uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abdelrazek, Fathya
    et al.
    Skytt, Bernice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Aly, Magda
    El-Sabour, Mona Abd
    Ibrahim, Naglaa
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leadership and management skills of first-line managers of elderly care and their work environment2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 736-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study the leadership and management skills of first-line managers (FLMs) of elderly care and their work environment in Egypt and Sweden. Background FLMs in Egypt and Sweden are directly responsible for staff and quality of care. However, FLMs in Sweden, in elderly care, have smaller units/organizations to manage than do their colleagues in Egypt. Furthermore, family care of the elderly has been the norm in Egypt, but in recent years institutional care has increased, whereas in Sweden, residential living homes have existed for a longer period. Methods A convenience sample of FLMs, 49 from Egypt and 49 from Sweden, answered a questionnaire measuring leadership and management skills, structural and psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and psychosomatic health. Results In both countries, FLMs' perceptions of their leadership and management skills and psychological empowerment were quite high, whereas scores for job satisfaction and psychosomatic health were lower. FLMs had higher values in several factors/study variables in Egypt compared with in Sweden. Conclusion and implications The work environment, both in Egypt and Sweden, needs to be improved to increase FLMs' job satisfaction and decrease stress. The cultural differences and levels of management have an effect on the differences between the two countries.

  • 2.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Staff members' perceptions of a ICT support package in dementia care during the process of implementation2009In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 781-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM

    The aim of the present study was to describe staff members' perceptions of an information and communication technology (ICT) support package during the process of implementation.

    BACKGROUND

    ICT in dementia care will likely increase in the future. The diffusion of new innovations can be better understood through diffusion research.

    METHODS

    Fourteen staff members in dementia care were interviewed, in groups, once before the new ICT, twice during its implementation and once after. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyses. The ICT included monitors/alarms: passage alarms, fall detectors, sensor-activated night-time illumination of the lavatory, and communication technology: Internet communication and additional computers.

    RESULTS

    The results showed two themes 'Moving from fear of losing control to perceived increase in control and security' and 'Struggling with insufficient/deficient systems'.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Staff perceptions of ICT were diverse and changed during the implementation. Benefits were more pronounced than disadvantages, and improvements were described both in care and in staff job situation.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT

    Functioning and use of ICT may relate to design as well as by application and the surrounding structure, and the whole system: the organizational structure, the employers and the new product needs to be taken into consideration when implementing new technology.

  • 3.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Birgitta
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Staff satisfaction with work, perceived quality of care and stress in elderly care: psychometric assessments and associations2006In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 318-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To evaluate validity and reliability of three questionnaires measuring 'work satisfaction', 'patient care' and 'staff health' for staff in elderly care and to study the relationship between staff members' satisfaction with work and perceived stress.

    Background Increased workload, difficulties in recruiting and retaining nurses are reported in elderly care. Valid and reliable instruments measuring staffs' perceptions of work are needed.

    Methods A convenience sample of 299 staff answered the questionnaires.

    Results Factor analysis of 'work satisfaction' gave eight factors, 'patient care' four factors and 'staff health' two factors, explaining 52.2%, 56.4% and 56.8% of the variance. Internal consistency was mostly satisfactory. Multiple regression analysis revealed a model that explained 41% of the variance in perceived stress symptoms.

    Conclusions There was support for the instruments' validity and reliability. Older age, higher scores/satisfaction with workload, cooperation, expectations and demands, personal development and lower scores on internal motivation contributed to less stress.

  • 4.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Skytt, Bernice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Working life and stress symptoms among caregivers in elderly care with formal and no formal competence2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 732-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to describe and compare caregivers with formal and no formal competence on job satisfaction, psychosomatic health, structural and psychological empowerment and perceptions of care quality. A further aim was to study relationships among study variables.

    Methods: A convenience sample of 572 caregivers in elderly care participated.

    Results: Caregivers with no formal competence perceived higher workload, more communication obstacles, less competence, poorer sleep and more stress symptoms than did their colleagues. Linear regression analyses revealed that the factor self-determination was an explanatory variable of stress levels among caregivers with no formal competence, and self-determination and impact among caregivers with formal competence. Linear regression analysis revealed that different dimensions in structural and psychological empowerment explained the variance in staff job satisfaction, perceived stress symptoms and quality of care.

    Conclusions: No formal competence seems to be a risk factor for psychosomatic health problems.

    Implications for nursing management: Managers need to have a strategic plan for how to create a working environment for caregivers with no formal competence. Caregivers’ self-determination seems to be important for stress symptoms. Meaning, self-determination, impact and opportunities appear to be important for job satisfaction and competence, opportunities, resources and formal power for quality of care.

  • 5.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    Caregivers' job satisfaction and empowerment before and after an intervention focused on caregiver empowerment.2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To evaluate a training programme aimed at strengthening caregivers' self-esteem and empowering them, and also to study correlations between psychological empowerment and job satisfaction.

    Background

    Structural and psychological empowerment have received increased attention in nursing management, yet few intervention studies on this topic, based on theoretical assumptions, have been conducted in elderly care.

    Method

    Data on self-assessed psychological empowerment and job satisfaction were collected in an intervention (n = 14) and a comparison group (n = 32), before and after the intervention.

    Results

    When compared over time in the respective groups, there were significant improvements in the intervention group regarding the factor criticism (job satisfaction scale). There were no statistically significant differences in the comparison group. Total empowerment and all factors of empowerment correlated positively with total job satisfaction. Six out of eight factors of job satisfaction correlated positively with total empowerment.

    Conclusions

    Caregivers' perception of criticism can improve through an intervention aimed at strengthening their self-esteem and empowering them.

    Implications for nursing management

    Intervention focused on psychological empowerment and especially caregivers' communication skills seems to be beneficial for caregivers. Recommendations are to increase the programme's length and scope and to include all staff at the unit. However, these recommendations need to be studied further.

  • 6.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Westerberg Jacobson, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Staff assessment of structural empowerment and ability to work according to evidence-based practice in mental health care2015In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 765-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study associations between staff members' self-rated structural empowerment in mental health care, organisational type, and the ability and willingness to work according to evidence-based practice.

    METHOD: Questionnaire data were collected from 253 mental health staff members.

    RESULT: Multivariate logistic regressions analyses revealed that participants who scored higher on opportunity (OR 2.5) and were employed by the county council (OR 1.9) vs. the municipality were more likely to report high evidence-based practice ability. A generalised estimating equation taking into account unknown correlations within units found opportunity and resources to be significant predictors of evidence-based practice ability. Regarding evidence-based willingness, increased odds were found for higher scores of opportunity (OR 2.2) and being employed by the county council (OR 2.9). The generalised estimating equation also found resources to be a significant predictor of evidence-based willingness. In both organisations, the values for empowerment were moderate.

    CONCLUSION: Structural conditions such as access to opportunities and resources are important for creating supporting structures for practice to be evidence-based.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Our results emphasise the managers' essential role in creating empowering structures, and especially access to opportunities and resources, for their staff to carry out evidence-based practice.

  • 7.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Education in Nursing.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Patient information and participation still in need of improvement: evaluation of patients' perceptions of quality of care2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 226-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims:

    To identify areas in need of quality improvement by investigating inpatients' perceptions of quality of care, and to identify differences in perceptions of care related to patient gender, age and type of admission.

    Background:

    Nursing managers play an important role in the development of high-quality care.

    Methods:

    Quality of care was assessed using the Quality from the Patients' Perspective (QPP). In all, 2734 inpatients at a Swedish university hospital completed the QPP.

    Results:

    Inadequate quality was identified for 15 out of 24 items, e.g. information given on treatment and examination results, opportunities to participate in decisions related to care and information on self-care. Patients with emergency admissions reported lower scores for quality of information and doctors' care than did patients with planned admissions.

    Conclusion:

    Results from the present survey identified areas in need of quality improvement and differences in perceived care quality between patients. Quality of care must be developed in close collaboration with other healthcare professionals; in this respect, nursing managers could play an important role.

    Implications for nursing management:

    Nursing managers could play a more active part in measuring quality of care, and in using results from such measurements to develop and improve quality of care.

  • 8.
    Furåker, Carina
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Walldal, Elvi
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Quality of care in relation to a critical pathway from thestaff´s perpective2004In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 12, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Idvall, Ewa
    Nurse Managers' prerequisite for nursing development: a survey on pressure ulcers and contextual factors in hospital organizations2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe and compare pressure ulcer prevalence in two county councils and concurrently explore Nurse Managers' perspective of contextual factors in a hospital organization. Background Despite good knowledge about risk factors and prevention of pressure ulcers, the prevalence of pressure ulcers remains high. Nurse Managers' have a key role in implementing evidence-based practice. Methods The present study included five hospitals in two Swedish county councils: county council A (non-university setting) and county council B (university setting). A pressure ulcer prevalence study was conducted according to the methodology developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The Nurse Managers' answered a (27-item) questionnaire on contextual factors. Results County council B had significantly less pressure ulcers grade (2-4) (7.7%) than county council A (11.3%). The Nurse Managers' assessed only two out of the 27 general contextual items significantly differently. Some significant differences were observed in ward organization. Conclusions In county council B, the Nurse Managers' seemed more aware of prevention strategies compared with Nurse Managers' in county council A. The Nurse Managers' should take more responsibility to develop the prerequisite for quality improvement in nursing. Implication for nursing management Nursing outcomes (e. g. pressure ulcers) should be incorporated into national quality registries for benchmarking and Nurse Managers' competence in evidence-based practice and research methodology increased.

  • 10.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, County Council of Värmland,Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sving, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Staff's perceptions of a pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injuries in a hospital ward: A qualitative study2018In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe staff's perceptions of a continuous pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injury in a hospital ward.

    BACKGROUND: Pressure injury development is still a problem in hospitals. It is important to understand how new information and communication technologies can facilitate pressure injury prevention.

    METHOD: A descriptive design with qualitative focus group interviews was used.

    RESULTS: Five categories were identified: "Need of information, training and coaching over a long period of time," "Pressure mapping - a useful tool in the prevention of pressure injury in high risk patients," "Easy to understand and use, but some practical issues were annoying," "New way of working and thinking," and "Future possibilities with the pressure mapping system."

    CONCLUSION: The pressure mapping system was an eye-opener for the importance of pressure injury prevention. Staff appreciated the real-time feedback on pressure points, which alerted them to the time for repositioning, facilitated repositioning and provided feedback on the repositioning performed.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: A continuous pressure mapping system can be used as a catalyst, increasing staff's competence, focus and awareness of prevention. For successful implementation, the nurse managers should have a shared agenda with the clinical nurse leaders, supporting the sustaining and spread of the innovation.

  • 11.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    The quality of postoperative pain management from the perspectives of patients, nurses and patient records.2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 756-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study the quality of postoperative pain management in a university hospital.

    Method Paired patient and nurse assessments of the patient's pain management were conducted in two departments, complemented with audit of patient records. The Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire was answered by 121 patients and 47 Registered Nurses.

    Results Of 14 items in the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire, four items in general surgery and five items in thoracic surgery reached the threshold for high quality of care. No significant differences were found between the assessments in the two departments, but the patients in general surgery experienced more pain than the patients in thoracic surgery. In general surgery, the patients assessed their worst pain significantly higher than the nurse did. The patients who experienced more pain than expected were less satisfied with the quality of their care and experienced higher pain intensity levels. For 25 (41.0%) patients in general surgery and four (6.7%) patients in thoracic surgery, pain intensity was documented according to hospital quality goals.

    Conclusion In both departments, areas for improvements could be found in all subscales of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire, i.e. communication, action, trust and environment. It is important to discuss what information the patient needs, as well as how and when it should be given. Furthermore, considering earlier pain experience and the goal of pain relief for the individual patient may facilitate an adequate assessment of the patient's pain. In future, electronic health records have the potential to support the use of clinical guidelines.

  • 12.
    Hagerman, Heidi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Skytt, Bernice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Male first-line managers' experiences of the work situation in elderly care: an empowerment perspective2015In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 695-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe male first-line managers' experiences of their work situation in elderly care.

    BACKGROUND: First-line managers' work is challenging. However, less attention has been paid to male managers' work situation in health care. Knowledge is needed to empower male managers.

    METHOD: Fourteen male first-line managers were interviewed. The interview text was subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    RESULT: Work situations were described as complex and challenging; challenges were the driving force. They talked about 'Being on one's own but not feeling left alone', 'Having freedom within set boundaries', 'Feeling a sense of satisfaction and stimulation', 'Feeling a sense of frustration' and 'Having a feeling of dejection and resignation'.

    CONCLUSION: Although the male managers report deficiencies in the support structure, they largely experience their work as a positive challenge.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: To meet increasing challenges, male first-line managers need better access to supportive structural conditions. Better access to resources is needed in particular, allowing managers to be more visible for staff and to work with development and quality issues instead of administrative tasks. Regarding organisational changes and the scrutiny of management and the media, they lack and thus need support and information from superiors.

