Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Comasco, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sylvén, Sara M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Papadopoulos, Fotios C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Postpartum depressive symptoms and the BDNF Val66Met functional polymorphism: effect of season of delivery:  2011In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 453-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is an often underdiagnosed and undertreated mood disorder, with negative impact on the mother's and infant's health. Seasonal variation has been discussed as a risk factor for PPD. Candidate genes, such as those encoding for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin transporter (5-HTT), and Period2 (PER2), have been associated with depression and seasonal disorders. The present study is aimed to examine whether functional polymorphic variants, BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR, or PER2 SNP 10870, are associated with PPD symptoms and whether these genetic polymorphisms interact with season in predicting PPD symptoms. This case-control study comprised of 275 women from a population-based cohort of delivering women in Sweden, who completed a questionnaire containing the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Stressful life events (SLEs) and maternity stressors were also assessed. The results did not reveal any statistically significant overall association between the studied genetic polymorphisms and PPD symptoms. However, a significant association between BDNF Met66 carrier status and development of PPD symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum, even when controlling for prepartum and postpartum environmental risk factors, was evident among mothers delivering during autumn/winter. No gene-gene interactions were found but a cumulative effect was detected with carriers of a greater number of 5-HTTLPR S and BDNFVal66Met Met alleles reporting higher EPDS scores, if delivered during autumn/winter. Our findings propose a role of the BDNF gene in the development of PPD symptoms, potentially mediated by season of delivery.

  • 2.
    Dabo Pettersson, Fatimah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Anxiety, Depressed Mood and the Use of Labor Analgesia2016In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little is known about mental health and labor pain. The aim of this study was to assess if self-rated antenatal depressed mood and anxiety are associated with pain-related behaviors and self-reported labor pain. We also wanted to replicate our previous finding of altered labor pain behavior in carriers of a specific guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 gene (GCH1) haplotype. Ninety-nine women in gestational weeks 37 to 40 filled out questionnaires on depression and anxiety symptoms and later rated their labor pain by use of visual analog scales. Each subject was also genotyped for GCH1. Following adjustment for relevant confounders, women who arrived early to the delivery unit (cervical dilation < 5 cm) had a significantly higher antenatal Montgomery-sberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S) score, p < 0.05, than late arrivers (cervical dilation > 5 cm). Women with increased Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) scores reported higher self-rated pain prior to labor analgesia, p < 0.05, than women with low STAI-T scores. No association between the GCH1 pain-protective haplotype and cervical dilation was found, but a previously demonstrated association with increased use of second-line analgesia was confirmed. Depressed mood during pregnancy is associated with early arrival to the delivery department, whereas antenatal anxiety is associated with increased self-rated pain prior to labor analgesia.

  • 3.
    Gingnell, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Neuroticism-related personality traits are related to symptom severity in patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder and to the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphism 5-HTTPLPR2010In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 417-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroticism has been linked to a functional polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), with short-allele carriers being overrepresented among high-scorers on neuroticism. Studies evaluating neuroticism-related personality traits in relation to the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism among patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and are lacking. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between PMDD and neuroticism-related personality traits, and secondly, to relate the personality trait scores of PMDD patients to experienced symptom severity and to the 5-HTTLPR short allele. Thirty PMDD patients and 55 asymptomatic healthy controls were included in the study. The Swedish Universities Scale of Personality was used to evaluate personality traits. Genotype analyses were available in 27 PMDD patients and 18 healthy controls. Women with PMDD displayed higher levels of neuroticism-related personality traits (psychic trait anxiety, somatic trait anxiety, embitterment, stress susceptibility and mistrust) than healthy controls, and these effects were most prominent in women with more severe luteal phase symptoms. Furthermore, PMDD patients with at least one copy of the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism scored higher on psychic trait anxiety and lack of assertiveness than PMDD patients who were homozygous for the long allele. PMDD patients who suffer from more severe luteal phase symptoms also display increased scores of neuroticism-related personality traits in comparison with healthy controls. Within the group of PMDD patients, differences in certain personality trait scores are associated with the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism.

