbourhood effects2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 605-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. We conduct a panel analysis quantifying the degree to which the mixture of low-income, middle-income, and high-income males in the neighbourhood affects the subsequent labour income of individuals, and test the degree to which these effects vary by timing (lagging up to three years), duration (one to four years), and cumulative amount of exposure and to what extent these effects are persistent. We employ a fixed-effects model to reduce the potential bias arising from unmeasured individual characteristics leading to neighbourhood selection. The empirical study applies individual-level data for the working-age population of the three largest cities in Sweden covering the period 1991 – 2006. The analyses suggest that there are important temporal dimensions in the statistical effect of neighbourhood income mix: recent, continued, or cumulative exposure yields stronger associations than lagged, temporary ones, and there is a distinct time decay (though some persistence) in the potential effects after exposure ceases, though with some gender differences. Keywords:neighbourhood effects, social mixing, duration effects, lag effects, cumulative effects, fixed-effects models

    This article has supplementary online material:Appendix

  • 31.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Evaluating the effects of place marketing campaigns on interregional migration in Sweden2004In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1991-2009Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hallencreutz, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Profiting from creativity? The music industry in Stockholm, Sweden and Kingston, Jamaica2002In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 34, p. 1833-1854Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Pugh, Rhiannon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Who speaks for economic geography?2018In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 1525-1531Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Valli, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    When cultural workers become an urban social movement. Political subjectification and alternative cultural production in the Macao movement, Milan2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 643-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between cultural production and insurgent political activity.  The specific context for the study is the urban cultural movement of Macao in Milan. Macao is an urban social movement that aims to challenge neoliberal cultural production and neoliberal urban politics through alternative cultural production models. The overarching argument is that Macao pursues its subjectification process through aesthetic tactics: the process of the formation of a political subject passes through arts and creative expressions to impact and re-configure the sensible domain. This collective subject is created: first, by re-appropriating urban spaces; second, by enacting alternative practices of cultural production; third, by guerrilla branding tactics. Ultimately, the paper explores the potential of alliances between urban struggles and struggles over commodification and exploitation of culture.  

  • 35.
    van Riemsdijk, Micheline
    Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.
    International migration and local emplacement: Everyday place-making practices of skilled migrants in Oslo, Norway2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, p. 138-147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Featured graphic. Superlocal spatial variations in fertility2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1019-1022Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Östh, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Shuttleworth, Ian
    Queen’s University, Belfast, UK.
    Niedomysl, Niedomysl
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Spatial and temporal patterns of economic segregation in Sweden’s metropolitan areas:: a mobility approach2018In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 809-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The statistical resources at hand for segregation research are usually almost exclusively confined to annual or decennial records where the only available spatial information is the individual’s place of residence. This coarse temporal periodicity and spatial resolution provides a very limited account of people’s diurnal lives. Incorporating mobility and temporal dimensions in segregation analysis is advocated within a growing body of research but there has rarely been sufficient data to make this possible. In this paper, we employ a fine-grained mobile phone dataset outlining the daily mobility of a substantial sample of the residents in Sweden’s metropolitan areas. Combining spatial trajectory data with detailed socio-economic residential statistics, we are able to study how everyday spatial mobility in cities shapes the segregation experiences of people and changes the segregation levels of places. Results indicate that while mobility alleviates segregation for some individuals, the population of a large number of areas remain highly segregated even when daily mobility is taken into account. Individuals residing or spending time in central urban areas are more exposed to individuals from other areas because of daily moves to these central places. Daytime movement to central areas also reduces segregation significantly for people from places remote from city centres but with high average levels of mobility whilst daytime segregation levels remain close to their original night-time levels in low-mobility areas in the outskirts of the cities

1 - 37 of 37
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