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  • 1.
    Alfven, Gösta
    et al.
    CLINTEC Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Hjern, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stressor, perceived stress and recurrent pain in Swedish schoolchildren2008In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 381-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Stress is an important etiological factor for pain. Little is known, however, about how this process is mediated. The aim of this study is to highlight how more stress corresponds with the amount of reported perceived stress, pain symptom, and the co-occurrence of two pain symptoms--headache and abdominal pain--and how these three phenomena are related. We have also studied possible gender differences. METHODS: A cross-sectional study based on data from child supplements linked to national household surveys in Sweden during 2002-2003. Information concerning harassment, perceived stress, headache, and abdominal pain was gathered from a questionnaire. The study population consisted of a representative national sample of 2597 children aged 10-18 years. RESULTS: Children's reports of exposure to the stressor harassment were associated with their subjective perception of stress and recurrent pain in a stepwise manner. Having both pain symptoms was more strongly associated with the stressor harassment and perceived stress than having only one pain symptom. This was especially true of girls, who reported higher levels of stress symptoms and who had a different profile of pain symptoms than boys. CONCLUSIONS: The stressor harassment, perceived stress, and recurrent pain are associated with each other in a stepwise fashion. The co-occurrence of headache and abdominal pain is much more closely associated with harassment and perceived stress than any of these symptoms separately, especially in girls.

  • 2. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Svalastog, Olav Kyrre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sarkohi, Ali
    Future thinking in tinnitus patients2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 191-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate future thinking in a group of tinnitus patients. It was predicted that participants in the tinnitus group would report fewer positive future events. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Two groups of participants completed the test session: tinnitus patients (n=20) and healthy controls (n=20) without tinnitus. Participants completed measures of anticipation of future positive and negative experiences, anxiety and depression. In addition, participants with tinnitus completed a test of tinnitus annoyance. Results: Tinnitus participants generated a greater number of negative future events compared to the controls. There was no difference between the groups on positive future events or on self-reported anxiety, but the tinnitus group scored higher on a depression measure. Controlling for depression scores removed the group difference. Conclusions: While the groups differed on future thinking, the difference concerned negative events, which suggests that anxious information processing might be important in explaining tinnitus annoyance. Levels of depressive symptoms should, however, be considered.

  • 3.
    Anderzén, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Söderberg, Tommy
    Söderman, Erik
    Stress and sensitization in children: A controlled prospective psychophysiological study of children exposed to international relocation.1997In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Alaie, Iman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Karolinska institutet; Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering.
    Recent randomized controlled trials of psychological interventions in healthcare: A review of their quantity, scope, and characteristics2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 75, no 5, p. 401-408Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to describe the quantity, scope, and fundamental characteristics of recently published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions.

    Methods: We queried two major databases (PsycINFO and PubMeD) for primary reports published in 2010 of RCTs of psychological interventions for participants with a medical condition. We collected data on the characteristics of the trials, participants, interventions, outcomes, and reports.

    Results: Of 3,696 retrieved reports 295 primary publications were included. About half (53%) of trials included participants with a mental disorder and more than half evaluated interventions based on a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) framework. A majority of trials recruited participants in North America and Europe (79%). A minority of the trials focused on children and adolescents (17%) or the elderly (8%). The median sample size of the intervention arm was n = 41. Thirty-nine percent of trials reported solely patient-reported outcomes. Only 5% of reports indicated funding from for-profit organizations. The median 2010 impact factor of the journals in which reports were published was 2.96.

    Conclusion: This snapshot of the research on psychological interventions suggests that the evidence base for psychological interventions is expanding mainly for CBT interventions for adults in high-income countries. Although the restrictive inclusion criteria limit the generalizability of these results, researchers and funding agencies might be advised to strive for greater diversity regarding interventions, geographical/cultural settings and age groups. Regularly updated reviews of this research field, with gradually refined methodology and increased scope, may further inform funders and researchers.