  • 4.
    Gokturk, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schultze, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Kent W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hallman, Jarmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine oxidase (MAOA) promoter polymorphisms in women with severe alcoholism2008In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 11, no 5-6, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The serotonin system is known to play a pivotal role for mood, behaviour and psychic illness as e.g. alcoholism. Alcoholism in both males and females has been associated with polymorphisms in genes encoding for proteins of importance for central serotonergic function. Genotyping of two functional polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A, respectively, (5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR), was performed in a group of women with severe alcohol addiction. A large sample of adolescent females from a normal population was used as controls. A significantly higher frequency of the LL 5-HTT genotype (high activity) was found in female addicts without a known co-morbid psychiatric disorder than in the controls. Genotype of the MAOA-VNTR polymorphism did not differ significantly between addicts and controls. However, within the group of alcoholics, when the patients with known co-morbid psychiatric disorders were excluded, aggressive anti-social behaviour was significantly linked to the presence of the high activity MAOA allele. The pattern of associations between genotypes of 5-HTT-LPR and MAOA-VNTR in women with severe alcoholism differs from most corresponding studies on males.

  • 5.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Bannbers, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Risbrough, Victoria
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Decreased startle modulation during anticipation in the postpartum period in comparison to late pregnancy2012In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about healthy women's psychophysiological adaptations during the large neuroendocrine changes of pregnancy and childbirth is essential in order to understand why these events have the potential to disrupt mental health in vulnerable individuals. This study aimed to compare startle response modulation, an objective psychophysiological measure demonstrated to be influenced by anxiety and depression, longitudinally across late pregnancy and the postpartum period. The acoustic startle response modulation was assessed during anticipation of affective images and during image viewing in 31 healthy women during gestational weeks 36-39 and again at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. No startle modulation by affective images was observed at either time point. Significant modulation during anticipation stimuli was found at pregnancy assessment but was reduced in the postpartum period. The women rated the unpleasant images more negative and more arousing and the pleasant images more positive at the postpartum assessment. Self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms did not change between assessments. The observed postpartum decrease in modulation of startle by anticipation suggests a relatively deactivated defense system in the postpartum period.

  • 6.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy and after birth in women living in Sweden who received treatments for fear of birth2022In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 473-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and associated factors in women who underwent treatments for fear of birth; internet-based cognitive therapy, counseling with midwives, continuity with a known midwife or standard care. A secondary analysis was performed using data collected from four samples of women identified with fear of birth and receiving treatment with different methods. A questionnaire was used to collect data in mid-pregnancy and at follow-up 2 months after birth. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depressive Scale. In mid-pregnancy, 32% of the 422 women with fear of birth also reported a co-morbidity with depressive symptoms. At postpartum follow-up, 19% reported depressive symptoms 2 months after birth, and 12% showed continued or recurrent depressive symptoms identified both during pregnancy and postpartum. A history of mental health problems was the strongest risk factor for presenting with depressive symptoms. None of the treatment options in this study was superior in reducing depressive symptoms. This study showed a significant co-morbidity and overlap between fear of birth and depressive symptoms. Screening for depressive symptoms and fear of birth during pregnancy is important to identify women at risk and offer specific treatment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 7. Hughes, Claire
    et al.
    Foley, Sarah
    Devine, Rory T
    Ribner, Andrew
    Kyriakou, Lara
    Boddington, Lucy
    Holmes, Emily A.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Worrying in the wings? Negative emotional birth memories in mothers and fathers show similar associations with perinatal mood disturbance and delivery mode.2019In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative birth experiences can lead to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in new mothers but have received much less attention in new fathers. A sample of 314 first-time expectant couples rated their symptoms of anxiety and depression in the third trimester and at 4-month post birth (227 vaginal delivery, 87 caesarean section), when they also completed the emotional memories subscale of the BirthMARQ (Foley et al. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 14, 211, 2014). We first examined mode of delivery (vaginal birth versus caesarean section) as a predictor of mothers' and fathers' BirthMARQ scores. Next, we used actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to investigate intra- and interpersonal associations between birth experiences and maternal/paternal latent factors for antenatal and postnatal depression/anxiety. Reports of negative birth experiences were more common for mothers than fathers and for parents of babies born by caesarean section than by vaginal delivery. Within-couple agreement was moderately strong and, for both parents at both time-points, individual differences in negative birth memories were associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety. Negative birth memories also played a mediating role in the association between birth via caesarean section and reduced postnatal maternal wellbeing. Given the striking similarities between mothers and fathers in links between birth experiences and wellbeing, our findings highlight the need for partner-inclusive intervention strategies.

  • 8.
    Iliadis, Stavros I
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Koulouris, Petros
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Papadopoulos, Fotis C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Personality and risk for postpartum depressive symptoms2015In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common childbirth complication, affecting 10-15 % of newly delivered mothers. This study aims to assess the association between personality factors and PPD. All pregnant women during the period September 2009 to September 2010, undergoing a routine ultrasound at Uppsala University Hospital, were invited to participate in the BASIC study, a prospective study designed to investigate maternal well-being. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) while the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) was used as a diagnostic tool for major depression. Personality traits were evaluated using the Swedish Universities Scale of Personality (SSP). One thousand thirty-seven non-depressed pregnant women were included in the study. Non-depressed women reporting high levels of neuroticism in late pregnancy were at high risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDSs) at 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery, even after adjustment for confounders (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-6.5 and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.9, 95 % CI 1.9-7.9). The same was true for a DSRS-based diagnosis of major depression at 6 months postpartum. Somatic trait anxiety and psychic trait anxiety were associated with increased risk for PPDS at 6 weeks (aOR = 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.5 and aOR = 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.1), while high scores of mistrust were associated with a twofold increased risk for PPDS at 6 months postpartum (aOR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.4). Non-depressed pregnant women with high neuroticism scores have an almost fourfold increased risk to develop depressive symptoms postpartum, and the association remains robust even after controlling for most known confounders. Clinically, this could be of importance for health care professionals working with pregnant and newly delivered women.

  • 9.
    Ismail, Khaled M K
    et al.
    School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK.
    Nevatte, Tracy
    Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Guy-Hilton Research Centre, Keele University, UK.
    O'Brien, Shaughn
    Paschetta, Elena
    Bäckström, Torbjorn
    Dennerstein, Lorraine
    Eriksson, Elias
    Freeman, Ellen W
    Panay, Nick
    Pearlstein, Teri
    Rapkin, Andrea
    Steiner, Meir
    Studd, John
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Clinical subtypes of core premenstrual disorders: a Delphi survey2013In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 197-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to classify the clinical subtypes of core premenstrual disorders during the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders' second consensus meeting. Multiple iterations were used to achieve consensus between a group of experts; these iterations included a two-generational Delphi technique that was preceded and followed by open group discussions. The first round was to generate a list of all potential clinical subtypes, which were subsequently prioritized using a Delphi methodology and then finalised in a final round of open discussion. On a six-point scale, 4 of the 12 potential clinical subtypes had a mean score of ≥5.0 following the second iteration and only 3 of the 4 still had a mean score of ≥5.0 after the third iteration. The final list consisted of these three subtypes and an additional subtype, which was introduced and agreed upon, in the final iteration. There is consensus amongst experts that core premenstrual disorder is divided into three symptom-based subtypes: predominantly physical, predominantly psychological and mixed. A proportion of psychological and mixed subtypes may meet the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  • 10.
    Ismaili, Elgerta
    et al.
    Univ Hosp North Staffordshire NHS Trust, City Gen Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Newcastle Rd, Stoke On Trent ST4 6QG, Staffs, England.;Univ Hosp North Midlands, Stoke On Trent, Staffs, England..
    Walsh, Sally
    Univ Hosp North Midlands, Stoke On Trent, Staffs, England..
    O'Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn
    Keele Univ, Sch Med, Univ Hosp North Staffordshire, Stoke On Trent, Staffs, England..
    Backstrom, Torbjorn
    Norrland Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Umea Neurosteroid Res Ctr, Umea, Sweden..
    Brown, Candace
    Univ Tennessee, Dept Psychiat, Memphis, TN USA.;Univ Tennessee, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Memphis, TN 38103 USA..
    Dennerstein, Lorraine
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Psychiat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Natl Ageing Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Eriksson, Elias
    Gothenburg Univ, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Freeman, Ellen W.
    Univ Penn, Dept Psychiat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Univ Penn, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ismail, Khaled M. K.
    Univ Birmingham, Coll Med & Dent Sci, Sch Clin & Expt Med, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Panay, Nicholas
    Chelsea & Westminster Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, London, England..
    Pearlstein, Teri
    Brown Univ, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Warren Alpert Med Sch, Providence, RI 02912 USA..
    Rapkin, Andrea
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Steiner, Meir
    McMaster Univ, Dept Psychiat, 100 West 5th St, Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7, Canada.;McMaster Univ, Dept Behav Neurosci, 100 West 5th St, Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7, Canada.;McMaster Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, 100 West 5th St, Hamilton, ON L8N 3K7, Canada..
    Studd, John
    Chelsea & Westminster Hosp, Dept Gynaecol, London, England..
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Endicott, Jean
    Columbia Univ, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY USA..
    Epperson, C. Neill
    Yale Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT USA.;Yale Univ, Sch Med, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, New Haven, CT USA..
    Halbreich, Uriel
    SUNY Buffalo, New York, NY USA.;WPA, New York, NY USA..
    Reid, Robert
    Queens Univ, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Rubinow, David
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Schmidt, Peter
    NIH, Sect Behav Endocrinol, Bldg 10, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Yonkers, Kimberley
    Yale Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT USA.;Yale Univ, Sch Med, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, New Haven, CT USA..
    Fourth consensus of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD): auditable standards for diagnosis and management of premenstrual disorder2016In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 953-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst professional bodies such as the Royal College and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have well-established standards for audit of management for most gynaecology disorders, such standards for premenstrual disorders (PMDs) have yet to be developed. The International Society of Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) has already published three consensus papers on PMDs covering areas that include definition, classification/quantification, clinical trial design and management (American College Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2011; Brown et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2:CD001396, 2009; Dickerson et al. in Am Fam Physician 67(8):1743-1752, 2003). In this fourth consensus of ISPMD, we aim to create a set of auditable standards for the clinical management of PMDs. All members of the original ISPMD consensus group were invited to submit one or more auditable standards to be eligible in the inclusion of the consensus. Ninety-five percent of members (18/19) responded with at least one auditable standard. A total of 66 auditable standards were received, which were returned to all group members who then ranked the standards in order of priority, before the results were collated. Proposed standards related to the diagnosis of PMDs identified the importance of obtaining an accurate history, that a symptom diary should be kept for 2 months prior to diagnosis and that symptom reporting demonstrates symptoms in the premenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle and relieved by menstruation. Regarding treatment, the most important standards were the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as a first line treatment, an evidence-based approach to treatment and that SSRI side effects are properly explained to patients. A set of comprehensive standards to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of PMD has been established, for which PMD management can be audited against for standardised and improved care.

  • 11.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Tillman, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engström, Gabriella
    5Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Öhrvik, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. karolinska Institutet.
    Sylven, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant2016In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents’ marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers’ and fathers’ EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.

  • 12.
    Lager, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Gidén, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Axfors, Cathrine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sigvardsson, Frida
    Kollia, Natasa
    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Nylander, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fransson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala University, WoMHeR (Centre for Women’s Mental Health during the Reproductive Lifespan).
    Alcohol consumption habits and associations with anxiety or depressive symptoms postpartum in women with high socioeconomic status in Sweden.2022In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postpar tum depression and anxiety are common among new mothers. It is well-established that in the general population alcohol use is associated with depression and anxiety. Linking alcohol consumption to symptoms of postpartum depression (PPDS) or postpartum anxiety (PPAS) is presently less established. This study aims to determine if alcohol consumption pre-pregnancy, 6 weeks postpartum, 6 months postpartum, or changes in alcohol consumption are associated with PPDS or PPAS. Longitudinal data on 3849 women from a Swedish perinatal cohort were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for associations between alcohol consumption and symptoms of anxiety or depression, as assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. There was no association between pre-pregnancy drinking habits and PPDS (p = 0.588, n = 2479) or PPAS (p = 0.942; n = 2449) at 6 weeks postpartum. Similarly, no associations were observed between concurrent drinking habits at 6 weeks postpartum and PPAS (p = 0.070, n = 3626), 6 months postpartum and PPDS (0.647, n = 3461) or PPAS (p = 0.700, n = 3431). However, there was an association between drinking habits at 6 weeks postpartum and concurrent PPDS (p = 0.047, n = 3659). In conclusion, robust associations were not found between postpartum alcohol consumption and mood symptoms. This lack of association between poor mental health and risk behaviors in new mothers could be interpreted as a result of long-term policy work and high participation in Swedish maternity care. Future studies need to address these research questions in more diverse socio-cultural contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Lagerberg, Dagmar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Magnusson, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Infant gender and postpartum sadness in the light of region of birth and some other factors: a contribution to the knowledge of postpartum depression2012In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse postpartum depressive symptoms as related to baby gender, maternal region of birth, stress, perception of child difficult temperament and some demographic factors. The setting was 36 Swedish child health centres. Mothers of 1,848 19-month-old children completed a questionnaire, including an item about recall of postpartum sadness. A subsample of 360 answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Overall, significantly more mothers of boys than of girls recalled postpartum sadness. The same was found in mothers born in Sweden and in other regions, except for the Middle East (no significant result). Among those born in Sweden and in other regions, more mothers of boys than of girls scored ≥12 on the EPDS, except for Middle East mothers with the opposite pattern (no significant finding). More mothers of “difficult”boys than of“difficult” girls recalled postpartum sadness. Our findings are tentative but may inspire future research. Immigrant mothers in Sweden seem rather like the majority population, possibly with the exception of Middle East mothers. The significance of parents’ knowledge of their child’s gender in advance is an important area for research. Future parents could benefit from discussing gender expectations with a nurse or other professional.

  • 14.
    Murphy, Susannah E.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.
    Braithwaite, Elizabeth C.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.
    Hubbard, Isabelle
    Univ Bath, Dept Psychol, North East Somerset, England.
    Williams, Kate V.
    Univ Bath, Dept Psychol, North East Somerset, England.
    Tindall, Elizabeth
    Univ Bath, Dept Psychol, North East Somerset, England.
    Holmes, Emily A.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Ramchandani, Paul G.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Acad Unit Child & Adolescent Psychiat, London, England.
    Salivary cortisol response to infant distress in pregnant women with depressive symptoms2015In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 247-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as a potential underlying biological mechanism linking prenatal depression with adverse offspring outcomes. However, it is unknown whether the reactivity of this system to stress is altered in pregnant women experiencing depression. The objective of this study was to investigate whether salivary cortisol response to a distressed infant film is enhanced in pregnant women with symptoms of depression compared with non-depressed controls. Salivary cortisol and subjective mood responses to the film were measured in 53 primiparous women, between 11 and 18 weeks gestation. Both groups showed similar increases in state anxiety in response to the film, but there was a significantly increased cortisol response in women experiencing symptoms of depression. Depression during pregnancy is associated with increased reactivity of the HPA axis. This is consistent with altered HPA axis functioning being a key mechanism by which prenatal mood disturbance can impact upon fetal development.

  • 15.
    Nevatte, Tracy
    et al.
    Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke on Trent, UK.
    O'Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn
    Academic Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital North Staffordshire, Keele University School of Medicine, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire, UK.
    Backstrom, Torbjorn
    Umea Neurosteroid Research Center, Department of Clinical Sciences, Norrland University Hospital, Umea, Sweden.
    Brown, Candace
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Tennessee Health Science Centre, Memphis, USA.
    Dennerstein, Lorraine
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne and National Ageing Research Institute, Australia.
    Endicott, Jean
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, USA.
    Epperson, C. Neill
    Department of Obstetrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Göteberg University, Sweden.
    Freeman, Ellen W.
    Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
    Halbreich, Uriel
    State University of New York at Buffalo and WPA, New York, USA.
    Ismail, Khalid
    School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Birmingham Women’s Foundation Trust, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK.
    Panay, Nicholas
    Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea and Westminster Hospitals, Imperial College London, UK.
    Pearlstein, Teri
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
    Rapkin, Andrea
    Department of Obstetrics and Genecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles,USA.
    Reid, Robert
    Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Rubinow, David
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Schmidt, Peter
    Section on Behavioral Endocrinology, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Steiner, Meir
    Department of Psychiatry, Behavioural Neurosciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Joseph’s Healthcare, McMaster University, Canada.
    Studd, John
    Department of Gynaecology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Yonkers, Kimberly
    Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT, USA.
    ISPMD consensus on the management of premenstrual disorders2013In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The second consensus meeting of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) took place in London during March 2011. The primary goal was to evaluate the published evidence and consider the expert opinions of the ISPMD members to reach a consensus on advice for the management of premenstrual disorders. Gynaecologists, psychiatrists, psychologists and pharmacologists each formally presented the evidence within their area of expertise; this was followed by an in-depth discussion leading to consensus recommendations. This article provides a comprehensive review of the outcomes from the meeting. The group discussed and agreed that careful diagnosis based on the recommendations and classification derived from the first ISPMD consensus conference is essential and should underlie the appropriate management strategy. Options for the management of premenstrual disorders fall under two broad categories, (a) those influencing central nervous activity, particularly the modulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin and (b) those that suppress ovulation. Psychotropic medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, probably acts by dampening the influence of sex steroids on the brain. Oral contraceptives, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol and estradiol all most likely function by ovulation suppression. The role of oophorectomy was also considered in this respect. Alternative therapies are also addressed, with, e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy, calcium supplements and Vitex agnus castus warranting further exploration.

  • 16.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hellström, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Cross, M
    Rural Health Academic Center, The University of Melbourne, Shepparton, VIC, Australia.
    Sydsjö, G
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Anxiety in early pregnancy: prevalence and contributing factors2014In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 221-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antenatal anxiety symptoms are not only a health problem for the expectant mother. Research has found that maternal anxiety may also have an impact on the developing baby. Therefore, it is important to estimate the prevalence of maternal anxiety and associated factors. The current study aims to estimate the prevalence of anxiety symptoms during the first trimester of pregnancy and to identify associated risk factors. Secondly, to investigate other factors associated with anxiety during early pregnancy including fear of childbirth and a preference for cesarean section. In a population-based community sample of 1,175 pregnant women, 916 women (78 %) were investigated in the first trimester (gestation week 8-12). The Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-A) was used to measure anxiety symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A scores ≥8 during pregnancy) was 15.6 % in early pregnancy. Women under 25 years of age were at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy (OR 2.6, CI 1.7-4.0). Women who reported a language other than Swedish as their native language (OR 4.2, CI 2.7-7.0), reported high school as their highest level of education (OR 1.6, CI 1.1-2.3), were unemployed (OR 3.5, CI 2.1-5.8), used nicotine before pregnancy (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.5), and had a self-reported psychiatric history of either depression (OR 3.8, CI 2.6-5.6) or anxiety (OR 5.2, CI 3.5-7.9) before their current pregnancy were all at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms during pregnancy increased the rate of fear of birth (OR 3.0, CI 1.9-4.7) and a preference for cesarean section (OR 1.7, CI 1.0-2.8). Caregivers should pay careful attention to history of mental illness to be able to identify women with symptoms of anxiety during early pregnancy. When presenting with symptoms of anxiety, the women might need counseling and or treatment in order to decrease her anxiety.

  • 17.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    et al.
    Department of Caring and Public Sciences, Mälardalen University, Sweden .
    Wickberg, B
    Department of Psychology, University of Göteborg, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, P
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Rådestad, I
    Department of Caring and Public Sciences, Mälardalen University, Sweden .
    Depressive symptoms in early pregnancy, two months and one year postpartum-prevalence and psychosocial risk factors in a national Swedish sample2005In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Depression and other psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and postpartum is an important health problem, especially if the symptoms are recurrent or sustained.

    Methods:

    All Swedish speaking women attending their first antenatal care visit during three predestined weeks were invited to participate. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in early pregnancy, two months and one year postpartum.

    Results:

    In all, 2430 women completed three questionnaires. A dose-effect relation was found between the numbers of stressful life events experienced in the year prior to pregnancy and mean EPDS score in pregnancy. The prevalence of recurrent or sustained depressive symptoms (EPDS≥12 on all three evaluations) was 3% (79/2430). Three factors were associated with depressive symptoms, two or more stressful life events in the year prior to pregnancy, native language other than Swedish and unemployment.

    Conclusions:

    Apart from questions about psychiatric history, a psychosocial history in early pregnancy including stressful life events, native language and employment status could help the health professionals to identify women at risk for recurrent or sustained depression during pregnancy and the year after giving birth.

  • 18.
    Segebladh, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Bannbers, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Moby, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nyberg, Sigrid
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bixo, Marie
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Allopregnanolone serum concentrations and diurnal cortisol secretion in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder2013In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most prior studies in patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) indicate a blunted hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis function. However, the relationship between neuroactive progesterone metabolites, such as allopregnanolone, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in PMDD patients is relatively sparsely studied. The primary aims of this study were to assess diurnal variation in circulating cortisol and low-dose dexamethasone suppression in PMDD patients and healthy controls, and the relationship between these two HPA axis indices and allopregnanolone serum concentrations. Twenty-six women with prospectively defined PMDD and 30 healthy controls were recruited. Participants underwent diurnal sampling for cortisol serum concentrations and a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test. In addition, morning allopregnanolone serum concentrations were determined. There was no difference in diurnal secretion of cortisol and degree of dexamethasone suppression of cortisol between PMDD patients and healthy controls. However, PMDD patients with high allopregnanolone levels displayed blunted nocturnal cortisol levels in comparison with healthy controls who had low allopregnanolone serum concentrations. In women with PMDD, diurnal secretion of cortisol may be influenced by allopregnanolone levels of the luteal phase. This finding may be attributed to timing of blood sampling in the late luteal phase as well as the individual level of allopregnanolone but could potentially explain the discrepancies in results between studies examining HPA axis function in women with PMDD.

  • 19.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Papadopoulos, Fotios C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Mpazakidis, Vassilios
    Helena Venizelos, Maternity Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Newborn gender as a predictor of postpartum mood disturbances in a sample of Swedish women2011In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a condition that affects about 10% of newly delivered women. The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between offspring gender and risk for development of PPD in Sweden. The study was undertaken as part of the UPPSAT project, a population-based longitudinal study in Uppsala, Sweden. From May 2006 to June 2007, women who gave birth at Uppsala University Hospital and fulfilled the inclusion criteria were asked to participate. The participating women filled out, at three points during the first 6 months after delivery, questionnaires containing the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as well as questions concerning various lifestyle factors, medical history, breast feeding habits, social support parameters, and diet factors. No significant difference in risk of PPD in relation to baby gender could be shown 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery. However, women who gave birth to a male offspring had a significantly higher risk of self-reported depressive symptomatology 5 days after delivery. The association remained statistically significant after adjustment for possible confounders in a logistic regression model. This longitudinal study demonstrates that, in Sweden, the gender of the offspring is not associated with a higher risk for self-reported postpartum depression in the mother 6 weeks or 6 months after delivery. The birth of a baby boy, however, gives the mother a higher risk of postpartum blues 5 days after delivery.

  • 20.
    Wallin Lundell, Inger
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Georgsson Öhman, Susanne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Helström, Lotti
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet .
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Neuroticism-related personality traits are associated with post-abortion posttraumatic stress2014In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Wikman, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Kramer, Michael S
    Yong, Eu-Leong
    Skoglund, Charlotte
    Epperson, Neill
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Factors associated with re-initiation of antidepressant treatment following discontinuation during pregnancy: a register-based cohort study.2020In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 709-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antidepressant treatment when facing a pregnancy is an important issue for many women and their physicians. We hypothesized that women with a greater burden of pre-pregnancy psychiatric illness would be more likely to re-initiate antidepressants following discontinuation of treatment during pregnancy. A register-based cohort study was carried out including 38,595 women who gave birth between the 1st of January 2007 and the 31st of December 2014, who had filled a prescription for an antidepressant medication in the year prior to conception. Logistic regressions were used to explore associations between maternal characteristics and antidepressant treatment discontinuation or re-initiation during pregnancy. Most women discontinued antidepressant treatment during pregnancy (n = 29,095, 75.4%), of whom nearly 12% (n = 3434, 11.8%) re-initiated treatment during pregnancy. In adjusted analyses, parous women (aOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.12-1.33), with high educational level (aOR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08-1.36); born within the EU (excluding Nordic countries, aOR 1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.92) or a Nordic country (aOR 1.42, 95% CI 1.22-1.65); who more often reported prior hospitalizations due to psychiatric disorders (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.10-2.03, for three or more episodes); and had longer duration of pre-pregnancy antidepressant use (aOR 6.10, 95% CI 5.48-6.77, for >2 years antidepressant use), were more likely to re-initiate antidepressants than were women who remained off treatment. Women with a greater burden of pre-pregnancy psychiatric illness were more likely to re-initiate antidepressants. Thus, pre-pregnancy psychiatric history may be particularly important for weighing the risks and benefits of discontinuing antidepressants during pregnancy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf