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  • 1.
    Hunt, Margaret R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    The De-eroticization of Women's Liberation:: Social Purity Movements and the Revolutionary Feminism of Sheila Jeffreys1990In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 34, p. 23-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Koobak, Redi
    et al.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Becoming non-Swedish: locating the paradoxes of in/visible identities2012In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 102, p. 125-134Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Thapar-Bjorkert, Suruchi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Univ London London Sch Econ & Polit Sci, London WC2A 2AE, England.;Univ Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England.;Univ Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH, Avon, England..
    Samelius, Lotta
    Sanghera, Gurchathen S.
    Univ Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH, Avon, England.;Univ St Andrews, Sch Int Relat, St Andrews KY16 9AJ, Fife, Scotland..
    exploring symbolic violence in the everyday: misrecognition, condescension, consent and complicity2016In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 112, p. 144-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we draw on Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of 'misrecognition', 'condescension' and 'consent and complicity' to demonstrate how domination and violence are reproduced in everyday interactions, social practices, institutional processes and dispositions. Importantly, this constitutes symbolic violence, which removes the victim's agency and voice. Indeed, we argue that as symbolic violence is impervious, insidious and invisible, it also simultaneously legitimises and sustains other forms of violence as well. Understanding symbolic violence together with traditional discourses of violence is important because it provides a richer insight into the 'workings' of violence, and provides new ways of conceptualising violence across a number of social fields and new strategies for intervention. Symbolic violence is a valuable tool for understanding contentious debates on the disclosure of violence, women leaving or staying in abusive relationships or returning to their abusers. While we focus only on violence against women, we recognise that the gendered nature of violence produces its own sets of vulnerabilities against men and marginalised groups, such as LGBT. The paper draws on empirical research conducted in Sweden in 2003. Sweden is an interesting case study because despite its progressive gender equality policies, there has been no marked decrease in violence towards women by men.

  • 4.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    University of Warwick, England.
    Women as Activists: Women as Symbols, A Study of the Indian Nationalist Movement1993In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 44, p. 80-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Törnqvist, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Troubling Romance Tourism: Sex, Gender, and Class inside the Argentinean Tango Clubs2012In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, Vol. 102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Törnqvist, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Troubling romance tourism: sex, gender and class inside the Argentinean tango clubs2012In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 102, p. 21-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore and make theoretical sense of a stream of tourism that blurs the boundaries between sex, romance and intimacy, and diffuses the line between affectionate and economic relations. The empirical scope is the expanding international tourism of tango dancing-meaning the increasing number of people from all over the world travelling to Buenos Aires to dance tango and engage with the local tango culture. In contrast to women's sex tourism on the beaches of Jamaica and Ghana, the relationships evolving in the Argentinean dance halls only occasionally lead to sexual affairs and temporary romances, but they are still part of a sensual geography made up of a transnational skin-to-skin intimacy. In addition, the relations between local dancers and tourists rarely result in economic transactions of sex for money; however, they engage with a growing market of intimate dance services and ore part of the economic injustices and exotified projections of our post-colonial time. Hence, this article seeks to shed critical light over a broader area of transnational romance. The case of tango evokes new sets of critical queries regarding the trade of bodily intimacy and affection; the consequences of economic inequality in the area of heterosexual romance; and the production of class morals and racialised gender regimes. Through an exploration of these intimate practices, discourses and sets of emotions produced in this particular context, a complex landscape of market forces and close-embrace dancing unfolds.

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