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  • 1.
    Flinkfeldt, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    'Filling one's days': managing sick leave legitimacy in an online forum2011In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 761-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inherent part of the general understanding of illness is that it is incapacitating, making those who are ill unable to do things that they would normally do. Staying at home from work is a common consequence, and what 'ill' people do while at home then becomes accountable. This article explores online discourse about the kinds of activities people engage in when on sick leave. It employs a discursive psychological framework for analysis, drawing heavily on conversation analysis. A Swedish internet forum thread on sick leave is examined, focusing on how the participants describe and account for the things they do when staying home from work due to illness. The analysis suggests that the participants' accounts of their activities delicately manage the legitimacy of their sick leave. In examining how this is done in practice, the analysis makes visible the balancing act between being ill enough to stay home from work and well enough for other activities. In the context of recent debates in Sweden and elsewhere about the legitimacy of sick leave in different situations, the analysis of how legitimacy is actually negotiated is an important concern, making visible the moral work of being on sick leave.

  • 2.
    Flinkfeldt, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Wanting to work: Managing the sick role in high-stake sickness insurance meetings2017In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1149-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article respecifies and develops Parsons's sick role theory, focusing on the postulate that the sick person must want' to get well. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology to study how the psychological term want' is used in high-stake, multi-professional meetings with sickness benefit claimants in Sweden, the article shows how establishing that one wants' to get well requires extensive interactional work. In the examined meetings, the sick person's want' formulations make explicit the relationship between wants' and illness or inabilities, thus allowing for motivational character to be established without committing to its implications, and without appearing strategic or biased. By contrast, professional parties in the meetings invoke the sick person's wants' either to hold them accountable, or for establishing a desired course of recovery, confirming the centrality of such wants' in this setting as well as the risks associated with expressing them. The article suggests that analysing psychological matters as they are oriented to by participants renders sick role theory relevant for a wide range of settings and respecifies criticism of the model.

  • 3.
    Fredriksson, Mio
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Aston Univ, Sch Languages & Social Sci, Birmingham B4 7ET, W Midlands, England.
    Tritter, Jonathan Q.
    Aston Univ, Sch Languages & Social Sci, Birmingham B4 7ET, W Midlands, England.
    Disentangling patient and public involvement inhealthcare decisions: Why the difference matters2017In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient and public involvement has become an integral aspect of many developedhealth systems and is judged to be an essential driver for reform. However, littleattention has been paid to the distinctions between patients and the public, and theviews of patients are often seen to encompass those of the general public. Usingan ideal-type approach, we analyse crucial distinctions between patientinvolvement and public involvement using examples from Sweden and England.We highlight that patients have sectional interests as health services users incontrast to the citizen who engage as public policy agent reecting societalinterests. Patients draw on experiential knowledge and focus on output legitimacyand performance accountability, aim at typical representativeness, and a directresponsiveness to individual needs and preferences. In contrast, the publiccontributes with collective perspectives generated from diversity, centres on inputlegitimacy achieved through statistical representativeness, democraticaccountability and indirect responsiveness to general citizen preferences. Thus,using patients as proxies for the public fails to achieve intended goals and benetsof involvement. We conclude that understanding and measuring the impact ofpatient and public involvement can only develop with the application of a clearercomprehension of the differences.

  • 4. Green, Gill
    et al.
    Davison, Charlie
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Krause, Kristine
    Morente Mejias, Felipe
    Alex, Gabriele
    Pathways to care: how superdiversity shapes the need for navigational assistance2014In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1205-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recently developed sociological concept of superdiversity provides a potentially interesting and useful way of developing an understanding of life in contemporary Europe. Here we report on research based on individual narratives about access to health care, as described by a range of people from very different sociocultural backgrounds in four European countries. This article notes the frequent appearance in first-person narratives of the need for navigational assistance in the form of knowledge, cultural competence and orientation that facilitate the identification and use of pathways to health care. Our dataset of 24 semi-structured interviews suggests that, in the context of needing health care, the feeling of being a ‘stranger in a strange land’ is common in people from a wide range of backgrounds. In social settings characterised by transnationalism and cultural heterogeneity, it is important to understand the need for navigational assistance, particularly at times of uncertainty, in the design and delivery of health services. The relationship between the inhabitants of contemporary Europe and the healthcare systems available in the places where they live is dominated by both complexity and contingency – and this is the cultural field in which navigation operates.

  • 5.
    Gröndal, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Harmless, friendly and lethal: antibiotic misuse in relation to the unpredictable bacterium Group A streptococcus2018In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1127-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence‐based treatment guidelines for managing infections in health care are promoted as tools to prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics. Antibiotic misuse has been examined as regards the doctor‐patient relation and the social context of medical practice. Less attention has been paid to how the very conceptualisation of human‐microbial relations may influence understandings of antibiotic misuse. The article examines a medical controversy concerning guidelines for managing throat infection and antibiotic treatment in Sweden. It demonstrates how this controversy unfolds around two different ways of relating to a specific bacterium – Group A Streptococcus. The analysis shows how two ‘microbiopolitics’, involving different understandings of human‐microbial relations, are created in the controversy and how different antibiotic prescribing practices are justified. By focusing on Group A Streptococcus, which is commonly observed, but also unpredictable and potentially dangerous, the article provides new insights into the relations between bacteria, humans and policy in an age of antimicrobial resistance. It argues, in particular, that the definition of antibiotic misuse is unstable and consequently that policy measures aimed at reducing misuse must be related to how specific infections and bacteria are conceptualised in the actual context the policy addresses.

  • 6.
    Grönvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Fuzzy Buzz Word: Conceptualizations of Disability in Disability Research Classics2007In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 750-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses five classical texts from the field of disability research/studies. The focus of the analysis is on how disability is defined both on a theoretical level and on an empirical or applied level. The findings suggest that definitional clarity can be questioned. First, a 'traditional' problem of validity occurs in some of the texts. Secondly, lack of clearly expressed and explicit definitions makes it difficult for the reader to understand what the author means with the term disability. Thirdly, some authors alter the definition of disability through their texts, without any explanations, making it arduous for the reader to follow the use and meaning of the term. It is suggested that these problems stem from the lack of proper theorising within the field of disability research. Disability researchers have been focusing on defining separate concepts, without any ambitions to relate them to each other in a theoretical frame. This means that the field of disability research consists of free-floating concepts, poorly related to each other.

  • 7.
    Iversen, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Now or never: Smoking cessation discussions in the face of serious illness2017In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1330-1348Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Schirmer, Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Agents of their health?: How the Swedish welfare state introduces expectations of individual responsibility2010In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 930-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the notion of individual responsibility for one’s health has been introduced into Swedish medico-political debate. Formerly expressed as a recommendation, it has now taken on the form of expectations. In a Swedish context, this shift from collective to individual responsibility is novel because it implies a break with well-established welfare state practice of comprehensive care for their citizens. Using a systems-theoretical approach, we interpret this shift of expectations as a political solution to the problem of legitimate allocation of scarce resources. A more inclusive medical conception of illness has facilitated the introduction of many new diagnoses that, in turn, have lead to a strong increase in claims for medical treatment and for compensation. This semantic change in medicine aggravates the budgetary situation of the welfare state. The political solution lies in a reorientation of the expectations the medical system can have on citizens as well as a shift of the expectations regarding the rights and obligations citizens can have on the medical system. Individuals are increasingly expected to live healthy lifestyles and to avoid hazardous habits. If they do not live up to these expectations, they have to face low prioritisation or denial of treatment.

  • 9.
    Strandh, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    Rehabiliteringsvetenskap vid Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet.
    Russel, Helen
    Econ & Social Res Inst, Dublin, Ireland.
    Unemployment, gender and mental health: the role of the gender regime2013In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 649-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing research suggests that gender differences in the effect of unemployment on mental health are related to the different positions and roles that are available for men and women in society and the family; roles that are connected with their different psychosocial and economic need for employment. The aim of this article is to analyse the role of gender in the relationship between unemployment and mental wellbeing in Sweden, representing a gender regime with a similar need for employment among women and men, and Ireland, representing a gender regime in which the need for employment differs between women and men. The results, based on longitudinal data from the two countries, show that unemployment was more negatively related to mental health among men than among women in Ireland, while men and women were equally affected by unemployment in Sweden. Factors related to the family and economic situation, as well as gendered selection into the unemployment population, explains the difference in mental health between unemployed men and women in Ireland. The overall conclusion is that the context has a major influence on the relationship between unemployment, gender and mental health.

1 - 9 of 9
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