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  • 1.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Equal Opportunity for Sexual Evolution2011In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 641-642Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2. Devlin, Robert H.
    et al.
    Sundström, L. Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Leggatt, Rosalind A.
    Assessing Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Growth-Accelerated Genetically Engineered Fishes2015In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 685-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetically engineered fish containing growth hormone (GH) transgenes have been synthesized for more than 25 years, now with modifications made in multiple aquacultured species. Despite significant improvements in production characteristics being realized, these fish have not yet entered commercial production. The very strong enhancement of growth rates that can arise from GH transgenesis in fish has generated public and scientific concern regarding ecological and food safety. Little ecological risk is anticipated from engineered strains kept in fully contained facilities, so the concern is largely directed toward the reliability of containment measures and determining whether robust ecological data, pertinent to nature, can be generated within research facilities to minimize uncertainty and allow reliable risk-assessment predictions. This article summarizes the growth, life history, and behavioral changes observed in GH-transgenic fish and discusses the environmental and evolutionary factors affecting the adaptation, plasticity, and fitness of transgenic fish and their potential consequences on natural ecosystems.

  • 3. Doak, Daniel F.
    et al.
    Boor, Gina K. Himes
    Bakker, Victoria J.
    Morris, William F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Louthan, Allison
    Morrison, Scott A.
    Stanley, Amanda
    Crowder, Larry B.
    Recommendations for Improving Recovery Criteria under the US Endangered Species Act2015In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recovery criteria, the thresholds mandated by the Endangered Species Act that define when species may be considered for downlisting or removal from the endangered species list, are a key component of conservation planning in the United States. We recommend improvements in the definition and scientific justification of recovery criteria, addressing both data-rich and data-poor situations. We emphasize the distinction between recovery actions and recovery criteria and recommend the use of quantitative population analyses to measure the impacts of threats and to explicitly tie recovery criteria to population status. To this end, we provide a brief tutorial on the legal and practical requirements and constraints of recovery criteria development. We conclude by contrasting our recommendations with other alternatives and by describing ways in which academic scientists can contribute productively to the planning process and to endangered species recovery.

  • 4.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Reading, UK.
    Cory, Neil
    SLU.
    Fölster, Jens
    SLU Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment.
    Köhler, Stephan
    SLU Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    SLU Department of Forest Ecology and Management.
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Increasing Dissolved Organic Carbon Redefines the Extent of Surface Water Acidification and Helps Resolve a Classic Controversy2011In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 614-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concentrations of organic acids in freshwaters have increased significantly during recent decades across large parts of Europe and North America. Different theories of the causes (e.g., recovery from acidification, climate change, land use) have different implications for defining the preindustrial levels for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which are crucial for assessing acidification and other aspects of water quality. We demonstrate this by classifying the acidification status of 66 lakes with long-term observations, representative of about 12,700 acid-sensitive lakes in nemoral and boreal Sweden. Of these lakes, 47% are classified as significantly acidified (Delta pH >= 0.4), assuming preindustrial DOC levels were equal to those observed in 1990. But if instead, the higher DOC levels observed in 2009 define preindustrial conditions, half as many lakes are acidified (24%). This emphasizes the need to establish reference levels for DOC and casts new light on the classic controversy about natural versus anthropogenic acidification.

  • 5.
    Logue, Jürg Brendan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bürgmann, Helmut
    Robinson, Christopher T.
    Progress in the Ecological Genetics and Biodiversity of Freshwater Bacteria2008In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of microbial ecology has grown tremendously with the advent of novel molecular techniques, allowing the study of uncultured microbes in the environment, and producing a paradigm shift: now, rather than using bacteria cultures for evaluating cell-specific questions, researchers use RNA and DNA techniques to examine more broad-based ecological and evolutionary constructs such as biogeography and the long-debated biological species concept. Recent work has begun to relate bacteria functional genes to ecosystem processes and functioning, thereby enabling a better understanding of the interactive role of bacteria in different and often-changing environments. The field continues to mature and will most likely make substantial contributions in the future with additional efforts that include metagenomics and genomics. Here we review progress in the application of molecular techniques to study microbial communities in freshwater environments.

  • 6.
    Trouwborst, Arie
    et al.
    Tilburg Univ, Dept European & Int Publ Law, Tilburg, Netherlands.
    Blackmore, Andrew
    Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, Sci Serv, Cascades, South Africa.
    Boitani, Luigi
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Biol & Biotechnol, Rome, Italy.
    Bowman, Michael
    Univ Nottingham, Treaty Ctr, Sch Law, Nottingham, England.
    Caddell, Richard
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands Inst Law Sea, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Chapron, Guillaume
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Cliquet, An
    Univ Ghent, Dept European Publ & Int Law, Ghent, Belgium.
    Couzens, Ed
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Law Sch, Australian Ctr Climate & Environm Law, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Epstein, Yaffa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Fernández-Galiano, Eladio
    Europe Council, Strasbourg, France.
    Fleurke, Floor M.
    Tilburg Univ, Dept European & Int Publ Law, Tilburg, Netherlands.
    Gardner, Royal
    Stetson Univ, Inst Biodivers Law & Policy, Gulfport, FL USA.
    Hunter, Luke
    Panthera, New York, NY USA.
    Jacobsen, Kim
    Univ Oxford, Wildlife Conservat Res Unit WildCRU, Tubney, England.
    Krofel, Miha
    Univ Ljubljana, Dept Forestry, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Lewis, Melissa
    Tilburg Univ, Dept European & Int Publ Law, Tilburg, Netherlands.
    López-Bao, José Vicente
    Univ Oviedo, Res Unit Biodivers, Mieres, Spain.
    MacDonald, David
    Univ Oxford, Wildlife Conservat Res Unit WildCRU, Tubney, England.
    Redpath, Stephen
    Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Wandesforde-Smith, Geoffrey
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Polit Sci, Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Linnell, John D. C.
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res NINA, Trondheim, Norway.
    International Wildlife Law: Understanding and Enhancing Its Role in Conservation2017In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 784-790, article id bix086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many conservation professionals are familiar with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Ramsar Convention, and the World Heritage Convention. Regional instruments, such as those focusing on Africa, Antarctica, or Europe, are also conspicuous features of the conservation arena. Other international wildlife agreements focus on particular species, such as polar bears or albatrosses, or particular transboundary protected areas, such as the huge Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (see table 1). These agreements are collectively known as international wildlife law (Bowman et al. 2010). The binding agreements themselves are typically accompanied and informed by an evolving set of nonbinding instruments, such as Conference of the Parties (COP) decisions and action plans.

  • 7.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Merrie, Andrew
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Metian, Marc
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Watson, James R.
    Rykaczewski, Ryan R.
    Ota, Yoshitaka
    Sarmiento, Jorge L.
    Christensen, Villy
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Gustafsson, Bo G.
    Stockholms universitet, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Stockholms universitet, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Muller-Karulis, Bärbel
    Stockholms universitet, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholms universitet, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Modeling Social—Ecological Scenarios in Marine Systems2013In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 63, no 9, p. 735-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities have substantial impacts on marine ecosystems, including rapid regime shifts with large consequences for human well-being. We highlight the use of model-based scenarios as a scientific tool for adaptive stewardship in the face of such consequences. The natural sciences have a long history of developing scenarios but rarely with an in-depth understanding of factors influencing human actions. Social scientists have traditionally investigated human behavior, but scholars often argue that behavior is too complex to be repre-ented by broad generalizations useful for models and scenarios. We address this scientific divide with a framework for integrated marine social ecological scenarios, combining quantitative process-based models from the biogeochemical and ecological disciplines with qualitative studies on governance and social change. The aim is to develop policy-relevant scenarios based on an in-depth empirical understanding from both the natural and the social sciences, thereby contributing to adaptive stewardship of marine social-ecological systems.

1 - 7 of 7
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