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  • 1.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nordstrom, P. M.
    Koskinen, L.
    Juhansoo, T.
    Mitchell, M. P.
    Marquis, F.
    Chasse, F.
    Critchley, K.
    Campbell, B.
    Hemingway, A.
    Enabling nursing students to focus on the Ottawa Charter and the nurses role in tackling inequalities in health through international exchange2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 448-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student nurses in a transatlantic exchange program explored the role of registered nurses in five countries' public health systems. The Ottawa Charter provided a framework for students to examine the nurse's responsibilities in public health. Students took practice placements in geographically rural areas on another continent and explored inequalities in health care. If nurses are to understand their role in the health care system then they must be taught the scope of their practice including their role in health promotion, public health practice and community development. For this project nursing instructors developed an assignment relevant to the aims and suitable for students in all five nursing programs. Only three of 48 students offered an assignment which focused on building healthy public policy. Nurse educators need to explore this further to ensure nurses of the future are aware of their role and responsibilities in this area and have skills to work effectively to influence and build healthy policy. The international student exchange supported the students' developing understanding of the breadth of initiatives around the globe where nurses are actively engaged in addressing inequalities of health. Findings from an analysis of their assignments are presented in this evaluative report.

  • 2. Bos, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan
    Saarikoski, Mikko
    Kaila, Päivi
    Factors associated with student learning processes in primary health care units: a questionnaire study.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical placement plays a key role in education intended to develop nursing and caregiving skills. Studies of nursing students' clinical learning experiences show that these dimensions affect learning processes: (i) supervisory relationship, (ii) pedagogical atmosphere, (iii) management leadership style, (iv) premises of nursing care on the ward, and (v) nursing teachers' roles. Few empirical studies address the probability of an association between these dimensions and factors such as student (a) motivation, (b) satisfaction with clinical placement, and (c) experiences with professional role models.

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to investigate factors associated with the five dimensions in clinical learning environments within primary health care units.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Teacher, a validated evaluation scale, was administered to 356 graduating nursing students after four or five weeks clinical placement in primary health care units. Response rate was 84%. Multivariate analysis of variance is determined if the five dimensions are associated with factors a, b, and c above.

    RESULTS: The analysis revealed a statistically significant association with the five dimensions and two factors: students' motivation and experiences with professional role models. The satisfaction factor had a statistically significant association (effect size was high) with all dimensions; this clearly indicates that students experienced satisfaction.

    CONCLUSIONS: These questionnaire results show that a good clinical learning experience constitutes a complex whole (totality) that involves several interacting factors. Supervisory relationship and pedagogical atmosphere particularly influenced students' satisfaction and motivation. These results provide valuable decision-support material for clinical education planning, implementation, and management.

  • 3.
    Bredesen, Ida Marie
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Bjoro, Karen
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hofoss, Dag
    Univ Oslo, Inst Hlth & Soc, N-0316 Oslo, Norway..
    Effect of e-learning program on risk assessment and pressure ulcer classification: A randomized study2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 40, p. 191-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a problem in health care. Staff competency is paramount to PU prevention. Education is essential to increase skills in pressure ulcer classification and risk assessment. Currently, no pressure ulcer learning programs are available in Norwegian. Objectives: Develop and test an e-learning program for assessment of pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcer classification. Methods: Design, participants and setting: Forty-four nurses working in acute care hospital wards or nursing homes participated and were assigned randomly into two groups: an e-learning program group (intervention) and a traditional classroom lecture group (control). Data was collected immediately before and after training, and again after three months. The study was conducted at one nursing home and two hospitals between May and December 2012. Analysis: Accuracy of risk assessment (five patient cases) and pressure ulcer classification (40 photos [normal skin, pressure ulcer categories I-IV] split in two sets) were measured by comparing nurse evaluations in each of the two groups to a pre-established standard based on ratings by experts in pressure ulcer classification and risk assessment. Inter-rater reliability was measured by exact percent agreement and multi-rater Fleiss kappa. A Mann-Whitney U test was used for continuous sum score variables. Results: An e-learning program did not improve Braden subscale scoring. For pressure ulcer classification, however, the intervention group scored significantly higher than the control group on several of the categories in post-test immediately after training. However, after three months there were no significant differences in classification skills between the groups. Conclusion: An e-learning program appears to have a greater effect on the accuracy of pressure ulcer classification than classroom teaching in the short term. For proficiency in Braden scoring, no significant effect of educational methods on learning results was detected.

  • 4.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, China.
    Löfmark, Anna
    Vae, Karen Johanne Ugland
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Nursing students' perceptions of using the Clinical Education Assessment tool AssCE and their overall perceptions of the clinical learning environment: A cross-sectional correlational study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 51, p. 63-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical education is a vital part of nursing students' learning; the importance of assessment tools and feedback in stimulating student learning has been stressed, but this needs to be studied in more detail.

    Objectives: To examine relationships between nursing students' perceptions of using an Assessment tool in Clinical Education (AssCE) during their mid-course discussion and final assessment, the content discussed during these meetings between the student, preceptor and nurse teacher and the students' overall perception of the clinical learning environment.

    Design: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used.

    Setting and Participants: A convenience sample of 110 nursing students from one Norwegian university college with two campuses.

    Methods: Data were collected with self-developed questionnaires and analysed using logistic regression with SASS and the PROCESS macro for mediation analysis.

    Results: There was a positive relationship between nursing students' perceptions of using the assessment tool AssCE and their overall perception of the clinical learning environment. This relationship was, in turn, mediated by the content discussed during the formative mid-course discussion and summative final assessment.

    Conclusions: Our conclusion is that the assessment tool AssCE supported students' clinical learning and that this relationship, in turn, was mediated by the degree to which the conversation during the assessment meeting focused on the student's knowledge, skills and professional judgement.

  • 5.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University.
    Holmström, Inger K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Örebro University.
    Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1169-1174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices.

    Design

    A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design.

    Participants

    RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1 year were included in the study (n = 113, response rate 57%).

    Method

    Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire.

    Results

    Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon.

    Conclusions

    This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed.

  • 6.
    Gardulf, Ann
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Immunol,Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Lepp, Margret
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Ostfold Univ Coll, Holden, Norway..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Hedmark, Norway..
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Cty Council Varmland, Primary Care Res Unit, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Hedmark, Norway..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Dept Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients. Objectives: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors. Methods and participants; The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1[20-56] years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated. Results: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27 years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (932% vs 875% of NSPGs). Summary and conclusion: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs.

  • 7.
    Hammar, Lena Marmstal
    et al.
    Malardalens Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Soc, Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalens Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Skoglund, Karin
    Malardalens Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Meranius, Martina Summer
    Malardalens Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Sundler, Annelle J.
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, SE-50190 Boras, Sweden..
    The care of and communication with older people from the perspective of student nurses. A mixed method study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 52, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Undergraduate nurse education needs to prepare student nurses to meet the demands and to have the necessary communication skills for caring for an increasing older population. The challenges involve how best to support and empower student nurses to learn the communication skills needed to care for older people. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' views on the care of and communication with older people. Design: A descriptive study with a mixed-method approach was conducted. Methods: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire completed by third-year Swedish student nurses in 2015. Results: The student nurses reported positive attitudes to the care of and communication with older people. The findings focus on the central aspects related to relationship building, techniques for communication and external prerequisites. Conclusions: Despite positive attitudes, student nurses had a limited view of communication with older people. Educators need to increase student nurses' capacity to communicate effectively with older people. Educational interventions to improve and evaluate the communication competency of nurses and student nurses are needed.

  • 8.
    Hedén, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Boras Univ, Fac Caring Sci, S-50190 Boras, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Linda
    Boras Univ, Fac Caring Sci, S-50190 Boras, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Individual response technology to promote active learning within the caring sciences: An experimental research study2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 202-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One major challenge in delivering lectures to large and diverse classes is the maintenance of a high standard of lecturing in order to engage students and increase their participation and involvement. The lecturer's assignment is to arrange and prepare the lecture before teaching, hence enabling students' enhanced learning. Individual response technology could encourage Students' active learning and activate higher cognitive levels. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate individual response technology as a complement during lectures for students in higher education, in terms of the students' experiences of participation, engagement, and active learning. Also of interest was whether this technology can be considered a supportive technical system. Design: Data were collected through a questionnaire where levels of each condition were reported on a numeric rating scale (0-10) at baseline and after the introduction of individual response technology. To get a broader perspective, two types of lectures (pediatric and statistical) were included, giving a total of four assessment times. Participants: The participants comprised 59 students in Bachelor of Nursing program at a Swedish metropolitan university. Results: Overall, when individual response technology was used, students reported increased experience of engagement (n = 82, mean 6.1 vs. is = 65, mean 7.3, p < 0.001), participation (n = 92, mean 6.1 vs. n = 79, mean 7.7, p < 0.001), and active learning (n = 92, mean 73 vs. n = 79, mean 8.2 p < 0.001). Additionally, the students experienced this technology as a supportive technical system during lectures (mean 6.6 vs. mean 8.1, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The use of individual response technology during teaching is one way to enhance students' experiences of engagement, participation, and learning within the caring sciences.

  • 9. Hellström-Hyson, Eva
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    To take responsibility or to be an onlooker: Nursing students' experiences of two models of supervision2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed at describing how nursing students engaged in their clinical practice experienced two models of supervision: supervision on student wards and traditional supervision.

    Background: Supervision for nursing students in clinical practice can be organized in different ways. In the present study, parts of nursing students' clinical practice were carried out on student wards in existing hospital departments. The purpose was to give students the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for their clinical education and to apply the nursing process more independently through peer learning.

    Method: A descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used. Interviews were carried out with eight nursing students in their final semester of a 3-year degree program in nursing. The data were analyzed using content analysis.

    Findings: Two themes were revealed in the data analysis: When supervised on the student wards, nursing students experienced assuming responsibility and finding one's professional role, while during traditional supervision, they experienced being an onlooker and haying difficulties assuming responsibility.

    Conclusions: Supervision on a student ward was found to give nursing students a feeling of acknowledgment and more opportunities to develop independence, continuity, cooperation and confidence.

  • 10.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Gustafsson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding: Nursing students' experiences of learning2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, p. 533-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Gustafsson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding: nursing students' experiences of learning2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 533-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge that they discuss in structured seminars. Case seminars in health education have been evaluated, compared and discussed, but descriptions that can help us understand how students learn in the seminars have not previously been published. In a Swedish nursing programme, where case seminars have been used for several years, students were asked to write about their experiences of learning in the seminars. The aim of the present study was to describe this learning process from the students' point of view.

    METHOD:

    Written data were analysed using content analysis.

    FINDINGS:

    A theme concerning how the Case Method opens doors to deeper understanding was identified as a thread running through different codes and categories. Students described the importance of new perspectives and their wish to participate in discussions with other students. The students indicated that the structure, which involved pre-prepared cases and writing on the white board, positioned their own knowledge in a wider context and that the learning atmosphere enabled everyone to participate.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and critical thinking.

  • 12.
    Holmstrom, Inger K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Nursing students' awareness of inequity in healthcare - An intersectional perspective2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 48, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The overall aim of the present study was to explore awareness of inequity in healthcare and the intersection between different structures of power among nursing students. Another aim was to delineate the knowledge and use of Swedish Healthcare Direct in this group.

    Design: The study had a descriptive design with a quantitative approach.

    Participants: The sample consisted of 157 nursing students from three universities in central Sweden.

    Methods: The students filled out a study specific questionnaire in class. The questionnaire consisted of short descriptions of twelve fictive persons who differed in gender, age, and ethnicity, with questions about their life situation. The mean was calculated for each assessed fictive person for every item. In the next step, the assessments were ranked from the lowest probability to the highest probability. A 'Good life-index' consisting of quality of life, power over own life, and experience of discrimination, was also calculated. Free text comments were analysed qualitatively.

    Results: People with Swedish names were assessed to have the highest probability of having a good life. Among those with Swedish names, the oldest woman was assessed as having the lowest probability of a good life. All students had knowledge about Swedish Healthcare Direct, but more female students had used the service compared to male students.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the nursing students had awareness of how power and gender, ethnicity and age, are related. Based on the free text comments, the questions and the intersectional perspective seemed to evoke some irritation which points to their sensitive nature. Therefore, the questionnaire could be used as a tool to start a discussion of equity in healthcare and in interventions where the aim is to raise awareness of inequality and intersectionality.

  • 13.
    Holmström, Inger
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Larsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    A tension between genuine care and other duties: Swedish nursing students' views of their future work.2005In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 148-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a current need for nurses to take on new roles due to changing health care policies, economic cut-backs and shortage of staff. It is therefore important to study nursing students' view of their future profession. The theoretical framework was contemporary theories of competence development, which has shown that people's understanding of their work is expressed in their actions. The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' understanding of their future professional role in health care. A purposeful sample of 12 nursing students wrote narratives. The texts were condensed in five steps using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological Method. The essence of the students' view of their future work was A tension between genuine nursing care and other duties. Four themes constituted this essence: professional status, working conditions and stress, evidence-based nursing contra holistic care, teamwork, co-operation and disrespect, and intensive care instead of geriatrics. This study highlights pedagogic and practical problems that need to be constructively addressed. The nursing students' eagerness to care in a holistic way needs to be acknowledged and used in a fruitful way. This core function of nursing needs to be integrated with up-to-date nursing research.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Inst Gerontol, Aging Res Network, S-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Silén, Marit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Research methods in nursing students' Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 66, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the nursing programme in Sweden, students complete an independent project that allows them to receive both a professional qualification as a nurse and a Bachelor's degree. This project gives students the opportunity to develop and apply skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making, thus preparing them for their future work. However, only a few, small-scale studies have analysed the independent project to gain more insight into how nursing students carry out this task. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to describe the methods, including ethical considerations and assessment of data quality, applied in nursing students' independent Bachelor's degree projects in a Swedish context. Design: A descriptive study with a quantitative approach.

    Methods: A total of 490 independent projects were analysed using descriptive statistics.

    Results: Literature reviews were the predominant project form. References were often used to support the analysis method. They were not, however, always relevant to the method. This was also true of ethical considerations. When a qualitative approach was used, and data collected through interviews, the participants were typically professionals. In qualitative projects involving analysis of biographies/autobiographies or blogs participants were either persons with a disease or next of kin of a person with a disease.

    Conclusions: Although most of the projects were literature reviews, it seemed unclear to the nursing students how the data should be analysed as well as what ethical issues should be raised in relation to the method. Consequently, further research and guidance are needed. In Sweden, independent projects are not considered research and are therefore not required to undergo ethics vetting. However, it is important that they be designed so as to avoid possible research ethics problems. Asking persons about their health, which occurred in some of the empirical projects, may therefore be considered questionable.

  • 15.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avd. för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Högskolan i Gävle.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care. Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avd. för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Högskolan i Gävle.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avd. för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Högskolan i Gävle.
    Löfmark, Anna
    Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avd. för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Högskolan i Gävle.
    Nursing students' perceptions of clinical supervision: The contributions of preceptors, head preceptors and clinical lecturers2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1252-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aims of the study were 1) to investigate to what extent nursing students were satisfied with the supervision provided by facilitators (preceptor, head preceptor, and clinical lecturer), 2) to compare nursing students' ratings of facilitators' contribution to supervision as supportive and challenging, and 3) to examine relationships between facilitators' supportive and challenging behavior in supervision and nursing students' perception of fulfillment of expected learning outcomes in clinical education. Background: Although there are many studies on support of students in clinical education, few have addressed this from the students' point of view or made comparisons between different facilitators. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted during April to November 2010, where 107 nursing students, from a university in central Sweden, answered a questionnaire about supervision immediately after their period of clinical education. Results: Supportive behavior in supervision was rated higher by students for all facilitator groups as compared with challenging behavior. The students rated preceptors and clinical lecturers as more supportive than head preceptors and clinical lecturers as providing more challenges than the two other facilitator groups. Supportive and challenging behavior in supervision explained 39% of the variance in students' overall learning outcomes. However, the regression coefficient was only significant for students' ratings of supportive behavior for the preceptor. Conclusions: Nursing students were satisfied with facilitators' supervision and by their contribution to fulfillment of overall learning outcomes. Comparisons showed that preceptors in a higher degree were perceived as supportive while clinical lecturers were perceived as more important as challengers for critical thinking, reflection and exchange of experiences between students. The model of supervision seems to be promising, but the roles across facilitators need to be made clearer, especially the head preceptor's role, which seemed to be the most unclear role in this model.

  • 16.
    Löfmark, Anna
    et al.
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.;Stord Haugesund Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Sci, Haugesund, Norway..
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden.
    Validation of the tool assessment of clinical education (AssCE): A study using Delphi method and clinical experts2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to establish the validity of the tool Assessment of Clinical Education (AssCE). The tool is widely used in Sweden and some Nordic countries for assessing nursing students' performance in clinical education. It is important that the tools in use be subjected to regular audit and critical reviews. The validation process, performed in two stages, was concluded with a high level of congruence. In the first stage, Delphi technique was used to elaborate the AssCE tool using a group of 35 clinical nurse lecturers. After three rounds, we reached consensus. In the second stage, a group of 46 clinical nurse lecturers representing 12 universities in Sweden and Norway audited the revised version of the AssCE in relation to learning outcomes from the last clinical course at their respective institutions. Validation of the revised AssCE was established with high congruence between the factors in the AssCE and examined learning outcomes. The revised AssCE tool seems to meet its objective to be a validated assessment tool for use in clinical nursing education.

  • 17.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    What are the structural conditions of importance to preceptors' performance?2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 444-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preceptors play a critical role in the process of developing nursing students' knowledge, skills and ability to make independent and critical judgments, however relatively little is known about what aspects are associated with nurses' performance as preceptors. Objectives: To investigate structural conditions and professional aspects of potential importance to nurses' perceptions of their performance as preceptors, and to evaluate the validity and reliability of a questionnaire measuring nurses' perceptions of being a preceptor. Methods: The study had a correlational design. Total population sampling (N = 1720) in a county council district in central Sweden was used to screen for nurses with recent preceptor experience, 933 nurses responded (response rate 54%), of those 323 nurses fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The present findings are based on data from 243 of these subjects. Data were collected with a questionnaire and analyzed using multiple regressions analyses, exploratory factor analyses and reliability coefficients. Results: The results show that aspects such as receiving feedback on the function as a preceptor, being able to plan and prepare the clinical education period, receiving support from unit managers and having specific supervision education explain 31% of nurses' overall view of their performance as preceptors. However, structural conditions and professional experiences could not explain preceptors' use of reflection and critical thinking when acting as preceptors. These findings are discussed within the framework of Kanter's structural theory of power in organizations. Further, the psychometric evaluation showed that the questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring nurses' structural conditions for and perceptions of their performance as preceptors. Conclusions: Structural conditions such as feedback and support seemed to strengthen nurses' general view of their performance as preceptors but did not seem to facilitate nurses' work toward the aim of higher education and helping nursing students develop critical thinking. 

  • 18.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lofmark, Anna
    Implementation and student evaluation of clinical final examination in nursing education2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 1563-1568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical examinations have a distinct focus, the overall aim being to demonstrate through action whether nursing students have acquired the knowledge and skills necessary to be safe and accountable practitioners. This complexity of knowledge cannot be assessed using single examinations, thus there is a need to develop multiple assessment approaches. Objectives: To describe the process of developing valid clinical examinations for nursing students at the end of the final semester and to evaluate students' perceptions of these examination formats. Outline of the developmental process: Based on earlier research, overall goals for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing and guided by both task-related and relational aspects of nursing, two clinical final examinations were developed and tested. One was a standardized test of performance in vitro using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) based on five specific areas in which newly graduated nurses had shown deficiencies. The other was a test of performance in real conditions, in vivo, using Bedside Observation Examination (BOE) assessing nurse-patient relation, entirely based on patients' needs. Nursing Students' Evaluation: Three classes of students (n=203) were asked to participate and answer a study-specific questionnaire. The students highly valued the two examinations and perceived that the knowledge and skills tested were relevant to nurses' work. They found the examinations stressful, but at the same time meaningful, and felt they could do themselves full justice through this form of examination. Recommendations: The assessment test should be chosen depending on the preferred outcome. The OSCE, with its high degree of standardization, is appropriate to use to assess task-related aspects of nursing (show how), while the BOE, with its low degree of standardization, is suitable in real settings and has the potential to capture the relational aspects of nursing (does).

  • 19. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Florin, Jan
    Gardulf, Ann
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    A short version of the nurse professional competence scale for measuring nurses' self-reported competence.2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 71, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale with 88-items has been used to measure self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses in many national and international nursing research projects. However, a shorter version of the scale with maintained quality has been requested to further enhance its usability.

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a shorter version of the NPC Scale.

    DESIGN: A developmental and methodological design.

    PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: The study was based on a sample of 1810 nursing students at the point of graduation from 12 universities in Sweden.

    METHODS: The number of items in the original NPC Scale was reduced using several established research steps and then evaluated for data quality and construct validity using principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was measured as internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The extensive process of reducing the number of items resulted in a version with 35 items. Principal component analysis resulted in six factors explaining 53.6% of the variance: "Nursing Care", "Value-based Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Care Pedagogics", "Documentation and Administration of Nursing Care", and "Development, Leadership, and Organization of Nursing Care". All factors showed Cronbach's alpha values of >0.70. The confirmative factor analysis goodness-of-fit indexes were for root mean square error of approximation 0.05 and for comparative fit index 0.89.

    CONCLUSIONS: The NPC Scale Short Form (NPC Scale-SF) 35-items revealed promising results with a six-factor structure explaining 53.6% of the total variance. This 35-item scale can be an asset when used alone and together with other instruments it can provide the possibility of more complex analyses of self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses.

  • 20. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Johansson, Eva
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    Florin, Jan
    Leksell, Janeth
    Lepp, Margret
    Lindholm, Christina
    Nordstrom, Gun
    Theander, Kersti
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Development and validation of a new tool measuring nurses self-reported professional competence-The nurse professional competence (NPC) Scale2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formal competence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHO guidelines. Design: A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometric properties. Participants and settings: 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges. Results: The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88 items and covering eight factors: "Nursing care", "Value-based nursing care", "Medical/technical care", "Teaching/learning and support", "Documentation and information technology", "Legislation in nursing and safety planning", "Leadership in and development of nursing care" and "Education and supervision of staff/students". All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted in two main themes: "Patient-related nursing" and "Nursing care organisation and development". In addition, evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained. Conclusions: The NPC Scale, which is based on national and international professional competence requirements for nurses, was comprehensively tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. It can e.g. be used to evaluate the outcomes of nursing education programmes, to assess nurses' professional competences in relation to the needs in healthcare organisations, and to tailor introduction programmes for newly employed nurses.

  • 21.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ädel, Eva
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    A peer learning intervention for nursing students in clinical practice education: A quasi-experimental study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 51, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of peer learning indicate that the model enables students to practice skills useful in their future profession, such as communication, cooperation, reflection and independence. However, so far most studies have used a qualitative approach and none have used a quasi-experimental design to study effects of nursing students' peer learning in clinical practice.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of peer learning in clinical practice education on nursing students' self-rated performance.

    DESIGN: Quasi-experimental.

    SETTING: The study was conducted during nursing students' clinical practice.

    PARTICIPANTS: All undergraduate nursing students (n=87) attending their first clinical practice were approached. Seventy students out of 87 answered the questionnaires at both baseline and follow-up (42 of 46 in the intervention group and 28 of 39 in the comparison group).

    METHODS: During the first two weeks of the clinical practice period, all students were supervised traditionally. Thereafter, the intervention group received peer learning the last two weeks, and the comparison group received traditional supervision. Questionnaire data were collected on nursing students' self-rated performance during the second (baseline) and last (follow-up) week of their clinical practice.

    RESULTS: Self-efficacy was improved in the intervention group and a significant interaction effect was found for changes over time between the two groups. For the other self-rated variables/tests, there were no differences in changes over time between the groups. Studying each group separately, the intervention group significantly improved on thirteen of the twenty variables/tests over time and the comparison group improved on four.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that peer learning is a useful method which improves nursing students' self-efficacy to a greater degree than traditional supervision does. Regarding the other self-rated performance variables, no interaction effects were found.

  • 22.
    Silén, Marit
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Johansson, Linda
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Inst Gerontol, Dept Nursing, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Aims and theoretical frameworks in nursing students' Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing students' independent projects in Sweden not only provide an opportunity to receive a professional qualification as a nurse but also gain a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The aim of these projects is to demonstrate knowledge and understanding within the major field of the education. Objectives: This study aimed to describe and analyze the topics as well as theoretical frameworks and concepts in nursing students' independent projects, which lead to a Bachelor's degree, in a Swedish context. Design: A total of 491 independent projects, written by nursing students in Sweden, were included in the study. Methods: Topics together with theoretical frameworks and concepts in the projects were identified. Similar topics and theoretical frameworks and concepts, respectively, were grouped into subcategories, and similar subcategories were then merged into a main category. The number of entries in each category was counted for descriptive statistics in order to allow for the demonstration of magnitude. Results: The most common topics concerned experiences and managing when having an illness, experiences of care and of being a caregiver, and healthcare staff's care and knowledge. The nursing theories/models that were most often used were Eriksson's Theory of Caritative Caring, Travelbee's Human-to-Human Relationship Model, and Orem's Self-care Theory. Among the non-nursing theories/models, perspectives and concepts life world, ethical values and principles, existential concepts and quality of life/health-related quality of life, were most often used by these students. Conclusion: There may be some difficulty in finding a topic for the project that is relevant for both a professional qualification as a nurse, as well as for achieving the requirements of a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The study indicates that there is a need to widen the student's understanding of different nursing theories/perspectives/models/concepts during nursing education so that students are familiar with a broad range of these when conducting their independent project.

  • 23. Skoglund, Karin
    et al.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Sundler, Annelie J
    Hammar, Lena Marmstål
    Previous work experience and age do not affect final semester nursing student self-efficacy in communication skills.2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 68, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With the continuing increase in the older population, being able to communicate with the elderly is one of the many important skills in caring for older people. Therefore, student nurses need support during education to be prepared with the necessary communication skills to meet these demands.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the development of communication skills during nursing education.

    DESIGN: A quantitative descriptive and comparative study.

    SETTINGS: The nursing programme at a university in an urban area of Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Student nurses in the first and third year in a nursing programme in Sweden in 2015.

    METHODS: Data were collected with a self-efficacy questionnaire and analysed with descriptive and comparative statistics.

    RESULTS: The student nurses in the final semester had a higher self-rated ability to communicate with older people than students in the second semester of the education year. There was also a difference in self efficacy between students with or without former experience of health care work or work in care with older persons in the second semester. However, these differences were not seen in the final semester. The age of the students did not affect the self-efficacy rate in either semester.

    CONCLUSIONS: Student nurses in the present study scored themselves relatively highly, while student nurses in previous studies expressed a need for more communication skills training. Further studies with observations of student nurses' actual communicative skills in clinical and simulations settings are needed, to pinpoint weak spots and targets for such an education.

  • 24.
    Staun, Margaretha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bergström, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Evaluation of a PBL strategy in clinical supervision of nursing students: Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 631-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed at investigating staff members' and nursing students' perception of and satisfaction with an intervention involving patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms during clinical supervision.

    Background: It is well known that clinical education is important and that the clinical learning environment influences the development of nursing students' ability to solve clinical problems. In the present study, an intervention using a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy was introduced and evaluated in clinical education. The PBL strategy is called 'Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms'.

    Design and methods: Descriptive; both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used.

    Result: Most participants found the PBL strategy to be highly satisfactory, both for staff and for students. The students seemed to feel that their time in clinical education had been used efficiently.

    Conclusion: Integration of theory and practice during clinical training has been emphasized as a necessary component, and the new strategy, which involves a method of promoting students' reflection, represents one way of facilitating such integration, in that it may bridge the gap between theory and practice. More extensive and more specific research is need in the future.

  • 25.
    Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Dept Nursing & Mental Hlth, Fac Publ Hlth, Hedmark, Norway..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res Immunotherapy,Di, Stockholm, Sweden.;Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res Immunotherapy,Di, Stockholm, Sweden.;Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordstrom, Gun
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Dept Nursing & Mental Hlth, Fac Publ Hlth, Hedmark, Norway..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. Objectives: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. Setting: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. Participants: In total, 119 (2011 n = 69, 2014 n = 50) nursing students responded. Methods: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students- both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing.

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