  • 13.
    Hagerman, Heidi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, China.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Skytt, Bernice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle.
    How do first-line managers in elderly care experience their work situation from a structural and psychological empowerment perspective?: An interview study2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1208-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The work situation for first-line managers in elderly care is complex and challenging. Little is known about these managers' work situation from a structural and psychological empowerment perspective.

    AIM: To describe first-line managers' experiences of their work situation in elderly care from a structural and psychological empowerment perspective.

    METHOD: Interviews from 14 female first-line managers were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The theme described the managers' work situation as "It's not easy, but it's worth it." In the four subthemes, the managers described their work in terms of "Enjoying a meaningful job," "A complex and demanding responsibility that allows great authority within set boundaries," "Supported by other persons, organisational preconditions and confidence in their own abilities" and "Lacking organisational preconditions, but developing strategies for dealing with the situations."

    CONCLUSION: The managers described having various amounts of access to structural empowerment and experienced a feeling of meaning, competence, self-determination and impact, that is, psychological empowerment in their work.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: It is vital that first-line managers have access to organisational support. Therefore, upper management and first-line managers need to engage in continuous dialogue to customize the support given to each first-line manager.

  • 14.
    Hagerman, Heidi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Skytt, Bernice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.; Lishui Univ, Nursing Dept, Med & Hlth Coll, Lishui, Peoples R China.
    Empowerment and performance of managers and subordinates in elderly care: A longitudinal and multilevel study2017In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 647-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate relationships between first-line managers' ratings of structural and psychological empowerment, and the subordinates' ratings of structural empowerment, as well as their ratings of the managers' leadership-management performance.

    BACKGROUND: Work situations in elderly care are complex. To date, few studies have used a longitudinal, correlational and multilevel design to study the working life of subordinates and managers.

    METHOD: In five Swedish municipalities, questionnaires were answered twice during 2010-12 by 56 first-line managers and 769 subordinates working in nursing homes or home-help services.

    RESULTS: First-line managers' empowerment at Time 1 partially predicted subordinate's structural empowerment and ratings of their managers' leadership-management performance at Time 2. Changes over time partially revealed that the more access managers had to structural empowerment, i.e. increase over time, the higher the ratings were for structural empowerment and managerial leadership-management performance among subordinates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings strengthen research and theoretical suggestions linking first-line managers' structural empowerment to their subordinates' structural empowerment and ratings of their manager's leadership-management performance.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers with high access to structural empowerment are more likely to provide subordinates access to structural empowerment.

  • 15.
    Jangland, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Education in Nursing.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Improving patient participation in a challenging context: a 2-year evaluation study of an implementation project2017In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 266-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To evaluate an implementation project on patient participation.

    Background

    Patient participation is one of the cornerstones of person-centred care. A previous intervention study resulted in improved patient participation in a surgical department in a large university hospital in Sweden. A subsequent implementation project was guided by the PARiSH framework and included several strategies over 2 years.

    Method

    Patients (n = 198) in five units completed a questionnaire and nurse managers (n = 5) were interviewed.

    Results

    Although the long-term implementation project did not improve patient participation in the units, the nurse managers described a changing culture in which staff grew to accept patients’ involvement in their own care. Several barriers to change and sustainability were acknowledged.

    Conclusions

    Improving patient participation in a busy environment is challenging. The framework was useful in the different steps of the project. In the future, the interrelationship of the core elements needs to be analysed in an ongoing and deeper way to allow both prediction and prevention of barriers to improvement.

    Implications for Nursing Management

    A dedicated leadership together with skilled facilitators should encourage and support staff to reflect on their attitudes and ways of working to increase person-centred care.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors.

    Background:

    Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance.

    Method:

    All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire.

    Results:

    The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities.

    Conclusions:

    The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Implications for nursing management Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  • 17.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Ersta Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindeborg, Petra
    Ostersund Hosp, Ostersund, Sweden.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Jangland, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Evidence-based nursing-How is it understood by bedside nurses?: A phenomenographic study in surgical settings2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1216-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to identify and describe nurses' understanding of working with evidence-based nursing (EBN) in clinical practice. Background Evidence-based health care is recognized as fundamental to nursing practice, but it is challenging to implement. How nurses understand this part of their work can affect their practice. Methods Using a qualitative explorative design with a phenomenographic approach, we interviewed 21 nurses working in Swedish surgical wards. Results We identified three understandings of EBN among nurses in surgical care: A. a fragmentary and difficult concept that is not integrated or used in clinical practice; B. an important approach guided by knowledgeable colleagues and students; and C. a process that nurses are responsible for developing and leading. Conclusion Nurses' understandings of working with EBN in surgical wards vary widely. Nurse managers have an important task to create a common outlook among nurses about integrating research, patient experience and clinical experience in decision-making. Implication for nursing management These findings could inspire nurse managers to reflect on how to move nurses towards a more comprehensive understanding of EBN and how to identify nurses who could act as facilitators in quality improvement work.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst, Div Nursing, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Registered nurses' perspectives of work satisfaction, patient safety and intention to stay: A double-edged sword2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1359-1365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe job satisfaction in registered nurses (RNs), their intention to stay at their current workplace and in the profession and to explore patient safety in relation to these.

    Background

    Nurse turnover presents a serious challenge to health care that may be predicted by factors related to the work environment.

    Method

    Descriptive design with 25 qualitative interviews.

    Results

    Five categories were identified: RNs feel satisfied when providing person‐centred care; RNs enjoy the variability of the nursing job, but want control; RNs feel frustrated when care is put on hold or left undone; RNs depend on team collaboration and the work environment to assure patient safety; intention to stay depends on the work environment and a chance for renewal.

    Conclusion

    Registered nurses' job satisfaction could be described as a double‐edged sword. Although the profession is described as a positive challenge, work overload threatens both job satisfaction and patient safety.

    Implications for Nursing Management

    Our findings suggest that nursing leadership can increase RNs’ intention to stay by meeting their needs for appreciation, a better work environment, competence development and professional career development.

  • 19.
    Klarare, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Lind, Susanne
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Hansson, Johan
    The Public Health Agency of Sweden (Folkhälsomyndigheten).
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Institutionen för Klinisk forskning och utbildning, Karolinska Institutet.
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Institutionen för Medicin och hälsovetenskap, Lunds universitet.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Institutionen för Neurobiologi, Vårdvetenskap och Samhälle, Karolinska institutet.
    Leadership in specialist palliative home care teams: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe team leaders' experiences of facilitators and barriers of leadership in specialist palliative home care teams. Background: For effective teamwork in specialist palliative care, leadership is crucial; however, defining and agreeing on what leadership comprises may be challenging. In palliative care, teamwork is recognized as imperative for multiprofessional perspectives to meet dying patients' and families' needs. Methods: Qualitative interviews with 13 team leaders in specialist palliative home care were performed, using the Pettigrew and Whipp framework, and analysed with directed content analysis. Results: Team leaders' experiences of conditions influencing the organisation and delivery of specialist palliative home care is multifaceted and leaders seem conflicted in their approach to the multiple levels of leadership, vision and responsibilities. Conclusion: Team leaders in specialist palliative home care described goals of care on differing levels and, for some, fiscal restraints and external pressures influenced their vision and leadership. Team leaders experienced challenges of leadership in relation to organisational issues, feeling burdened by responsibilities, budget restraints and team size. Implications for nursing management: Team leadership is demanding and complex. In specialist palliative home care, affirming values and enabling vision during times of fiscal strain and external pressures, is challenging. For successful leadership that develops both individuals and the health care team, leaders are recommended to adapt the leadership style to the present situation surrounding the team.

  • 20. Nilsson Kajermo, Kerstin
    et al.
    Undén, Maria
    Gardulf, Ann
    Eriksson, Lars E
    Orton, Marie-Louise
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nordström, Gun
    Predictors of nurses' perceptions of barriers to research utilization2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 305-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify predictors of nurses' self-reported barriers to using research findings in clinical practice. Background Several studies have shown that nurses perceive barriers to research utilization but to our knowledge predictors of nurses perceptions of barriers to research utilization have not been identified before. Methods Three questionnaires were answered by 833 nurses: the Barriers Scale, the Quality Work Competence questionnaire and a questionnaire including questions on professional issues. Results Dissatisfaction with support from immediate superiors for participating in research and/or development projects, having no academic degree and unclear and unrealistic workplace goals were identified as factors increasing the risk of perceiving barriers to the use of research findings in clinical practice. Conclusions The results imply that head nurses, nursing managers and other health care leaders should create strategies for supporting nurses' professional development and possibilities to implement research findings in clinical practice. Implications for nursing management To support research utilization and evidence-based care health care leaders, head nurses and nurse managers should create clear and realistic goals for the work place including demands on evidence-based care. It is also important for head nurses and nurse managers to create strategies for supporting nurses' professional development and possibilities to implement research findings in clinical practice.

  • 21.
    Orton, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Qual & Patient Safety, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Asa
    Swedish Soc Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Linkoping Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nursing management matters for registered nurses with a PhD working in clinical practice2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 955-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To investigate what registered nurses (RNs) with a PhD working in clinical practice experience in terms of their role, function and work context.

    Background

    Previous studies have shown that RNs with a graduate degree contribute to better and safer care for patients. However, little is known about what further academic schooling of RNs, at PhD level, means for clinical practice.

    Method

    Qualitative design, with semi‐structured interviews and inductive content analysis.

    Results

    The main areas of responsibilities for RNs with a PhD working in clinical practice were related to practice development and implementation of research results. In their work, they experienced barriers to the full use of their competence; the expectations and prerequisites of the organisation were not clearly defined, and they often lacked a mandate to create conditions for quality improvement of nursing care.

    Conclusions

    RNs with a PhD can contribute to evidence‐based practice (EBP), clinical training, as well as the development of clinical research. Their roles and responsibilities need to be clarified, and for this, they need support from managers.

    Implications for Nursing Management

    Nurse managers have the opportunity to partner with RNs with a PhD to support the EBP process and help structure nursing practice in more efficient ways.

  • 22.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Implementation of a multi-professional standardized care plan in electronic health records for the care of stroke patients2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 810-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To compare staff opinions about standardized care plans and self-reported habits with regard to documentation, and their perceived knowledge about the evidence-based guidelines in stroke care before and after implementation of an evidence-based-standardized care plan (EB-SCP) and quality standard for stroke care. The aim was also to describe staff opinions about, and their use of, the implemented EB-SCP.

    Background

    To facilitate evidence-based practice (EBP), a multi-professional EB-SCP and quality standard for stroke care was implemented in the electronic health record (EHR).

    Method

    Quantitative, descriptive and comparative, based on questionnaires completed before and after implementation.

    Results

    Perceived knowledge about evidence-based guidelines in stroke care increased after implementation of the EB-SCP. The majority agreed that the EB-SCP is useful and facilitates their work. There was no change between before and after implementation with regard to opinions about standardized care plans, self-reported documentation habits or time spent on documentation.

    Conclusions

    An evidence-based SCP seems to be useful in patient care and improves perceived knowledge about evidence-based guidelines in stroke care. Implications for nursing management  For nursing managers, introduction of evidence-based SCP in the EHR may improve the prerequisites for promoting high-quality EBP in multi-professional care.

  • 23. Salberg, J
    et al.
    Bäckström, J2
    Röing, M
    Öster C, C
    Ways of understanding nursing in psychiatric inpatient care - A phenomenographic study.2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. Nov, no 27(8), p. 1826-1834Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Salberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Röing, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ways of understanding nursing in psychiatric inpatient care - A phenomenographic study.2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1826-1834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to describe the ways that nursing staff in psychiatric inpatient care understand nursing.

    BACKGROUND: Nursing in psychiatric care is marginalized with ambiguous role definitions and imperceptible activities. Nurse managers' capabilities to establish a direction and shared vision are crucial to motivate nursing staff to take part in practice development. However, before establishing a shared vision it is important to identify the different ways nursing can be understood.

    METHODS: Sixteen individual semi-structured interviews with nursing staff members were analysed using a phenomenographic approach.

    RESULTS: Five ways of understanding nursing were identified. These understandings were interrelated based on the way that the patient, nursing interventions and the goal of nursing were understood.

    CONCLUSION: The diversity of identified understandings illuminates the challenges of creating a shared vision of roles, values and goals for nursing.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Awareness of staff members' different understandings of nursing can help nurse managers to establish a shared vision. To be useful, a shared vision has to be implemented together with clear role definitions, professional autonomy of nurses and support for professional development. Implementation of such measures serves as a foundation to make nursing visible and thereby enhance the quality of patient care.

  • 25.
    Silén, Marit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Svantesson, Mia
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Impact of clinical ethics support on daily practice-First-line managers' experiences in the Euro-MCD project2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1374-1383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore first-line managers' experiences of what Moral Case Deliberation has meant for daily practice, to describe perceptions of context influence and responsibility to manage ethically difficult situations. Background In order to find measures to evaluate Moral Case Deliberation, the European Moral Case Deliberation Outcome instrument was developed and is now in the stage of revision. For this, there is a need of several perspectives, one of them being the managerial bird-eye perspective. Method Eleven first-line managers at workplaces, participating in the European Moral Case Deliberation Outcome instrument project, were interviewed and thematic analysis was applied. Results Managers' experiences were interpreted as enhanced ethical climate: a closer-knit and more emotionally mature team, morally strengthened individuals, as well as ethics leaving its marks on everyday work and morally grounded actions. Despite organizational barriers, they felt inspired to continue ethics work. Conclusion and Implications This study confirmed, but also added ethical climate aspects, such as morally grounded actions. Furthermore, adding ethical climate as a construct in the European Moral Case Deliberation Outcome instrument should be considered. First-line managers need clear directives from their managers that ethics work needs to be prioritized for the good of both the staff and the patients.

  • 26.
    Skytt, Bernice
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Psychometric testing of the Leadership and Management Inventory: a tool to measure the skills and abilities of first-line nurse managers2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 784-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim? To estimate the validity and reliability of the Leadership and Management Inventory, a tool to measure the skills and abilities of first-line nurse managers.

    Background? The decision to develop an inventory reflects the need for an instrument that can measure the various skills and abilities first-line nurse managers should possess.

    Method? Factor analysis was conducted and internal consistency initially estimated on data from 149 registered nurses; a second sample of 197 health care personnel was used to test these results.

    Results? Principal component analysis of the first sample resulted in a preferred three-factor solution that explained 65.8% of the variance; Cronbach's alpha coefficient varied between 0.90 and 0.95. Analysis of the second sample also resulted in a three-factor solution that explained 64.2% of the variance; Cronbach's alpha coefficient varied from 0.88 to 0.96. For both samples, the factors were labelled `interpersonal skills and group management', `achievement orientation' and `overall organizational view and political savvy'.

    Conclusion? Results indicate that estimates of validity and reliability for the Leadership and Management Inventory can be considered acceptable. Implications for nursing management?The Leadership and Management Inventory can be used when first-line nurse managers' leadership and management skills and abilities are to be measured.

  • 27.
    Skytt, Bernice
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hagerman, Heidi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Strömberg, Annika
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    First-line managers' descriptions and reflections regarding their staff's access to empowering structures2015In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1003-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To elucidate first-line managers' descriptions and reflections regarding their staff's access to empowering structures using Kanter's theory of structural empowerment.

    BACKGROUND: Good structural conditions within workplaces are essential to employees' wellbeing, and their ability to access empowerment structures is largely dependent on the management.

    METHOD: Twenty-eight first-line managers in elderly care were interviewed. Deductive qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data.

    RESULTS: Managers perceived that staff had varying degrees of access to the empowering structures described in Kanter's theory - and that they possessed formal power in their roles as contact persons and representatives. The descriptions mostly started from the managers' own actions, although some started from the needs of staff members.

    CONCLUSION: All managers described their staff's access to the empowering structures in Kanter's theory as important, yet it seemed as though this was not always reflected on and discussed as a strategic issue.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers could make use of performance and appraisal dialogues to keep up to date on staff's access to empowering structures. Recurrent discussions in the management group based on such current information could promote staff's access to power through empowering structures and make job definitions a strategic issue in the organisation.

  • 28.
    Skytt, Bernice
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Reasons to leave: the motives of first-line nurse managers for leaving their posts2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 294-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To study the reasons for first-line nurse managers to resign, their perceptions of difficult situations, experience of support and satisfaction with work.

    Background The intentions of first-line nurse managers' to stay at their posts varied between 45% and 75% in different studies.

    Methods Data were collected by questionnaire and letters from 32 first-line nurse managers who had left their posts. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the letters.

    Results Eleven first-line nurse managers resigned due to reorganization or other changes and 19 due to their own accord. Reasons to leave were personal, organizational, as well as lack of support from and relations to the head of department. Difficult situations were unclear conditions, lack of support from supervisors and, implementation of changes, staff matters and economy. Important support was personal, organizational, practical and to have opportunities for development and education. The perception of work satisfaction was higher after resignation.

    Conclusions The dominant reason to leave was reorganization and other changes. The relation to the head of department influenced the first-line nurse managers' overall work situation.

  • 29.
    Skytt, Bernice
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjödén, Per-Olow
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    The roles of the first-line nurse manager: Perceptions from four perspectives2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1012-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  To study the perception of the first-line nurse managers (FLNMs), registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and head of departments (HDs) on the FLNM's current and desired roles. Background  In the process of decentralization, the role of FLNM has changed from having overall responsibility for patients to having responsibility for the management of the ward. Method  Interviews with five FLNMs, five RNs, five ANs, and one HD were used. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the transcribed text. Results  When describing the current roles, the FLNMs, RNs and ANs focused on the coordination of activities that contributed to a well-functioning service and care of patients as well as on the recruitment of, support to and development of the personnel. The HD focused on the FLNM's responsibilities towards the personnel, especially regarding empowerment and staff well-being. When describing desired roles, the FLNMs, RNs and ANs emphasized service on the ward while the HD underlined the development of services and co-operation with other nurse managers. Conclusion  The perception of the current and desired roles of the FLNM varied among the groups. The FLNMs, RNs and ANs reported a similar understanding which in turn differed from that of the HD who described fewer roles and focused on other areas.

  • 30.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Public nursing home staff's experience of participating in an intervention aimed at enhancing their self-esteem2009In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 833-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the present study was to gain an understanding of how nursing staff experienced participating in a training programme aimed at strengthening their self-esteem and empowering them, to determine whether participation benefited them in any way, and to describe their opinions about possible benefits or disadvantages.

    BACKGROUND: Staff working in institutions such as nursing homes have a low status in society. A training programme was introduced to staff in a public nursing home. It focused on helping them understand factors in the work situation that influence them and on empowering them.

    METHOD: The study was explorative and qualitative in design.

    FINDINGS: The participants in the programme were generally satisfied with it. Their opinions about the benefits they received from the programme can be described using three themes: 'improved communication skills', 'enhanced self-esteem' and 'sees work in a different light'.

    CONCLUSIONS: The most important finding of the present study is that it was possible to strengthen and empower staff. Staff members were generally pleased and satisfied with the content/organization of the training programme. They felt the programme had been of value to them by improving their communication skills and increasing their self-esteem.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The present result could be of value to managers and educators working in the area of nursing home care when planning education and development activities for staff. Learning to communicate better and understand the social structure at the workplace could improve staff members' self-esteem, thereby enhancing the work situation and atmosphere as well as empowering the individuals.

  • 31. Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    et al.
    Klingvall, Emma
    Wilhelmsson, Maria
    Jangland, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Education in Nursing.
    Obstacles and opportunities for achieving good care on the surgical ward: nurse and surgeon perspective2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 492-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand from the perspectives of nurses and surgeons the situations and processes that are important in the context of surgical care support or are obstacles to achieving good care.

    BACKGROUND: Medical advances and inpatients with multiple illnesses are on the increase. In addition, a high turnover of registered nurses has been identified. This contributes to an increasingly inexperienced nursing staff. Concurrently, studies have shown that patient safety and quality of care are linked to organisational structures and staffing education levels.

    METHOD: Eight nurses and six surgeons from three hospitals were interviewed and data were analysed by systematic text condensation.

    RESULTS: This identified three themes: shifting focus away from the patients, emphasising good communication, and using the competence of the team.

    CONCLUSION: This study contributes to a deeper understanding that many interruptions, insufficient communication and unused competence can be a threat to patient safety. Sweden has a high standard but this study elucidates that challenges remain to be resolved.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The focus on patients can increase by a balance between direct/indirect patient work and administration and by the support of clinicians using their full professional competence.

  • 32. Ödegård, Synnöve
    et al.
    Andersson, Dan K G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Insulin treatment as a tracer for identifying latent patient safety risks in home-based diabetes care2006In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 116-27Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore whether attitudes and opinions in areas of importance to patient safety expressed by nurses with medical responsibility were related to the knowledge of diabetes among home care personnel.

    Design A questionnaire survey was used to evaluate the knowledge of diabetes among 3144 nurses' aides' and assistant nurses working in 15 municipalities in Sweden. In each municipality a nurse with medical responsibility answered another questionnaire dealing with patient safety matters in general and diabetes in particular.

    Results There were large differences in the knowledge of diabetes among home care personnel on the municipality level. Attitudes and opinions of the nurses with medical responsibility in the areas of leadership, guidance and continuing education were significantly related to the knowledge of diabetes among nurses' aides' and assistant nurses.

    Conclusions Our study shows that factors that are related to attitudes and opinions about patient safety among nurses with medical responsibility can increase the risk of home care personnel to make mistakes in the direct care of patients with diabetes.

1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf