uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Five-day food intake in elderly female outpatients with Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or stroke2004In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the intake of food, energy and selected nutrients in elderly outpatients, i.e. women with Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or stroke.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

    Sixty-three elderly women aged 64-88 years participated in the study. For assessing dietary intake, a repeated 24-h recall and an estimated food diary for three consecutive days were used.

    RESULTS:

    The mean age was 73.4 +/- 6.6 years. Mean reported daily energy intake was 6.4 +/- 1.7 MJ, i.e. lower than reference figures for all groups. However, looking at nutrient density, only intakes of vitamin E and folate were below recommended levels. The most frequently consumed food groups were bread, coffee, milk products, buns and cookies, and spreads.

    CONCLUSION:

    The reported energy intake among the elderly female outpatients was low. This might be explained by actual low intake and/or under-reporting. However, the intake of most vitamins and minerals, i.e. nutrient density, was adequate, with the exception of vitamin E and folate intake, which was below recommended levels. Food intake showed large variation and good diet composition, and there was a tendency towards high consumption of food items that are easily prepared and eaten.

  • 2.
    Dent, E.
    et al.
    Torrens Univ Australia, Wakefield St, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Baker Heart & Diabet Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Morley, J. E.
    St Louis Univ, Sch Med, Div Geriatr Med, St Louis, MO 63104 USA.
    Cruz-Jentoft, A. J.
    Hosp Univ Ramon y Cajal IRYCIS, Serv Geriatr, Madrid, Spain.
    Arai, H.
    Natl Ctr Geriatr & Gerontol, Obu, Japan.
    Kritchevsky, S. B.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Sticht Ctr Hlth Aging & Alzheimers Prevent, Winston Salem, NC USA.
    Guralnik, J.
    Bauer, J. M.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Heidelberg Univ Agaples Bethanien Krankenhaus, Ctr Geriatr Med, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Pahor, M.
    Univ Florida, Dept Aging & Geriatr Res, Gainesville, FL USA.
    Clark, B. C.
    OMNI, Athens, OH USA.
    Cesari, M.
    Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Geriatr Unit, Milan, Italy;Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth, Milan, Italy.
    Ruiz, J.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Div Geriatr & Palliat Med, Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Sieber, C. C.
    Aubertin-Leheudre, M.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Biomed Ageing, Nurnberg, Germany;Univ Quebec Montreal, Fac Sci, Dept Sci Act Phys, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Waters, D. L.
    Univ Otago, Dept Med, Sch Physiotherapy, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Visvanathan, R.
    Univ Adelaide, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Adelaide Med Sch, Adelaide Geriatr Training & Res Aged Care GTRAC C, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Landi, F.
    Fdn Policlin A Gemelli, Rome, Italy.
    Villareal, D. T.
    Michael E DeBakey VA Med Ctr, Ctr Translat Res Inflammatory Dis, Houston, TX USA;Baylor Coll Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Fielding, R.
