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  • 1.
    Brydsten, A
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Gustafsson, P
    Umeå University.
    Hammarström, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    San Sebastian, M
    Umeå University.
    Does contextual unemployment matter for health status across the lifecourse? A longitudinal multilevel study exploring the link between neighbourhoodunemployment and functional somatic symptoms.2017In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 43, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ettarh, Remare
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Galiwango, Edward
    Iganga/Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, Uganda.
    Rutebemberwa, Elizeus
    Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Pariyo, George
    Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Spatial analysis of determinants of choice of treatment provider for fever in under-five children in Iganga, Uganda2011In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 320-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although health facilities and drug shops are the main alternatives to home management of fever in children in Uganda, the influence of distance on the choice of treatment provider by caretakers is still unclear. We examined the spatial distribution of choice of treatment provider for fever in under-five children and the influence of household and geographical factors. Spatial and regression analysis of choices of treatment provider was done using data from a 2-week recall survey conducted in the Iganga-Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Of 3483 households with febrile children, 45% of caretakers treated the child at home, 33% took the child to a health facility, and 22% obtained treatment at drug shops. The distance to access care outside the home was crucial as seen in the greater preference for treatment at home or at drug shops among caretakers living more than 3km from health facilities. The influence of proximity to health facilities in the choice of treatment provider highlights the need for greater access to health care services. The current Uganda Ministry of Health threshold of 5km for access to health facilities needs to be reviewed for rural areas.

  • 3.
    Fransson, Urban
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Leisure home ownership and early death: A longitudinal study in Sweden2010In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People who perform paid work may benefit from psychological restoration afforded by a leisure home and its natural surroundings. This may hinder the development of some forms of life-threatening illness. Using longitudinal register data for 108,114 employed Swedes, we assessed the prospective association between leisure home ownership and death before age 65. Among men, but not among women, leisure home owners had lower odds of early death, after adjustment for sociodemographic and residential characteristics (OR=0.875, 95% CI=0.702-0.980). The results bear on natural environments as health resources, inform debate on urban densification, and broaden the discussion of residence and health.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå Unniversity.
    Bozorgmehr, K
    Umeå universitet.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    San Sebastian, M
    Umeå University.
    What role does adolescent neighborhood play for adult health? Across-classified multilevel analysis of life course models in Northern Sweden2017In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 46, p. 137-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Catalano, Ralph
    Cold summer weather, constrained restoration, and very low birth weight in Sweden2013In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 22, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher latitudes, relatively cold summer weather may constrain outdoor activities that provide relief from chronic stress. Chronic stress can affect human birth outcomes, including the length of gestation and so the birth weight of the infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in Sweden, the odds of very low birth weight (VLBW; < 1500 g) vary inversely with mean monthly temperature for the summer months. We applied time-series modeling methods to nationally aggregated data on singleton births during the 456 months from January, 1973, through December, 2010. We found elevated odds of VLBW among male infants for relatively cold June and August temperatures. Unpleasant weather may figure in stress-related health outcomes, not only as a stressor, but also as a constraint on restoration.

  • 6.
    Hug, Stella-Maria
    et al.
    Environment and Culture Unit, Institut for Environmental Decisions, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH).
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Hansmann, Ralf
    Environment and Culture Unit, Institut for Environmental Decisions, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH).
    Seeland, Klaus
    Environment and Culture Unit, Institut for Environmental Decisions, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH).
    Hornung, Rainer
    Department of Psychology, University of Zürich.
    Restorative qualities of indoor and outdoor exercise settings as predictors of exercise frequency2009In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 971-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive environmental determinants of exercise frequency remain poorly understood. Knowing that people often value exercise for psychological restoration, we investigated the restorative quality of indoor and outdoor exercise settings as predictors of exercise frequency. We surveyed 319 members of fitness centers in Zurich that offer indoor and outdoor exercise alternatives. Outdoor settings were rated as more restorative. For each type of environment, restorative quality predicted the frequency of exercise in the past 30 days, independent of socio-demographic characteristics, expectations of exercise benefits, and personal barriers. We discuss the results with regard to the provision of exercise settings for urban populations.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Klara
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Socialmedicin.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå universitet, Socialmedicin.
    Neighbourhood disadvantage and individual adversities in adolescence and total alcohol consumption up to mid-life: Results from the Northern Swedish Cohort2015In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 33, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tests if neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and family social and material adversities during adolescence are independently related to total alcohol consumption from adolescence through to mid-life. Self-reports from the Northern Swedish Cohort (effective sample=950) at ages 16, 18, 21, 30 and 42 was combined with register data on the socioeconomic composition of neighbourhoods at age 16. Total volume of alcohol consumed between age 16-42 was estimated based on the five survey waves, and self-reported social and material adversities were computed as composite variables. Neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage at age 16 was associated with alcohol consumption age 16-42 for men but not for women. Social adversities at age 16 were associated with alcohol consumption age 16-42 for both women and men, but material adversity or parental class was not. In conclusion, neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage in adolescence has a significant relationship with later alcohol consumption among men, even independently from individual factors. On family level, social factors but not socioeconomic factors in adolescence independently predict later alcohol consumption.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå, Sweden.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Gustafsson, Per E.
    Umeå Univ, Unit Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå, Sweden.
    Are neighbourhood inequalities in adult health explained by socio-economic and psychosocial determinants in adolescence and the subsequent life course in northern Sweden?: A decomposition analysis2018In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 52, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explains neighbourhood deprivation inequalities in adult health for a northern Swedish cohort by examining the contribution of socio-economic and psychosocial determinants from adolescence (age 16), young adulthood (age 21) and midlife (age 42) to the disparity. Self-reported information from 873 participants was drawn from questionnaires, with complementary neighbourhood register data. The concentration index was used to estimate the inequality while decomposition analyses were run to attribute the disparity to its underlying determinants. The results suggest that socio-economic and psychosocial factors in midlife explain a substantial part, but also that the inequality can originate from conditions in adolescence and young adulthood.

  • 9.
    Merlo, Juan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Res Unit Social Epidemiol, Jan Waldenstroms St 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Lund Univ, Fac Med, Res Unit Social Epidemiol, Jan Waldenstroms St 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden;.
    Leckie, George
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Res Unit Social Epidemiol, Jan Waldenstroms St 35, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden;Univ Bristol, Ctr Multilevel Modelling, 35 Berkeley Sq, Bristol BS8 1JA, Avon, England.
    A simple multilevel approach for analysing geographical inequalities in public health reports: The case of municipality differences in obesity2019In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 58, article id UNSP 102145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiological analysis of geographical inequalities in individual outcomes is a fundamental theme in public health research. However, many traditional studies focus on analysing area differences in averages outcomes, disregarding individual variation around such averages. In doing so, these studies may produce misleading information and lead researchers to draw incorrect conclusions. Analysing individual and municipality differences in body mass index (BMI) and overweight/obesity status, we apply an analytical approach based on the multilevel analysis of individual heterogeneity and discriminatory accuracy (MAIHDA). This analytical approach may be viewed as a reorganization of existing multilevel modelling concepts in order to provide a systematic approach to simultaneously considering both differences between area averages and individual heterogeneity around those averages. In doing so, MAIHDA provides an improved approach to the quantification and understanding of geographical inequalities as compared with traditional approaches.

  • 10. Pemberton, Simon
    et al.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Lopes, Jessica
    Samerski, Silja
    Humphris, Rachel
    Access to healthcare in superdiverse neighbourhoods2019In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 55, p. 128-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date little attention has been focused on how the differing features of ‘superdiverse’ neighbourhoods shape residents’ access to healthcare services. Through utilising a cross-national mixed-methods approach, the paper highlights how defining features of superdiverse neighbourhoods - ‘newness’, ‘novelty’ and ‘diversity’ - influence a number of neighbourhood ‘domains’ and ‘rules of access’ that regulate access to healthcare. Issues of uncertainty, affordability, compliance, transna- tionalism and the diversity of community and local sociability are identified as being particularly significant, but which may vary in importance according to the nationality, ethnicity and / or religion of particular individuals.

  • 11. Sellström, E.
    et al.
    O'Campo, P.
    Muntaner, C.
    Arnoldsson, G.
    Hjern, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hospital admissions of young persons for illicit drug use or abuse: Does neighborhood of residence matter?2011In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 551-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence constitutes a period of risk for drug use and drug use disorders. Previous research, largely focused on individual risk factors, has failed to include neighborhood structure in the study of determinants of youth drug use or abuse. A cohort of 76,693 adolescents ages 13-15 from 586 urban neighborhoods in Sweden were followed up for 12 years, from age 16 to age 28. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze neighborhood variations in hospital admissions due to illicit drug use or abuse. We found a variation of 8% by neighborhood economic status and the risk of being admitted to hospital increased 73% in low-compared to high-income neighborhoods. Our results suggest that neighborhood of residence in adolescence plays a significant role in predicting future health-related behaviors and that the need for drug abuse interventions at a neighborhood level is compelling.

  • 12.
    Von Lindern, Eike
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Dept Psychol, Appl Social & Hlth Psychol, Binzmuhlestr 14,Box 14, CH-8050 Zurich, Switzerland.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Lercher, Peter
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Hyg Microbiol & Social Med, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Traffic-related exposures, constrained restoration, and health in the residential context2016In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 39, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic-related exposures may undermine the restorative character of the home, and this may in turn undermine health and residential satisfaction. We addressed this possibility with data for adults residing in a large valley near Innsbruck, Austria (N=572). We joined objective measures of traffic-related sound and air pollutants with reports from door-to-door surveys concerning perceived disturbance from traffic-related exposures, restorative qualities of the living environment, self-perceived health and residential satisfaction. We analyzed these data with successive tests of nested structural equation models, with and without the restorative quality variables. The results suggest that the negative impact of traffic-related exposures on self-perceived health and satisfaction with the living environment involves the constraint of restorative qualities of the living environment, over and above the share traditionally attributed to such exposures viewed as stressors. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the distinction between environmental stressors and constraints on restoration.

1 - 12 of 12
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