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  • 1.
    Funkquist, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Influence of test weighing before/after nursing on breastfeeding in preterm infants2010In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Swedish hospitals apply various regimens for preterm infants' nutrition in connection with their mothers' establishment of breastfeeding. Milk intake is assessed either by test weighing before and after breastfeeding or by observing the infant's suckling behavior (ie, clinical indices). These differing policies may lead to differences in infants' feeding progress. The purpose of this study was to compare effects on breastfeeding and weight gain of preterm infants, depending on whether the volume of breast milk intake when suckled in the hospital was estimated by "clinical indices" or determined by test weighing. SUBJECTS: Sixty-four infants treated at a unit applying test weighing were compared with 59 infants treated at a unit assessing milk intake by "clinical indices." DESIGN AND METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive, and comparative design was used to explore the consequences of different nutrition regimens. Data were obtained from a review of hospital medical records. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: The infants treated at the hospital where test weighing was practiced attained exclusive breastfeeding at an earlier postmenstrual age (PMA) and were also discharged at an earlier PMA. However, the 2 study units were alike regarding the proportion of infants attaining exclusive breastfeeding, the postnatal age when this occurred, and the weight pattern in hospital. CONCLUSION: To establish breastfeeding in preterm infants, test weighing before and after breastfeeding and gradual reduction of supplementation are both applicable regimens. Mothers can be encouraged to choose either of them, although test weighing may help infants attain exclusive breastfeeding at an earlier PMA.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Christina
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurse Decision Making and Attitudes About Circuit Disconnection During Ventilator Therapy at a Swedish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit2018In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 18, no 6, p. E13-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are many challenges to providing care to infants in need of ventilator therapy. Yet, few studies describe the practical handling of the ventilator circuit during nursing care.

    Purpose: To describe neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses' decision making regarding whether or not to disconnect the ventilator circuit when changing the infant's position and to investigate the grounds for their decisions.

    Methods: A descriptive questionnaire study with both quantitative and qualitative elements was conducted. In 2015, a convenience sample of nurses working in an NICU completed a questionnaire including both closed-ended and open-ended, free-text questions. Answers to the closed-ended questions were analyzed with descriptive statistics, whereas answers to the free-text questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Nurses' decisions on whether to disconnect or keep the ventilator circuit closed were based on the infant's needs for ventilator support. The nurses gave several reasons and motivations both for why they disconnected the circuit and for why they did not. The handling of the circuit and the reasons and motivations given were inconsistent among the nurses.

    Implications for Practice: This study highlights the need for continuous, repetitive education and training for NICU nurses, as well as demonstrating the importance of clear and distinct guidelines and working methods regarding the care of infants on ventilator support.

    Implications for Research: Future research should continue to find ways of working and handling an infant on ventilator support that are least harmful to the infant.

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