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  • 1.
    Bergstrom, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Association between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations after stroke2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Within occupational therapy, it is assumed that individuals are satisfied when participating in everyday occupations that they want to do. However, there is little empirical evidence to show this. Aims: The aim of this study is to explore and describe the relation between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations in a Swedish cohort, 5 years post stroke. Methods: Sixty-nine persons responded to the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). The questionnaire measures subjective restrictions in participation, i.e. the discrepancy between doing and wanting to do 30 different occupations in everyday life, and satisfaction per activity. Results were analysed with McNemar/chi-square. Results: Seventy percent of the persons perceived participation restrictions. Individuals that did not perceive restrictions in their participation had a significantly higher level of satisfaction (p=.002) compared to those that had restrictions. Participants that performed activities that they wanted to do report between 79 and 100% satisfaction per activity. Conclusion: In this cohort, there was a significant association between satisfaction and participating in everyday occupations one wants to do, showing that satisfaction is an important aspect of participation and substantiates a basic assumption within occupational therapy. The complexity of measuring satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations is discussed.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 3.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 4. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 5. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 6. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 7.
    Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tham, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Significant others' experiences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 377-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Client-centredness is a prominent contemporary concept in rehabilitation. However, there is a lack of knowledge on if and how a client-centred rehabilitation approach is incorporated in the everyday life of significant others of people who receive such rehabilitation. Objective: Explore and describe if and how a client-centred ADL intervention (CADL) was integrated in the everyday lives of significant others of people with stroke. Materials and methods: Qualitative longitudinal design, with a grounded theory approach. Seven significant others, who cohabited with persons receiving a CADL intervention, were interviewed during the first year. Findings: One core category was identified: "Taking responsibility and achieving balance with respect to self-esteem in order to get on with everyday life". The integration of the CADL was a process. A key aspect was that as the person with stroke acted upon his/her own desired activity goals the significant others were encouraged to act on their own needs. Conclusions: Enablement is important also for the significant others of people with stroke. One way of enabling significant others to maintain an active lifestyle and find respite in everyday life might be to enable people with stroke to formulate and act upon their desired activity goals.

  • 8. Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Lidström, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Thelin, Nils
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group. Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 9.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers' opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students' computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Kottorp, Anders
    A cross-diagnostic validation of an instrument measuring participation in everyday occupations: The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to validate the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ) when used in samples of people with acquired brain injuries (ABI), stroke, stress-related disorders, concussion, and persons receiving rehabilitation after ABI to investigate whether the OGQ could be used as a generic scale. A total of 601 individuals answered the OGQ at various time points after illness/injury. A Rasch analysis was performed on the data to evaluate evidence of internal scale validity and person response validity, and the capability of the OGQ to separate people into different levels of participation in everyday occupations. The results provided evidence that the OGQ is a valid measure across different diagnostic groups. A generic version of the OGQ can separate at least two levels of perceived occupational gaps and is therefore recommended as a screening tool to be used by occupational therapists working with different diagnostic groups.

  • 11. Eriksson, Therese
    et al.
    Jonsson, Hans
    Tham, Kerstin
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    A comparison of perceived occupational gaps between people with stress-related ill health or musculoskeletal pain and a reference group2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 411-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe and compare how occupational gaps were reported in everyday occupations in a rehabilitation group of people with musculoskeletal pain or stress-related ill health and in a reference group from the Swedish population.

    Method: Seventy-two persons with musculoskeletal pain or stress-related ill health and 261 people from the Swedish population were included. The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, measuring to what extent individuals perceive a discrepancy between what they want to do and what they actually do, was completed by the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data.

    Results: Occupational gaps were reported more often in the rehabilitation group. Leisure activities were the gaps reported most often. The occupational repertoire seemed to decrease over time as the number of activities was decreasing, particularly leisure and work-related activities. Instrumental ADL were more desirable as the length of sick leave extended.

    Conclusions: Being on sick leave appears to start a process towards occupational deprivation where the areas that remain in the occupational repertoire become more important. Our study highlights the need to emphasize the whole occupational repertoire in rehabilitation and to facilitate engagement in valued activities to create a sound base for the process of returning to work.

  • 12.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Granlund, Mats
    Evaluating intervention using time aids in children with disabilities2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate complex intervention using time aids for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities who exhibit limitations in daily time management. Methods: Participating children (n = 47) (F17/M30) were aged 6-11 with ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, mild or moderate intellectual disability, spina bifida, and cerebral palsy. This study used a Randomized Block and Waiting List control group design, with 25 children allocated to control and 22 to intervention group. In total 10 children (21.3%), five from each group, dropped out, leaving 37 children in the data analysis. Results: Children in both groups gained significantly in time-processing ability between the first and second data collection, but the children in the intervention group improved time-processing ability significantly more than controls. The control group also displayed significant changes after receiving intervention between the second and third data collection. The intervention had a large effect (ES Cohen's d = 0.81) on time-processing ability and a medium effect (ES Cohen's d = 0.68) on managing one's time. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that time-processing ability and managing one's time can be improved by intervention using time aids in children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, supporting the need to consider time aids in intervention in these children.

  • 13.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Lidström Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro university.
    White, Suzanne
    State University of New York Downstate Medical CenterNY.
    Holmefur, Marie
    eFaculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Assessment of time management skills: psychometric properties of the Swedish version2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Persons with impaired time management skills are often in need of occupational therapy. Valid and reliable instruments to assess time management and organizational skills are needed for the evaluation of intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S) for persons with and without impaired time management skills.

    Method: A total of 238 persons participated in the study, of whom 94 had self-reported impaired time management skills due to mental disorders such as schizophrenic spectrum or neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mild intellectual disabilities, and 144 persons had no reported impaired time management skills. Rasch analysis was used to analyze data.

    Results: Three subscales were detected: the time management subscale with 11 items, the organization & planning subscale with 11 items, and the subscale of regulation of emotions with 5 items, with excellent to acceptable psychometric properties. The conclusions were that: ATMS-S is a valid instrument for self-rating of time management, organization & planning and for the regulation of emotions. ATMS-S can be useful for persons with mental disorders including mild neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Annica E. M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Relatives' experiences of family members' eating difficulties2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with stroke or traumatic injury often suffer from eating disorders. This study describes relatives' experiences of their next of kin's eating and swallowing disorders. A strategic sample was obtained, and nine informants were interviewed. Using a constant comparative approach for data analysis, three themes emerged: provider for health and well-being, sensitive attitudes about the next of kin's changed appearance, and adaptation to the new situation. The informants' roles included qualities of caring and concern, Food preparation was crucial, with more time spent on cooking than previously. Combined with circumstantial eating, it dominated the working hours. The informants expressed emotional reactions to eating behaviour. In particular the loss of good, proper eating and affinity during meals left them feeling sad. Strategies such as dinner arrangements and shared responsibility guided the informants in adapting to a new situation. In clinical practice it is important to support informal caregivers, to provide adequate information, and to share responsibility. In occupational therapy one intervention could be to help clients find a balance in activities of work, leisure, and rest.

  • 15. Johansson, Gun
    et al.
    Hultin, Hanna
    Möller, Jette
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Kjellberg, Katarina
    The impact of adjustment latitude on self-assessed work ability in regard to gender and occupational type2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Objective

     Adjustment latitude describes opportunities to change demands at work when ill and may affect work ability. The aim here is to study the association between adjustment latitude and self-assessed work ability among men and women and employees from different occupational sectors.

    Methods

     This cross-sectional study used data from a questionnaire sent to 3020 employees in three occupational sectors in Sweden; 1430 responded. Subjects were divided into: full, moderately reduced, and greatly reduced work ability. Presence of nine adjustment opportunities was requested and subjects were divided into three groups. Each specific opportunity was also analyzed in relation to work ability. Multinomial logistic regression was used for analyses.

    Results

     Number of opportunities to adjust was associated with work ability among men and employees in health care. "Shortening the working day" was associated with work ability in most groups. For men and industrial employees, "postponing work", "going home and working later", and "working without disturbance" were associated with work ability. "To work from home" was associated with work ability among women and employees in insurance.

    Conclusions

     The assumption that adjustment latitude affects work ability is supported. Associations differ with regard to gender and occupational sectors. Further studies with longitudinal design and alternative samples are needed.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Ulla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Högberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Participation in everyday occupations in a late phase of recovery after brain injury.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 116-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe to what extent individuals of working age, in a late phase after an acquired brain injury, participate in everyday occupations related to home maintenance, work, and leisure. The aim was also to evaluate if participation in different occupations influences their life satisfaction. A sample of 157 people consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation clinic between June 1995 and December 2000 answered a mailed questionnaire. The subjects who were of working age had had a brain injury on average 6 years before this study. The perceived participation was reported using the Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNL) and life satisfaction according to an expanded version of the LiSat 11. This study showed that in this late phase of recovery after brain injury the subjects still experienced many restrictions in participation in everyday occupations. The area with the lowest reported participation was work activity while most comfort with the situation was reported for self-care. The RNL subscales showed a significant connection with satisfaction with life as a whole. Furthermore an interaction was found between the two subscales "Daily living" and "Perception of self". This study showed restrictions in participation in the community even several years after brain injury, which underlines the need for rehabilitation services long after injury.

  • 17. Kårefjärd, Ann
    et al.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Effects of dog-assisted intervention on quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 433-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with dementia often have a poor quality of life. Therefore, methods that can improve their life situation must be identified. One promising method is dog-assisted intervention.

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate the effects of dog-assisted intervention on quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A one-group, pretest post-test study design was used. Quality of life was measured using the QUALID in 59 nursing home residents prior to and after a dog-assisted intervention. Non-parametric tests were used to analyze the data, and effect sizes were calculated.

    RESULTS: The participants' total scores improved significantly between baseline and post-test 1 (p = < 0.001) and worsened significantly at post-test 2 (p = 0.025). The largest effect size was found for the item 'Verbalization suggests discomfort' (p = 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate that dog-assisted interventions can have positive effects on quality of life in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The results contribute to a growing knowledge base about non-pharmacological methods that can be used in dementia care. Occupational therapists should consider dog-assisted interventions when planning activities that can reduce the illness burden and improve the quality of life for people with dementia.

  • 18.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Benefits of the use of ICT in school activities by students with motor, speech, visual, and hearing impairment: A literature review2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 251-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to enhance participation in educational activities for students with physical disabilities. Even though incorporating ICTs into teaching and learning in education has become an important issue, it is unclear what evidence research has provided. The aim of this study was to investigate types of ICT items and how ICT is being used by students with physical disabilities, and describe the benefits of ICT use in school activities. Methods: A systematic literature search, covering the period 2000-May 2012, was performed in the databases AMED, CINAHL, Eric, OTseeker, Psych Info, PubMed, and Scopus. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings. Results: A total of 32 articles were included, 16 of which were intervention studies. More than half of the studies concerned students with motor impairments. Type of ICT used differed among impairment groups, and ICT seemed to be especially beneficial for writing, spelling, and communication. Conclusions: Even though the review found heterogeneity across the studies students seemed to benefit from ICT use regardless of the type. For future research it is important to highlight intervention studies, especially for students with visual, hearing, and communication impairments.

