uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Alipour, Akbar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ghaffari, Mostafa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Shariati, Batoul
    Jensen, Irene
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Occupational neck and shoulder pain among automobile manufacturing workers in Iran2008In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 51, no 5, 372-379 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the upper extremities are a major problem globally, though most relevant studies have been reported from high income countries. Aims and Methods The prevalence of neck and shoulder pain and its association with work-related physical and psychosocial factors and life style was determined by a cross-sectional survey using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) in the largest Iranian car manufacturing company, with more than 18,000 employees. Results A total of 14,384 (79.8%) of all employees completed the questionnaire. Depending on the questions used to measure neck and shoulder symptoms, the prevalence varied widely (from 20.5% to 3.9%). In the multiple logistic regression model, limited to employees with at least I year of work experience, risk indicators for disabling pain of the neck and/or shoulder that remained for male were: duration of employment, high visual demands, repetitive work, sitting position at work, awkward working position, no regular exercise, monotonous work, lack of encouraging organizational culture, and anxiety concerning change. For female repetitive work, sitting position at work and no support if there is trouble at work were the only remaining factors. Conclusions The study confirms the effects of physical and psychosocial factors on neck and shoulder symptoms among automobile manufacturing workers in a low to middle income country in spite of the relative youth and job insecurity of the population.

  • 2.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Aranyos, Deanna
    Ager, Joel
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Development and Application of a Population-Based System for Workplace Violence Surveillance in Hospitals2011In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 54, no 12, 925-934 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A unique and comprehensive reporting and population-based violence surveillance system in a multi-site hospital system is presented. Methods Incidence rates and rate ratios (RR) were calculated by year, hospital, violence type, and job category in six hospitals, 2003-2008. Results Incidence rates per hospital for the 6-year period ranged from a low of 1.52 to a high of 10.89 incidents/100 full-time equivalents (FTEs), with the highest risk at a hospital with an outpatient mental health facility (RR = 7.16, 95% CI = 5.17-10.26). Rates for worker-on-worker violence exceeded rates for patient-to-worker violence from 2004 to 2008. Mental health technicians (RR = 13.82, 95% CI = 11.13-17.29) and security personnel (RR = 2.25, CI = 1.68-3.00) were at greatest risk for violence. Conclusions This surveillance system provides ongoing information on professional groups and hospital departments at risk and trends in violence reporting over time. It can be used to determine where appropriate violence prevention efforts are most needed, and to evaluate violence interventions.

  • 3.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Ager, Joel
    Aranyos, Deanna
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Luborsky, Mark
    Russell, Jim
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Application and Implementation of the Hazard Risk Matrix to Identify Hospital Workplaces at Risk for Violence2014In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 57, no 11, 1276-1284 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundA key barrier to preventing workplace violence injury is the lack of methodology for prioritizing the allocation of limited prevention resources. The hazard risk matrix was used to categorize the probability and severity of violence in hospitals to enable prioritization of units for safety intervention. MethodsProbability of violence was based on violence incidence rates; severity was based on lost time management claims for violence-related injuries. Cells of the hazard risk matrix were populated with hospital units categorized as low, medium, or high probability and severity. Hospital stakeholders reviewed the matrix after categorization to address the possible confounding of underreporting. ResultsForty-one hospital units were categorized as medium or high on both severity and probability and were prioritized for forthcoming interventions. Probability and severity were highest in psychiatric care units. ConclusionsThis risk analysis tool may be useful for hospital administrators in prioritizing units for violence injury prevention efforts.  

  • 4. Mirabelli, Maria C.
    et al.
    Olivieri, Mario
    Kromhout, Hans
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Radon, Katja
    Torén, Kjell
    van Sprundel, Marc
    Villani, Simona
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Inhalation incidents and respiratory health: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey2009In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 52, no 1, 17-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inhalation incidents are an important cause of acute respiratory symptoms, but little is known about how these incidents affect chronic respiratory health. METHODS: We assessed reported inhalation incidents among 3,763 European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) participants with and without cough, phlegm, asthma, wheezing or bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We then examined whether inhalation incidents during the 9-year ECRHS follow-up period were associated with a new onset of any of these respiratory outcomes among 2,809 participants who were free of all five outcomes at the time of the baseline ECRHS survey. RESULTS: Inhalation incidents were reported by 5% of participants, with higher percentages reported among individuals with asthma-related outcomes at the time of the baseline survey. Among participants without symptoms at baseline, our analyses generated non-statistically significant elevated estimates of the risk of cough, phlegm, asthma and wheezing and a non-statistically significant inverse estimate of the risk of bronchial hyperresponsiveness among participants who reported an inhalation incident compared to those without such an event reported. DISCUSSION: Our findings provide limited evidence of an association between inhalation incidents and asthma-related symptoms. These data could be affected by differences in the reporting of inhalation incidents according to symptom status at the time of the baseline survey; they should thus be interpreted with caution.

  • 5.
    Runeson, Roma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindgren, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Wahlstedt, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sleep Problems and Psychosocial Work Environment Among Swedish Commercial Pilots2011In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 54, no 7, 545-551 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to assess relationships between sleeping problems and the psychosocial work situation based on the job-strain and iso-strain models among Swedish commercial pilots. Methods Three hundred fifty-four pilots participated (61%), who are in 2008 responded to a questionnaire concerning sleep problems, the psychosocial work situation, personal factors, and flight length. Results Low social support was associated with sleep problems for pilots. High demands were associated with sleep problems among captains and long-haul flights were associated with sleep problems among first officers. Low skill discretion was associated with less sleep problems among first officers. Conclusions Psychosocial climate at work such as low social support affects negatively sleep for both captains and for first officers. More research on what creates a best social support for pilots and cabin crew is needed. Adjusting scheduling work crew teams could increase social support at work and contribute to a better sleep quality.

  • 6.
    Thelin, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Hip osteoarthritis in a rural male population: a prospective population-based register study2007In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 8, 604-607 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: A cohort of rural men with urban referents was followed over 13 years to study the risk of developing osteoarthritis of the hip joint. METHODS: A group of 1,220 farmers, 1,130 matched rural non-farming men, and 1,087 urban men were identified in 1989 and followed over time. Information on hospital care and surgery was obtained from the national Swedish register of hospital care and surgery. RESULTS: More farmers than referents had been hospitalized for osteoarthritis and had undergone surgery for osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Hazard ratio for osteoarthritis of the hip joint was 3.0 (95% CI: 1.7-5.3) for farmers versus urban controls. Non-farming rural men had no increased risk as compared with urban referents. CONCLUSION: Farmers but not non-farming rural men had a significantly increased risk of developing osteoarthritis of the hip joint as compared with urban referents.

  • 7.
    Wahlstedt, Kurt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindgren, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Wieslander, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Runeson, Roma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Psychosocial work environment and medical symptoms among Swedish commercial airline cabin crew2010In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 53, no 7, 716-723 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Associations between stress measured by the demands-control model, iso-strain model, and stress-related symptoms among cabin crew were studied. METHODS: A questionnaire about psychosocial work environment and symptoms was answered by 918 (82%) flight attendants, stewards, and pursers at one airline company in 2005. Adjustment was made for age, gender, smoking, job category, and flight length using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Weekly headaches, concentration difficulties, fatigue, and gastrointestinal symptoms were reported at rates of 18%, 10%, 56%, and 13%, respectively. Pursers scored higher on control than the others and they had lower associations between the strain measured by the demands-control model and symptoms than stewards and flight attendants. All symptoms were more common in the high strain situation than in the low strain (reference). An active situation was related to an excess of symptoms. Low social support in the iso-strain model increased risk of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Demands-control and iso-strain models are useful in studying stress-related symptoms in cabin crews. The dimension of social support adds explanatory value.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf