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  • 1. Barthelmess, Klaus
    et al.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A watercolour of a stranded sperm whale from the late seventeenth century2013In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 38-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A manuscript album, known as Kungsboken, contains various documents of military relevance assembled during the rule of the Swedish kings Charles XI and Charles XII. Among them is a watercolour depicting a stranded sperm whale. The painting is not signed or dated but is believed to have been done around 1675. It may be an illustration of a whale that was stranded on the north German coast, then part of the Swedish empire. The painting is an interesting example of anamorphosis.

  • 2.
    Fredga, Karl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Stjernberg, Torsten
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    An early (1834) illustration of the wood lemming, Myopus schisticolor (Lilljeborg, 1844), from Finland2011In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wood lemming, Myopus schisticolor, was described as a new species by the Swedish zoologist Wilhelm Lilljeborg in 1844 from a specimen captured in Norway the year before. With the original description was a fine hand-coloured lithograph by the artist Magnus Korner. A Latin translation of the description published later that year also used an illustration by Korner, but it was of lesser quality. However, the species had been observed, described and depicted earlier, but these renderings never reached the scientific community. In 2008 and 2009 respectively, one illustration of the wood lemming made by the Finnish-born artist Wilhelm von Wright was sold twice at auctions in Stockholm. The illustration is dated 1834 and shows a specimen that was found dead at the artist's native home, Haminalaks, in Kuopio parish, Central Finland, that year. However, an accurate description of the species had already been made in 1765, by a group of young naturalists on a tour in the Swedish province Dalecarlia.

  • 3.
    Hellström, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Darwin and the Tree of Life: The roots of the evolutionary tree2012In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 234-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To speak of evolutionary trees and of the Tree of Life has become routine in evolution studies, despite recurrent objections. Because it is not immediately obvious why a tree is suited to represent evolutionary history - woodland trees do not have their buds in the present and their trunks in the past, for a start - the reason why trees make sense to us is historically and culturally, not scientifically, predicated. To account for the Tree of Life, simultaneously genealogical and cosmological, we must explore the particular context in which Darwin declared the natural order to be analogous to a pedigree, and in which he communicated this vision by recourse to a tree. The name he gave his tree reveals part of the story, as before Darwin's appropriation of it, the Tree of Life grew in Paradise at the heart of God's creation.

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  • 4.
    Hellström, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Review of J. David Archibald, Aristotle's ladder, Darwin's tree. The evolution of visual metaphors for biological order, Columbia University Press, 20142015In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 378-379Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hellström, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Review of Nick Hopwood, Haeckel’s embryos. Images, evolution, and fraud, Chicago University Press, 20152016In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 367-368Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hellström, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Review of: PIETSCH, T. W. Trees of life. A visual history of evolution. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore: 2012.2013In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 184-185Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 7.
    Hellström, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    The tree as evolutionary icon: TREE in the Natural History Museum, London2011In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the Darwin celebrations in 2009, the Natural History Museum in London unveiled TREE, the first contemporary artwork to win a permanent place in the Museum. While the artist claimed that the inspiration for TREE came from Darwin's famous notebook sketch of branching evolution, sometimes referred to as his "tree of life" drawing, this article emphasises the apparent incongruity between Darwin's sketch and the artist's design -- best explained by other, complementary sources of inspiration. In the context of the Museum's active participation in struggles over science and religion, the effect of the new artwork is contradictory. TREE celebrates Darwinian evolutionism, but it resonates with deep-rooted, mythological traditions of tree symbolism to do so. This complicates the status of the Museum space as one of disinterested, secular science, but it also contributes, with or without the intentions of the Museum's management, to consolidate two sometimes conflicting strains within the Museum's history. TREE celebrates human effort, secular science and reason -- but it also evokes long-standing mythological traditions to inspire reverence and remind us of our humble place in the world.

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    NP Hellström - The tree as evolutionary icon
  • 8.
    Hellström, Petter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    André, Gilles
    76 Rue Hurepoix, F-91470 Limours, France.
    Philippe, Marc
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, CMR LEHNA 5023, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Life and works of Augustin Augier de Favas (1725–1825), author of 'Arbre botanique' (1801)2017In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Augustin Augier's “Arbre botanique” (“botanical tree”) (1801), a diagram representing the natural order of plants in the shape of a family tree, is today a standard reference in histories of systematics and phylogenetic trees. The previously unidentified author was a nobleman from Saint-Tropez, a schoolteacher and a priest in the Société de l'Oratoire de Jésus et de Marie immaculée. His biography and two previously unnoticed publications, as well as his correspondence with the Institut national in Paris, are discussed. Knowledge of Augier's identity, his life and works sheds new light upon his taxonomic theories, and helps us to understand his “Arbre botanique”. Long before the tree was made into an icon of evolutionism, Augier used it to demonstrate the beauty and perfect order of divine creation.

  • 9. Lundberg, S.
    et al.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Stone loach in Stockholm, Sweden, and royal fish-ponds in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries2010In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stone loach (Barbatula barbatula) occurs in three main areas in Sweden. In the north, it is found in Lapland in the River Tornealven. In the south, it is found in Skane. There are also two populations near the cities of Stockholm and Nykoping. New data suggest that these two populations originate from fish that were kept in ponds. In the 1740s King Frederick I is said to have released stone loaches from German sources in Lake Malaren, but this cannot explain its occurrence in Igelbacken near Stockholm. There is also reason to believe that it was kept in ponds at the royal castle Ulriksdal in the mid-eighteenth century. The fish was possibly imported from the king's native Germany, to be eaten as a delicacy. However, historical records tell of pond-keeping of stone loach by the Royal court in the Stockholm area during the 1680s.

  • 10.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Box 50007, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    European weather loach (Misgurnus fossilis) at Ulriksdal Palace, Stockholm, in the 1750s   2016In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 163-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Cios, Stanislaw
    Petrus Magni and the history of fresh-water aquaculture in the later Middle Ages2014In: Archives of Natural History, ISSN 0260-9541, E-ISSN 1755-6260, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 124-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1520 the Bridgettine priest Petrus Magni (1460-1534), wrote a manual on agriculture. The manuscript, in Late Old Swedish, is to a large extent taken from Columella's De re rustica with many additions. At the end of the manual there is a brief chapter on making and keeping ponds for crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and tench (Tinca tinca). Aquaculture, with keeping and breeding fish in artificial ponds, was probably an innovation that became established in secular and monastic environments in Sweden in the fifteenth century. The text is to some extent based on Petrus's own experience and provides rare knowledge of pond-breeding of cyprinids in Scandinavia in late Medieval times. Petrus's account is the oldest known manual on fish-breeding in northern Europe. This brief manual is compared with manuals on fish culture by the Bohemian Bishop Janus Dubravius (1486-1553) and Polish nobleman Olbrycht Strumienski (d. 1609) published in 1547 and 1573 respectively.

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