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  • 1.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Högman, C.
    Johansson, A.
    Killander, A.
    Simonsson, B.
    Wide, L.
    Serum ferritin in the regulation of iron therapy in blood donors1980In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    12 regular blood donors were selected on the basis of subnormal serum ferritin levels as a criterion for iron deficiency. It was found that all had high transferrin levels but only 5 had subnormal serum iron or transferrin saturation. The donors were given oral iron therapy in a dose of 2,800 mg between each phlebotomy, and the donation interval was standardized to 8 weeks. Test samples were collected every 4th week. After an initial rise in ferritin during the first 2 months, 6 of the donors again had subnormal serum ferritin levels, and the iron dose was therefore doubled after 32 weeks. Following this, all subjects taking the higher dose had normal ferritin values and stainable marrow iron was found at the end of the study, after 92 weeks. 3 subjects did not take the higher dose, had no raised serum ferritin level or stainable hemosiderin. It is concluded that serum ferritin estimation can be used to monitor the therapy in blood donors so that a satisfactory amount of iron is stored.

  • 2.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Högman, C.
    Killander, A.
    Wide, L.
    Serum ferritin levels in male blood donors: relation to number of phlebotomies and iron supplementation1978In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serum ferritin estimation has been shown to be a reliable test to reveal iron deficiency. Such estimations have been made in groups of male blood donors with a varying number of previous phlebotomies and a mean interval between donations of 9.9 +/- 1.7 SD weeks. It was found that the mean ferritin level was significantly (p less than 0.001) lower in the blood donors than in nondonors. After 6-8 phlebotomies it was about 40% lower. Subnormal ferritin values were found in 10% of the donors, almost exclusively among those who had taken less than 1,000 mg of iron supplementation since the last donation. It is concluded that with a donation interval of about 10 weeks, there is a considerable risk for iron deficiency after about 6 donations. This risk is far less if more than 1,000 mg of iron supplementation is taken between phlebotomies. A role for serum ferritin estimation in monitoring donation intervals and/or iron therapy is suggested.

  • 3.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Schneider, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ulfberg, J.
    High incidence of iron depletion and restless leg syndrome (RLS) in regular blood donors: intravenous iron sucrose substitution more effective than oral iron2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 354-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives Iron depletion is common in regular blood donors. The objective of the study was to investigate the frequency and severity of iron depletion in regular blood donors and whether IV iron is more effective than oral to avoid iron depletion and symptoms thereof, especially restless legs syndrome (RLS). Method One hundred and twenty blood donors with at least five previous whole blood donations were randomized to receive either IV iron sucrose (Venofer (R), RenaPharma/Vifor, Uppsala, Sweden), 200 mg, or to 20 x 100 mg of oral iron sulphate (Duroferon (R), GlaxoSmithKline, Stockholm, Sweden), after each blood donation during 1 year. Iron status and RLS incidence and severity were investigated. Results Iron status was generally poor among regular blood donors, especially in women, with a high incidence of iron depletion (> 20%) and RLS (18%). The IV iron group increased storage iron to a greater extent than the oral iron group after 12 months (P = 0 center dot 0043). Female donors were more responsive to IV iron sucrose compared to oral iron sulphate, particularly female donors below 50 years of age. RLS severity scores were significantly lower in the IV iron group. The two treatments were safe. Conclusion Iron status is poor in regular blood donors, restless legs syndrome is common, and the routine iron supplementation is insufficient. IV iron sucrose substitutes iron loss in blood donors more efficiently compared with oral iron sulphate, especially in women. Iron substitution to blood donors should be individualized and based on P-ferritin monitoring.

  • 4. Gong, J
    et al.
    Rawal, B D
    Högman, C F
    Vyas, G N
    Nilsson, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gustafsson, I
    Complement killing of Yersinia enterocolitica and retention of the bacteria by leucocyte removal filters.1994In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 166-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report studies on the complement sensitivity of four strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, serotypes O:3, O:9, O:5.27, and O:20, isolated from blood units involved in transfusion fatalities. Complement in fresh CPD plasma killed Y. enterocolitica within 4 h at 22 degrees C in 100% of the experiments. The bactericidal action was serotype and complement activation pathway dependent. Both classic and alternate pathways seemed to be active, but the latter to a lesser degree. When the classic pathway was blocked by chelation of Ca2+ no complete killing was obtained. Complement did not enhance or condition Yersinia for leucocyte filter retention. Direct removal of Yersinia by filtration was also related to serotype; all strains were reduced by filtration in heat-inactivated plasma, and all except serotype O:5.27 were reduced in Ca(2+)-chelated plasma. Our findings may explain why plasma products and platelet concentrates are rarely involved in Yersinia sepsis related to transfusion.

  • 5.
    Greinacher, A.
    et al.
    Univ Med, Inst Immunol & Transfus Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Lubenow, Norbert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Predonation finger lancet punctures: a potential risk factor for interdonor pathogen transmission in the blood donor clinic2016In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Point-of-care testing using capillary blood from a finger prick is widely used for predonation haemoglobin testing of blood donors. It is common practice to cover the finger prick with a cotton swab and to instruct the donor to press for few minutes. The finger prick can cause blood contamination of surfaces in contact with the lanced finger, especially door handles, risking infectious disease transmission, particularly if another person touching the contaminated door handle also has a punctured fingertip.

    Materials and Methods: First, we investigated contamination by blood (benzidine assay) of the door handles of our blood donor clinic, taking 175 samples 3 h after opening of the donation centre (baseline). We then introduced band-aids to cover the finger prick and started an information campaign using educational flyers to sensitize blood donors and staff to this problem (period-1). Thereafter, the staff was instructed to use the non-dominant hand for blood sampling and mandated to replace any discarded band-aids immediately (period-2).

    Results: At baseline, 82% of the nurse room door handles showed contamination with blood. This decreased somewhat (10-40%) after period-1, but only after immediate mandatory band-aid replacement on any donor finger without a band-aid (period-2), no further blood contaminations were detected.

    Conclusion: Blood contamination of shared surfaces can occur after finger prick for capillary blood sampling. Application of a band-aid and use of the non-dominant hand for fingertip incision are easy to apply and effective in reducing this iatrogenic health hazard.

  • 6.
    Knutson, Folke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lejskog, K.
    Uppsala University.
    Lof, H.
    Uppsala University.
    A FEASIBILITY STUDY WITH THE TACSI DEVICE PRODUCING 2 DOSES OF PLATELETS STORED FOR 7 DAYS WITH THE USE OF ONE INTERCEPT PATHOGEN INACTIVATION KIT2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 202-202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Knutson, Folke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Lof, H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tennby, E.
    Donnelly, B.
    Schott, M. A.
    Erickson, A.
    Mufti, N.
    Quality Of Inactivated Red Cells Compared To Gamma Irradiated Red Cells2013In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 105, no S1, p. 151-152Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Knutson, Folke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Osselaer, J.
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Clin Univ Mont Godinne, Yvoir, Belgium..
    Pierelli, L.
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dept Expt Med, I-00185 Rome, Italy..
    Lozano, M.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CDB, Dept Hemotherapy & Hemostasis, Barcelona, Spain..
    Cid, J.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CDB, Dept Hemotherapy & Hemostasis, Barcelona, Spain..
    Tardivel, R.
    EFS Bretagne, Rennes, France..
    Garraud, O.
    EFS Auvergne Loire, St Etienne, France..
    Hervig, T.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Immunol & Transfus Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Domanovic, D.
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Cukjati, M.
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Gudmundson, S.
    Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Blood Bank, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Hjalmarsdottir, I. B.
    Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Blood Bank, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Castrillo, A.
    Transfus Ctr Galicia, Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Gonzalez, R.
    Transfus Ctr Galicia, Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Brihante, D.
    Inst Portugues Oncol Lisboa, Serv Imunohemoterapia, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Santos, M.
    Inst Portugues Oncol Lisboa, Serv Imunohemoterapia, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Schlenke, P.
    Med Univ Graz, Dept Blood Grp Serol & Transfus Med, Graz, Austria..
    Elliott, A.
    Cerus Corp, Concord, CA 94520 USA..
    Lin, J. -S
    Tappe, D.
    Cerus Corp, Concord, CA 94520 USA..
    Stassinopoulos, A.
    Cerus Corp, Concord, CA 94520 USA..
    Green, J.
    Cerus Corp, Concord, CA 94520 USA..
    Corash, L.
    Cerus Corp, Concord, CA 94520 USA..
    A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen-UVA photochemical treatment2015In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 109, no 4, p. 343-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT (TM) Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0-4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0.6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0.4%) and urticaria (41, 0.2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (<0.1%). No case of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion-transmitted infection or death was attributed to the transfusion of PCT-PLT. Conclusion This longitudinal haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components.

  • 9. Lozano, M.
    et al.
    Knutson, N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tardivel, R.
    Cid, J.
    Maymo, R.
    Lof, H. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Roddie, H. P.
    Pelly, J. P.
    Docherty, A. R.
    Sherman, C. D.
    Lin, L.
    Propst, M.
    Corash, M.
    Prowse, C. , V
    A multi-center study of therapeutic efficacy and safety of platelet components prepared with pathogen inactivation (intercept (tm)) stored for 6 OR 7 days prior to transfusion2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 13-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lööf, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Joelsson Saxner, A.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Pathogen inactivated platelets decrease transfusion reactions2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 240-241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lübenow, Norbert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Englund, A.
    Uppsala University.
    Säfwenberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    AUTOADSOPTION AFTER RECENT (< 3 MONTHS) TRANSFUSION OF RED CELLS - REVIEW OF A FIVE YEAR SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCE2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 430-431Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Hagström, U
    Englund, A
    Säfwenberg, J
    A simplified assay for the specific diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: detection of DAF(CD55)- and HRF20(CD59)- erythrocytes in microtyping cards.1993In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare disease that is caused by a monoclonal stem cell defect. The affected cells lack the carbohydrate linkage between phosphatidylinositol and a group of membrane proteins of which three protect the cell against complement lysis. The absence of these three proteins, DAF(CD55), C8BP and HRF20(CD59), makes cells from the erythropoiesis, thrombopoiesis and myelopoiesis extensively sensitive to complement attack and affected patients suffer from intravascular hemolysis, thrombosis and increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we describe a swift and specific assay for the detection of CD55- and CD59- erythrocytes, which is suitable for screening of possible PNH patients.

  • 13.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lööf, L
    Nilsson, U R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    An improved method to study complement receptor-mediated function of the fixed macrophage system in vivo.1991In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to coat unsensitized erythrocytes with fragments of C3 and C4 using autologous serum, in order to study complement receptor-dependent function of the fixed macrophage system, is presented. After incubation with serum under optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells had C3b/iC3b deposited on the surface, with an average of 20 x 10(3) molecules per cell. Elimination of the coated cells by the fixed macrophage system was studied in 12 normal subjects. With a dose of 4.5 x 10(8) red cells injected, 75% of the cells were eliminated with a half-life of approximately 2.4 +/- 0.3 min (n = 7). In subjects receiving ten times more cells, there was a rapid decrease in the amount of C3-coated cells, reaching a nadir with 85% remaining for 4-6 min, after which there was a gradual release of cells for another 20 min (n = 5). In absolute numbers, 3 x 10(8) of labeled cells were eliminated regardless of the dose injected. The coating procedure presented here is simple, does not introduce heterologous blood components and makes it possible to control the amount and the degree of fragmentation of the C3 and C4 deposited on the erythrocyte surface.

  • 14.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lööf, L
    Nilsson, U R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Development of an immunoassay for the detection of minute amounts of IgG-coated erythrocytes in whole blood and its application for the assessment of Fc-mediated clearance of anti-D-coated erythrocytes in vivo.1989In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 188-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapid and sensitive immunoassay for the detection of minute quantities of IgG-coated erythrocytes in whole blood was developed. Washed red blood cells were incubated in two steps with anti-human IgG antiserum followed by 125I-labelled protein A. The assay was able to detect amounts of sensitized erythrocytes as small as 0.5 ml of packed erythrocytes in a total blood volume of 5 liters and hematocrit 40%. A linear relation between increasing amounts of IgG-coated red cells in whole blood and the binding of 125I-labelled protein A was obtained. We applied the technique on the assessment of the removal of IgG anti-D-coated erythrocytes from the circulation of test individuals. T1/2 for the elimination of approximately 4 ml packed red cells sensitized with 62 micrograms of anti-D in 14 normal subjects was 20 +/- 5 min (mean +/- SEM). A splenectomized person did not clear the injected cells from the circulation during the test period of 70 min. If a standard curve was constructed the total blood volume in the test subjects could be calculated. This value correlated well (r = 0.99) with the blood volume calculated from the height and weight of the test individuals.

  • 15.
    Norda, R. A. C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Abedi, M.
    Ekermo, B.
    Grandin, B.
    Holthuis, N.
    Konar, J.
    Lubenow, Norbert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Lundahl, J.
    Sojka, Nilsson B.
    Schneider, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    An Evaluation Of The Blood Donor Health Questionnaire (Dhq) In Sweden 20122013In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 105, no S1, p. 17-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Norda, Rut A. C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Bergsten, M.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Evaluation Of Maual Pooling Of 8 Buffy-Coats For Double-Dosespooled Pathogen-Reduced Platelet Concentrates2013In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 105, no S1, p. 135-135Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Norda, Rut
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Berseus, O.
    Åkerblom, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Stegmayr, B.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Unexpected effects of donor gender on the storage of liquid plasma2007In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Swedish regulations in effect since 2006 allow the storage of plasma for transfusion up to 14 days at 2-6 degrees C and for 3 years at < or = -30 degrees C. In this study, the quality of currently used plasma components was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plasma components, prepared from whole blood or by apheresis, either leucocyte depleted or not leucocyte depleted, were stored at 2-6 degrees C as liquid plasma or as thawed fresh-frozen plasma; 31% were from female donors. Concentration, function and activation markers of the plasma coagulation systems were investigated during storage for up to 42 days. RESULTS: Cold-induced contact activation was the dominant storage lesion, occurring earlier and at higher frequency in plasma from females. Increased kallikrein-like activity led to changes in activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, protein C and C1 inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH function dropped to 53% on Day 14 in cold-activated plasma components. CONCLUSION: Contact activation may be triggered before Day 14, especially in plasma from females, and may progress as a result of the consumption of C1INH. The data suggest that lack of cold-induced contact activation may be an important quality criterion. To achieve this, plasma from male donors could be selected for transfusion and the storage time limited to 7 days.

  • 18.
    Norda, Rut
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Schött, Ulf
    Örebro.
    Berseus, Olof
    Örebro.
    Åkerblom, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umeå.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Complement activation products in liquid stored plasma and C3a-kinetics after transfusion of autologous plasma2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives  Keeping a small stock of liquid plasma readily available for transfusion is common practise in Sweden. We report data on complement activation markers in plasma components during storage in the liquid state and the kinetics of C3a-(desArg) after transfusion of autologous plasma with high content of C3a-(desArg) . Material and Methods  Plasma components were prepared by apheresis or from whole blood. C3 fragments (C3a-(desArg) , C3d,g, iC3), and soluble terminal complement complex (sC5b-9) were investigated. C3a-(desArg) kinetics was investigated in regular apheresis donors. Results  Apheresis plasma prepared by membrane centrifugation had significantly higher level of C3a-(desArg) , C3d,g and sC5b-9 from day 0 and low iC3, than plasma prepared by other methods. By storage day 7, C3a-(desArg) -levels were above the reference value in 88% of all components. After re-infusion of autologous plasma with high C3a-(desArg) content, there were rapid a(1) and a(2) -distribution followed by a slower b-elimination phase. Conclusion  Plasma components prepared by different methods and stored in the liquid phase differ significantly in the amount and timing of complement activation. C3a-(desArg) present in plasma is rapidly eliminated after transfusion. Autologous plasma could be used to study complement kinetics in different clinical situations.

  • 19. Offergeld, R.
    et al.
    Kamp, C.
    Heiden, M.
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Behr-Gross, M-E
    Sexual risk behaviour and donor deferral in Europe2014In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 420-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most controversial policies in blood transfusion worldwide is the permanent deferral from donating blood of men with sexual contacts to other men (MSM). This policy was implemented for safety reasons as sex between men is known to be a high risk factor for acquiring severe infectious diseases transmissible by blood transfusion. Sexual contacts among heterosexual persons may hold similar risks but a clear-cut discrimination between different individual risks is impossible. Nevertheless, the current blood donor deferral periods defined by European Union (EU) legislation depend on a distinction of different grades of risk with respect to sexual behaviour. Under the aegis of the Steering Committee on Blood Transfusion (CD-P-TS) of the Council of Europe (CoE), an international working group evaluated epidemiological and behavioural data, modelling studies on residual risk and spread of infections, and studies on adherence to donor selection criteria. The aim was to distinguish sexual behaviour of different risk categories. It was concluded, that existing data confirm that MSM and commercial sex workers (CSW) are groups at high risk. Any further grading lacks a scientific data base. Modelling studies indicate that adherence to deferral policies is of major relevance suggesting that good donor adherence may outweigh the small negative effects on blood safety postulated for changing from permanent to temporary deferral periods for high risk sexual behaviours. The fact that a considerable percentage of donors are MSM - despite the permanent deferral policy - demonstrates the need to increase donor understanding and adherence.

  • 20. Pietersz, R. N. I.
    et al.
    Reesink, H. W.
    Panzer, S.
    Gilbertson, M. P.
    Borosak, M. E.
    Wood, E. M.
    Leitner, G. C.
    Rabitsch, W.
    Ay, C.
    Lambermont, M.
    Deneys, V.
    Sondag, D.
    Compernolle, V.
    Legrand, D.
    Francois, A.
    Tardivel, R.
    Garban, F.
    Sawant, R. B.
    Rebulla, P.
    Handa, M.
    Ohto, H.
    Kerkhoffs, J. -LH.
    Brand, A.
    Zhiburt, E.
    Cid, J.
    Escolar, G.
    Lozano, M.
    Puig, L.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hallbook, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lubenow, Norbert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Estcourt, L.
    Stanworth, S.
    Murphy, M. F.
    Williams, L.
    Mraz, D. L.
    Ross, R. L.
    Snyder, E.
    Prophylactic platelet transfusions2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 159-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Reesink, H. W.
    et al.
    Davis, K.
    Wong, J.
    Schwartz, D. W. M.
    Mayr, W. R.
    Devine, D. V.
    Georgsen, J.
    Chiaroni, J.
    Ferrera, V.
    Roubinet, F.
    Lin, C. K.
    O'Donovan, B.
    Fitzgerald, J. M.
    Raspollini, E.
    Villa, S.
    Rebulla, P.
    Makino, S.
    Gounder, D.
    Safwenberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Murphy, M. F.
    Staves, J.
    Milkins, C.
    Mercado, T. C.
    Illoh, O. C.
    Panzer, S.
    The use of the electronic (computer) cross-match2013In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 104, no 4, p. 350-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Reesink, H. W.
    et al.
    Engelfriet, C. P.
    Hyland, C. A.
    Coghlan, P.
    Tait, B.
    Wsolak, M.
    Keller, A. J.
    Henn, G.
    Mayr, W. R.
    Thomas, I.
    Osselaer, J. -C
    Lambermont, M.
    Beaten, M.
    Wendel, S.
    Qiu, Y.
    Georgsen, J.
    Krusius, T.
    Maki, T.
    Andreu, G.
    Morel, P.
    Lefrere, J. -J
    Rebulla, P.
    Giovanelli, S.
    Butti, B.
    Lecchi, L.
    Mozzi, F.
    van Hilten, J. A.
    Zwaginga, J. J.
    Flanagan, P.
    Flesland, O.
    Brojer, E.
    Letowska, M.
    Åkerblom, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Norda, R.
    Prowse, C.
    Dow, B.
    Jarvis, L.
    Davidson, F.
    Kleinman, S.
    Bianco, C.
    Stramer, S. L.
    Dodd, R. Y.
    Busch, M. P.
    Biobanks of blood from donors and recipients of blood products2008In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 242-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Shanwell, A.
    et al.
    Andersson, M-L.
    Rostgaard, K.
    Edgren, G.
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Melbye, Mads
    Nyrén, O.
    Reilly, M.
    Post-transfusion mortality among recipients of ABO-compatible but non-identical plasma2009In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 316-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of ABO-compatible non-identical plasma for patient outcome have not been studied in randomized clinical trials or large cohort studies and use varies widely in the absence of evidence-based policies. We investigated if transfusion with compatible instead of identical plasma confers any short-term survival disadvantage on the recipients. The cohort of all 86 082 Swedish patients who received their first plasma transfusion between 1990 and 2002 was followed for 14 days and the risk of death in patients exposed to compatible non-identical plasma compared to recipients of only identical plasma. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, there was an increased mortality associated with exposure to ABO-compatible non-identical plasma, with the excess risk mostly confined to those receiving 5 or more units (relative risk, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.29). Stratification by blood group indicated higher risks in group O recipients, especially when the compatible plasma was from a group AB donor. This study suggests that ABO-compatible non-identical plasma is less safe than identical plasma. Subanalyses by blood group suggest a role for circulating immune complexes. Our findings may have policy implications for improving transfusion safety.

  • 24.
    Ståhle, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, K.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Photochemical pathogen inactivation of human serum enables its large-scale application in clinical cell transplantation2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 98, no 3, p. e364-e365Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Tadokoro, K.
    et al.
    Reesink, H. W.
    Panzer, S.
    Chabanel, A.
    Santailler, G.
    Guerin, T.
    Socquet, D.
    David, B.
    Labrune, J. L.
    Lin, C. K.
    Tsoi, W. C.
    Letowska, M.
    Antoniewicz-Papis, J.
    Naniewicz, J.
    Dudziak, K.
    Lachert, E.
    Lozano, M.
    Schneider, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Snyder, E. L.
    Champion, M. H.
    Problems with irradiators2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gidlöf, C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ragnarsson, L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Högbom, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lindeberg, M.
    von der Lehr, N.
    Einarsson, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Soegaard, M.
    Kristensson, K.
    Kalland, T.
    Dohlsten, M.
    Targeted superantigens for immunotherapy of haematopoietic tumours1998In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 74, no Supp 2, p. 483-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the exception of childhood common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (cALL), treatment of other hematopoietic B cell lineage tumours such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL), adult ALL and multiple myeloma (MM) is unsatisfactory. Similarly, the therapeutic outcome of acute and chronic myeloid leukaemia (AML, CML) is frequently dismal. At the same time, leukaemia/lymphoma cells represent ideal targets for immunotherapy. The present review summarizes our preclinical experience with a novel type of cytotoxic T cell based immunotherapy for B-lineage and myeloid tumours. Staphylococcal enterotoxin-derived superantigens (SAgs) are among the most potent T cell activators known, linking the T cell receptor to HLA-DR on natural target cells. SAgs were genetically engineered to reduce DR binding and were then fused to Fab parts of tumour-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using these "targeted" SAgs, highly efficient lysis of B-lineage (B-NHL, B-CLL, ALL, MM) and myeloid (AML, CML) tumour cells by T-cells was achieved in vitro and in an animal model. We are entering an interesting era of innovative cancer therapy based on novel man-made biotherapeutic agents.

  • 27. Ullum, H.
    et al.
    Kamper-Jorgensen, M.
    Edgren, G.
    Rostgaard, K.
    Melbye, M.
    Nyrén, O.
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hjalgrim, H.
    FREQUENCY OF BLOOD DONATION DOES NOT AFFECT BLOOD DONOR SURVIVAL2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 184-185Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 27 of 27
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