  • 5.
    Bendix, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ, Hosp Huddinge, Dept Consultat Psychiat, Psychiat Southwest, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahlstrom, Lars
    Karolinska Univ, Hosp Huddinge, Dept Consultat Psychiat, Psychiat Southwest, Stockholm, Sweden..
    John, Michael
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Psychiat Dept, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lexne, Erik
    Farjestaden Hlth Care Ctr, Morbylanga, Sweden..
    Konig, Monika
    PBO Globen, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ostryd, Pia
    Reg Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Issursing, Abha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Strindhall, Par
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Towards a Swedish identity in consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry and psychosomatics - Re-foundation of the Swedish Association of CL Psychiatry2018In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 108, p. 20-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Condén, Emelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Åslund, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Type D personality is associated with sleep problems in adolescents. Results from a population-based cohort study of Swedish adolescents2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 290-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Sleep problems are associated with an increased risk of psychiatric and somatic diseases. Type D personality, or the distressed personality, refers to the joint tendency to experience negative emotions and to inhibit self-expression in social interaction. Type D personality is associated with an increased number of health complaints including cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated whether Type D personality was associated with sleep problems among adolescents. Methods: The study was part of the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vastmanland 2008 (SALVe 2008). A total of 5012 adolescents (age 15-18 years old) completed a questionnaire including the Type D measurement DS14 and questions on sleep disturbances, sleep hours during school nights, and sleep hours during weekend nights. Results: Adolescents with a Type D personality had an approximately four times increased risk of having sleep disturbances. Moreover, Type D personality was associated with sleeping fewer hours. Conclusion: As adolescence represents a formative period for development it is critical to identify sleep disorders early. The presence of Type D personality associated with poor sleep demands attention because sleep problems may be an early stage in the development of later diseases.

  • 7.
    DeMarinis, V.
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, IMPACT Res Programme, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cetrez, Andreas Önver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Psychology of Religions. Swedish Res Inst, Istanbul, Turkey..
    A psychosocial-, somatic- and existential health study among Assyrian-Syrian refugees in Istanbul- understanding resilience in the midst of hardship2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 61-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Anxiety related brain mechanisms in social anxiety disorder.2004In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, p. 587-588Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Granstam Björneklett, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindemalm, Christina
    Immune and Gene Therapy Laboratory,Cancer Centre,Karolinska,Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ojutkangas, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Letocha, Henry
    Onkologi kliniken Västerås.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institute,SSH Stockholm.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Long-term follow-up of a randomized study of support group intervention in women with primary breast cancer2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Despite a fairly good prognosis, many breast-cancer patients suffer from symptoms such as anxiety, depression and fatigue, which may affect health-related quality of life and may persist for several years. The aim of the present study was to perform a long-term follow-up of a randomized study of support group intervention in women after primary breast cancer treatment.

    Materials and methods:

    Three hundred and eighty two women with primary breast cancer were randomized to support group intervention or control group, 181 in each group. Women in the intervention group participated in 1 week of intervention followed by 4 days of follow-up 2 months later. This is a long-term follow-up undertaken, in average, 6.5. years after randomization. Patients answered the questionnaires the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Breast Cancer Module questionnaire (BR23), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) and the Norwegian version of the fatigue scale (FQ).

    Results:

    After adjusting for treatment with chemotherapy, age, marriage, education and children at home, there was a significant improvement in physical, mental and total fatigue (FQ), cognitive function, body image and future perspective (EORTC QLQ C30 and BR23) in the intervention group compared with controls. The proportion of women affected by high anxiety and depression scores were not significantly different between the groups.

    Conclusion:

    Support intervention significantly improved cognitive function, body image, future perspective and fatigue, compared with to the findings in the control group.

  • 10.
    Halford, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Anderzen, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Endocrine measures of stress and self-rated health: A longitudinal study2003In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 317-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Simple global self-ratings of health have been found to hold considerable predictive validity in relation to morbidity and mortality. Inverse associations between chronic stress and self-rated health (SRH) have been found and suggested to explain part of the predictive validity of SRH. Studies including biological data are, however, few. The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between endocrine measures of stress and SRH.

    Methods: A longitudinal study of 102 healthy middle-aged men. Written questionnaires and blood samples were collected at baseline and at follow-up 1 year later.

    Results: A decrease in SRH below the level of good was associated with significantly increased s-prolactin and decreased s-testosterone. Poorer SRH and increased levels of s-prolactin were significantly associated with increased vital exhaustion at follow-up.

    Conclusion: Our study identifies a possible biological pathway, which might be of relevance in understanding the well-established association between SRH and health.

  • 11.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cars, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rahnert, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsen, Hans-Christian
    Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Audiology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Use of a self-help book with weekly therapist contact to reduce tinnitus distress: a randomized controlled trial2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Tinnitus distress can be reduced by means of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). To compensate for the shortage of CBT therapists, we aimed, in this study, to investigate the effects of a CBT-based self-help book guided by brief telephone support. Methods: Seventy-two patients were randomized either to a self-help book and seven weekly phone calls or to a wait-list control condition, later on receiving the self-help book with less therapist support. The dropout rate was 7%. Follow-up data 1 year after completion of treatment were also collected (12% dropout). The Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire (TRQ) was the main outcome measure, complemented with daily ratings of tinnitus and measures of insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Results: On the TRQ, significant reductions were found in the treatment group both immediately following treatment and at 1-year follow-up. In the treatment group, 32% reached the criteria for clinical significance (at least 50% reduction of the TRQ) compared to 5% in the wait-list group. Directly after treatment, two out of five measures showed significant differences in favor of the treatment with more therapist support compared with the group who, after their waiting period, received little therapist support. The self-help treatment was estimated to be 2.6 (seven phone calls) and 4.8 (one phone call) times as cost-effective as regular CBT group treatment. Conclusions: Guided self-help can serve as an alternative way to administer CBT for tinnitus. Preliminary results cast some doubts on the importance of weekly therapist contact. The effect size was somewhat smaller than for regular CBT, but on the other hand, the self-help seems far more cost-effective. Future studies should compare treatment modalities directly and explore cost-effectiveness more thoroughly.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lööf, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rönnblom, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Quality of life for patients with exacerbation in inflammatory bowel disease and how they cope with disease activity2008In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) is influenced by symptoms and treatments. Periods with increased disease activity are specifically trying, but the knowledge of how patients manage this is sparse. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine (1) HRQoL for patients with UC or CD, (2) how patients cope with increased disease activity, and (3) if coping is associated with HRQoL. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to patients with UC and CD who attended the gastroenterology and surgery department at a Swedish university hospital. Coping, HRQoL, and emotional well-being were assessed by Jalowiec Coping Scale, Short Form-36 Health survey, Short Health Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: Patients with increased disease activity reported impaired HRQoL and emotional distress. This was more prevalent among patients with CD, as compared to patients with UC. Optimistic, self-reliant and confrontive coping strategies were most frequently used to manage stressors, with no differences found between patients in exacerbation or remission or between patients with UC or CD. Conclusion: Impaired HRQoL and emotional distress is prevalent among patients with exacerbation in UC and CD. Thus, a complete evaluation of psychosocial status and management of psychosocial distress should be included in the clinical treatment of the patient. Patients use a variety of coping strategies in an effort to manage increased disease activity. However, these results did not support any associations between coping and HRQoL.

  • 13. Lennartsson, A-K
    et al.
    Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Theorell, Töres
    Ullén, F
    Creative artistic achievement (in writing, music, dance, theatre and visual arts) is associated with emotional competence2015In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wikström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fluid Intake Appraisal Inventory: Development and psychometric evaluation of a situation-specific measure for haemodialysis patients' self-efficacy to low fluid intake2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-efficacy is an important determinant of health behaviour and reflects a person's belief about their capability to complete a given task. The relationship between self-efficacy and fluid adherence has been investigated, although limited attention has been given to measurement issues. The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of situation-specific self-efficacy for constructive fluid intake behaviour in haemodialysis patients, the Fluid Intake Appraisal Inventory (FIAI). METHODS: Items were generated from an analysis of empirical studies available in the literature and exposed to an interpretability critique before haemodialysis patients confirmed sufficiency of each item. In a multi-centre study, data from 144 haemodialysis patients were collected regarding general self-efficacy, situation-specific self-efficacy, and estimated fluid consumption. Internal consistency, criterion-related validity, and structural validity were tested. RESULTS: The FIAI was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha 0.96) and the theoretical assumptions for criterion-related validity and known-group validity were supported. Structural validity was not confirmed, however, because the theoretically hypothesized four-factor model was not the prime structure. CONCLUSION: The FIAI was revealed to have satisfactory psychometric properties. The scale may be used in research or in clinical settings to study the mediating effects of self-efficacy or to modify haemodialysis patients' fluid-intake behaviour. Although this first validity study is promising, further validation focusing on reliability and cultural validity is needed.

  • 15.
    Lissåker, Claudia T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Wallert, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Olsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Emotional Distress as a Predictor of Statin Non-adherence among Swedish First-Time Myocardial Infarction Patients, 2006–20132017In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 97, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Emotional distress (depression and anxiety) has been known to affect mortality after a myocardial infarction (MI). One possible mechanism is through medication non-adherence. Few studies have investigated the link between statin adherence and emotional distress, and results are not consistent. We aimed to explore whether emotional distress affects adherence among first-time MI patients younger than 75 years old receiving a prescription for the first time.

    Methods: We identified first-MI individuals younger than 75 years from the SWEDEHEART national quality registers discharged with a statin prescription. The main exposure was the anxiety/depression portion of the EQ-5D from Interview 1 (6-10 weeks post -MI) and Interview 2 (12-14 months post -MI). We calculated adherence from the Swedish Prescribed Drugs Register during three observation periods (OP): [1] Interview 1 to Interview 2, [2] one year post Interview 2, and [3] two years post Interview 1.

    Results: Emotional distress at Interview 1 was not associated with statin adherence for OP1 (RR: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.01). Emotional distress at Interview 2 was associated with lower adherence one year later (RR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.98). Emotional distress at Interview 1 was associated with a small decrease in adherence in the complete OP for adherence (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.96, 0.99).

    Conclusion: Emotional distress was marginally, but independently, associated with lower adherence to statin two years after the MI. Our study suggests that emotional distress may be an important factor for long-term statin adherence, and, thus, may play a clinically important role in long-term outcome.

  • 16.
    Rothman, M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Johansson, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Ortendahl, M.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Improved quality of life, working ability and patient satisfaction after a pre-treatment multimodal assessment method in patients with mixed chronic muscular pain: A randomized controlled study2012In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 500-500Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Wandell, Per
    et al.
    Ljunggren, Gunnar
    Wahlstrom, Lars
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Diabetes and psychiatric illness in the total population of Stockholm2014In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 169-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Concomitant psychiatric disorders in people with diabetes affect morbidity and mortality. We aimed to study psychiatric morbidity in people with diabetes and the general population using administrative health care data in Stockholm County. Methods: The study population included all living persons who resided in Stockholm County, Sweden, on January 1, 2011 (N = 2,058,408). Subjects with a diagnosis of diabetes were identified with data from all consultations in primary health care, specialist outpatient care and inpatient care during the time span 2009-2013. As outcome, information was obtained on all consultations due to any psychiatric diagnosis as well as, specifically, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, depression, and anxiety disorders, in 2011-2013. Analyses were performed by age group and gender. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% Cl) for women and men with diabetes, using individuals without diabetes as referents, were calculated. Results: Age-adjusted OR for all psychiatric diagnoses among people with diabetes was 1.296 (95% Cl 1.267-1.326) for women and 1.399 (95% Cl 1.368-1.432) for men. The greatest excess risk was found for schizophrenia, with OR 3.439 (95% Cl 3.057-3.868) in women and 2.787 (95% Cl 2.514-3.089) in men, with ORs between 1276 (95% Cl 1227-1327) and 1.714 (95% Cl 1.540-1.905) for the remaining diagnoses. Conclusion: The prevalence of psychiatric disorders is elevated in people with diabetes, which calls for preventive action to be taken to minimize suffering and costs to society.

  • 18.
    Wasteson, Elisabet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sjödén, Per-Olow
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Comparison of a questionnaire commonly used for measuring coping with a daily-basis prospective coping measure2006In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 813-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Much research have investigated the relation between stress and health, with focus on the role of coping as a moderator. The use of the concept of coping is in need of more stringency since it is often used in a more or less careless manner. A contributory cause of the confusion within the research field is the often-negligent interpretation of results from the Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC) Scale (i.e., results are discussed in terms of coping strategies instead of mental adjustment). Furthermore, checklists are often used in research but seldom specify the stressor that patients are attempting to cope with. METHODS: Consecutive patients newly diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer were included in this study. Of 151 eligible patients, 95 (63%) participated. As soon as their physical condition so permitted, patients were asked to assess their coping by way of two methods: an instrument commonly used for measuring coping (MAC Scale) and a daily-basis prospective coping measure [Daily Coping Assessment (DCA)]. The study investigated the relations between these two methods, which are used to evaluate different ways of coping with cancer, and related these to specified stressful events and psychologic distress outcomes [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)]. RESULTS: Among patients with GI cancers, a comparison of the DCA with the MAC Scale renders important differences regarding the use of coping strategies. Furthermore, coping as measured by the DCA is more clearly separated from both stressors such as psychologic aspects and psychologic distress outcomes as measured by the HADS. DISCUSSION: A comparison between the two measures renders differences regarding the use of coping strategies among patients with GI cancers. The daily-basis prospective coping measure seems to be better separated from both stressful events and psychologic distress outcomes. The DCA offers a promising alternative to the use of coping checklists. The difference between the measures is in accordance with the original intention that the MAC Scale be used to measure mental adjustment rather than coping (i.e., the results do not support the use of the MAC Scale as a coping measure).

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