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  • 1.
    Agrasada, Grace V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Exclusive breastfeeding of low birth weight infants for the first six months: infant morbidity and maternal and infant anthropometry2011In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0964-7058, E-ISSN 1440-6047, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 62-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: to report anthropometry and morbidity among term low birth weight infants and anthropometry of their first time mothers during the first six months in relation to breastfeeding practice. Methods: we examined data from a randomized controlled trial in Manila, the Philippines. Of the 204 mothers randomized, 68 mothers received eight postpartum breastfeeding counseling sessions, the rest did not. Maternal and infant anthropometric data at birth, 2, 4 and 6 months were taken. During seven follow-up hospital visits, an independent interviewer recorded feeding data. Results: the 24 infants exclusively breastfed from birth to six months did not have diarrhea compared to 134 partially breastfed (mean 2.3 days) and 21 non-breastfed infants (mean 2.5 days). Partially breastfed and non-breastfed infants compared to exclusively breastfed infants had more frequent, as well as more severe episodes of respiratory infections. At six months, neither overall gain in infant weight, length and head circumferences nor mean maternal weight and body mass index differed significantly between the feeding groups. Conclusions: exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months can be recommended in term low birth weight infants, who were protected from diarrhea, had fewer respiratory infections, required no hospitalization and had catch up growth. Exclusively breastfeeding mothers did not differ from mothers who breastfed partially or those who did not breastfeed with regard to weight changes at six months.

  • 2.
    Ogle, Britta M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hung, Pham Huang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tuyet, Ho Thi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Significance of wild vegetables in micronutrient intakes of women in Vietnam: an analysis of food variety2001In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0964-7058, E-ISSN 1440-6047, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between food variety and nutrient intake/health status among rural women was tested in two agro-ecological settings in Vietnam. Special emphasis was placed on the significance of wild vegetables 'Rau Dai' in micronutrient supply and on the usefulness of food variety analysis in determining their current role. Data from 7-day food frequency interviews and a nutrition/health survey with 93 and 103 rural women in the Mekong Delta and the Central Highlands, respectively, were used in the analysis. Energy and nutrient intakes in the groups with the highest food variety score (FVS) (high = > or = 21) in the two regions were compared to those with the lowest food variety score (low = < or = 15). The high FVS groups in both regions also had a more diversified diet in terms of food categories. With the exception of low iron and riboflavin intakes in all groups, the high FVS groups had relatively adequate diets. A large variety of vegetables was used and only approximately half of the vegetable species were cultivated. In both regions the high FVS groups used a significantly greater variety of vegetables than the low FVS groups. Wild vegetables contributed significantly to the overall micronutrient intakes, mostly carotene, vitamin C and calcium intakes, but only the contribution to carotene intake was significantly higher in the high FVS group. Overall, we conclude that a food variety analysis is a useful tool in capturing the dietary role of wild vegetables.

  • 3.
    Ogle, Britta M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Madelene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tuyet, Ho Thi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johannesson, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Evaluation of the significance of dietary folate from wild vegetables in Vietnam2001In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0964-7058, E-ISSN 1440-6047, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 216-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on the overall dietary folate intakes among high-risk groups in poor countries is very limited. Vegetables are considered good sources but the evaluation of their contribution is hampered by the lack of data on folate concentrations in many traditional foods. Data on the analysis of folate concentrations in 16 wild vegetables used in the Mekong Delta and the Central Highlands in Vietnam and an evaluation of the relative importance of different foods in folate intakes of women is presented. Vegetable samples were collected in four study villages, blanched and frozen samples were transported to Sweden for analysis. Freeze-dried samples were analysed for total folate quantification using a commercial radio protein binding assay. Daily folate intakes among women were estimated from 7-day food frequency interviews with 213 women. The folate concentration in the vegetable samples ranged from 10 to 96 microg/100 g. The mean estimated daily folate intake among the 213 women in the study areas was 251 microg. Vegetables contributed approximately one-third of the daily folate intake, of which 72% and 42%, respectively, in the two regions was from wild vegetables. A majority of the women (87%) got some dietary folate from wild vegetables and nearly one-third had mean daily folate intakes of > 50 microg from such hidden food sources. The evaluation of dietary folate is complicated by data gaps in food composition tables, the unreliability of existing food data, variations between methods used for folate analysis and limited understanding of the bioavailability of food folate.

  • 4.
    Thelin, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Type 2 diabetes among farmers and rural and urban referents: cumulative incidence over 20 years and risk factors in a prospective cohort study2014In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0964-7058, E-ISSN 1440-6047, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have examined the risk of type 2 diabetes in various occupational groups. Farmers in Sweden have a low risk of coronary heart disease, but less is known about diabetes. Objective: To analyze the cumulative incidence and relative risk of type 2 diabetes among farmers and referents taking lifestyle factors and components of the metabolic syndrome into account. Methods: In a longitudinal observational cohort study we followed 1,220 farmers, 1,130 rural non-farmer referents and 1,219 urban referents over 20 years. Outcomes were generated from national registers and from two surveys 12 years apart. Baseline data were assessed at the first survey conducted in 1990-91. Results: Farmers had a significantly lower risk of all diabetes compared with urban and rural referents (p<0.05). A total of 91 farmers (8.4%) and 102 non-farming rural referents (11.5%) were identified with type 2 diabetes over the 20 year study period (OR=0.70; 95% CI 0.52-0.95). Fractional analyses of lifestyle factors and components of the metabolic syndrome showed that the low risk of type 2 diabetes among farmers was explained in terms of physical activity and meal quality. Farmers had significantly higher physical capacity (p<0.001) and scored higher in a meal quality index than rural referents (p<0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was significantly lower among farmers. The low relative risk was explained by high physical activity and better meal quality, indicating that farmers' lifestyles and their work environment are health-promoting.

1 - 4 of 4
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