    Tufts Univ, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Boston, MA 02111 USA.
    Won, C. W.
    Kyung Hee Univ, Coll Med, Dept Family Med, Elderly Frailty Res Ctr, Seoul, South Korea.
    Theou, O.
    Univ Adelaide, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Adelaide Med Sch, Adelaide Geriatr Training & Res Aged Care GTRAC C, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Dalhousie Univ, Dept Med, Halifax, NS, Canada.
    Martin, F. C.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Populat Hlth Sci, London, England.
    Dong, B.
    Sichuan Univ, West China Hosp, Natl Clin Res Ctr Geriatr, Chengdu, Sichuan, Peoples R China.
    Woo, J.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Flicker, L.
    Univ Western Australia, Med Sch, Western Australian Ctr Hlth & Ageing, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ferrucci, L.
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Merchant, R. A.
    Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Natl Univ Hosp, Div Geriatr Med, Dept Med, Singapore, Singapore.
    Cao, L.
    Sichuan Univ, West China Hosp, Ctr Gerontol & Geriatr, Chengdu, Sichuan, Peoples R China.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Theme Aging, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ribeiro, S. M. L.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Publ Hlth, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    Rodriguez-Manas, L.
    Hosp Univ Getafe, Serv Geriatr, Madrid, Spain.
    Anker, S. D.
    Charite, Dept Cardiol CVK, Berlin, Germany;Charite, Berlin Brandenburg Ctr Regenerat Therapies BCRT, Berlin, Germany;Charite, German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK Partner Site Berli, Berlin, Germany;Univ Gottingen, Med Sch, Dept Cardiol & Pneumol, Gottingen, Germany.
    Lundy, J.
    Perry Cty Mem Hosp, Perryville, MO USA.
    Gutierrez Robledo, L. M.
    Natl Inst Geriatr, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Bautmans, I.
    VUB, Gerontol Dept, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium;VUB, Frailty Ageing FRIA Res Dept, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium;Univ Ziekenhuis Brussel UZ Brussel, Geriatr Dept, Laarbeeklaan 101, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium.
    Aprahamian, I.
    Fac Med Jundiai, Div Geriatr, Dept Internal Med, Jundiai, Brazil.
    Schols, J. M. G. A.
    Maastricht Univ, FHML, Caphri, Dept Hlth Serv Res, Maastricht, Netherlands;Maastricht Univ, Sect Old Age Med, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Izquierdo, M.
    Univ Publ Navarra, Dept Hlth Sci, CIBER Fragilidad & Envejecimiento Saludable, Navarrabiomed,IdiSNA,Navarra Inst Hlth Res, Navarra, Spain.
    Vellas, B.
    CHU Toulouse, Gerontopole Clin, Toulouse, France.
    International Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sarcopenia (ICFSR): Screening, Diagnosis and Management2018In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1148-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sarcopenia, defined as an age-associated loss of skeletal muscle function and muscle mass, occurs in approximately 6 - 22 % of older adults. This paper presents evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for screening, diagnosis and management of sarcopenia from the task force of the International Conference on Sarcopenia and Frailty Research (ICSFR).

    Methods: To develop the guidelines, we drew upon the best available evidence from two systematic reviews paired with consensus statements by international working groups on sarcopenia. Eight topics were selected for the recommendations: (i) defining sarcopenia; (ii) screening and diagnosis; (iii) physical activity prescription; (iv) protein supplementation; (v) vitamin D supplementation; (vi) anabolic hormone prescription; (vii) medications under development; and (viii) research. The ICSFR task force evaluated the evidence behind each topic including the quality of evidence, the benefit harm balance of treatment, patient preferences/values, and cost-effectiveness. Recommendations were graded as either strong or conditional (weak) as per the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Consensus was achieved via one face-to-face workshop and a modified Delphi process.

    Recommendations: We make a conditional recommendation for the use of an internationally accepted measurement tool for the diagnosis of sarcopenia including the EWGSOP and FNIH definitions, and advocate for rapid screening using gait speed or the SARC-F. To treat sarcopenia, we strongly recommend the prescription of resistance-based physical activity, and conditionally recommend protein supplementation/a protein-rich diet. No recommendation is given for Vitamin D supplementation or for anabolic hormone prescription. There is a lack of robust evidence to assess the strength of other treatment options.

  • 3.
    Fielding, R. A.
    et al.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Travison, T. G.
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Kirn, D. R.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Koochek, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Reid, K. F.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    von Berens, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Zhu, H.
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Folta, S. C.
    Tufts Univ, Friedman Sch Nutr Sci & Policy, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Sacheck, J. M.
    Tufts Univ, Friedman Sch Nutr Sci & Policy, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Nelson, M. E.
    Tufts Univ, Friedman Sch Nutr Sci & Policy, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Sustainabil Inst, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Liu, C. K.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Med, Sect Geriatr, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. School of Education, Health and Society, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. School of Education, Health and Society, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lilja, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Effect of structured physical activity and nutritional supplementation on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the VIVE2 randomized trial2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interactions between nutritional supplementation and physical activity on changes in physical function among older adults remain unclear. The primary objective of this study was to examine the impact of nutritional supplementation plus structured physical activity on 400M walk capacity in mobility-limited older adults across two sites (Boston, USA and Stockholm, Sweden). All subjects participated in a physical activity program (3x/week for 24 weeks), involving walking, strength, balance, and flexibility exercises. Subjects were randomized to a daily nutritional supplement (150kcal, 20g whey protein, 800 IU vitamin D) or placebo (30kcal, non-nutritive). Participants were recruited from urban communities at 2 field centers in Boston MA USA and Stockholm SWE. Mobility-limited (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) ae<currency>9) and vitamin D insufficient (serum 25(OH) D 9 - 24 ng/ml) older adults were recruited for this study. Primary outcome was gait speed assessed by the 400M walk. Results: 149 subjects were randomized into the study (mean age=77.5 +/- 5.4; female=46.3%; mean SPPB= 7.9 +/- 1.2; mean 25(OH)D=18.7 +/- 6.4 ng/ml). Adherence across supplement and placebo groups was similar (86% and 88%, respectively), and was also similar across groups for the physical activity intervention (75% and 72%, respectively). Both groups demonstrated an improvement in gait speed with no significant difference between those who received the nutritional supplement compared to the placebo (0.071 and 0.108 m/s, respectively (p=0.06)). Similar effects in physical function were observed using the SPPB. Serum 25(OH)D increased in supplemented group compared to placebo 7.4 ng/ml versus 1.3 ng/ml respectively. Results suggest improved gait speed following physical activity program with no further improvement with added nutritional supplementation.

  • 4. Kaiser, M. J.
    et al.
    Bauer, J. M.
    Ramsch, C
    Uter, W
    Guigoz, Y
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Thomas, D. R.
    Anthony, P
    Charlton, K. E.
    Maggio, M
    Tsai, A. C.
    Grathwohl, D
    Vellas, B
    Sieber, C. C.
    Validation of the Mini Nutritional Assessment short-form (MNAA (R)-SF): A practical tool for identification of nutritional status2009In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 782-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To validate a revision of the Mini Nutritional Assessment short-form (MNAA (R)-SF) against the full MNA, a standard tool for nutritional evaluation. A literature search identified studies that used the MNA for nutritional screening in geriatric patients. The contacted authors submitted original datasets that were merged into a single database. Various combinations of the questions on the current MNA-SF were tested using this database through combination analysis and ROC based derivation of classification thresholds. Twenty-seven datasets (n=6257 participants) were initially processed from which twelve were used in the current analysis on a sample of 2032 study participants (mean age 82.3y) with complete information on all MNA items. The original MNA-SF was a combination of six questions from the full MNA. A revised MNA-SF included calf circumference (CC) substituted for BMI performed equally well. A revised three-category scoring classification for this revised MNA-SF, using BMI and/or CC, had good sensitivity compared to the full MNA. The newly revised MNA-SF is a valid nutritional screening tool applicable to geriatric health care professionals with the option of using CC when BMI cannot be calculated. This revised MNA-SF increases the applicability of this rapid screening tool in clinical practice through the inclusion of a "malnourished" category.

