uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Agustsson, Atli
    et al.
    Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Res Ctr Movement Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Sveinsson, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Res Ctr Movement Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Rodby-Bousquet, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Lund Univ, Orthopaed, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden..
    The effect of asymmetrical limited hip flexion on seating posture, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion2017In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 71, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postural asymmetries with seating problems are common in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Aims: To analyse the prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion (< 90) in adults with CP, and to evaluate the association between asymmetrical limited hip flexion and postural asymmetries in the sitting position.

    Methods and procedures: Cross-sectional data of 714 adults with CP, 16-73 years, GMFCS level I -V, reported to CPUP, the Swedish cerebral palsy national surveillance program and quality registry, from 2013 to 2015. Hip range of motion was analysed in relation to pelvic obliquity, trunk asymmetry, weight distribution, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

    Outcomes and results: The prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion increased as GMFCS level decreased. Of adults at GMFCS level V, 22% had asymmetrical limited hip flexion (< 90). The odds of having an oblique pelvis (OR 2.6, 95% CI:1.6-2.1), an asymmetrical trunk (OR 2.1, 95% CI:1.1-4.2), scoliosis (OR 3.7, 95% CI:1.3-9.7), and windswept hip distortion (OR 2.6, 95% CI:1.2-5.4) were higher for adults with asymmetrical limited hip flexion compared with those with bilateral hip flexion > 90 degrees.

    Conclusions and implications: Asymmetrical limited hip flexion affects the seating posture and is associated with scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

  • 2.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Claesson, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Classical and modern prejudice: attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities.2006In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 605-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In two studies, we examine whether attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities, like sexism and racism, consist of two forms – a classical and a modern, where the classical is overt and blatant and the modern is more subtle and covert. Self-report scales tapping these two forms were developed in Study 1. Based on confirmatory factor analyses, the results in Study 1 supported our hypothesis and revealed that the modern and classical forms are correlated but distinguishable. This outcome was replicated in Study 2. Construct and discriminatory validations of the scales provided further support for the distinction. The theoretical and practical importance of the results is discussed in relation to previous research on attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities and other social outgroups.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Martin, Lene
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Strand Brodd, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Almqvist, Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term2017In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 67, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Children born preterm are at risk of neonatal complications but the long-term consequences for everyday functioning is not well known. The study aimed to identify patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term in relation to perinatal data, neonatal risk factors, behaviour, and socioeconomic status. Registry data and data from parent rated questionnaires were collected for 331 children.

    Method: A person-oriented approach with a cluster analysis was used.

    Results: A seven cluster solution explained 65.91% of the variance. Most children (n = 232) showed patterns of strong everyday functioning. A minority of the children (n = 99), showed diverse patterns of weak everyday functioning. Perinatal characteristics, neonatal risk factors and socio-economics did not predict cluster group membership. Children born preterm were represented in all clusters.

    Conclusion, implications: Most preschool children are perceived by their parents with strong everyday functioning despite being born preterm. However small groups of children are, for various reasons, perceived with weak functioning, but preterm birth is not the sole contributor to patterns of weak everyday functioning. More critical for all children's everyday functioning is probably the interaction between individual factors, behavioural factors and contextual factors. To gain a broader understanding of children's everyday functioning. Child Health Services need to systematically consider aspects of body function, activity and in addition participation and environmental aspects.

  • 4. Axelsson, Emma L.
    et al.
    Hill, Catherine M.
    Sadeh, Avi
    Dimitriou, Dagmara
    Sleep problems and language development in toddlers with Williams syndrome2013In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, p. 3988-3996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep and related maternal beliefs were assessed in a narrow age range of 18 children with Williams syndrome (WS) and 18 typically developing (TD) children. WS is a rare genetic disorder characterised by a complex physical, cognitive and behavioural phenotype. High prevalence of sleep difficulties in older children and adults with WS have been reported. Parents completed 6 questionnaires: the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire, Infant Sleep Vignettes Interpretation Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index of Parents, Child Behaviour Checklist, MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory for Infants - Words and Gestures, and the Major (ICD-10) Depression Inventory. Compared to TD children, those with WS had shorter night sleep, more night wakings and wakefulness according to parental report. Regression analyses revealed that a proportion of the variance in language development scores in WS children could be explained by night sleep duration. Compared to control parents, the mothers of the WS group were more likely to describe their child’s sleep as problematic and had higher rates of involvement with child sleep, yet they had a lesser tendency to interpret sleep problems as signs of distress and a greater tendency to emphasise limit setting. Approximately half of both groups of mothers experienced poor sleep quality. This was also related to maternal mood, and night wakefulness in the children with WS. This is the first study to quantify sleep difficulties in young children with WS in a narrow age range using maternal report. The possible negative effects on maternal sleep and mood, and the link between night sleep and language development in young children with WS, requires further detailed investigation. ?? 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    et al.
    Department of Social Work and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle.
    Westerlund, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Miniscalco, Carmela
    Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Problems and limitations in studies on screening for language delay2010In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 943-950Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study discusses six common methodological limitations in screening for language delay (LD) as illustrated in 11 recent studies. The limitations are (1) whether the studies define a target population, (2) whether the recruitment procedure is unbiased, (3) attrition, (4) verification bias, (5) small sample size and (6) inconsistencies in choice of "gold standard". It is suggested that failures to specify a target population, high attrition (both at screening and in succeeding validation), small sample sizes and verification bias in validations are often caused by a misguided focus on screen positives (SPs). Other limitations are results of conflicting methodological goals. We identified three such conflicts. One consists of a dilemma between unbiased recruitment and attrition, another between the comprehensiveness of the applied gold standard and sample size in validation and the third between the specificity of the gold standard and the risk of not identifying co-morbid conditions.

  • 6.
    Hedenius, Martina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Persson, Jonas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alm, Per A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Ullman, Michael T
    Georgetown University, Washington.
    Howard, James H
    Catholic University of America, Washington.
    Howard, Darlene V
    Georgetown University, Washington.
    Jennische, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Impaired implicit sequence learning in children with developmental dyslexia2013In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 3924-3935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proposed that an impairment of procedural memory underlies a range of linguistic, cognitive and motor impairments observed in developmental dyslexia (DD). However, studies designed to test this hypothesis using the implicit sequence learning paradigm have yielded inconsistent results. A fundamental aspect of procedural learning is that it takes place over an extended time-period that may be divided into distinct stages based on both behavioural characteristics and neural correlates of performance. Yet, no study of implicit sequence learning in children with DD has included learning stages beyond a single practice session. The present study was designed to fill this important gap by extending the investigation to include the effects of overnight consolidation as well as those of further practice on a subsequent day. The results suggest that the most pronounced procedural learning impairment in DD may emerge only after extended practice, in learning stages beyond a single practice session.

  • 7.
    Hedenius, Martina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Persson, Jonas
    Tremblay, Antoine
    Adi-Japha, Esther
    Verissimo, Joao
    Dye, Cristina D.
    Alm, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Jennische, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Tomblin, J. Bruce
    Ullman, Michael T.
    Grammar predicts procedural learning and consolidation deficits in children with Specific Language Impairment2011In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 2362-2375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH) posits that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) can be largely explained by abnormalities of brain structures that subserve procedural memory. The PDH predicts impairments of procedural memory itself, and that such impairments underlie the grammatical deficits observed in the disorder. Previous studies have indeed reported procedural learning impairments in SLI, and have found that these are associated with grammatical difficulties. The present study extends this research by examining consolidation and longer-term procedural sequence learning in children with SLI. The Alternating Serial Reaction Time (ASRT) task was given to children with SLI and typically developing (TD) children in an initial learning session and an average of three days later to test for consolidation and longer-term learning. Although both groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only the TO children showed clear signs of consolidation, even though the two groups did not differ in longer-term learning. When the children were re-categorized on the basis of grammar deficits rather than broader language deficits, a clearer pattern emerged. Whereas both the grammar impaired and normal grammar groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only those with normal grammar showed consolidation and longer-term learning. Indeed, the grammar-impaired group appeared to lose any sequence knowledge gained during the initial testing session. These findings held even when controlling for vocabulary or a broad non-grammatical language measure, neither of which were associated with procedural memory. When grammar was examined as a continuous variable over all children, the same relationships between procedural memory and grammar, but not vocabulary or the broader language measure, were observed. Overall, the findings support and further specify the PDH. They suggest that consolidation and longer-term procedural learning are impaired in SLI, but that these impairments are specifically tied to the grammatical deficits in the disorder. The possibility that consolidation and longer-term learning are problematic in the disorder suggests a locus of potential study for therapeutic approaches. In sum, this study clarifies our understanding of the underlying deficits in SLI, and suggests avenues for further research.

  • 8.
    Ozel-Kizil, Erguvan Tugba
    et al.
    Ankara Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Kokurcan, Ahmet
    Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Res & Training Hosp, Psychiat Clin, Ankara, Turkey..
    Aksoy, Umut Mert
    Bakirkoy Mazhar Osman Res & Training Hosp Psychia, Psychiat Clin, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Kanat, Bilgen Bicer
    Bergama Publ Hosp, Psychiat Clin, Izmir, Turkey..
    Sakarya, Direnc
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bastug, Gulbahar
    Ankara Univ, Vocat Sch Hlth, Ankara, Turkey..
    Colak, Burcin
    Ankara Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Altunoz, Umut
    Klinikum Wahrendorff Psychiat Hosp, Dept Transcultural Psychiat, Hannover, Germany..
    Kirici, Sevinc
    Ankara Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Demirbas, Hatice
    Gazi Univ, Dept Psychol, Ankara, Turkey..
    Oncu, Bedriye
    Ankara Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Hyperfocusing as a dimension of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2016In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 59, p. 351-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) suffer not only from inability to focus but also from inability to shift attention for events that trigger their interests. This phenomenon is called "hyperfocusing". Previous literature about hyperfocusing is scarce and relies mainly on case reports. The study aimed to investigate and compare the severity of hyperfocusing in adult ADHD with and without psycho-stimulant use. ADHD (DSM-IV-TR) patients either psycho-stimulant naive (n = 53) or on psycho-stimulants (n = 79) from two ADHD clinics were recruited. The control group (n = 65) consisted of healthy university students. A socio-demographic form, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Wender-Utah Rating Scale, the Adult ADHD Self- Report Scale and the Hyperfocusing Scale were applied to the participants. There was no difference between total Hyperfocusing Scale and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale scores of two patient groups, but both have higher scores than controls (p < 0.001). Hyperfocusing is higher in adult ADHD and there was no difference between stimulant-naive patients or patients on stimulants. Hyperfocusing can be defined as a separate dimension of adult ADHD.

  • 9.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Natl Ctr Neurol & Psychiat, Natl Inst Mental Hlth, Dept Child & Adolescent Mental Hlth, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 1878553, Japan.;Sodertorn Univ, Stockholm Ctr Hlth & Social Change SCOHOST, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.;Univ Tokyo, Grad Sch Med, Dept Human Ecol, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1130033, Japan..
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Parc Sanit Sant Joan Deu, Fdn Sant Joan Deu, Dr Antoni Pujadas,42, Barcelona 08830, Spain.;CIBERSAM, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental, Inst Salud Carlos 3, Monforte Lemos 3-5 Pabellcin 11, Madrid 28029, Spain..
    Takahashi, Hidetoshi
    Natl Ctr Neurol & Psychiat, Natl Inst Mental Hlth, Dept Child & Adolescent Mental Hlth, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 1878553, Japan..
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Yale Univ, Ctr Child Study, Sch Med, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Kamio, Yoko
    Natl Ctr Neurol & Psychiat, Natl Inst Mental Hlth, Dept Child & Adolescent Mental Hlth, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 1878553, Japan..
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and loneliness among adults in the general population2017In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 62, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research on the association between adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and loneliness is scarce even though factors which have been previously linked to loneliness, such as divorce and poorer mental health may be more prevalent among adults with ADHD. This study investigated the relation between ADHD symptoms/symptom severity and loneliness in the general adult population. Methods: Data from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 (N = 7403, aged >16 years) were analyzed. ADHD symptoms and common mental disorders (CMDs) were assessed with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener and the Clinical Interview Schedule Revised, respectively. Loneliness was measured with a question from the Social Functioning Questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations. Results: In the fully adjusted model, an ASRS score >14 was strongly associated with loneliness (OR= 2.48 95%CI = 1.83-336). ADHD symptom severity was related to loneliness in a dose-response fashion. Over one-third of the association between ADHD symptoms and loneliness was explained by CMDs. Conclusions: Adults with more ADHD symptoms are at an increased risk of feeling lonely. Future research should determine how ADHD symptoms are linked to loneliness and if loneliness is affectihg well-being.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf