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  • 1.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Winefield, Helen
    School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Australia.
    Sargent, Charli
    Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Shi, Zumin
    Human Nutrition Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Qatar.
    Unique associations of the Job Demand-Control-Support model subscales with leisure-time physical activity and dietary energy intake.2018In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and dietary energy intake are two important health behaviours, which at too low or high levels respectively, are associated with overweight and obesity. This study explores associations between subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model, LTPA and dietary energy intake. A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=433) from a South Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. In analyses adjusted for sex, age, and sociodemographic variables, higher levels of skill discretion were associated with increased odds for attaining sufficient physical activity (OR=2.45; 95% CI=1.10-5.47). Higher levels of decision authority were associated with reduced odds (OR=0.43; 95% CI=0.20-0.93) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. Higher scores for coworker support were associated with increased odds (OR=2.20; 95% CI=1.15-4.23) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. These findings support the consideration of the individual JDCS subscales, since this practice may reveal novel associations with health behaviour outcomes, thereby presenting new opportunities to improve employee health and wellbeing.

  • 2.
    Gunnarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Systematic Work Environment Management: Experiences from Implementation in Swedish Small-scale Enterprises2010In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 185-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale enterprises face difficulties in fulfilling the regulations for organising Systematic Work Environment Management. This study compared three groups of small-scale manufacturing enterprises with and without support for implementing the provision. Two implementation methods, supervised and network method, were used. The third group worked according to their own ideas. Twenty-three enterprises participated. The effects of the implementation were evaluated after one year by semi-structured dialogue with the manager and safety representative. Each enterprise was classified on compliance with ten demands concerning the provision. The work environment was estimated by the WEST-method. Impact of the implementation on daily work was also studied. At the follow-up, the enterprises in the supervised method reported slightly more improvements in the fulfilment of the demands in the provision than the enterprises in the network method and the enterprises working on their own did. The effect of the project reached the employees faster in the enterprises with the supervised method. In general, the work environment improved to some extent in all enterprises. Extensive support to small-scale enterprises in terms of advise and networking aimed to fulfil the regulations of Systematic Work Environment Management had limited effect - especially considering the cost of applying these methods.

  • 3.
    Gunnarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Josephson, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Self rated health and working conditions of small-scale enterprisers in sweden2007In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 775-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was an investigation of prevalence and associations between self-rated health and working conditions for small-scale enterprisers in a county in Sweden. A postal questionnaire was answered by 340 male and 153 female small-scale enterprisers in different sectors, with a response rate of 66%. For comparative purposes, data from a population study of 1,699 employees in private companies was included in the analyses. Differences were tested by Chi²-test and associations were presented as odds ratios (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The frequency of health problems in male enterprisers was higher than in employees in the private sector, while the frequency of health problems in female enterprisers was equal to that of the control employees. The main findings highlighted that male enterprisers reported higher rate of health problems and female enterprisers equal rate compared with employees in the private sector. Enterprisers stated musculoskeletal pain (women 59%, men 56%) and mental health problems (women 47%, men 45%) as the most frequent health problems. Poor job satisfaction, reported by 17% of the females and 20% of the male enterprisers, revealed an OR of 10.42 (95% CI 5.78-18.77) for poor general health. For the enterprisers, the most frequent complaints, musculoskeletal pain and mental health problems, were associated with poor job satisfaction and poor physical work environment. An association between poor general health and working as an enterpriser remained after adjusting for working conditions, sex and age.

  • 4. Lastovkova, Andrea
    et al.
    Carder, Melanie
    Rasmussen, Hans Martin
    Sjoberg, Lars
    de Groene, Gerda J
    Sauni, Riitta
    Vevoda, Jiri
    Vevodova, Sarka
    Lasfargues, Gerard
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Varga, Marek
    Colosio, Claudio
    Pelclova, Daniela
    Burnout syndrome as an occupational disease in the European Union: an exploratory study.2018In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of psychological disorders influencing the health of workers increases in accordance with growing requirements on employees across various professions. This study aimed to compare approaches to the burnout syndrome in European countries. A questionnaire focusing on stress-related occupational diseases was distributed to national experts of 28 European Union countries. A total of 23 countries responded. In 9 countries (Denmark, Estonia, France, Hungary, Latvia, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia and Sweden) burnout syndrome may be acknowledged as an occupational disease. Latvia has burnout syndrome explicitly included on the List of ODs. Compensation for burnout syndrome has been awarded in Denmark, France, Latvia, Portugal and Sweden.Only in 39% of the countries a possibility to acknowledge burnout syndrome as an occupational disease exists, with most of compensated cases only occurring in recent years. New systems to collect data on suspected cases have been developed reflecting the growing recognition of the impact of the psychosocial work environment. In agreement with the EU legislation, all EU countries in the study have an action plan to prevent stress at the workplace.

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