  • 5. Kozlowska, K.
    et al.
    Szczecinka, A.
    Roszkowski,, W.
    Brzozowska, A.
    Alfonso, C.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Morais, C.
    Nielsen, N.A.
    Pfau, C.
    Saba, A.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Turrini, A.
    Raats, M.
    Lumbers, M.
    Patterns of healthy lifestyle and positive health attitudes in older Europeans2008In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine (i) the extent to which recommended lifestyle healthy behaviors are adopted and the existence of positive attitudes to health; (ii) the relative influence of socio-demographic variables on multiple healthy lifestyle behaviors and positive attitudes to health; (iii) the association between healthy lifestyle behaviors and positive attitudes to health. Design: two distinct healthy behavioral measures were developed: (i) healthy lifestyles based on physical activity, no cigarette smoking, no/moderate alcohol drinking, maintaining a "healthy" weight and having no sleeping problems and (ii) positive health attitudes based on having positive emotional attitudes, such as: self-perceived good health status, being calm, peaceful and happy for most of the time, not expecting health to get worse and regular health check-ups. A composite healthy lifestyle index, ranging from 0 (none of behaviors met) to 5 (all behaviors met) was calculated by summing up the individual's scores for the five healthy lifestyle items. Afterwards, each individual's index was collapsed into three levels: 0-2 equivalent to 'level 1' (subjectively regarded as 'too low'), a score of 3 equivalent to 'level 2' ('fair') and 4-5 as 'level 3' satisfactory 'healthy lifestyle' practices. The same procedure was applied to the positive health attitudes index. Multinomial logistic regression analyses by a forward selection procedure were used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Participants: a multi-national sample consisting of 638 older Europeans from 8 countries, aged 65-74 and 75+, living alone or with others. Results and conclusions: maintaining a "healthy" weight was the most frequently cited factor in the healthy lifestyles index and therefore assumed to be the most important to the older Europeans in the study; positive attitudes to health were relatively low; participants achieved a 'satisfactory' level for healthy lifestyles index (level 3) more frequently than a satisfactory level for positive attitudes to health; having a satisfactory 'healthy lifestyle' was directly related to having a satisfactory level of positive attitudes to health based on the positive health attitudes index; income and geographical location in Europe appeared to be key predictors for meeting both the recommended healthy lifestyle factors in the index and having positive health attitudes however, the composition and nature of the study sample should be taken into consideration when considering the impact of the location on healthy lifestyles and attitudes to health across Europe.

  • 6.
    Kullberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Björklund, Anita
    Ekblad, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Daily Eating Events among Co-living and Single-Living, Diseased Older Men2008In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 176-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To analyse, describe and compare the frequency and energy intake of eating events, including specific food items, among diseased older men living in ordinary housing. Design: Descriptive and explorative. Setting: Interviews were performed in the participants' home. Participants: Thirty-five co-living and 26 single-living men, 64-88 years of age. Participants had one of three chronic diseases associated with difficulties in buying and preparing food and with difficulties related to the meal situation: Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or stroke. Measurements: A repeated 24-h recall was used to assess food intake and meal patterns. Results: Eating events were distributed over a 24-h period. Co-living men had a higher (p=0.001) number of eating events/day; both hot and cold eating events were consumed more frequently. There was no difference between groups concerning energy intake. Co-living men more often had hot eating events cooked from raw ingredients (p=0.001) and a greater mix of vegetables/roots (p=0.003) included in such eating events. Conclusion: Single-living men may constitute a vulnerable group from a nutritional perspective, while co-living men, besides the pleasure of eating with another person, seem to get support with food and eating events from their partners. Hence, the group of single-living men, particularly those with a disability, should receive particular attention with regard to possible food-related difficulties.

  • 7.
    Mamhidir, A. -G
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wimo, A.
    Kihlgren, A.
    FEWER REFERRALS TO SWEDISH EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS AMONG NURSING HOME PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA, COMPREHENSIVE COGNITIVE DECLINE AND MULTICOMORBIDITY2012In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 891-897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective was to describe the extent to which nursing home patients had cognitive impairments and were diagnosed with dementia. Furthermore, to describe and compare multicomorbidity, health status and drug use in the three subgroups; dementia diagnosis/not referred, dementia diagnosis/referred and no dementia diagnosis/not referred to an emergency department (ED) over a one-year period. Methods: A cross-sectional follow-up study was carried out in Sweden. RAI/MDS assessments were conducted on 719 patients in 24 nursing homes, of whom 209 were referred to EDs during a one-year period, accounting for 314 visits. This study involved an extensive examination of the population. Results: The 719 patients were reported to suffer from comprehensive cognitive impairments, which not accorded with the dementia diagnoses, they were significantly fewer. Cognitive decline or dementia diagnosis contributed to a significant decrease of referrals to EDs. Patients with dementia diagnosis/not referred had difficulties understanding others, as well as impaired vision and hearing. Patients with dementia diagnosis/referred usually understood messages. Low BMI, daily pain, multicomorbidity and high drug consumption occurred in all groups. Patients with no dementia diagnosis/not referred had significantly less multicomorbidity. Neuroleptica was significantly more prevalent among those with dementia diagnosis. Conclusion: Dementia remains undetected. Patients with cognitive decline and dementia are probably as sick as or even worse than others but may, due to low priority be undertreated or referrals avoided with the objective to provide good care in the setting. Observational studies are needed to identify what is done and could be done in referral situations.

  • 8.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Food and nutrient intake in a group of self-managing elderly Swedish women2003In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With the increasing numbers of elderly women living at home, there is an interest to investigate the dietary intake of this group.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the food and nutrient intake in a group of self-managing elderly women in Sweden.

    DESIGN: A 3-day self-reported food diary and a repeated 24-h dietary recall were used. The study comprised 135 single-living or married/cohabiting women (mean age 79.5 8.0 years).

    RESULTS: Mean energy intake for the whole group was 6.8 1.9 MJ, and low energy figures were obtained in all age groups indicating some possible under-reporting with a calculated EIrep/BMRest of 1.24 0.36 for the whole group. Overall, energy and nutrient intake was similar in the different age groups (64-68 yrs, 74-78 yrs and 84-88 yrs). Reported intakes of vitamin D (4.8 2.7 mg), tocopherol (5.9 2.2 mg), iron (8.5 2.9 mg), folate (200 8.7 mg) and selenium (29 11 mg) were low compared to recommended intakes. Only minor differences between women in different household types were found. The women reported a variety of food items in their diet.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the results from this study indicate that self-managing elderly women report low energy figures, but have a sufficient intake of most nutrients. However, there is a tendency that the oldest women, i.e. 84-88 yrs have lower intakes.

  • 9. Odlund Olin, A
    et al.
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ljungqvist, O
    Minimal effect on energy intake by additional evening meal for frail elderly service flat residents: a pilot study2008In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 295-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nutritional problems are common in frail elderly individuals receiving municipal care. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if an additional evening meal could improve total daily food intake, nutritional status, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in frail elderly service flat (SF) residents. DESIGN: Out of 122 residents in two SF complexes, 60 subjects agreed to participate, of which 49 subjects (median 84 (79-90) years, (25th-75th percentile)) completed the study. For six months 23 residents in one SF complex were served 530 kcal in addition to their regular meals, i.e. intervention group (I-group). Twenty-six residents in the other SF building were controls (C-group). Nutritional status, energy and nutrient intake, length of night time fast, cognitive function and HRQOL was assessed before and after the intervention. RESULTS: At the start, the Mini Nutritional Assessment classified 27% as malnourished and 63% as at risk for malnutrition, with no difference between the groups. After six months the median body weight was unchanged in the I-group, +0.6 (-1.7-+1.6) kg (p=0.72) and the C-group -0.6 (-2.0-+0.5) kg (p=0.15). Weight change ranged from -13% to +15%. The evening meal improved the protein and carbohydrate intake (p<0.01) but the energy intake increased by only 180 kcal/day (p=0.15). The night time fast decreased in the I-group from 15.0 (13.0-16.0) to 13.0 (12.0-14.0) hours (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in cognitive function or HRQOL between the groups. CONCLUSION: Nine out of ten frail elderly SF residents had nutritional problems. Serving an additional evening meal increased the protein and carbohydrate intake, but the meal had no significant effect on energy intake, body weight or HRQOL. The variation in outcome within each study group was large.

  • 10.
    Skinnars Josefsson, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Persson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Quality indicators of nutritional care practice in elderly care2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1057-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim is to explore the effects of antecedent, structural and process quality indicators of nutritional care practice on meal satisfaction and screened nutritional status among older adults in residential care homes. Design: Data for this Swedish cross-sectional study regarding older adults living in residential care homes were collected by i) a national questionnaire, ii) records from the quality registry Senior Alert, iii) data from an Open Comparison survey of elderly care in 2013/2014. The data represented 1154 individuals in 117 of 290 Swedish municipalities. Measurements: Meal satisfaction (%) and adequate nutritional status, screened by the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF), were the two outcome variables assessed through their association with population density of municipalities and residents’ age, together with 12 quality indicators pertaining to structure and process domains in the Donabedian model of care. Results: Meal satisfaction was associated with rural and urban municipalities, with the structure quality indicators: local food policies, private meal providers, on-site cooking, availability of clinical/community dietitians, foodservice dietitians, and with the process quality indicators: meal choice, satisfaction surveys, and ‘meal councils’. Adequate nutritional status was positively associated with availability of clinical/community dietitians, and energy and nutrient calculated menus, and negatively associated with chilled food production systems. Conclusion: Municipality characteristics and structure quality indicators had the strongest associations with meal satisfaction, and quality indicators with local characteristics emerge as important for meal satisfaction. Nutritional competence appears vital for residents to be well-nourished.

  • 11.
    Törmä, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Winblad, Ulrika Spångberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Saletti, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Strategies to implement community guidelines on nutrition and their long-term clinical effects in nursing home residents2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Studies on implementation techniques that focus on nutrition in the setting of elderly care are scarce. The aims of this study were to compare two implementation strategies i.e., external facilitation ( EF) and educational outreach visits ( EOVs), in order to introduce nutritional guidelines ( e.g. screening, food quality and mealtime ambience), into a nursing home ( NH) setting and to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Design: A controlled study with baseline and follow-up measurements. Setting: Four NHs. Participants: A total of 101 NH residents. Intervention: The EF was a one-year, multifaceted intervention that included support, guidance, practice audits, and feedback that were provided to two NHs. The EOVs performed at the other NHs consisted of one session of three hours of lectures about the guidelines. Both interventions targeted a team of the unit manager, the head nurse, and 5-10 of the care staff. Measurements: The outcomes were nutritional status ( Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, MNA-SF), body mass index ( BMI), functional ability ( Barthel Index, BI), cognitive function ( Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, SPMSQ, performed in a subgroup of communicative NH residents), health-related quality of life ( EQ-5D), and the levels of certain biochemical markers like for example vitamin D, albumin and insulin-like growth factor 1. Results: After a median of 18 months, nutritional parameters ( MNA-SF and BMI) remained unchanged in both groups. While there were no differences in most outcomes between the two groups, the cognitive ability of those in the EOV group deteriorated more than in individuals in the EF group ( p=0.008). Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that the intervention group assignment ( EF) was independently from other potentially related factors associated with less cognitive decline. Conclusion: An extended model of implementation of nutritional guidelines, including guidance and feedback to NH staff, did not affect nutritional status but may be associated with a delayed cognitive decline in communicative NH residents.

  • 12. Van Kan, G Sbellan
    et al.
    Gambassie, L de Groot
    Andrieu, S.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Andre, E.
    Caubere, J-P.
    Bonjour, J-P.
    Ritz, P.
    Salva, A.
    Sinclair, A.
    Vellas, B.
    Nutrition and aging: The Carla Workshop2008In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 355-364Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 13.
    von Berens, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fielding, R. A.
    Gustafsson, T.
    Kirn, D.
    Laussen, J.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Travison, T. G.
    Reid, K.
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Physical performance and serum 25(OH)vitamin D status in community dwelling old mobility limited adults: A cross-sectional study2018In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:

    To examine the potential association between serum 25(OH) vitamin D and theperformance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) including the sub-components; five repeatedchair stands test, 4 meters walk test and balance in older mobility-limited community-dwelling men and women.

    Design:

    A cross sectional study was performed in American and Swedish subjects who were examined forpotential participation in a combined exercise and nutrition intervention trial. Logistic regression analysis andlinear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association for 25(OH)D with the overall score onthe SBBP, chair stand, gait speed and balance.

    Participants:

    Community-dwelling (mean age 77.6 ± 5.3 years)mobility limited American (n=494) and Swedish (n=116) females (59%) and males.

    Measurements:

    The SPPB(0-12 points) includes chair stand (s), gait speed (m/s) and a balance test. Mobility limitation i.e., SPPB score ≤9 was an inclusion criterion. A blood sample was obtained to measure serum 25(OH)vitamin D concentrations.

    Results:

    No clear association of 25(OH)D with SPPB scores was detected either when 25(OH)D was assessedas a continuous variable or when categorized according to serum concentrations of <50, 50-75 or <75 nmol/L.However, when analyzing the relationship between 25(OH)D and seconds to perform the chair stands, asignificant quadratic relationship was observed. Thus, at serum levels of 25(OH)D above 74 nmol/L, higherconcentrations appeared to be advantageous for the chair stand test, whereas for serum levels below 74 nmol/Lthis association was not observed.

    Conclusion:

    This cross- sectional study lacked clear association betweenserum 25(OH)D and physical performance in mobility limited adults. A potentially interesting observation wasthat at higher serum levels of 25(OH)D a better performance on the chair stand test was indicated.

  • 14.
    Wimo, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Aging Res Ctr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elmståhl, S.
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Div Geriatr Med, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Fratiglioni, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Aging Res Ctr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Gerontol Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjölund, B. -M
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Aging Res Ctr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.; Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sköldunger, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Aging Res Ctr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fagerström, C.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Berglund, J.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Lagergren, M.
    Stockholm Gerontol Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Formal and informal care of community-living older people: A population-based study from the swedish national study on aging and care2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Study formal and informal care of community-living older people in the Swedish National study of Aging and Care (SNAC). Design: Cross-sectional, population based cohort. Setting: Three areas in Sweden: Municipality of Nordanstig, Stockholm and Skane County. Participants: 3,338 persons >= 72 years. Measurements: Patterns and amounts of informal and formal care by cognition and area of residence. Results: 73% received no care; 14% formal care; and 17% informal care (7% received both). In the whole study population, including those who used no care, individuals in small municipalities received 9.6 hours of informal care/month; in mid-size municipalities, 6.6; and in urban areas, 5.6. Users of informal care received 33.1 hours of informal care/month in small municipalities, 54.6 in mid-size municipalities and 36.1 in urban areas. Individuals with cognitive impairment received 14.1 hours of informal care/month, 2.7 times more than people with no/slight impairment. In the whole study population, individuals in small municipalities received an average of 3.2 hours of formal care/month; in mid-size municipalities 1.4; and in urban areas, 2.6. Corresponding figures for formal care users were 29.4 hours in small municipalities, 13.6 in mid-size municipalities and 16.7 in urban areas. Formal care users received 7.1 hours, and informal care users, 5.9 hours for each hour/month received by people in the study population as a whole. Conclusions: More informal than formal care was provided. Informal care is more frequent in small municipalities than urban areas and for those with than without cognitive impairment. The relationship between data on the whole population and the data on users or care indicates that population-based data are needed to avoid overestimates of care.

  • 15.
    Wleklik, M
    et al.
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Uchmanowicz, I
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Jankowska-Polańska, B
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Andreae, Christina
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Regulska-Ilow, B
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    The Role of Nutritional Status in Elderly Patients with Heart Failure2018In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 581-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence indicates that malnutrition very frequently co-occurs with chronic heart failure (HF) and leads to a range of negative consequences. Studies show associations between malnutrition and wound healing disorders, an increased rate of postoperative complications, and mortality. In addition, considering the increasing age of patients with HF, a specific approach to their treatment is required. Guidelines proposed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) for treating acute and chronic HF refer to the need to monitor and prevent malnutrition in HF patients. However, the guidelines feature no strict nutritional recommendations for HF patients, who are at high nutritional risk as a group, nor do they offer any such recommendations for the poor nutritional status subgroup, for which high morbidity and mortality rates have been observed. In the context of multidisciplinary healthcare, recommended by the ESC and proven by research to offer multifaceted benefits, nutritional status should be systematically assessed in HF patients. Malnutrition has become a challenge within healthcare systems and day-to-day clinical practice, especially in developed countries, where it affects the course of disease and patients' prognosis.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf