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  • 1.
    Canton, S. E.
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Biophys Chem, IFG Struct Dynam Biochem Syst, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.;Deutsch Elektronensynchrotron DESY, Struct Dynam Ultra Short Pulsed Xrays, FS SCS, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Zhang, X.
    Argonne Natl Lab, Xray Sci Div, Argonne, IL 60439 USA..
    Liu, Y.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Anal & Synth, Dept Chem, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Zhang, J.
    Tianjin Polytech Univ, Sch Environm & Chem Engn, Tianjin 300387, Peoples R China..
    Papai, M.
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Wigner Res Ctr Phys, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary..
    Corani, A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Smeigh, Amanda L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Smolentsev, G.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Attenkofer, K.
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Photon Sci Directorate, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Jennings, G.
    Argonne Natl Lab, Xray Sci Div, Argonne, IL 60439 USA..
    Kurtz, C. A.
    Argonne Natl Lab, Xray Sci Div, Argonne, IL 60439 USA..
    Li, F.
    Dalian Univ Technol, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Harlang, T.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Vithanage, D.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Chabera, P.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Bordage, A.
    Univ Paris 11, UMR CNRS 8182, Inst Chim Mol & Mat Orsay, F-91405 Orsay, France..
    Sun, L.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Chem Sci & Engn, Dept Chem, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ott, Sascha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Warnmark, K.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Anal & Synth, Dept Chem, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Sundstrom, V.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Watching the dynamics of electrons and atoms at work in solar energy conversion2015In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 185, p. 51-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photochemical reactions performed by transition metal complexes have been proposed as viable routes towards solar energy conversion and storage into other forms that can be conveniently used in our everyday applications. In order to develop efficient materials, it is necessary to identify, characterize and optimize the elementary steps of the entire process on the atomic scale. To this end, we have studied the photoinduced electronic and structural dynamics in two heterobimetallic ruthenium-cobalt dyads, which belong to the large family of donor-bridge-acceptor systems. Using a combination of ultrafast optical and X-ray absorption spectroscopies, we can clock the light-driven electron transfer processes with element and spin sensitivity. In addition, the changes in local structure around the two metal centers are monitored. These experiments show that the nature of the connecting bridge is decisive for controlling the forward and the backward electron transfer rates, a result supported by quantum chemistry calculations. More generally, this work illustrates how ultrafast optical and X-ray

  • 2. Hakkert, Sebastiaan B
    et al.
    Gräfenstein, Jürgen
    Erdelyi, Mate
    The 15N NMR chemical shift in the characterization of weak halogen bonding in solution.2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 203, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the applicability of 15N NMR spectroscopy in the characterization of the very weak halogen bonds of nonfluorinated halogen bond donors with a nitrogenous Lewis base in solution. The ability of the technique to detect the relative strength of iodine-, bromine- and chlorine-centered halogen bonds, as well as solvent and substituent effects was evaluated. Whereas computations on the DFT level indicate that 15N NMR chemical shifts reflect the diamagnetic deshielding associated with the formation of a weak halogen bond, the experimentally observed chemical shift differences were on the edge of detectability due to the low molar fraction of halogen-bonded complexes in solution. The formation of the analogous yet stronger hydrogen bond of phenols have induced approximately ten times larger chemical shift changes, and could be detected and correlated to the electronic properties of substituents of the hydrogen bond donors. Overall, 15N NMR is shown to be a suitable tool for the characterization of comparably strong secondary interactions in solution, but not sufficiently accurate for the detection of the formation of thermodynamically labile, weak halogen bonded complexes.

  • 3.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Artificial photosynthesis: closing remarks2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 198, p. 549-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper derives from my closing remarks lecture at the 198th Faraday Discussion meeting on Artificial Photosynthesis, Kyoto, Japan, February 28-March 2. The meeting had sessions on biological approaches and fundamental processes, molecular catalysts, inorganic assembly catalysts, and integration of systems for demonstrating realistic devices. The field has had much progress since the previous Faraday Discussion on Artificial Photosynthesis in Edinburgh, UK, in 2011. This paper is a personal account of recent discussions and developments in the field, as reflected in and discussed during the meeting. First it discusses the general directions of artificial photosynthesis and some considerations for a future solar fuels technology. Then it comments on some scientific directions in the area of the meeting.

  • 4.
    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Per J. R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Complexity of dissolved organic matter in the molecular size dimension: insights from coupled size exclusion chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry2019In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 218, p. 52-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the relationship between apparent size distribution and molecular complexity of dissolved organic matter from the natural environment. We used a high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) method coupled to UV-Vis diode array detection (UV-DAD) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in order to compare the apparent size of natural organic matter, determined by HPSEC-UV and the molecular mass determined online by ESI-MS. We found that there was a clear discrepancy between the two methods, and found evidence for an important pool of organic matter that has a strong UV absorbance and no ESI-MS signal. Contrary to some previous research, we found no evidence that apparently high molecular weight organic matter is constituted by aggregates of low molecular weight (<1000 Da) material. Furthermore, our results suggest that the majority of apparent size variability within the ESI ionisable pool of organic matter is due to secondary interaction and exclusion effects on the HPSEC column, and not true differences in hydrodynamic size or intermolecular aggregation.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Boixel, Julien
    Pellegrin, Yann
    Blart, Errol
    Becker, Hans-Christian
    Odobel, Fabrice
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Accumulative electron transfer: Multiple charge separation in artificial photosynthesis2012In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 155, p. 233-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve artificial photosynthesis it is necessary to couple the single-electron event of photoinduced charge separation with the multi-electron reactions of fuel formation and water splitting. Therefore, several rounds of light-induced charge separation are required to accumulate enough redox equivalents at the catalytic sites for the target chemistry to occur, without any sacrificial donors or acceptors other than the catalytic substrates. Herein, we discuss the challenges of such accumulative electron transfer in molecular systems. We present a series of closely related systems base on a Ru-II-polypyridine photosensitizer with appended triaryl-amine or oligo-triaryl-amine donors, linked to nanoporous TiO2 as the acceptor. One of the systems, based on dye 4, shows efficient accumulative electron transfer in high overall yield resulting in the formation of a two-electron charge-separated state upon successive excitation by two photons. In contrast, the other systems do not show accumulative electron transfer because of different competing reactions. This illustrates the difficulties in designing successful systems for this still largely unexplored type of reaction scheme.

  • 6. Kimberg, Victor
    et al.
    Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alvaro
    Mercadier, Laurent
    Weninger, Clemens
    Lutman, Alberto
    Ratner, Daniel
    Coffee, Ryan
    Buchner, Maximilian
    Mucke, Melanie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Agåker, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Såthe, Conny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Bostedt, Christoph
    Nordgren, Joseph
    Rubensson, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Rohringer, Nina
    Stimulated X-ray Raman scattering - a critical assessment of the building block of nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy2016In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 194, p. 305-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the invention of femtosecond X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), studies of light-induced chemical reaction dynamics and structural dynamics reach a new era, allowing for time-resolved X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy. To ultimately probe coherent electron and nuclear dynamics on their natural time and length scales, coherent nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy schemes have been proposed. In this contribution, we want to critically assess the experimental realisation of nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy at current-day XFEL sources, by presenting first experimental attempts to demonstrate stimulated resonant X-ray Raman scattering in molecular gas targets.

  • 7. Kumagai, Hiromu
    et al.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Whang, Dong Ryeol
    Shinohara, Yuki
    Martinez, Jose
    Karlsson, Joshua
    Summers, Peter
    Windle, Christopher D.
    Kodera, Masanori
    Cogdell, Richard
    Tolod, Kristine Rodulfo
    Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar
    Fujita, Etsuko
    Kibler, Alexander
    Fan, Fengtao
    Gibson, Elizabeth A.
    Usami, Hisanao
    Iwase, Akihide
    Inoue, Haruo
    Kudo, Akihiko
    Gust, Devens
    Domen, Kazunari
    Cassiola, Flavia
    Takagi, Katsuhiko
    Kang, Sang Ook
    Yamakata, Akira
    Li, Can
    Sun, Licheng
    Park, Hyunwoong
    Kang, Young Soo
    Li, Rengui
    Di Fonzo, Fabio
    Setoyama, Tohru
    Ishitani, Osamu
    Inorganic assembly catalysts for artificial photosynthesis: general discussion2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 198, p. 481-507Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Löfås, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Jahn, B. O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Wärnå, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Emanuelsson, Rikard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Grigoriev, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Ottosson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    A computational study of potential molecular switches that exploit Baird's rule on excited-state aromaticity and antiaromaticity2014In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 174, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of tentative single-molecule conductance switches which could be triggered by light were examined by computational means using density functional theory (DFT) with non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). The switches exploit the reversal in electron counting rules for aromaticity and antiaromaticity upon excitation from the electronic ground state (S0) to the lowest [small pi][small pi]* excited singlet and triplet states (S1 or T1), as described by Huckel's and Baird's rules, respectively. Four different switches and one antifuse were designed which rely on various photoreactions that either lead from the OFF to the ON states (switches 1, 2 and 4, and antifuse 5) or from the ON to the OFF state (switch 3). The highest and lowest ideal calculated switching ratios are 1175 and 5, respectively, observed for switches 1 and 4. Increased thermal stability of the 1-ON isomer is achieved by benzannulation (switch 1B-OFF/ON). The effects of constrained electrode-electrode distances on activation energies for thermal hydrogen back-transfer from 1-ON to 1-OFF and the relative energies of 1-ON and 1-OFF at constrained geometries were also studied. The switching ratio is strongly distance-dependent as revealed for 1B-ON/OFF where it equals 711 and 148 when the ON and OFF isomers are calculated in electrode gaps with distances confined to either that of the OFF isomer or to that of the ON isomer, respectively.

  • 9.
    Milne, Chris J.
    et al.
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Villigen, Switzerland..
    Weber, Peter M.
    Brown Univ, Providence, RI 02912 USA..
    Kowalewski, Markus
    Univ Calif Irvine, Irvine, CA USA..
    Marangos, Jon P.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Johnson, Allan S.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Forbes, Ruaridh
    UCL, London, England..
    Worner, Hans Jakob
    Eidgenoss Tech Hsch Zuerich, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Rolles, Daniel
    Kansas State Univ, Manhattan, KS 66506 USA..
    Townsend, Dave
    Heriot Watt Univ, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Schalk, Oliver
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mai, Sebastian
    Univ Vienna, Vienna, Austria..
    Vacher, Morgane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Miller, R. J. Dwayne
    Max Planck Inst Struct & Dynam Matter, Berlin, Germany..
    Centurion, Martin
    Univ Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583 USA..
    Vibok, Agnes
    ELI HU Nonprofit Ltd, Budapest, Hungary..
    Domcke, Wolfgang
    Tech Univ Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Cireasa, Raluca
    Inst Sci Mol Orsay, Orsay, France..
    Ueda, Kiyoshi
    Tohoku Univ, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan..
    Bencivenga, Filippo
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Basovizza, Italy..
    Neumark, Daniel M.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Stolow, Albert
    Univ Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Rudenko, Artem
    Kansas State Univ, Manhattan, KS 66506 USA..
    Kirrander, Adam
    Univ Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Dowek, Danielle
    Inst Sci Mol Orsay, Orsay, France..
    Martin, Fernando
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Ivanov, Misha
    Dahlstrom, Jan Marcus
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dudovich, Nirit
    Weizmann Inst Sci, Rehovot, Israel..
    Mukamel, Shaul
    Univ Calif Irvine, Irvine, CA USA..
    Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alvaro
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Minitti, Michael P.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Menlo Pk, CA USA..
    Austin, Dane R.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Kimberg, Victor
    Royal Inst Technol, Karlsruhe, Germany..
    Masin, Zdenek
    Max Born Inst, Berlin, Germany..
    Attosecond processes and X-ray spectroscopy: general discussion2016In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 194, p. 427-462Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Univ Bristol, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Verlet, Jan R. R.
    Univ Durham, Durham, England..
    Penfold, Tom J.
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Minns, Russell S.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Minitti, Michael P.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Menlo Pk, CA USA..
    Solling, Theis I.
    Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Schalk, Oliver
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kowalewski, Markus
    Univ Calif Irvine, Irvine, CA USA..
    Marangos, Jon P.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Robb, Michael A.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Johnson, Allan S.
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Worner, Hans Jakob
    Eidgenoss Tech Hsch Zuerich, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Miller, R. J. Dwayne
    Max Planck Inst Struct & Dynam Matter, Berlin, Germany..
    Domcke, Wolfgang
    Tech Univ Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Ueda, Kiyoshi
    Tohoku Univ, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan..
    Weber, Peter M.
    Brown Univ, Providence, RI 02912 USA..
    Cireasa, Raluca
    Inst Sci Mol Orsay, Orsay, France..
    Vacher, Morgane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Roberts, Gareth M.
    Univ Bristol, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Decleva, Piero
    Univ Trieste, Trieste, Italy..
    Bencivenga, Filippo
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Basovizza, Italy..
    Neumark, Daniel M.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Gessner, Oliver
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA USA..
    Stolow, Albert
    Univ Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Polyak, Iakov
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Baeck, Kyoung Koo
    Gangneung Wonju Natl Univ, Kangnung, South Korea..
    Kirrander, Adam
    Univ Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Dowek, Danielle
    Inst Sci Mol Orsay, Orsay, France..
    Jimenez-Galan, Alvaro
    Max Born Inst, Berlin, Germany..
    Martin, Fernando
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Mukamel, Shaul
    Univ Calif Irvine, Irvine, CA USA..
    Sekikawa, Taro
    Hokkaido Univ, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan..
    Gelin, Maxim F.
    Tech Univ Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Townsend, Dave
    Heriot Watt Univ, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Makhov, Dmitry V.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Neville, Simon P.
    Univ Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Electronic and non-adiabatic dynamics: general discussion2016In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 194, p. 209-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Peddis, D.
    et al.
    CNR, Ist Struttura Mat, I-00015 Monterotondo, RM, Italy.;Univ Belgrade, Vinca Inst Nucl Sci, POB 522, Belgrade 11001, Serbia..
    Muscas, Giuseppe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics. CNR, Ist Struttura Mat, I-00015 Monterotondo, RM, Italy.
    Mathieu, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Kumar, P. Anil
    Univ Duisburg Essen, Fac Phys, Lotharstr 1, D-47048 Duisburg, Germany.;Univ Duisburg Essen, CENIDE, Lotharstr 1, D-47048 Duisburg, Germany..
    Varvaro, G.
    CNR, Ist Struttura Mat, I-00015 Monterotondo, RM, Italy..
    Singh, G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Orue, I.
    Univ Basque Country, UPV EHU, SGIker Medidas Magnet, Bilbao, Spain..
    Gil-Carton, D.
    CIBERehd, CIC BioGUNE, Struct Biol Unit, Derio, Spain..
    Marcano, L.
    Univ Basque Country, UPV EHU, Dept Elect & Elect, Bilbao, Spain..
    Muela, A.
    BCMaterials, Bldg 500,Technol Pk Biscay, Derio, Spain.;Univ Basque Country, UPV EHU, Dept Inmunol Microbiol & Parasitol, Bilbao, Spain..
    Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.
    BCMaterials, Bldg 500,Technol Pk Biscay, Derio, Spain.;Univ Basque Country, UPV EHU, Dept Elect & Elect, Bilbao, Spain..
    Studying nanoparticles' 3D shape by aspect maps: Determination of the morphology of bacterial magnetic nanoparticles2016In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 191, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely investigated due to their potential use in various applications, ranging from electronics to biomedical devices. The magnetic properties of MNPs are strongly dependent on their size and shape (i.e., morphology), thus appropriate tools to investigate their morphology are fundamental to understand the physics of these systems. Recently a new approach to study nanoparticle morphology by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis has been proposed, introducing the so-called Aspect Maps (AMs). In this paper, a further evolution of the AM method is presented, allowing determination of the nanoparticles' 3D shape by TEM image. As a case study, this paper will focus on magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4), with a mean size of similar to 45 nm extracted from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense magnetostatic bacteria (MTB). The proposed approach gives a complete description of the nanoparticles' morphology, allowing estimation of an average geometrical size and shape. In addition, preliminary investigation of the magnetic properties of MTB nanoparticles was performed, giving some insight into interparticle interactions and on the reversal mechanism of the magnetization.

  • 12. Polcar, Tomas
    et al.
    Gustavsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Thersleff, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Jacobson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Cavaleiro, Albano
    Complex frictional analysis of self-lubricant W-S-C/Cr coating2012In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 156, p. 383-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition metal dichalcogenides belong to one of the most developed classes of materials for solid lubrication. However, one of the main drawbacks of most of the self-lubricating coatings is their low load-bearing capacity, particularly in terrestrial atmospheres. In our previous work, alloying thin films based on tungsten disulfide with non-metallic interstitial elements, such as carbon or nitrogen, has been studied in order to improve tribological performance in different environments. Excellent results were reached with the deposited coatings hardness, in some cases, more than one order of magnitude higher than single W-S films. In this work, W-S-C films were deposited with increasing Cr contents by co-sputtering chromium and composite WS2-C and targets. Two films were prepared with approx. 7 and 13 at.% of Cr. Alloying with chromium led to dense films with amorphous microstructure; the hardness and adhesion was improved. Sliding tests were carried out in dry and humid air using a pin-on-disc tribometer with 100Cr6 steel balls as a counterpart. To analyse the sliding process, the surfaces in the contact were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (bonding), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Surface and sub-surface structural modification of the coating and composition of the transferred tribolayer are discussed in detail. High friction in humid air was attributed to the absence of a well-ordered WS2 sliding interface. On the other hand, the existence of such an interface explained the very low friction observed in dry air.

  • 13.
    Shylin, Sergii I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Pavliuk, Mariia V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Angstrom Lab, Dept Chem, POB 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    D'Amario, Luca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. Free Univ Berlin, Phys Dept, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Fritsky, Igor O.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Dept Chem, Volodymyrska 64, UA-01601 Kiev, Ukraine;PBMR Labs Ukraine, Murmanska 1, UA-02094 Kiev, Ukraine.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Photoinduced hole transfer from tris(bipyridine)ruthenium dye to a high-valent iron-based water oxidation catalyst2019In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 215, p. 162-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient water oxidation system is a prerequisite for developing solar energy conversion devices. Using advanced time-resolved spectroscopy, we study the initial catalytic relevant electron transfer events in the light-driven water oxidation system utilizing [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) (bpy = 2,2 '-bipyridine) as a light harvester, persulfate as a sacrificial electron acceptor, and a high-valent iron clathrochelate complex as a catalyst. Upon irradiation by visible light, the excited state of the ruthenium dye is quenched by persulfate to afford a [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+)/SO4- pair, showing a cage escape yield up to 75%. This is followed by the subsequent fast hole transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the Fe-IV catalyst to give the long-lived Fe-V intermediate in aqueous solution. In the presence of excess photosensitizer, this process exhibits pseudo-first order kinetics with respect to the catalyst with a rate constant of 3.2(1) x 10(10) s(-1). Consequently, efficient hole scavenging activity of the high-valent iron complex is proposed to explain its high catalytic performance for water oxidation.

  • 14.
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels2012In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 155, p. 357-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution was presented as the closing lecture at the Faraday Discussion 155 on artificial photosynthesis, held in Edinburgh Scotland, September 5-7 2011. The world needs new, environmentally friendly and renewable fuels to exchange for fossil fuels. The fuel must be made from cheap and "endless" resources that are available everywhere. The new research area of solar fuels aims to meet this demand. This paper discusses why we need a solar fuel and why electricity is not enough; it proposes solar energy as the major renewable energy source to feed from. The scientific field concerning artificial photosynthesis expands rapidly and most of the different scientific visions for solar fuels are briefly overviewed. Research strategies and the development of artificial photosynthesis research to produce solar fuels are overviewed. Some conceptual aspects of research for artificial photosynthesis are discussed in closer detail.

  • 15.
    Wang, Mei
    et al.
    Dalian Univ Technol, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Artero, Vincent
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France..
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Martinez, Jose
    Northwestern Univ, Evanston, IL 60208 USA..
    Karlsson, Joshua
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Gust, Devens
    Arizona State Univ, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Summers, Peter
    Univ Nottingham Ningbo China, Ningbo, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Machan, Charles
    Univ Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Brueggeller, Peter
    Univ Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria..
    Windle, Christopher D.
    CEA, Paris, France..
    Kageshima, Yosuke
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Chem Syst Engn, Tokyo, Japan..
    Cogdell, Richard
    Univ Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Tolod, Kristine Rodulfo
    Univ Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Politec Torino, Lyon, Italy..
    Kibler, Alexander
    Univ Nottingham, Nottingham, England..
    Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar
    Linz Inst Organ Solar Cells LIOS, Phys Chem, Linz, Austria..
    Fujita, Etsuko
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Ehrmaier, Johannes
    Tech Univ Munich, Munich, Germany. Max Planck Inst Terr Microbiol, Marburg, Germany..
    Shima, Seigo
    Gibson, Elizabeth
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Karadas, Ferdi
    Bilkent Univ, Bilkent, Turkey..
    Harriman, Anthony
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Inoue, Haruo
    Tokyo Metropolitan Univ, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kudo, Akihiko
    Tokyo Univ Sci, Tokyo, Japan..
    Takayama, Tomoaki
    Tokyo Univ Sci, Tokyo, Japan..
    Wasielewski, Michael
    Northwestern Univ, Evanston, IL 60208 USA..
    Cassiola, Flavia
    Shell Technol Ctr Houston, Houston, TX USA..
    Yagi, Masayuki
    Niigata Univ, Niigata, Japan..
    Ishida, Hitoshi
    Kitasato Univ, Grad Sch Sci, Dept Chem, Shiroganedai, Japan..
    Franco, Federico
    Inst Chem Res Catalonia ICIQ, Perugia, Italy..
    Kang, Sang Ook
    Korea Univ, Seoul, South Korea..
    Nocera, Daniel
    Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Li, Can
    CAS Dalian Inst Chem Phys, Dalian, Peoples R China..
    Di Fonzo, Fabio
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Genoa, Italy..
    Park, Hyunwoong
    Kyungpook Natl Univ, Daegu, South Korea..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Setoyama, Tohru
    Mitsubishi Chem, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kang, Young Soo
    Sogang Univ, Seoul, South Korea..
    Ishitani, Osamu
    Tokyo Inst Technol, Tokyo, Japan..
    Shen, Jian-Ren
    Okayama Univ, Okayama, Japan. Inst Mol Sci, Okazaki, Aichi, Japan..
    Son, Ho-Jin
    Korea Univ, Seoul, South Korea..
    Masaoka, Shigeyuki
    Molecular catalysts for artificial photosynthesis: general discussion2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 198, p. 353-395Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 15 of 15
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