  • 19.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Grann, Martin
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mentally disordered offenders’ daily occupations after one year of forensic care2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 302-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons detained as mentally disordered offenders need support for transition from care to community life. Few systematic studies have been completed on the outcomes of standard forensic care. The aim was to investigate the target group's life conditions and daily occupations one year after care. In a follow-up design occupational performance (OP) and social participation (SP) were investigated at two time points. After informed consent 36 consecutively recruited participants reported OP using the Capability to Perform Daily Occupations, Self-Efficacy Scale, Importance scale, and Allen Cognitive Level Screen. SP was measured with the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, and Interview Schedule for Social Interaction. After one year 24 participants were still incarcerated, 11 were conditionally released, and one participant was discharged. The group were generally more satisfied and engaged in daily occupations than at admission. The study's attrition rate, 51%, is discussed. The conclusion and the clinical implications indicate that the target group need early, goal directed interventions in OP and SP for alterations in daily occupations. Furthermore, to increase the knowledge base concerning mentally disordered offenders, studies with research designs that have the potential to uncover changes in daily occupation and other measures for this target group are necessary.

  • 20.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stålenheim, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Sjödén, Per-Olow
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mentally disordered offenders' abilities in occupational performance and social participation2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major aim was to describe occupational performance (OP) and social participation (SP) of mentally disordered offenders (MDO), and to compare professionals’ and MDOs’ appraisals of these abilities. Also, diagnostic groups and groups with/without substance related disorders were compared with regard to OP and SP. Self-report instruments (Capability to Perform Daily Occupations, Self-Efficacy Scale, Importance scale, Interview Schedule for Social Interaction), observations (Allen Cognitive Level Screen), and register data (Psychosocial and Environment Problems—Axis IV; Global Assessment of Functioning Scale—Axis V; Assessment Concerning Support and Service for Persons with Certain Functional Impairments) were utilized. Demographic and register data were collected from the Swedish National Board of Forensic Medicine. Seventy-four out of 161 incarcerated subjects (46%), selected consecutively after informed consent during a period of 16 months, were interviewed on their hospital wards. The MDOs reported some disability in performing occupations and participating in community life. However, they were satisfied with their performance and participation, implying limited awareness of their disabilities. The professionals judged the MDOs as having problems with social participation, and major, longstanding disablements in several areas. Subjects with schizophrenia scored lower in some OP and SP variables than did subjects with personality disorders and other mental disorders. The results suggest that a large proportion of MDOs need support to enable their community living.

  • 21.
    Nilsson, Annika Öst
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hellman, Therese
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Intervent & Implementat Res Worker Hlth, Solna, Sweden..
    Experiences of the return to work process after stroke while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 349-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, less than 50% of those getting stroke in working age return to work (RTW). Effective rehabilitation programmes need to be developed and therapeutic aspects understood.Aim: To explore and describe how persons with stroke experience their RTW process while participating in a person-centred rehabilitation programme focusing on RTW.Materials and methods: Seven persons with mild or moderate stroke were interviewed twice during the intervention in the vocational training phase using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using grounded theory.Results: Having a coordinator by their side gave support and guidance during the RTW process. Knowledge of stroke, strategies and a straightforward communication created a structure for the RTW process. Expressing one's own wishes increased opportunities to influence and decide which path to follow in order to reach the goal.Conclusion: Straightforward, open and recurring communication facilitated the possibility to adapt to the situation. These aspects increased insight and awareness which facilitated the RTW process.Significance: The findings indicate that a precondition for a fruitful RTW process was that suitable platforms at work were created in which the actors involved could cooperate. This knowledge might also be valuable in the RTW process for people with other diagnosis.

  • 22.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Mälardalens högskola.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Heart failure clients' encounters with professionals and self-rated ability to return to work2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 115-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with heart failure are sick listed for long periods and disability pension is common. Healthcare professionals need knowledge about factors that can enhance their return to work processes.

    AIMS: This study focus on people on sick leave due to heart failure and their encounters with healthcare professionals/social insurance officers. Specifically, it aimed to investigate associations between: (1) encounters and socio-demographic factors and, (2) encounters and self-rated ability to return to work.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study based on registry data and a postal questionnaire to people on sick leave due to heart failure (n = 590). Bivariate correlation analyses and logistic regression analyses were used.

    RESULTS: Gender, income, and age were strongly associated with encounters with both social insurance officers and healthcare professionals. Self-rated ability to return to work was associated with the encounters 'Made reasonable demands', 'Gave clear and adequate information/advice' and 'Did not keep our agreements'.

    CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: To enhance clients' abilities to return to work demands should be reasonable, information and advice need to be clear, and agreements should be kept. These results can be used by healthcare professionals as occupational therapists involved in vocational rehabilitation for people on sick leave due to heart failure.

  • 23.
    Sköld, Annika
    et al.
    Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, Nissers Vag 3, SE-79182 Falun, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Janeslätt, Gunnel Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, Nissers Vag 3, SE-79182 Falun, Sweden..
    Self-rating of daily time management in children: psychometric properties of the Time-S2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 178-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Impaired ability to manage time has been shown in several diagnoses common in childhood. Impaired ability involves activities and participation domain (daily time management, DTM) and body function and structure domain (time-processing ability, TPA). DTM needs to be evaluated from an individual's own perspective. To date, there has been a lack of self-rating instruments for children that focus on DTM.Aim: The aim of this study is to describe psychometric properties of Time-S when used in children aged 10-17 years with a diagnosis of ADHD, Autism, CP or mild ID. Further, to test whether TPA correlates with self-rated DTM.Material and methods: Eighty-three children aged 10-17 years participated in the study. Rasch analysis was used to assess psychometric properties. Correlation analysis was performed between Time-S and a measure of TPA.Results: The 21 items of the Time-S questionnaire fit into a unitary construct measuring self-perceived daily management of an individual's time. A non-significant, small correlation was found between TPA and DTM.Conclusion and significance: The results indicate good psychometric properties for the questionnaire. The questionnaire is potentially useful in intervention planning and evaluation.

  • 24.
    Söderback, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Stein, Franklin
    Cancer Patients' and their Physicians' Perceptions of the Formers' need for Occupational Therapy2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to identify cancer patients' need for occupational therapy by (a) describing their and their physicians' perceptions of the former's needs (b) exploring whether patients and physicians agree on the patient's need for occupational therapy, and (c) identifying the factors related to the physicians' and the patients' perceptions of patient needs. One-hundred-and-two patients with a cancer disease and the 11 physicians responsible for them completed the ?Occupational Therapy Needs Assessment? during a visit to a medical consultation unit. Fifty-six percent of the patients felt a need for occupational therapy. In 59% of cases, their physicians judged that there was a need for occupational therapy. Patients and physicians both judged that those patients who were older than 66 years and in the active phase of the disease needed therapy more than those patients under 66 years and not in an active phase of the disease. More patients judged by their physicians to have more than 6 months to live needed occupational therapy more than those judged to have less than 6 months. In conclusion, it seems that occupational therapy is felt by cancer patients and their physicians to be underutilised.

  • 25.
    Vroland-Nordstrand, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Neuropediat Unit, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Inst, Neuropediat Unit, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Neuropediat Unit, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Occupat Therapy Unit, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parents' experiences of conducting a goal-directed intervention based on children's self-identified goals, a qualitative study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim/objective: To explore and describe parents' perceptions and experiences of conducting a goal-directed intervention focused on children's self-identified goals.Material and methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were performed with nine parents (8 mothers, 1 father). All the parents had participated actively in conducting a goal-directed intervention addressing their children's self-identified goals. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: From a parental perspective, working on children's self-identified goals was a positive experience. The findings revealed three categories: Goals challenged the parents describes the parents' experiences of the complexity of goal setting. The intervention demanded an intensive and flexible parental engagement; here the parents expressed the importance of active parental engagement, which for some parents could be challenging. The child's personal goals gave more than anticipated describes the parents' experiences of how the children's personal goals positively influenced the children's self-esteem, increased the children's motivation for practice, and helped the children develop more than the parents had anticipated.Conclusions and significance: In the parents' experience, goal-directed intervention comprehensively relies on their engagement. Follow up's from the occupational therapist motivated the parents and their own child's personal goals gave them more than they could have expected. This indicates the importance of supporting parents and letting children actively participate in the goal setting process.

  • 26.
    Vroland-Nordstrand, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, L.
    The perceived efficacy and goal setting system (PEGS), Part II: Evaluation of testretest reliability and differences between child and parental reports in the Swedish version2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 506-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to evaluate the testretest reliability of children's perceptions of their own competence in performing daily tasks and of their choice of goals for intervention using the Swedish version of the Perceived Efficacy and Goal Setting System (PEGS). A second aim was to evaluate agreement between children's and parents' perceptions of the child's competence and choices of intervention goals. Methods: Forty-four children with disabilities and their parents completed the Swedish version of the PEGS. Thirty-six of the children completed a retest session allocated into one of two groups: (A) for evaluation of perceived competence and (B) for evaluation of choice of goals. Cohen's kappa, weighted kappa and absolute agreement were calculated. Results: Testretest reliability for children's perceived competence showed good agreement for the dichotomized scale of competent/non-competent performance; however, using the four-point scale the agreement varied. The children's own goals were relatively stable over time; 78% had an absolute agreement ranging from 50% to 100%. There was poor agreement between the children's and their parents' ratings. Goals identified by the children differed from those identified by their parents, with 48% of the children having no goals identical to those chosen by their parents. These results indicate that the Swedish version of the PEGS produces reliable outcomes comparable to the original version.

  • 27.
    Vroland-Nordstrand, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    The Perceived Efficacy and Goal Setting System (PEGS), Part I: Translation and cross-cultural adaptation to a Swedish context2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 497-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To translate, adapt, and evaluate the applicability of the Perceived Efficacy and Goal Setting System (PEGS) for use in Sweden.

    Method:

    Based on guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of self-reports, the study was performed in several phases involving (i) translation and back-translation, (ii) pre-testing of the translated version, (iii) development of adjusted items and, finally, (iv) field testing of the proposed Swedish version. Participants were 63 parent-child dyads recruited through convenience sampling by 19 therapists.

    Results:

    Overall, five items in the original PEGS required adaptation, and one new item was added. Using the Swedish version of the PEGS, both children and parents were able to identify individual strengths and weaknesses in the child's performance of daily tasks as well as to select goals for intervention.

    Conclusions:

    The Swedish version of the PEGS thus showed evidence of validity based on test content and was applicable for use with children enrolled in paediatric rehabilitation who had a variety of disabilities and who were between five and 12 years of age.

  • 28.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Box 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Nordin, Maria
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, Umea, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Box 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Domestic work division and satisfaction in cohabiting adults: Associations with life satisfaction and self-rated health2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The amount and perception of domestic work may affect satisfaction with everyday life, but further knowledge is needed about the relationship between domestic work division and health and well-being. Aim: To describe the division of, and satisfaction with, domestic work and responsibility for home/family in adults living with a partner. A further aim was to investigate the associations between these aspects and self-rated life satisfaction and health. Method: Data from the Work, Lipids and Fibrinogen survey collected 2009 were used, comprising 4924 participants living with a partner. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Results: The majority shared domestic work and responsibility for home/family equally with their partner. However, more women conducted the majority of the domestic work and were less satisfied with its division. When both division and satisfaction with division was included in the analysis, solely satisfaction with the division and the responsibility were associated with higher odds for good life satisfaction. Regarding health, higher odds for good self-rated health were seen in those who were satisfied with their division of responsibility. Conclusion and significance: The results highlight the importance of taking into account not solely the actual division of domestic work but also the satisfaction with it.

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