uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Sex role reversal in a pipefish: female ornaments as amplifying handicaps2000In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reasons for sex role reversal in the pipefish Syngnathus typhle are reviewed. In this species, females compete for males, which are choosier than females. Before mating, females display a sexual ornament, a cross-wise striped pattern along their body sides. This ornament is here shown to be an amplifier that facilitates for males to tell females of different sizes apart (males prefer larger females). When students were asked to compare bar sizes, where bars differed in "ornamentation", accuracy in estimating size was highest with "heavy ornamented" as compared with "intermediate" or "not ornamented" bars. Moreover, bar size was more accurately judged with crosswise than with lengthwise striped bars, explaining why stripes run cross- rather than lengthwise in females. The ornament is probably costly (it reduces crypsis and may be socially provocative), and it is also attractive to males. Thus, the ornament is best described as an amplifying handicap.

  • 2.
    Dowling, Damian K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Mulder, Raoul A.
    Red plumage and its association with reproductive success in red-capped robins2006In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 311-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red plumage is produced mainly by deposition of carotenoid'pigments into the feathers, and is assumed to be costly. Recent studies suggest red plumage may be a condition-dependent, sexually selected signal. To date, few studies have explored the relationship between carotenoid-based plumage colour and genetic (realised) reproductive success. This is despite the rarity of genetic monogamy among. avian mating systems. We studied. this-relationship. in the red-capped robin (Petroica goodenovii) across two breeding seasons, using spectrophotometric techniques, to score colour and molecular markers to assign paternity. Males with the highest. within-pair. reproductive success during the first season moulted into,the most colourful plumage at the conclusion of that season. We found;no such correlations, when using putative measures of reproductive success, underlining the importance of unambiguous paternity assignment. However, males that moulted into the most, colourful plumage did not go on to attain highest. reproductive success during-the, subsequent breeding season (while displaying this plumage). Instead, variation in male reproductive success was explained by male body condition and age. These results suggest that the information value of male-plumage colour is unpredictable.

  • 3. Franzén, M.
    et al.
    Larsson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Pollen harvesting and reproductive rates in specialized solitary bees2007In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Andrena humilis is an endangered oligolectic solitary bee and has declined in recent decades throughout western Europe. The aim of this study was to explore the pollen harvesting pattern and to determine the reproductive rate in specialized andrenid bees. We measured the amount of pollen required to produce one brood-cell, the pollen harvesting rate and compared our results with data for other specialized andrenid bee species. Pollen-foraging trips were registered and the activity events (entering, leaving or digging) recorded at the nests. The mean number of pollen-foraging trips per day was 5.3 and an average bee nest was active (and open) 88 min day(-1). The bees were highly efficient in harvesting pollen and spent on average 10.7 min to complete one pollen-foraging trip. Most pollen-foraging trips (77%) were completed in less than 15 min. The duration of pollen-foraging trips increased over the day, presumably because pollen became more costly to harvest. Based on pollen counts (pollen loads on bees and pollen provisions) an average bee required 3.85 foraging trips to complete one brood cell and one bee managed to accomplish 1.37 brood cells in one day with suitable weather. In the literature we found data on an additional 19 specialized andrenid bee species. Andrena humilis seems to be extremely efficient compared with most other species, with an average trip for pollen lasting almost one hour (average for andrenid bees = 46 min). An extremely low reproductive rate seems to be a common trait among specialized bees in the family Andrenidae with an average 0.9 offspring produced per day and less than ten offspring produced during the whole lifetime. The high degree of specialisation and the low reproductive rate among andrenid bees can explain the severe decline in many species today.

  • 4.
    Goropashnaya, Anna V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Fedorov, Vadim B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Seifert, Bernhard
    Pamilo, Pekka
    Phylogeography and population structure in the ant Formica exsecta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) across Eurasia as reflected by mitochondrial DNA variation and microsatellites2007In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 462-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogeography and population structure of the ant Formica exsecta was studied across Eurasia by using mtDNA sequences and microsatellite genotypes. The phylogeny based on 1.5 kb mtDNA fragment including the cytochrome b and part of the ND6 gene showed significant division (1.63% of nucleotide divergence) between a haplotype from Tibet and all other haplotypes. Similar to findings in diverse array of species associated with forest in Eurasia, the mtDNA phylogeny revealed no evidence for vicariant events due to separation in different forest refugia over glacial periods. The haplotype network includes several small clades (with 2-4 haplotypes in each) with geographically limited distribution, but one geographical region may have received haplotypes from two or more of such clades. This pattern could indicate mixing of different gene pools during postglacial colonization of Europe from different forest refugia or from an ancestral source with some spatial genetic differentiation. The genealogy and the haplotype frequencies suggest postglacial colonization of Siberia from a single refugial source of limited size. Maternal and biparental DNA markers indicated a moderate but significant level of population differentiation (mtDNA Phi(ST) = 0.42, microsatellite F-ST = 0.13) across Eurasia. However, no correlation between genetic differentiation estimated for mtDNA and microsatellites was found among the populations. Considerable reduction in microsatellite genetic diversity was found in the small population of F. exsecta in England, giving some basis to classify this population as near threatened.

  • 5.
    Hemborg, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Animal Ecology.
    Merilä, Juha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Population Biology.
    Reproductive investment and moult-breeding overlap in the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis: an experimental approach1999In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We manipulated brood sizes of 132 pairs of the collared flycatcher to investigate whether or not an investment in reproduction was traded against an investment and timing of the post-nuptial moult. Our manipulations did not affect the probability of moult-breeding overlap in males, and there was no effect on their moult scores at fledging time of the young. Males and young birds initiated moult earlier than females and old birds, respectively. Very few females started moulting during the period of nestling care. Reproductive success in terms of recruitment rate of fledglings was independent of parental moult stage during reproduction, which indicates that the manipulation did not induce a trade-off between moult and post-fledging care. Furthermore, the survival probability of adults was independent of brood size manipulations and their moult stage at fledging time. Thus, our brood size manipulations showed no evidence for a trade-off between reproductive and moult investments in the collared flycatcher.

  • 6. Hoglund, J
    Lek-kin in birds - provoking theory and surprising new results2003In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 249-253Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lohmus, Mare
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Sundström, L. Fredrik
    Björklund, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Dress for success: human facial expressions are important signals of emotions2009In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to test how emotions affect individual neutral facial expressions and the reliability of humans to read these expressions, we photographed faces of 25 women wearing clothes in which they felt attractive, unattractive, or comfortable while expressing an emotionally neutral face. Men found the faces of women in attractive clothes the most attractive, whereas the faces of women in comfortable and unattractive clothes were ranked as intermediate and least attractive, respectively, even though the clothes were not visible in the photographs. Our results demonstrate that despite very subtle effects, the emotional state of women is perceived by men and that the two sexes are concordant on the signal sent and received. We show a close connection between exterior attributes, confidence, and how a person is perceived by others.

  • 8.
    Milbrink, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Björklund, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Rapid growth response of the Arctic charr to changing environmental conditions is not the result of a population bottleneck2013In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 385-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested if within-lake differences in individual growth in an Arctic charr population before and after nutrient enrichment was due to a population bottleneck, for example as a result of strong selection for growth in a limited part of the population. The positive change in growth pattern after treatment was not coincident with a reduction in microsatellite variability, and various genetic estimators of demographic change did not indicate changes in population size. This suggests that the change in growth was not a result of only a limited part of the population responding, but an overall response.

  • 9. Rintamaki, P T
    et al.
    Hoglund, J
    Alatalo, R V
    Lundberg, A
    Correlates of male mating success on black grouse (Tetrao tetrix L.) leks2001In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Tegelström, Håkan
    et al.
    Wyöni, Per-Ivan
    Ryttman, Hans
    Thin-layer Isoelectric Focusing as a Tool for Higher Category Systematics1982In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 203-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Vennerström, Pia
    et al.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Cerenius, Lage
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    The origin of two crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci) epizootics in Finland on noble crayfish, Astacus astacus1998In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fungus identified as Aphanomyces astaci was isolated from two crayfish plague epizootics among noble crayfish, Astacus astacus, in Central Finland. The isolated fungal strains from Vaikkojoki, Kaavi and Iso-Suojarvi, Saarijarvi were able to kill healthy

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf