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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål Andre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Barn och ungdomsvetenskap, Stockholms universitet.
    Response cries and other gaming moves-Building intersubjectivity in gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1557-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co-occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages, Advanced Studies in Modern Swedish.
    Referring as interaction: On the interplay between linguistic and bodily practices2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 240-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study targets the interface of linguistic and bodily activities in referring to physically present objects in face-to-face interaction. Oil the basis of examples from a multi-party encounter between four speakers of Swedish, cases of referring sequences are analyzed, especially those involving demonstrative expressions. Referring to present objects constitutes an embedded action sequence, in which different practices provide solutions to the task of achieving a satisfactory identification of the referent. The larger matrix action sequence involves several interactional steps, such as guaranteeing a common visual focus in order to carry out the reference, as well as the Subsequent confirmation by the other participants. The bodily displays used to make the referent salient involve a variety of forms, including pointing, touching, holding, picking up, shaking, and even fetching the object. Nevertheless, the combination of demonstratives and bodily practices may not be sufficient to establish the referent in a way that the participants find satisfactory. Repairs may be initiated and completed with the same type of means as the ones by which referring had been done in the first place, i.e. demonstratives and bodily practices.

  • 3.
    Heinemann, Trine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Participation and exclusion in third party complaints2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2435-2451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on I he relationship between third party complaints (i.e. complaints that target someone other than the recipient) and social exclusion. I demonstrate how participants, by engaging in complaining about someone who is physically present, exclude that person from participating in the interaction and from defending herself against the accusations entailed in the complaint. Focusing on video-recorded data from Danish home help visits, I show how the institutional roles of the participants affect the way in which Such complaints develop. When a caregiver initiates a complaint about the care recipient other caregivers immediately affiliate with the complaint. Such complaints are successful because the caregivers agree to treat the target of the complaint, the care recipient, as it non-ratified participant. By contrast, when the care recipient initiates complaints about a caregiver the caregiver's colleague rejects the complaint. Such complaints are unsuccessful because the exclusion of the target of the complaint fails. These results suggest that participation is constituted through and influenced by the social roles we have and the social activities we engage in as members of society.

  • 4.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Collaborating towards Coherence: Lexical Cohesion in English Discourse. Sanna-Kaisa Tanskanen2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1071-1073Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Grammar for adjusting assumptions in interaction: the Estonian enclitic -gi/-ki2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 2879-2896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article shows how a bound morpheme, the enclitic -gi/-ki in Estonian, functions in the domain of interpersonal relations and mutual knowledge calibration in conversation. Speakers use the enclitic with verbs in order to adjust some assumption previously held by themselves or by their interlocutors. When formulating contributions in talk, participants always display assumptions about matters at hand as well as about what they believe other participants know. Furthermore, when accomplishing a first action in a sequence, they display an assumption that the next speaker will align in her action. All these assumptions are subject to adjustment by other participants who may present themselves as more knowledgeable on the subject matter or more entitled to provide opinions about it. The enclitic is used in reactive turns to indicate better epistemic access and higher authority in relation to a prior speaker, which may result in a disaligning action.

  • 6.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Social action of syntactic reduplication2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 800-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduplication has been shown to carry the semantic meaning of increased intensity, duration or emphasis. This study demonstrates that syntactic reduplication in Estonian is regularly used in responsive positions in action sequences. Instances of syntactic reduplication constitute specific social practices such as affiliative and disaffiliative urging, challenging the prior speaker, reinforcing answers to yes/no questions, and providing a non-elicited confirmation. It is a sedimented linguistic pattern grounded in the social actions it recurrently performs. Different reduplicative actions furthermore display characteristic prosodic features, involving initial prominence in affiliative actions and delayed pitch peak in disaffiliative ones. Mock repeats and disconfirming answers are produced with double pitch peaks. Grammar and prosody are complementary means of achieving social action in particular positions in interactive sequences. The paper shows that sequential and social contingencies may be essential in understanding a grammatical pattern.

  • 7.
    Lindgren, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Vogels, Jorrig
    Referential cohesion in Swedish preschool children's narratives2018In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 133, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Referential cohesion is an important part of discourse, as speakers use referring expressions to glue utterances together. Choosing an appropriate expression requires the speaker to continuously keep track of the salience of referents in the discourse. Because this is cognitively challenging, children are expected to have problems creating referential cohesion. Yet, research has also shown that young children are sensitive to discourse factors in choosing referring expressions. To shed more light on how and when children learn to use referential expressions to create a cohesive discourse, we analyzed oral narratives by monolingual Swedish-speaking children aged 4;0-6;10, elicited with the Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN).We hypothesized that children would base their choice of referring expressions to a large extent on discourse factors for which no detailed mental model of the discourse is required, such as animacy. Our results show that the children indeed relied heavily on animacy as a cue for pronominalization. At the same time, they were sensitive to fine-grained levels of local discourse salience. We propose that, like adults, children use a combination of global and local discourse factors for choosing referring expressions, but that the relative weights of these factors may vary with cognitive capacity.

  • 8.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Weatherall, Ann
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Orientations to Epistemics and Deontics in Treatment Discussions2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 78, p. 39-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ideological shift to patient-centered health care raises questions about how, in the face of medical authority, patients can assert agency in interactions with doctors. This study uses conversation analysis to explore how epistemic and deontic orientations are raised and made relevant in different types of responses to treatment proposals across two health care settings – New Zealand general practice consultations and Swedish hospital-based physician encounters. By examining responses ranging from acceptance to strong resistance, we show patient practices for deferring to and resisting medical authority, which includes claiming independent access to expert knowledge and raising everyday, experientially-based concerns. Doctors rightfully privilege their own epistemic expertise in treatment decisions but they also take patient experiences into consideration. In cases of strong resistance we found doctors raising patients’ ultimate right to refuse treatment recommendation. Our analysis further nuances current knowledge by documenting the ways epistemic and deontic domains are observably relevant forces shaping the sequential unfolding of treatment proposals. 

  • 9.
    Melander, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Knowing how to play the game of jump rope: Participation and stancetaking in a material environment2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 1434-1456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the relations between knowledge, affect, and social organization are explored using as data a video recording of a jump rope activity. The analyses focus on how epistemic and affective stance interplay in the constitution of social order. In the activity, the participants position themselves as knowing and unknowing through talk and embodied action. Knowing is tied to the handling of game-relevant artifacts, the spatial configuration of the game, as well as rules for turn-taking. Language use is indexical with frequent references to embodied actions and the material environment. When disputing over problematic moves the participants re-enact previous actions, thus displaying not only knowledge of how the game should be played, but also taking a forceful affective stance toward each other. This interplays with epistemic stance so that the participants and their actions are evaluated in different ways, thus leading to a local social hierarchy in which one participant is excluded from the game. Such phenomena shed light on epistemic and affective stances and how they figure into the organization of action and social order in the midst of children’s games.

  • 10.
    Melander, Helen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sahlström, Fritjof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    In tow of the blue whale.: Learning as interactional changes in topical orientation2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1519-1537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at taking part in the development of conversation analysis approaches to studying learning in interaction. In focus is the learning of a small group of children doing child-initiated reading. We examine how a topic - the size of the blue whale - is constituted and developed over time in interaction, and how this development can be understood as learning. The analysis is based on a video recording of three 7-year-old children reading a picture book together, where the children explicitly orient to the topic of blue whales. The results of the analysis show that, when content is considered an intrinsic aspect of participation, there are changes over time in the organisation of participation in relation to, in this case, the topic of blue whales. In particular, this concerns how the children relate to the size of the blue whale. Thus, the results show that learning occurs, and how this learning is accomplished. This is made possible through the fine-grained participant perspective-based conversation analysis. The reported work also demonstrates how issues of topic and content can be integrated into micro-analyses of learning.

  • 11.
    Norén, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pivots constructions as methods for perspective shift during turns at talk2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 54, no SI, p. 35-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a conversation analytic (CA) study on how participants use pivot constructions as methods to shift perspective during on-going turn construction while engaging in local communicative tasks and projects. Data are drawn from a corpus of everyday and institutional Swedish talk-in-interaction. Three main variants of perspective shifts are presented: shifts into explanatory talk; shifts in epistemic stance; and shifts during turns within an extended telling sequence. Perspective shifts with pivot construction may be used as an incremental method of redesigning the incipient turn for next actions (by self or other), as a method for avoiding involvement into the turn construction by other participants, or as a turn-keeping method when facing overlapping talk. The results indicate that grammar and grammatical structure are organized dialogically on a local level and emerge from speakers’ turn construction methods and turn-taking practices when participating in talk-in-interaction.

  • 12.
    Norén, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Linell, Per
    Linköpings universitet.
    Pivot constructions as everyday conversational phenomena within a cross-linguistic perspective: An introduction2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 54, no August, p. 1-15Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue collects six articles (including this introduction) about a family of grammatical constructions in everyday talk-in-interaction, syntactic pivot constructions, as they appear within five different languages: Estonian, Finnish, French, German (Siebenburger Sachsisch variety) and Swedish or six, as pivot utterances from English talk are often used as comparative data. In this introduction, we will try to sketch the empirical background to the collected studies as it has emerged during the last decade. We will also discuss some central issues regarding the analysis of pivots as participants' methods to engage in communicative projects in talk, as well as the theoretical relevance of pivots for a grammar of conversational language. First we will define the phenomenon of syntactic pivots and present some basic conceptual tools for the discussions. After the introduction follows an overview of the basic resources and methods of pivot construction (apart from formal syntax), such as prosody, lexis, incrementation, and projection, based on naturally occurring pivot utterances drawn from different languages. The introduction ends with a discussion of the dependence of pivots on other grammatical construction methods within specific languages, as well as the relation between the use of pivots and activity types.

  • 13.
    Nyroos, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Sandlund, Erica
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Pia
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Code-switched repair initiation: The case of Swedish eller in L2 English test interaction2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 120, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a long-standing interest in repair practices, much is yet to be learned about participants' selections of components of the repair operation, and their systematic variation across contexts and languages (Hayashi et al., 2013b; Kitzinger, 2013). The present paper targets the initiation of self-repair through examination of a particular discursive object, the Swedish conjunction eller ('or'), located in repair-prefacing position in a corpus of 79 second language (L2) oral proficiency tests. In the corpus, eller is systematically produced in Swedish, while surrounding talk is produced in the target language, English. As such, the repair initiations are code-switched (e.g., Auer, 1998b). Building on the recent work on or-prefaced repair initiations in English (Lerner and Kitzinger, 2015), we examine the role of eller-initiated repair (EIR), i.e., repair prefaced by eller, in the context of paired L2 tests. We also contrast EIRs with or-prefaced repair initiations in the same dataset. Findings indicate that EIRs serve to display trouble awareness, which may relate to necessary revisions of both form and content of the talk in English. The 'other-languageness' (Gafaranga, 2000) of the momentary code-switch amplifies test-takers' attention to what needs to be replaced or revised, and indicates to co-participants that self-repair is underway. The practice helps push forward turn transition and pre-empts conclusions about the speaker's stance or linguistic competence, which may be particularly relevant in a language testing context. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Rauniomaa, Mirka
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Haddington, Pentti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Melander, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gazin, Anne-Danièle
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    McIlvenny, Paul
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Parsing tasks for the mobile novice: Orientation to the learner's actions and to spatial and temporal constraints in instructing-on-the-move2018In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 128, p. 30-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies parsing as a practice used in mobile instruction. The findings build on ethnomethodological conversation analysis and on observations made on video data that have been collected from three settings: skiing, driving a car and flying a plane. In the data, novice learners are instructed by more experienced instructors to accomplish various mobile tasks. The paper shows how instructors use parsing to guide learners to carry out, step-by-step, the sub-actions that the ongoing mobile task (e.g. turning, landing) is composed of. The paper argues that parsing is a practice employed by instructors to highlight the sub-actions of a mobile task. Instructors may also use parsing to orient learners to emergent problems to do with the timing, quality and order of the sub-actions in the performance of a complex mobile task. Finally, the paper shows that sometimes there is not enough time to parse an ongoing task, in which case the parsing can be carried out afterwards.

  • 15. Wingard, Leah
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Parent involvement in children’s homework in American and Swedish dual-earner families2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1576-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes parent involvement by employing ethnographic methods and discourse analysis of parent–child talk about homework. We juxtapose what is often presented as a straightforward and unproblematic concept of parent involvement in education policy and research with actual instances of the day-to-day practices and reported experiences of parent involvement in children's homework in the U.S. and Sweden. Our analyses show that parent involvement may be either parent or child initiated, and varies widely according to how much homework the child is assigned, the child's orientation to homework and a number of other factors. Analyses demonstrate that parents become involved in two main ways: 1. through anticipating and planning the activity of homework and 2. by directly participating in the accomplishment of the homework task itself. We additionally highlight in the paper that there is an inherent tension between a parent's responsibility for homework and the child's responsibility for homework, and that parent involvement can cause tension in communication in the parent–child relationship.

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