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  • 1.
    Biskop Lindgren, Emilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Grandahl, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    To Feel Abandoned in an Insecure Situation: Parents' Experiences of Separation From Their Newborn Due to the Mother Being COVID-19 Positive2023In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: 

    The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in changes in neonatal care, sometimes resulting in a separation between parents and their newborn. Knowledge about parents' experiences of this separation is limited.

    Purpose: 

    To explore parents' experiences of separation from their newborn due to COVID-19.

    Methods: 

    Interviews with parents (n = 11) separated from their newborn.

    Results: 

    The parents' experiences of being separated from their newborn were expressed under 3 themes: “To create a sense of safety in an insecure situation”; “Unexpected start to parenthood”; and “To be reunited.” Parents felt abandoned and alone, even if they had support from significant others. Although they considered the separation as undesired, wanting to be with their newborn infant, it was secondary to not wanting to infect the infant with COVID-19. Furthermore, lacking information about a potentially lethal virus adds to the uncertainty that comes with having a newborn. The separation affected the whole family, some for a long time afterward.

    Implications for Practice and Research: 

    If a new situation with potentially life-threatening effects, like the COVID-19 pandemic, occurs again, considering the experiences of these parents is paramount. Precautions should be taken to minimize the potential harm. If a separation between newborns and parents is inevitable, parents need preparation and transparent information prior to the separation and before the reunion. Well-thought-out policies must be in place to minimize the impact of a separation on both parties. Parents should be able to have a deputy parent present during an undesired but necessary separation from their newborn.

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  • 2.
    Funkquist, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Influence of test weighing before/after nursing on breastfeeding in preterm infants2010In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Swedish hospitals apply various regimens for preterm infants' nutrition in connection with their mothers' establishment of breastfeeding. Milk intake is assessed either by test weighing before and after breastfeeding or by observing the infant's suckling behavior (ie, clinical indices). These differing policies may lead to differences in infants' feeding progress. The purpose of this study was to compare effects on breastfeeding and weight gain of preterm infants, depending on whether the volume of breast milk intake when suckled in the hospital was estimated by "clinical indices" or determined by test weighing. SUBJECTS: Sixty-four infants treated at a unit applying test weighing were compared with 59 infants treated at a unit assessing milk intake by "clinical indices." DESIGN AND METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive, and comparative design was used to explore the consequences of different nutrition regimens. Data were obtained from a review of hospital medical records. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: The infants treated at the hospital where test weighing was practiced attained exclusive breastfeeding at an earlier postmenstrual age (PMA) and were also discharged at an earlier PMA. However, the 2 study units were alike regarding the proportion of infants attaining exclusive breastfeeding, the postnatal age when this occurred, and the weight pattern in hospital. CONCLUSION: To establish breastfeeding in preterm infants, test weighing before and after breastfeeding and gradual reduction of supplementation are both applicable regimens. Mothers can be encouraged to choose either of them, although test weighing may help infants attain exclusive breastfeeding at an earlier PMA.

  • 3. Funkquist, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Jonsson, Björn
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Influence of Test Weighing Before/After Nursing on Breastfeeding in Preterm Infants2010In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-39Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Lina
    et al.
    Cent Hosp Karlstad, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Karlstad, Sweden.;Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing Sci, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Ulrica
    Cent Hosp Karlstad, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Karlstad, Sweden.;Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing Sci, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Hosp Uppsala, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wallström, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Univ Hosp Uppsala, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Brostrom, Anders
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing Sci, Jönköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linköping, Sweden..
    Neonatal Resuscitation A Critical Incident Technique Study Exploring Pediatric Registered Nurses' Experiences and Actions2023In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 220-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Teamwork during neonatal resuscitation is essential. Situations arise quickly and unexpectedly and are highly stressful, requiring pediatric registered nurses (pRN) to respond effectively and in a structured manner. In Sweden, pRNs work in all pediatric settings including the neonatal intensive care unit. The experience and actions of pRNs are seldom explored, and studies within this area could develop and improve strategies for neonatal resuscitation situations.

    Purpose:To describe pRNs' experiences and actions during neonatal resuscitation.

    Methods:A qualitative interview study based on the critical incident technique was performed. Sixteen pRNs from 4 neonatal intensive care units in Sweden were interviewed.

    Results:Critical situations were divided into 306 experiences and 271 actions. pRNs' experiences were divided into 2 categories: individual- and team-focused experiences. Critical situations were managed by individual- or team-focused actions.Experiences revealed were variation of alarms, psychological impact, parental presence, structured working methods, the team's interactions, professional experience and resource availability, and the impact of the environment. Actions revealed were being prepared, managing the psychological impact, adopting a professional attitude toward parents, working in a structured way, and competence/resource reinforcement.

    Implications for Practice: Developing a structured role distribution within the neonatal resuscitation program and ensuring clear communication in the team during simulation training and in intense situations can increase pRNs' feeling of safety and allow them to further develop their professional role in neonatal resuscitation situations.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Christina
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurse Decision Making and Attitudes About Circuit Disconnection During Ventilator Therapy at a Swedish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit2018In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 18, no 6, p. E13-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are many challenges to providing care to infants in need of ventilator therapy. Yet, few studies describe the practical handling of the ventilator circuit during nursing care.

    Purpose: To describe neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses' decision making regarding whether or not to disconnect the ventilator circuit when changing the infant's position and to investigate the grounds for their decisions.

    Methods: A descriptive questionnaire study with both quantitative and qualitative elements was conducted. In 2015, a convenience sample of nurses working in an NICU completed a questionnaire including both closed-ended and open-ended, free-text questions. Answers to the closed-ended questions were analyzed with descriptive statistics, whereas answers to the free-text questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Nurses' decisions on whether to disconnect or keep the ventilator circuit closed were based on the infant's needs for ventilator support. The nurses gave several reasons and motivations both for why they disconnected the circuit and for why they did not. The handling of the circuit and the reasons and motivations given were inconsistent among the nurses.

    Implications for Practice: This study highlights the need for continuous, repetitive education and training for NICU nurses, as well as demonstrating the importance of clear and distinct guidelines and working methods regarding the care of infants on ventilator support.

    Implications for Research: Future research should continue to find ways of working and handling an infant on ventilator support that are least harmful to the infant.

  • 6.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Karlsson, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Dawit, Feven
    Astrid Lindgrens Children Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sindelar, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Physiological Stability in Very Preterm Infants During Skin-to-Skin Contact as Assessed by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy2020In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 495-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: 

    Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) has been demonstrated to allow adequate thermal stability in high-technology settings with extremely preterm infants, while other aspects on how SSC influences basic physiological parameters have been less extensively investigated.

    Purpose: 

    To evaluate physiological stability during SSC and incubator care in a group of preterm infants born at a gestational age (GA) of 32 weeks or less and receiving respiratory support.

    Methods: 

    Descriptive, observational study including 10 preterm infants (GA 22-32 weeks, postnatal age 2-48 days) were evaluated during SSC compared with flanking time periods in the incubator. Cerebral and systemic regional oxygen saturation (rSao2), pulse oximetry (Spo2), heart rate (HR), and body temperature were recorded, and the fractional tissue oxygen extraction (fTOE) was calculated.

    Results: 

    A total of 16 periods of SSC (mean duration 3 hours 30 minutes) were evaluated, 9 during nasal continuous positive airway pressure and 7 during mechanical ventilation. Cerebral rSao2 was 68% ± 4% (SE) and 69% ± 4% during incubator care and SSC, respectively (P = .56). Somatic rSao2 was 64% ± 4% during incubator care and 66% ± 4% during SSC (P = .54). Also, fTOE, HR, and Spo2 was similar during the 2 modes of care. Body temperature increased during SSC (P < .01).

    Implications for Practice: 

    The present study reveals no differences in cerebral and somatic tissue oxygenation between periods of SSC and care in the incubator. The findings indicate that SSC supports physiological stability also during management of very preterm infants receiving respiratory support.

    Implications for Research: 

    Further studies directed to further optimize SSC performance should enable its safe implementation at gradually lower gestational and postnatal ages.

1 - 6 of 6
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