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  • 1. Dunn, Patrick M.
    et al.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Christensen, John F.
    Homer, Louis
    Meeting the imperative to improve physician well-being: assessment of an innovative program2007In: Journal of general internal medicine, ISSN 0884-8734, E-ISSN 1525-1497, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1544-1552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND  Improving physician health and performance is critical to successfully meet the challenges facing health systems that increasingly emphasize productivity. Assessing long-term efficacy and sustainability of programs aimed at enhancing physician and organizational well-being is imperative. OBJECTIVE  To determine whether data-guided interventions and a systematic improvement process to enhance physician work-life balance and organizational efficacy can improve physician and organizational well-being. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS  From 2000 to 2005, 22–32 physicians regularly completed 3 questionnaires coded for privacy. Results were anonymously reported to physicians and the organization. Data-guided interventions to enhance physician and organizational well-being were built on physician control over the work environment, order in the clinical setting, and clinical meaning. MEASUREMENTS  Questionnaires included an ACP/ASIM survey on physician satisfaction, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and the Quality Work Competence (QWC) survey. RESULTS  Emotional and work-related exhaustion decreased significantly over the study period (MBI, p = 0.002; QWC, p = 0.035). QWC measures of organizational health significantly improved initially and remained acceptable and stable during the rest of the study. CONCLUSIONS  A data-guided program on physician well-being, using validated instruments and process improvement methods, enhanced physician and organizational well-being. Given the increases in physician burnout, organizations are encouraged to urgently create individual and systems approaches to lessen burnout risk.

  • 2. Thompson, Rachel
    et al.
    Johnston, Louise
    Taruscio, Domenica
    Monaco, Lucia
    Beroud, Christophe
    Gut, Ivo G.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    't Hoen, Peter-Bram A.
    Patrinos, George P.
    Dawkins, Hugh
    Ensini, Monica
    Zatloukal, Kurt
    Koubi, David
    Heslop, Emma
    Paschall, Justin E.
    Posada, Manuel
    Robinson, Peter N.
    Bushby, Kate
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    RD-Connect: An Integrated Platform Connecting Databases, Registries, Biobanks and Clinical Bioinformatics for Rare Disease Research2014In: Journal of general internal medicine, ISSN 0884-8734, E-ISSN 1525-1497, Vol. 29, no S3, p. S780-S787Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into rare diseases is typically fragmented by data type and disease. Individual efforts often have poor interoperability and do not systematically connect data across clinical phenotype, genomic data, biomaterial availability, and research/trial data sets. Such data must be linked at both an individual-patient and whole-cohort level to enable researchers to gain a complete view of their disease and patient population of interest. Data access and authorization procedures are required to allow researchers in multiple institutions to securely compare results and gain new insights. Funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme under the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC), RD-Connect is a global infrastructure project initiated in November 2012 that links genomic data with registries, biobanks, and clinical bioinformatics tools to produce a central research resource for rare diseases.

  • 3. Thompson, Rachel
    et al.
    Johnston, Louise
    Taruscio, Domenica
    Monaco, Lucia
    Beroud, Christophe
    Gut, Ivo G.
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    't Hoen, Peter-Bram A.
    Patrinos, George P.
    Dawkins, Hugh
    Ensini, Monica
    Zatloukal, Kurt
    Koubi, David
    Heslop, Emma
    Paschall, Justin E.
    Posada, Manuel
    Robinson, Peter N.
    Bushby, Kate
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    RD-Connect: An Integrated Platform Connecting Databases, Registries, Biobanks and Clinical Bioinformatics for Rare Disease Research2014In: Journal of general internal medicine, ISSN 0884-8734, E-ISSN 1525-1497, Vol. 29, p. S780-S787Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into rare diseases is typically fragmented by data type and disease. Individual efforts often have poor interoperability and do not systematically connect data across clinical phenotype, genomic data, biomaterial availability, and research/trial data sets. Such data must be linked at both an individual-patient and whole-cohort level to enable researchers to gain a complete view of their disease and patient population of interest. Data access and authorization procedures are required to allow researchers in multiple institutions to securely compare results and gain new insights. Funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme under the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC), RD-Connect is a global infrastructure project initiated in November 2012 that links genomic data with registries, biobanks, and clinical bioinformatics tools to produce a central research resource for rare diseases.

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