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  • 1.
    Muntlin Athlin, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. School of Nursing, University of Adelaide.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    To Receive or Not to Receive Analgesics in the Emergency Department: The Importance of the Pain Intensity Assessment and Initial Nursing Assessment2015In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 743-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients seeking emergency care for abdominal pain still experience poor pain management. Pain intensity is not always seen as a mandatory parameter in the initial nurse assessment. Despite the development of nurse-initiated analgesic protocols, many patients do not receive analgesics in the emergency department. The aim of this study was to describe initial nursing assessment related to pain management and to identify predictors for receiving or not receiving analgesics in the emergency department. The sample consists of 100 patients from an intervention group in a previously undertaken Swedish intervention study. The main findings were that the registered nurses assessed 62 patients as being in need of analgesics, and that 52 of these obtained analgesics. The majority of the patients assessed as not being in need of analgesics did not receive analgesics because they did not want medication. Median value for pain intensity at initial assessment was 6 on the numerical rating scale. The results for the logistic regression (n = 80) showed significant differences between receiving analgesics/not receiving analgesics and the predictor pain intensity (measured at initial nurse assessment). Nurses in emergency departments play a crucial role, in that their initial assessment is of specific importance for the patient's further care and whether the patient may or may not receive analgesics. However, more attention has to be paid to patients' experiences and their expectations regarding the pain management in the emergency department. These complex questions have to be studied further in a more systematic way.

  • 2.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. University Hospital, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gradin, Maria
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pain Assessment and Management in Swedish Neonatal Intensive Care Units2020In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 354-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To investigate registered nurses' (RNs') and physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding assessing and managing pain in infants at seven level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Sweden.

    DESIGN: Descriptive and explorative study using an online questionnaire.

    METHODS: A researcher-developed online questionnaire with 34 items about knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding pain assessment and management was emailed to 306 RNs and 79 physicians working at seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Most NICUs had pain assessment guidelines, but there was a discrepancy regarding interprofessional discussions of pain assessments. A total of seven different pain assessment instruments were reported from the included NICUs and RNs were reportedly those who usually performed the pain assessments. Most respondents expressed a positive attitude toward pain assessment but recognized a lack of intervention after the assessment. Forty-six percent (n = 11) of the physicians said they had sufficient knowledge of assessing pain using pain assessment instruments, versus 75% (n = 110) of the RNs. Difficulties assessing pain in certain populations of infants, such as the most premature infants and infants receiving sedative medicines, were recognized.

    CONCLUSIONS: RNs in this study reported that their pain assessments did not lead to appropriate pain management interventions. They were thus discouraged from further pain assessments or advocating for ethical pain management. An interprofessional team effort is needed to effectively assess and manage pain in neonates.

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