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  • 1.
    Andersson, Helén
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Brittebo, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Combination Effects of 17 beta-Estradiol and PCB 126 on Human Endothelial Cells2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 11, p. E303-E303Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Bonaca, Marc P.
    et al.
    Morrow, David A.
    Braunwald, Eugene
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Jiang, Songtao
    Breher, Stephanie
    Sabatine, Marc S.
    Kempf, Tibor
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wollert, Kai C.
    Growth Differentiation Factor-15 and Risk of Recurrent Events in Patients Stabilized After Acute Coronary Syndrome Observations From PROVE IT-TIMI 222011In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-To investigate growth differentiation factor (GDF)-15 at hospital discharge for assessment of the risk of death, recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), and congestive heart failure, and to determination of whether these risks can be modified by statins. Methods and Results-GDF-15 is a transforming growth factor-beta-related cytokine induced in response to tissue injury. GDF-15 concentration is associated with all-cause mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We measured GDF-15 in 3501 patients after ACS, treated with moderate or intensive statin therapy in PROVE IT-TIMI 22. By using established cutoff points, GDF-15 (< 1200, 1200-1800, and > 1800 ng/L) was associated with 2-year risk of death or MI (5.7%, 8.1%, and 15.1%, respectively; P < 0.001), death (P < 0.001), MI (P < 0.001), and congestive heart failure (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, MI, qualifying event, renal function, B-type natriuretic peptide, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, GDF-15 was associated with the risk of death or MI (adjusted hazard ratio per ln increase GDF-15, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.6 to 2.9]; P < 0.001), death (P < 0.001), MI (P < 0.001), and congestive heart failure (P < 0.001). There was no significant interaction between GDF-15 and intensive statin therapy for the risk of death or MI (P = 0.24 for the interaction). Conclusion-GDF-15 is associated with recurrent events after ACS, independent of clinical predictors, B-type natriuretic peptide, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. This finding supports GDF-15 as a prognostic marker in ACS and investigation of other therapies that modify this risk.

  • 3.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Smedman, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lithell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Relations to Fatty Acid Composition in the Diet and in Serum Cholesterol Esters2001In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 2086-2092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 levels and poor dietary fat quality are potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The aim was to investigate the cross-sectional associations between PAI-1 activity and dietary nutrient intake, focusing on fat quality, in a population-based study of 871 men aged 70 years. The relationship between PAI-1 and the fatty acid composition in serum cholesterol esters (n=381 men) was also studied. The estimated total fat intake was positively associated with PAI-1 activity. The intake of both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids was positively associated with PAI-1 activity, whereas the intake of saturated fatty acids was not. In serum cholesterol esters, higher proportions of palmitoleic and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, a lower proportion of linoleic acid, and reduced estimated Δ5-desaturase activity were associated with higher PAI-1 levels. These associations were confounded by factors representing the insulin resistance syndrome. PAI-1 activity was positively associated with γ-linolenic and arachidonic acid, independent of potential confounders. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that dietary intake of unsaturated fatty acids is positively associated with PAI-1 activity, whereas intake of saturated fatty acids is not. The associations present between PAI-1 activity and the fatty acid proportions in serum cholesterol esters are partly influenced by metabolic syndrome-related factors.

  • 4.
    Caolo, Vincenza
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Peacock, Hanna M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kasaai, Bahar
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Swennen, Geertje
    Maastricht Univ, CARIM, Dept Physiol, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Gordon, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Post, Mark J.
    Maastricht Univ, CARIM, Dept Physiol, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Verhamme, Peter
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Jones, Elizabeth A. V.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leuven, Belgium.
    Shear Stress and VE-Cadherin: The Molecular Mechanism of Vascular Fusion2018In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 2174-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Vascular fusion represents an important mechanism of vessel enlargement during development; however, its significance in postnatal vessel enlargement is still unknown. During fusion, 2 adjoining vessels merge to share 1 larger lumen. The aim of this research was to identify the molecular mechanism responsible for vascular fusion.

    Approach and Results: We previously showed that both low shear stress and DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester) treatment in the embryo result in a hyperfused vascular plexus and that increasing shear stress levels could prevent DAPT-induced fusion. We, therefore, investigated vascular endothelial-cadherin (VEC) phosphorylation because this is a common downstream target of low shear stress and DAPT treatment. VEC phosphorylation increases after DAPT treatment and decreased shear stress. The increased phosphorylation occurred independent of the cleavage of the Notch intracellular domain. Increasing shear stress rescues hyperfusion by DAPT treatment by causing the association of the phosphatase vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase with VEC, counteracting VEC phosphorylation. Finally, Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src) inhibition prevents VEC phosphorylation in endothelial cells and can rescue hyperfusion induced by low shear stress and DAPT treatment. Moesin, a VEC target that was previously reported to mediate endothelial cell rearrangement during lumenization, relocalizes to cell membranes in vascular beds undergoing hyperfusion.

    Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence that VEC phosphorylation, induced by DAPT treatment and low shear stress, is involved in the process of fusion during vascular remodeling.

  • 5. Casazza, Andrea
    et al.
    Fu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Johansson, Irja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Capparuccia, Lorena
    Andersson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Giustacchini, Alice
    Squadrito, Mario Leonardo
    Venneri, Mary Anna
    Mazzone, Massimiliano
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Carmeliet, Peter
    De Palma, Michele
    Naldini, Luigi
    Tamagnone, Luca
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Systemic and Targeted Delivery of Semaphorin 3A Inhibits Tumor Angiogenesis and Progression in Mouse Tumor Models2011In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 741-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-The role of semaphorins in tumor progression is still poorly understood. In this study, we aimed at elucidating the regulatory role of semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A) in primary tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Methods and Results-We used 3 different experimental approaches in mouse tumor models: (1) overexpression of SEMA3A in tumor cells, (2) systemic expression of SEMA3A following liver gene transfer in mice, and (3) tumor-targeted release of SEMA3A using gene modified Tie2-expressing monocytes as delivery vehicles. In each of these experimental settings, SEMA3A efficiently inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting vessel function and increasing tumor hypoxia and necrosis, without promoting metastasis. We further show that the expression of the receptor neuropilin-1 in tumor cells is required for SEMA3A-dependent inhibition of tumor cell migration in vitro and metastatic spreading in vivo. Conclusion-In sum, both systemic and tumor-targeted delivery of SEMA3A inhibits tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in multiple mouse models; moreover, SEMA3A inhibits the metastatic spreading from primary tumors. These data support the rationale for further investigation of SEMA3A as an anticancer molecule.

  • 6. Chernogubova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Strawbridge, Rona
    Mahdessian, Hovsep
    Malarstig, Anders
    Krapivner, Sergey
    Gigante, Bruna
    Hellenius, Mai-Lis
    de Faire, Ulf
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Troutt, Jason S.
    Konrad, Robert J.
    Eriksson, Per
    Hamsten, Anders
    van 't Hooft, Ferdinand M.
    Common and Low-Frequency Genetic Variants in the PCSK9 Locus Influence Circulating PCSK9 Levels2012In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1526-1534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective- Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating protein that influences plasma low-density lipoprotein concentration and susceptibility to coronary heart disease. Circulating PCSK9 levels show considerable interindividual differences, but the factors responsible for this variation are largely unknown.

    Methods and Results- We analyzed circulating PCSK9 levels in 4 cohorts of healthy, middle-aged Swedes (n=5722) and found that PCSK9 levels varied over approximate to 50-fold range, showed a positive relationship with plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration, and were associated with plasma triglyceride, fibrinogen, insulin, and glucose concentrations. A genome-wide association study conducted in 2 cohorts (n=1215) failed to uncover common genetic variants robustly associated with variation in circulating PCSK9 level. As expected, the minor allele of the PCSK9 R46L variant was in all cohorts associated with reduced PCSK9 levels and decreased plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations, but no relationship was observed with the plasma triglyceride concentration. Further mapping of the PCSK9 locus revealed a common polymorphism (rs2479415, minor allele frequency 43.9%), located approximate to 6 kb upstream from PCSK9, which is independently associated with increased circulating PCSK9 levels.

    Conclusion- Common and low-frequency genetic variants in the PCSK9 locus influence the pronounced interindividual variation in circulating PCSK9 levels in healthy, middle-aged white (predominantly Swedish) subjects.

  • 7.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    ADAM-mediated shedding, a new flavor in angiogenesis regulation2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 2087-2088Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    VEGF-B taken to our hearts: specific effect of VEGF-B in myocardial ischemia2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1575-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Crosas-Molist, Eva
    et al.
    Meirelles, Thayna
    López-Luque, Judit
    Serra-Peinado, Carla
    Selva, Javier
    Caja, Laia
    Institut d’Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya
    Uriarte, Juan José
    Bertran, Esther
    Mendizábal, Yolanda
    Hernández, Vanessa
    García-Calero, Carolina
    Busnadiego, Oscar
    Condom, Enric
    Toral, David
    Castellà, Manel
    Forteza, Alberto
    Navajas, Daniel
    Sarri, Elisabet
    Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando
    Dietz, Harry C
    Fabregat, Isabel
    Egea, Gustavo
    Vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic changes in patients with Marfan syndrome2015In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 960-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Marfan's syndrome is characterized by the formation of ascending aortic aneurysms resulting from altered assembly of extracellular matrix microfibrils and chronic tissue growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. TGF-β is a potent regulator of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype. We hypothesized that as a result of the chronic TGF-β signaling, VSMC would alter their basal differentiation phenotype, which could facilitate the formation of aneurysms. This study explores whether Marfan's syndrome entails phenotypic alterations of VSMC and possible mechanisms at the subcellular level.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: Immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses of dilated aortas from Marfan patients showed overexpression of contractile protein markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, smooth muscle protein 22 alpha, and calponin-1) and collagen I in comparison with healthy aortas. VSMC explanted from Marfan aortic aneurysms showed increased in vitro expression of these phenotypic markers and also of myocardin, a transcription factor essential for VSMC-specific differentiation. These alterations were generally reduced after pharmacological inhibition of the TGF-β pathway. Marfan VSMC in culture showed more robust actin stress fibers and enhanced RhoA-GTP levels, which was accompanied by increased focal adhesion components and higher nuclear localization of myosin-related transcription factor A. Marfan VSMC and extracellular matrix measured by atomic force microscopy were both stiffer than their respective controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: In Marfan VSMC, both in tissue and in culture, there are variable TGF-β-dependent phenotypic changes affecting contractile proteins and collagen I, leading to greater cellular and extracellular matrix stiffness. Altogether, these alterations may contribute to the known aortic rigidity that precedes or accompanies Marfan's syndrome aneurysm formation.

  • 10.
    Ganna, Andrea
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Reilly, Marie
    Arnloe, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multilocus Genetic Risk Scores for Coronary Heart Disease Prediction2013In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 2267-2272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-Current guidelines do not support the use of genetic profiles in risk assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, new single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with CHD and intermediate cardiovascular traits have recently been discovered. We aimed to compare several multilocus genetic risk score (MGRS) in terms of association with CHD and to evaluate clinical use. Approach and Results-We investigated 6 Swedish prospective cohort studies with 10 612 participants free of CHD at baseline. We developed 1 overall MGRS based on 395 single nucleotide polymorphisms reported as being associated with cardiovascular traits, 1 CHD-specific MGRS, including 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and 6 trait-specific MGRS for each established CHD risk factors. Both the overall and the CHD-specific MGRS were significantly associated with CHD risk (781 incident events; hazard ratios for fourth versus first quartile, 1.54 and 1.52; P<0.001) and improved risk classification beyond established risk factors (net reclassification improvement, 4.2% and 4.9%; P=0.006 and 0.017). Discrimination improvement was modest (C-index improvement, 0.004). A polygene MGRS performed worse than the CHD-specific MGRS. We estimate that 1 additional CHD event for every 318 people screened at intermediate risk could be saved by measuring the CHD-specific genetic score in addition to the established risk factors. Conclusions-Our results indicate that genetic information could be of some clinical value for prediction of CHD, although further studies are needed to address aspects, such as feasibility, ethics, and cost efficiency of genetic profiling in the primary prevention setting.

  • 11.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Arnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Plasma-Parathyroid Hormone Is Associated With Subclinical and Clinical Atherosclerotic Disease in 2 Community-Based Cohorts2014In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1567-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk factors have different impact on different arterial territories. Diseases with elevated circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) such as primary hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, predominantly heart or cerebrovascular diseases. However, data on the associations between circulating PTH and peripheral atherosclerosis are limited.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: Two prospective, community-based studies were used. In 306 men and women, who were 70 years old, from the Prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study, cross-sectional relations between PTH and atherosclerotic burden assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography were investigated. In 998 men, who were 71 years old, from the Uppsala longitudinal study of adult men (ULSAM) study, the association between PTH concentration and risk of subsequent nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (excluding coronary or cerebrovascular disease) was investigated. Adjusting for established vascular risk factors, PTH was associated with burden of atherosclerosis (increase in total atherosclerotic score per SD PTH increase: 0.04, 0.003-0.08; P=0.03) in the PIVUS study. During follow-up in the ULSAM study (median 16.7 years), 89 men were diagnosed with nonfatal atherosclerotic disease. In Cox-regression analyses adjusting for established vascular risk factors and mineral metabolism, higher PTH was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (hazard ratio for 1 SD increase of PTH: 1.55, 1.33-1.88; P<0.0001). Results were similar when including fatal atherosclerotic disease in the outcome.

    CONCLUSIONS: In 2 independent community-based cohorts, PTH was associated to the degree of atherosclerosis and risk of clinically overt atherosclerotic disease, respectively. Our data confirm and extend previous studies supporting a role for PTH in the development of atherosclerotic disease.

  • 12.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    The Prevalence and Quantification of Atherosclerosis in an Elderly Population Assessed by Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography2007In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 649-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-The principal aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of using whole-body magnetic resonance angiography to assess atherosclerosis in different vascular territories in a cohort of elderly. Methods and Results-Three hundred six 70-year-old subjects (145 women, 161 men) recruited from a population-based cohort study (Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors, ie, the PIVUS study) underwent 1.5-T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with gadodiamide. The arteries were divided into 26 segments. In total, 7956 vessel segments were evaluated with 7900 segments (99.3%) possible to evaluate. Of these, 7186 segments (91%) were normal. Luminal narrowing of ≥50% was observed in 9 (1.5%) of the renal arteries, 12 (1.8%) of the carotid arteries, in 31 segments (1.1%) of the pelvic/upper leg territories, and in 136 segments (6.2%) of territories in the lower leg. Approximately one-third of the sample had no vascular abnormalities, one-third had stenoses of <50%, and the remainder had stenoses ≥50% or occlusions. Six subjects (2%) had aortic aneurysms. In subjects without evident vascular disease, 26% had significant vascular abnormalities. Conclusions-Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography performed with a clinical scanner can be used for quantifying atherosclerosis in different vascular territories in a single examination in an elderly population.

  • 13. Henshall, Tanya L
    et al.
    Keller, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    He, Liqun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Johansson, Bengt R
    Wallgard, Elisabet
    Raschperger, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Jin, Shaobo
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Lendahl, Urban
    Notch3 Is Necessary for Blood Vessel Integrity in the Central Nervous System2015In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 409-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are important for contraction, blood flow distribution, and regulation of blood vessel diameter, but to what extent they contribute to the integrity of blood vessels and blood-brain barrier function is less well understood. In this report, we explored the impact of the loss of VSMC in the Notch3(-/-) mouse on blood vessel integrity in the central nervous system.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: Notch3(-/-) mice showed focal disruptions of the blood-brain barrier demonstrated by extravasation of tracers and accompanied by fibrin deposition in the retinal vasculature. This blood-brain barrier leakage was accompanied by a regionalized and patchy loss of VSMC, with VSMC gaps predominantly in arterial resistance vessels of larger caliber. The loss of VSMC appeared to be caused by progressive degeneration of VSMC resulting in a gradual loss of VSMC marker expression and a progressive acquisition of an aberrant VSMC phenotype closer to the gaps, followed by enhanced apoptosis and cellular disintegration in the gaps. Arterial VSMC were the only mural cell type that was morphologically affected, despite Notch3 being expressed also in pericytes. Transcriptome analysis of isolated brain microvessels revealed gene expression changes in Notch3(-/-) mice consistent with loss of arterial VSMC and presumably secondary transcriptional changes were observed in endothelial genes, which may explain the compromised vascular integrity.

    CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that Notch3 is important for survival of VSMC, and reveal a critical role for Notch3 and VSMC in blood vessel integrity and blood-brain barrier function in the mammalian vasculature.

  • 14. Hernández Vera, Rodrigo
    et al.
    Vilahur, Gemma
    Ferrer-Lorente, Raquel
    Peña, Esther
    Badimon, Lina
    Platelets derived from the bone marrow of diabetic animals show dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins that contribute to increased thrombosis2012In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 2141-2148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of suffering atherothrombotic syndromes and are prone to clustering cardiovascular risk factors. However, despite their dysregulated glucose metabolism, intensive glycemic control has proven insufficient to reduce thrombotic complications. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the determinants of thrombosis in a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiovascular risk factors clustering.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Intravital microscopy was used to analyze thrombosis in vivo in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZD) and lean normoglycemic controls. Bone marrow (BM) transplants were performed to test the contribution of each compartment (blood or vessel wall) to thrombogenicity. ZD showed significantly increased thrombosis compared with lean normoglycemic controls. BM transplants demonstrated the key contribution of the hematopoietic compartment to increased thrombogenicity. Indeed, lean normoglycemic controls transplanted with ZD-BM showed increased thrombosis with normal glucose levels, whereas ZD transplanted with lean normoglycemic controls-BM showed reduced thrombosis despite presenting hyperglycemia. Significant alterations in megakaryopoiesis and platelet-endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, protein disulfide isomerase and 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein, were detected in ZD, and increased tissue factor procoagulant activity was detected in plasma and whole blood of ZD.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that diabetes mellitus with cardiovascular risk factor clustering favors BM production of hyperreactive platelets with altered protein disulfide isomerase and 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein expression that can contribute to increase thrombotic risk independently of blood glucose levels.

  • 15.
    Hytönen, Jarkko
    et al.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Mol Med, AI Virtanen Inst, Kuopio, Finland..
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Braesen, Jan Hinrich
    Univ Clin Schleswig Holstein, Inst Pathol, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany..
    Schunck, Wolf-Hagen
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Mueller, Dominik
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Jung, Friedrich
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Inst Biomat Sci, Teltow, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Berlin Brandenburg Ctr Regenerat Therapies BCRT, Teltow, Germany..
    Mrowietz, Christoph
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Inst Biomat Sci, Teltow, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Berlin Brandenburg Ctr Regenerat Therapies BCRT, Teltow, Germany..
    Jastroch, Martin
    Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Inst Diabet & Obes, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Munich, Germany..
    von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne Intervent Immunol, Cologne, Germany..
    Kappert, Kai
    Charite, CCR, Inst Lab Med Clin Chem & Pathobiochem, Berlin, Germany..
    Heuser, Arnd
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Pieske, Burkert
    Charite, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany..
    Thierfelder, Ludwig
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany..
    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Mol Med, AI Virtanen Inst, Kuopio, Finland..
    Blaschke, Florian
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Berlin, Germany.;Charite, Dept Cardiol, Berlin, Germany..
    Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-δ as Novel Therapeutic Strategy to Prevent In-Stent Restenosis and Stent Thrombosis2016In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1534-1548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Drug-eluting coronary stents reduce restenosis rate and late lumen loss compared with bare-metal stents; however, drug-eluting coronary stents may delay vascular healing and increase late stent thrombosis. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR) exhibits actions that could favorably influence outcomes after drug-eluting coronary stents placement. Approach and Results Here, we report that PPAR ligand-coated stents strongly reduce the development of neointima and luminal narrowing in a rabbit model of experimental atherosclerosis. Inhibition of inflammatory gene expression and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, prevention of thrombocyte activation and aggregation, and proproliferative effects on endothelial cells were identified as key mechanisms for the prevention of restenosis. Using normal and PPAR-depleted VSMCs, we show that the observed effects of PPAR ligand GW0742 on VSMCs and thrombocytes are PPAR receptor dependent. PPAR ligand treatment induces expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4 and downregulates the glucose transporter 1 in VSMCs, thus impairing the ability of VSMCs to provide the increased energy demands required for growth factor-stimulated proliferation and migration. Conclusions In contrast to commonly used drugs for stent coating, PPAR ligands not only inhibit inflammatory response and proliferation of VSMCs but also prevent thrombocyte activation and support vessel re-endothelialization. Thus, pharmacological PPAR activation could be a promising novel strategy to improve drug-eluting coronary stents outcomes.

  • 16. Kappert, Kai
    et al.
    Sparwel, Jan
    Sandin, Åsa
    Seiler, Alexander
    Siebolts, Udo
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Rosenkranz, Stephan
    Östman, Arne
    Antioxidants relieve phosphatase inhibition and reduce PDGF signaling in cultured VSMCs and in restenosis2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 2644-2651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - Growth factor- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced activation of VSMCs is involved in vascular disease. This study investigates whether inhibitory oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) contributes to signaling in VSMCs in vitro and in vivo, and analyzes whether ROS- and growth factor-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) signaling is blunted by antioxidants that are able to activate oxidized PTPs. Methods and Results - Signaling induced by H2O2 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was analyzed in VSMCs with or without the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and tempol. Effects of antioxidants on PDGF-stimulated chemotaxis and proliferation were determined. In vivo effects of antioxidants were analyzed in the rat carotid balloon-injury model, by analyzing neointima formation, cell proliferation, PDGF beta-receptor status, and PTP expression and activity. NAC treatment prevented H2O2-induced PTP inhibition, and reduced H2O2-and ligand-induced PDGF beta-receptor phosphorylation, PDGF-induced proliferation, and chemotaxis of VSMCs. Antioxidants inhibited neointima formation and reduced PDGF receptor phosphorylation in the neointima and also increased PTP activity. Conclusion - PTP-inhibition was identified as an intrinsic component of H2O2-and PDGF-induced signaling in cultured VSMCs. The reduction in PDGF beta-receptor phosphorylation in vivo, and the increase in PTP activity, by antioxidants indicate activation of oxidized PTPs as a previously unrecognized mechanism for the antirestenotic effects of antioxidants. The findings thus suggest, in general terms, reactivation of oxidized PTPs as a novel antirestenotic strategy.

  • 17.
    Kreuger, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kerjaschki, Dontscho
    Petrova, Tatiana
    Alitalo, Kari
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Early lymph vessel development from embryonic stem cells2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 1073-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to establish a model system for lymph vessel development based on directed differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Stem cells were aggregated to form embryoid bodies, and subsequently cultured in 3-dimensional collagen matrix for up to 18 days. Treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and VEGF-A individually enhanced formation of lymphatic vessel structures, although combined treatment with VEGF-C and VEGF-A was most potent and gave rise to a network of LYVE-1, podoplanin, Prox1, and VEGF receptor-3 positive lymphatic vessel structures running parallel to and apparently emanating from, capillaries. In contrast, fibroblast growth factor-2, hepatocyte growth factor, or hypoxia had little or no effect on the development of the early lymphatics. Further, cells of hematopoietic origin were shown to express lymphatic markers. In summary, different subpopulations of lymphatic endothelial cells were identified on the basis of differential expression of several lymphatic and blood vessel markers, indicating vascular heterogeneity.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We conclude that the present model closely mimics the early steps of lymph vessel development in mouse embryos.

  • 18.
    Krispin, Shlomo
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Stratman, Amber N.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Melick, Chase H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Stan, Radu V.
    Dartmouth Coll, Geisel Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Cell Biol, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 03756 USA.;Dartmouth Coll, Geisel Sch Med, Dept Pathol, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 03756 USA..
    Malinverno, Matteo
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn, Vasc Biol Program, IFOM, Milan, Italy..
    Gleklen, Jamie
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Castranova, Daniel
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Dejana, Elisabetta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn, Vasc Biol Program, IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Weinstein, Brant M.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Growth Differentiation Factor 6 Promotes Vascular Stability by Restraining Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling2018In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 353-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - The assembly of a functional vascular system requires a coordinated and dynamic transition from activation to maturation. High vascular endothelial growth factor activity promotes activation, including junction destabilization and cell motility. Maturation involves junctional stabilization and formation of a functional endothelial barrier. The identity and mechanism of action of prostabilization signals are still mostly unknown. Bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their ligands have important functions during embryonic vessel assembly and maturation. Previous work has suggested a role for growth differentiation factor 6 (GDF6; bone morphogenetic protein 13) in vascular integrity although GDF6's mechanism of action was not clear. Therefore, we sought to further explore the requirement for GDF6 in vascular stabilization.

    Approach and Results - We investigated the role of GDF6 in promoting endothelial vascular integrity in vivo in zebrafish and in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. We report that GDF6 promotes vascular integrity by counteracting vascular endothelial growth factor activity. GDF6-deficient endothelium has increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, increased vascular endothelial-cadherin Y658 phosphorylation, vascular endothelial-cadherin delocalization from cell-cell interfaces, and weakened endothelial cell adherence junctions that become prone to vascular leak.

    Conclusions - Our results suggest that GDF6 promotes vascular stabilization by restraining vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. Understanding how GDF6 affects vascular integrity may help to provide insights into hemorrhage and associated vascular pathologies in humans.

  • 19.
    Krispin, Shlomo
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Stratman, Amber N.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Melick, Chase H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Stan, Radu V.
    Dartmouth Coll, Geisel Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Cell Biol, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 03756 USA.;Dartmouth Coll, Geisel Sch Med, Dept Pathol, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 03756 USA..
    Malinverno, Matteo
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn, Vasc Biol Program, IFOM, Milan, Italy..
    Gleklen, Jamie
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Castranova, Daniel
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Dejana, Elisabetta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn, Vasc Biol Program, IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Weinstein, Brant M.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum, Div Dev Biol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Growth Differentiation Factor 6 Promotes Vascular Stability by Restraining Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling2018In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 353-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The assembly of a functional vascular system requires a coordinated and dynamic transition from activation to maturation. High vascular endothelial growth factor activity promotes activation, including junction destabilization and cell motility. Maturation involves junctional stabilization and formation of a functional endothelial barrier. The identity and mechanism of action of prostabilization signals are still mostly unknown. Bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their ligands have important functions during embryonic vessel assembly and maturation. Previous work has suggested a role for growth differentiation factor 6 (GDF6; bone morphogenetic protein 13) in vascular integrity although GDF6's mechanism of action was not clear. Therefore, we sought to further explore the requirement for GDF6 in vascular stabilization.

    Approach and Results

    We investigated the role of GDF6 in promoting endothelial vascular integrity in vivo in zebrafish and in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. We report that GDF6 promotes vascular integrity by counteracting vascular endothelial growth factor activity. GDF6-deficient endothelium has increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, increased vascular endothelial-cadherin Y658 phosphorylation, vascular endothelial-cadherin delocalization from cell-cell interfaces, and weakened endothelial cell adherence junctions that become prone to vascular leak.

    Conclusions

    Our results suggest that GDF6 promotes vascular stabilization by restraining vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. Understanding how GDF6 affects vascular integrity may help to provide insights into hemorrhage and associated vascular pathologies in humans.

  • 20. Larsson, Tobias E
    et al.
    Olauson, Hannes
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Conjoint effects of serum calcium and phosphate on risk of total, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality in the community2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Hyperphosphatemia is a cardiovascular risk factor in patients with chronic kidney disease. Relations of circulating calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (Pi) to long-term mortality risk in the community require further investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Associations of serum Ca and Pi to mortality were evaluated in a community-based cohort of 2176 men (mean age, 50.1 years). During follow-up (median, 29.8 years), 1009 men died, and 466 of these deaths resulted from cardiovascular causes. In Cox proportional hazards models, serum Pi and [CaxPi] were independent predictors of total mortality (hazard ratio per SD, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12; P=0.03; 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12; P=0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18; P=0.01; 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03-1.19; P=0.008). Serum Ca was associated with risk of total mortality (1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P=0.02) and noncardiovascular mortality (1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.21; P=0.04). Results were consistent after multivariate adjustments in subsamples of individuals with estimated glomerular filtration rate >90 mL/min and low-to-normal serum Ca and Pi. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating Ca and Pi levels are associated with risks of total, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality in the community, and their conjoint effects are additive. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate whether Ca and Pi are modifiable risk factors in the general population.

  • 21.
    Le Jan, Sébastien
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hayashi, Makoto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kasza, Zsolt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bishop, Joseph R
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Spillmann, Dorothe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Esko, Jeffrey D
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Functional Overlap Between Chondroitin and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans During VEGF-Induced Sprouting Angiogenesis2012In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1255-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate key steps of blood vessel formation. The present study was undertaken to investigate if there is a functional overlap between heparan sulfate proteoglycans and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Using cultures of genetically engineered mouse embryonic stem cells, we show that angiogenic sprouting occurs also in the absence of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Cells unable to produce heparan sulfate instead increase their production of chondroitin sulfate that binds key angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, TGFβ, and platelet-derived growth factor B. Lack of heparan sulfate proteoglycan production however leads to increased pericyte numbers and reduced adhesion of pericytes to nascent sprouts, likely due to dysregulation of TGFβ and platelet-derived growth factor B signal transduction.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides direct evidence for a previously undefined functional overlap between chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis. Our findings provide information relevant for potential future drug design efforts that involve targeting of proteoglycans in the vasculature.

  • 22.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    A Detailed Cardiovascular Characterization of Obesity Without the Metabolic Syndrome2011In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 31, no 8, p. e27-e34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although obesity without metabolic disturbances has been regarded as harmless, we have recently shown that obese subjects without the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disorders and mortality during long-term follow-up. To investigate the basis for that increased risk, we studied the impact of obesity without MetS on multiple markers of subclinical CV disease.

    Methods and Results: At age 70, 1016 subjects were investigated in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study. According to body mass index (BMI)/MetS status, they were categorized as normal weight (BMI = 30 kg/m(2)) without MetS (n = 102), and obese with MetS (n = 118). Several different measurements of endothelial reactivity, arterial compliance (plethysmography and ultrasound), carotid artery atherosclerosis, and echocardiography were performed, and 7 markers of coagulation/fibrinolysis were measured. Subjects with obesity without MetS showed impaired vasoreactivity, a more echolucent carotid artery wall, increased left ventricular mass and function together with impaired coagulation/fibrinolysis compared with normal-weight subjects without the MetS (P < 0.05 to 0.001). The majority of these disturbances were also seen in overweight subjects without the MetS.

    Conclusion: In contrast to some previous studies, our data do not support that obesity without MetS is a benign condition, because obesity without MetS was associated with impairments in multiple markers of subclinical CV disease. This was also the case for overweight subjects without the MetS.

  • 23. Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    The apolipoprotein B/AI ratio and the metabolic syndrome independently predict risk for myocardial infarction in middle-aged men2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 406-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both the metabolic syndrome and an increased apolipoprotein B/AI (apoB/AI) ratio are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that the apoB/AI ratio well-characterizes the dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome and investigated those relations and if the apoB/AI ratio and the metabolic syndrome independently predicted subsequent myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: A community-based sample of 1826 men aged 50 was investigated at baseline and again at age 70. ApoB/AI ratio and the metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program definition) were evaluated, and the incidence of fatal and nonfatal MI was followed for a median of 26.8 years from the age 50 baseline. ApoB/AI ratio was significantly higher in men with versus without the metabolic syndrome (P<0.0001), and increased with the number of components defining the syndrome (P<0.0001). ApoB/AI ratio was inversely related to euglycemic insulin clamp glucose disposal rate at age 70 (r=-0.34, P<0.0001). During follow-up from age 50, 462 subjects developed an MI. An apoB/AI ratio > or =0.9 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 1.91) and presence of the metabolic syndrome (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.30 to 2.21) at baseline were independent predictors for MI, adjusting for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: The apoB/AI ratio was related to the metabolic syndrome, as well as to a direct measurement of insulin resistance. Despite this, the apoB/AI ratio and the metabolic syndrome were both independent long-term predictors of MI in a community-based sample of middle-aged men.

  • 24.
    Lindmark, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tenno, Taavo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Role of platelet P-selectin and CD40 ligand in the induction of monocytic tissue factor expression2000In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2322-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activated platelets can express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and trigger inflammatory response and tissue factor (TF) expression in endothelial cells through interaction with CD40. This pathway is also important for T cell-induced monocyte and endothelial cell procoagulant activity. We have studied the potential role of the CD40-CD40L pathway in platelet-induced TF expression in a monocytic cell line and in whole-blood monocytes. In vitamin D(3)-differentiated U-937 cells, thrombin-stimulated platelets increased TF expression as measured by mRNA quantification, flow cytometry, and procoagulant activity. Maximum antigen expression occurred after 2 hours. Neutralizing anti-P-selectin antibody yielded a 50% suppression of procoagulant activity, whereas antibody to CD40L had no effect. In thrombin receptor activator-stimulated citrated blood, monocytes were up to 77% TF-positive, with peak expression after only 15 minutes. However, no TF mRNA was detectable at that time. Anti-P-selectin antibody reduced TF by 50%, whereas antibody to CD40L gave a 17% reduction. Thus, we conclude that P-selectin exposed on activated platelets induces the expression of TF in both U-937 cells and whole-blood monocytes but by different mechanisms. Platelet CD40L does not display any significant effect on U-937 cells but may be of some importance on whole-blood monocytes. This suggests a possible functional difference between U-937 and monocyte CD40. Another important finding in this study is the rapid appearance of surface TF on monocytes without detectable mRNA formation. This indicates that TF may be stored intracellularly in these cells and can be exposed on the surface independent of de novo protein synthesis.

  • 25.
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Looman, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Åhgren, Aive
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wu, Yan
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Heuchel, Rainer L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta constitutive activity promotes angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro2007In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 2142-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE - Knockout studies have demonstrated crucial roles for the platelet-derived growth factor-B and its cognate receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), in blood vessel maturation, that is, the coverage of newly formed vessels with mural cells/pericytes. This study describes the consequences of a constitutively activating mutation of the PDGFR-β (Pdgfrb) introduced into embryonic stem cells with respect to vasculogenesis/angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS - Embryonic stem cells were induced to either form teratomas in vivo or embryoid bodies, an in vitro model for mouse embryogenesis. Western blotting studies on embryoid bodies showed that expression of a single allele of the mutant Pdgfrb led to increased levels of PDGFR-β tyrosine phosphorylation and augmented downstream signal transduction. This was accompanied by enhanced vascular development, followed by exaggerated angiogenic sprouting with abundant pericyte coating as shown by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. Pdgfrb embryoid bodies were characterized by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF receptor-2; neutralizing antibodies against VEGF-A/VEGF receptor-2 blocked vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in mutant embryoid bodies. Moreover, Pdgfrb embryonic stem cell-derived teratomas in nude mice were more densely vascularized than wild-type teratomas. CONCLUSION - Increased PDGFR-β kinase activity is associated with elevated expression of VEGF-A and VEGF receptor-2, acting directly on endothelial cells and resulting in increased vessel formation.

  • 26.
    Magnusson, Peetra Ulrica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ronca, Roberto
    Dell'Era, Patrizia
    Carlstedt, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Partanen, Juha
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 expression is required for hematopoietic but not endothelial cell development2005In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 944-949Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Matsumoto, Taro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schiller, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dietrich, Lothar C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bahram, Fuad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Iribe, Yuji
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wikner, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Chan, Gordon
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ninein Is Expressed in the Cytoplasm of Angiogenic Tip-Cells and Regulates Tubular Morphogenesis of Endothelial Cells2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, p. 2123-2130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective— Angiogenesis is an integral part of many physiologicalprocesses but may also aggravate pathological conditions suchas cancer. Development of effective angiogenesis inhibitorsrequires a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanismsregulating vessel formation. The aim of this project was toidentify proteins that regulate tubular morphogenesis of endothelialcells.

    Methods and Results— Phosphotyrosine-dependent affinity-purificationand mass spectrometry showed tyrosine phosphorylation of nineinduring tubular morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Ninein wasrecently identified as a centrosomal microtubule-anchoring protein.Our results show that ninein is localized in the cytoplasm inendothelial cells, and that it is highly expressed in the vasculaturein normal and pathological human tissues. Using embryoid bodiesas a model of vascular development, we found that ninein isabundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells duringsprouting angiogenesis, in particular in the sprouting tip-cell.In accordance, siRNA-dependent silencing of ninein in endothelialcells inhibited tubular morphogenesis.

    Conclusions— In this study, we show that ninein is expressedin developing vessels and in endothelial tip cells, and thatninein is critical for formation of the vascular tube. Thesedata strongly implicate ninein as an important new regulatorof angiogenesis.

    Proteins orchestrating morphological changes accompanying formationof the vascular tube constitute new targets for antiangiogenictherapy. In this study, we identify the microtubule-anchoringprotein ninein as an important new regulator of tubular morphogenesisof endothelial cells. This is the first report of a functionalrole of ninein in angiogenesis.

  • 28.
    Mirza, Majd
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Alsiö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hammarstedt, Ann
    Erben, Reinhold
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Tivesten, Åsa
    Marsell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Orwoll, Eric
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Mellström, Dan
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Larsson, Tobias
    Circulating fibroblast growth factor-23 is associated with fat mass and dyslipidemia in two independent cohorts of elderly individuals2011In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective—Disturbances in mineral metabolism define an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease. Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a circulating regulator of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism and has recently been implicated as a putative pathogenic factor in cardiovascular disease. Because other members of the FGF family play a role in lipid and glucose metabolism, we hypothesized that FGF23 would associate with metabolic factors that predispose to an increased cardiovascular risk. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between FGF23 and metabolic cardiovascular risk factors in the community.

    Methods and Results—Relationships between serum FGF23 and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, serum lipids, and fat mass were examined in 2 community-based, cross-sectional cohorts of elderly whites (Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study: 964 men aged 75±3.2; Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study: 946 men and women aged 70). In both cohorts, FGF23 associated negatively with high-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A1 (7% to 21% decrease per 1-SD increase in log FGF23; P<0.01) and positively with triglycerides (11% to 14% per 1-SD increase in log FGF23; P<0.01). A 1-SD increase in log FGF23 was associated with a 7% to 20% increase in BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio and a 7% to 18% increase in trunk and total body fat mass (P<0.01) as determined by whole-body dual x-ray absorptiometry. FGF23 levels were higher in subjects with the metabolic syndrome compared with those without (46.4 versus 41.2 pg/mL; P<0.05) and associated with an increased risk of having the metabolic syndrome (OR per 1-SD increase in log FGF23, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.40; P<0.05).

    Conclusion—We report for the first time on associations between circulating FGF23, fat mass, and adverse lipid metabolism resembling the metabolic syndrome, potentially representing a novel pathway(s) linking high FGF23 to an increased cardiovascular risk.

  • 29.
    Mälarstig, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Soluble CD40L levels are regulated by the -3459 A>G polymorphism and predict myocardial infarction and the efficacy of antithrombotic treatment in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1667-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES - Current evidence suggests the CD40-CD40L pathway as a key process in the development, progression, and outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim was to investigate the prognostic importance of soluble (s) CD40L levels, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the CD40LG gene, and the relation between sCD40L and SNPs in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS AND RESULTS - Samples were obtained on admission from 2359 patients with non-ST elevation ACS randomized to an early invasive versus a conservative and to placebo controlled long-term dalteparin treatment in the FRISC-II study. The -3459 A>G SNP was identified as a novel regulator of sCD40L levels (P=0.001). In the placebo-treated group, sCD40L levels above median were associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) (P≤0.001) but not with raised mortality. In the dalteparin treated group, sCD40L showed no association with MI (P=0.75). Consequently, dalteparin treatment was effective in reducing the risk of MI only in patients with sCD40L levels above median. A combined assessment of troponin-T and sCD40L complemented the prognostic information on risk of MI. CONCLUSIONS - We identified a SNP in the CD40LG gene as a novel regulator of sCD40L plasma concentrations. Soluble CD40L levels above median reflect a prothrombotic state, which can be managed with the use of intense anti-thrombotic treatments.

  • 30. Mälarstig, Anders
    et al.
    Sigurdsson, Snaevar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Eriksson, Per
    Paulsson-Berne, Gabrielle
    Hedin, Ulf
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Variants of the interferon regulatory factor 5 gene regulate expression of IRF5 mRNA in atherosclerotic tissue but are not associated with myocardial infarction2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 975-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Signaling events after activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important mechanisms promoting inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque. INF regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the mediators of downstream effects of TLRs. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IRF5 gene have been found to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    We examined IRF5 mRNA expression in carotid atherosclerotic tissue (n=99) and the case-control association between SNPs in the IRF5 gene with myocardial infarction (MI) (n=376+387) and unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) (n=3101+445). Among unstable CAD patients, association of IRF5 SNPs with recurrent coronary events (n=401) was also investigated. The IRF5 mRNA expression was increased in atherosclerotic tissue compared with control tissue (P<0.001). Significant associations with IRF5 expression was observed for 6 of 10 SNPs in the study. However, the IRF5 SNPs examined were neither associated with the risk of precocious MI, nor with unstable CAD or risk of recurrent cardiovascular events in unstable CAD patients.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    IRF5 mRNA is expressed in cells in atherosclerotic tissue and its expression is modified by SNPs in the IRF5 gene. Genetic variation at the IRF5 locus was, however, not associated with CAD or related phenotypes.

  • 31.
    Mälarstig, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Tenno, Taavo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Johnston, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Genetic variations in the tissue factor gene are associated with clinical outcome in acute coronary syndrome and expression levels in human monocytes2005In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 2667-2672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Tissue factor (TF) has, among other factors, a prominent role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Our goal was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the TF gene (F3) are associated with plasma TF, risk, and outcome in patients with ACS. Moreover, we wanted to investigate the impact of associated TF SNPs on mRNA production in human monocytes.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    In 725 patients with ACS [Fragmin and Fast Revascularization during Instability in Coronary Artery Disease II (FRISC-II) study] and 376 controls, 13 SNPs were genotyped and plasma TF measured. Thereafter, the 5466 A>G and the -1812 C>T were genotyped among all of the FRISC-II participants (n=3143) and assessed concerning clinical outcome. Associated SNPs were genotyped in 92 healthy blood donors for comparison of TF activity and TF mRNA expression. None of the SNPs were associated with patient/control status. The 5466 A>G SNP was associated with cardiovascular death (odds ratio, 1.8; P=0.025). The CG haplotype by -1812 C>T and 5466 A>G was associated with a 3-fold increased risk of death (P<0.001). TF mRNA and basal TF activity was significantly lower among 5466 AG carriers, whereas the increase in monocyte TF activity on lipopolysaccharide stimulation was significantly stronger (P=0.04).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The 5466 AG genotype is a novel predictor of cardiovascular death in ACS and may act through a high TF response.

  • 32. Nastase Mannila, Maria
    et al.
    Mahdessian, Hovsep
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Eggertsen, Gösta
    de Faire, Ulf
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Eriksson, Per
    Hamsten, Anders
    van't Hooft, Ferdinand M
    Identification of a Functional Apolipoprotein E Promoter Polymorphism Regulating Plasma Apolipoprotein E Concentration2013In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1063-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    There is compelling evidence that the plasma apolipoprotein E (APOE) concentration, in addition to the APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 genotype, influences plasma lipoprotein levels, but the functional genetic variants influencing the plasma APOE concentration have not been identified.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS

    Genome-wide association studies in 2 cohorts of healthy, middle-aged subjects identified the APOE locus as the only genetic locus showing robust associations with the plasma APOE concentration. Fine-mapping of the APOE locus confirmed that the rs7412 ε2-allele is the primary genetic variant responsible for the relationship with plasma APOE concentration. Further mapping of the APOE locus uncovered that rs769446 (-427T/C) in the APOE promoter is independently associated with the plasma APOE concentration. Expression studies in 199 human liver samples demonstrated that the rs769446 C-allele is associated with increased APOE mRNA levels (P=0.015). Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays in human hepatoma HepG2 cells corroborated the role of rs769446 in transcriptional regulation of APOE. However, no relationships were found between rs769446 genotype and plasma lipoprotein levels in 2 cohorts (n=1648 and n=1039) of healthy middle-aged carriers of the APOE ε3/ε3 genotype.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    rs769446 is a functional polymorphism involved in the regulation of the plasma APOE concentration.

  • 33. Ocaya, Pauline
    et al.
    Gidlöf, Andreas C.
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    Törmä, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sirsjö, Allan
    CYP26 inhibitor R115866 increases retinoid signaling in intimal smooth muscle cells2007In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1542-1548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Intimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are dedifferentiated SMCs that have a powerful ability to proliferate and migrate. This cell-type is responsible for the development of intimal hyperplasia after vascular angioplasty. Retinoids, especially all-trans retinoid acid, are known to regulate many processes activated at sites of vascular injury, including modulation of SMC phenotype and inhibition of SMC proliferation. Intracellular levels of active retinoids are under firm control. A key enzyme is the all-trans retinoic acid-degrading enzyme cytochrome p450 isoform 26 (CYP26). Thus, an alternative approach to exogenous retinoid administration could be to increase the intracellular level of all-trans retinoic acid by blocking CYP26-mediated degradation of retinoids. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular intimal and medial SMCs expressed CYP26A1 and B1 mRNA. Although medial cells remained unaffected, treatment with the CYP26-inhibitor R115866 significantly increased cellular levels of all-trans retinoic acid in intimal SMCs. The increased levels of all-trans retinoic acid induced retinoid-regulated genes and decreased mitogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: Blocking of the CYP26-mediated catabolism mimics the effects of exogenously administrated active retinoids on intimal SMCs. Therefore, CYP26-inhibitors offer a potential new therapeutic approach to vascular proliferative disorders.

  • 34. Palumbo, Roberta
    et al.
    Gaetano, Carlo
    Antonini, Annalisa
    Pompilio, Giulio
    Bracco, Enrico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Rönnstrand, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Capogrossi, Maurizio C.
    Different effects of high and low shear stress on platelet-derived growth factor isoform release by endothelial cells: consequences for smooth muscle cell migration2002In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we analyzed the effect of conditioned media (CM) from bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to laminar shear stress (SS) of 5 dyne/cm2 (SS5) or 15 dyne/cm2 (SS15) for 16 hours on smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration. In response to CM from bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to SS5 (CMSS5) and SS15 (CMSS15), migration was 45 +/- 5.5 and 30 +/- 1.5 cells per field, respectively (P<0.05). Similar results were obtained with SS of 2 versus 20 dyne/cm2 and also when SS of 5 and 15 dyne/cm2 lasted 24 hours. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA levels in CMSS5 and CMSS15 were 9 +/- 7 and 18 +/- 5 ng/10(6) cells for 16 hours, respectively (P<0.05); PDGF-BB levels in CMSS5 and CMSS15 were 38 +/- 10 and 53 +/- 10 ng/10(6) cells for 16 hours, respectively (P<0.05). PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) and PDGF receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) in SMCs were phosphorylated by CMSS15>CMSS5. In response to CMSS15, a neutralizing antibody against PDGF-AA enhanced SMC migration to a level comparable to that of CMSS5; in contrast, antibodies against PDGF-BB abolished SMC migration. Transfection of SMCs with a dominant-negative PDGFRalpha or PDGFRbeta increased or inhibited, respectively, SMC migration in response to CMSS15. Overexpression of wild-type PDGFRalpha inhibited SMC migration in response to CMSS5, CMSS15, or recombinant PDGF-BB (P<0.001). These results suggest that the ability of high SS to inhibit arterial wall thickening in vivo may be related to enhanced activation of PDGFRalpha in SMCs by PDGF isoforms secreted by the endothelium.

  • 35. Perisic, Ljubica
    et al.
    Hedin, Erika
    Razuvaev, Anton
    Lengquist, Mariette
    Osterholm, Cecilia
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Gillgren, Peter
    Paulsson-Berne, Gabrielle
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    Hedin, Ulf
    Profiling of Atherosclerotic Lesions by Gene and Tissue Microarrays Reveals PCSK6 as a Novel Protease in Unstable Carotid Atherosclerosis2013In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 2432-2443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Carotid plaque instability is a major cause of ischemic stroke, but detailed knowledge about underlying molecular pathways is still lacking. Here, we evaluated large-scale transcriptomic and protein expression profiling in a biobank of carotid endarterectomies followed by characterization of identified candidates, as a platform for discovery of novel proteins differentially regulated in unstable carotid lesions. Approach and Results Genes highly upregulated in symptomatic versus asymptomatic plaques were selected from Affymetrix microarray analyses (n=127 plaques), and tissue microarrays constructed from 34 lesions were assayed for 21 corresponding proteins by immunohistochemistry. Quantification of stainings demonstrated differential expression of CD36, CD137, and DOCK7 (P<0.05) in unstable versus stable lesions and the most significant upregulation of a proprotein convertase, PCSK6 (P<0.0001). Increased expression of PCSK6 in symptomatic lesions was verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (n=233), and the protein was localized to smooth muscle -actin positive cells and extracellular matrix of the fibrous cap by immunohistochemistry. PCSK6 expression positively correlated to genes associated with inflammation, matrix degradation, and mitogens in microarrays. Stimulation of human carotid smooth muscle cells in vitro with cytokines caused rapid induction of PCSK6 mRNA. Conclusions Using a combination of transcriptomic and tissue microarray profiling, we demonstrate a novel approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in unstable carotid atherosclerosis. The proprotein convertase PCSK6 was detected at increased levels in the fibrous cap of symptomatic carotid plaques, possibly associated with key processes in plaque rupture such as inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of PCSK6 in atherosclerosis.

  • 36.
    Pujol, Francoise
    et al.
    I2MC INSERM UMR 1048, Toulouse, France.
    Hodgson, Tina
    Kings Coll London, Dept Craniofacial Dev & Stem Cell Biol, London, England.
    Martinez-Corral, Ines
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Prats, Anne-Catherine
    I2MC INSERM UMR 1048, Toulouse, France.
    Devenport, Danelle
    Princeton Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA.
    Takeichi, Masatoshi
    RIKEN Ctr Dev Biol, Lab Cell Adhes & Tissue Patterning, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan.
    Genot, Elisabeth
    Univ Bordeaux, INSERM, Bordeaux, France.
    Mäkinen, Taija
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Francis-West, Philippa
    Kings Coll London, Dept Craniofacial Dev & Stem Cell Biol, London, England.
    Garmy-Susini, Barbara
    I2MC INSERM UMR 1048, Toulouse, France.
    Tatin, Florence
    I2MC INSERM UMR 1048, Toulouse, France.
    Dachsousl-Fat4 Signaling Controls Endothelial Cell Polarization During Lymphatic Valve Morphogenesis-Brief Report2017In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 1732-1735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Fat4 and Dachsous 1 signaling in the lymphatic vasculature. Approach and Results-Phenotypic analysis of the lymphatic vasculature was performed in mice lacking functional Fat4 or Dachsousl. The overall architecture of lymphatic vasculature is unaltered, yet both genes are specifically required for lymphatic valve morphogenesis. Valve endothelial cells (Proxl(high) [prospero homeobox protein 1] cells) are disoriented and failed to form proper valve leaflets. Using Lifeact-GFP (green fluorescent protein) mice, we revealed that valve endothelial cells display prominent actin polymerization. Finally, we showed the polarized recruitment of Dachsousl to membrane protrusions and cellular junctions of valve endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions-Our data demonstrate that Fat4 and Dachsousl are critical regulators of valve morphogenesis. This study highlights that valve defects may contribute to lymphedema in Hennekam syndrome caused by Fat4 mutations.

  • 37. Rattik, Sara
    et al.
    Wigren, Maria
    Bjorkbacka, Harry
    Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin
    Hedblad, Bo
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Schiopu, Alexandru
    Edsfeldt, Andreas
    Duner, Pontus
    Grufman, Helena
    Goncalves, Isabel
    Nilsson, Jan
    High Plasma Levels of Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor Are Associated With a More Stable Plaque Phenotype and Reduced Incidence of Coronary Events2015In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 222-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the major cause of acute coronary events (CEs). Plaque destabilization is the consequence of an imbalance between inflammatory-driven degradation of fibrous tissue and smooth muscle cell-dependent tissue repair. Proinflammatory factors have been documented extensively as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk but factors that contribute to stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques have received less attention. The present study aimed to investigate whether plasma levels of the smooth muscle cell growth factor epidermal growth factor (EGF), heparin-binding-EGF (HB-EGF), and platelet-derived growth factor correlate with plaque phenotype and incidence of CEs. Approach and Results-HB-EGF, EGF and platelet-derived growth factor were measured in plasma from 202 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy and in 384 incident CE cases and 409 matched controls recruited from the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort. Significant positive associations were found between the plasma levels of all 3 growth factors and the collagen and elastin contents of the removed plaques. CE cases in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort had lower levels of HB-EGF in plasma, whereas no significant differences were found for EGF and platelet-derived growth factor. After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors in a Cox proportional hazard model, the hazard ratio for the highest HB-EGF tertile was 0.61 (95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.82; P<0.001). Conclusions-The associations between high levels of smooth muscle cell growth factors in plasma and a more fibrous plaque phenotype as well as the association between low levels of HB-EGF and incident CEs point to a potential clinically important role for factors that contribute to plaque stabilization by stimulating smooth muscle cells.

  • 38. Shang, Ming-Mei
    et al.
    Talukdar, Husain A
    Hofmann, Jennifer J
    Division of Vascular Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Niaudet, Colin
    Asl, Hassan Foroughi
    Jain, Rajeev K
    Rossignoli, Aranzazu
    Cedergren, Cecilia
    Silveira, Angela
    Gigante, Bruna
    Leander, Karin
    de Faire, Ulf
    Hamsten, Anders
    Ruusalepp, Arno
    Melander, Olle
    Ivert, Torbjörn
    Michoel, Tom
    Schadt, Eric E
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Skogsberg, Josefin
    Björkegren, Johan L M
    Lim domain binding 2: a key driver of transendothelial migration of leukocytes and atherosclerosis2014In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 2068-2077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Using a multi-tissue, genome-wide gene expression approach, we recently identified a gene module linked to the extent of human atherosclerosis. This atherosclerosis module was enriched with inherited risk for coronary and carotid artery disease (CAD) and overlapped with genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocyte (TEML) pathway. Among the atherosclerosis module genes, the transcription cofactor Lim domain binding 2 (LDB2) was the most connected in a CAD vascular wall regulatory gene network. Here, we used human genomics and atherosclerosis-prone mice to evaluate the possible role of LDB2 in TEML and atherosclerosis.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: mRNA profiles generated from blood macrophages in patients with CAD were used to infer transcription factor regulatory gene networks; Ldlr(-/-)Apob(100/100) mice were used to study the effects of Ldb2 deficiency on TEML activity and atherogenesis. LDB2 was the most connected gene in a transcription factor regulatory network inferred from TEML and atherosclerosis module genes in CAD macrophages. In Ldlr(-/-)Apob(100/100) mice, loss of Ldb2 increased atherosclerotic lesion size ≈2-fold and decreased plaque stability. The exacerbated atherosclerosis was caused by increased TEML activity, as demonstrated in air-pouch and retinal vasculature models in vivo, by ex vivo perfusion of primary leukocytes, and by leukocyte migration in vitro. In THP1 cells, migration was increased by overexpression and decreased by small interfering RNA inhibition of LDB2. A functional LDB2 variant (rs10939673) was associated with the risk and extent of CAD across several cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: As a key driver of the TEML pathway in CAD macrophages, LDB2 is a novel candidate to target CAD by inhibiting the overall activity of TEML.

  • 39.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Johnell, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Åberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Velling, Teet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    TF/FVIIa transactivate PDGFRbeta to regulate PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis in different cell types: involvement of Src and PLC2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 135-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We have previously reported the potentiation of PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis of fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells by FVIIa. Here we studied the role of TF/FVIIa and the induced signaling pathways in regulation of chemotaxis of human monocytes, fibroblasts, and porcine aorta endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human monocytes were obtained by using Ficoll-Paque gradient and the MACS system (for highly purified population), fibroblasts and PAE cells have been characterized previously. Inhibitors of selected signaling intermediates were used, and the effect of TF/FVIIa on the migratory response of all cells to chemotactic agents was analyzed. The induced signaling was studied by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. TF/FVIIa complex selectively enhanced PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis in a Src-family, PLC, and PAR-2-dependent manner. Using PAE cells we identified c-Src and c-Yes as the Src-family members activated by TF/FVIIa. We report for the first time the PAR-2 and Src family-dependent transactivation of PDGFRbeta by TF/FVIIa involving phosphorylation of a subset of PDGFRbeta tyrosines. CONCLUSIONS: The described transactivation is a likely mechanism of TF/FVIIa-mediated regulation of PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis. Similar behavior of 3 principally different cell types in our experimental setup may reflect a general function of TF in regulation of cell migration.

  • 40. Siegel, Guenter
    et al.
    Ermilov, Eugeny
    Saunders, Ramsey
    Pries, Axel R.
    Malmsten, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Nanotechnologic Point-of-Care Ellipsometric Device for Arteriosclerotic Diseases2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 11, p. E210-E210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41. Uronen, Riikka-Liisa
    et al.
    Lundmark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Jauhiainen, Matti
    Larsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Melander, Olle
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Ikonen, Elina
    Niemann-Pick C1 modulates hepatic triglyceride metabolism and its genetic variation contributes to serum triglyceride levels2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1614-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study how Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) influences hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) metabolism and to determine whether this is reflected in circulating lipid levels.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

     In Npc1−/− mice, the hepatic cholesterol content is increased but the TG content is decreased. We investigated lipid metabolism in Npc1−/− mouse hepatocytes and the association of NPC1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with circulating TGs in humans. TGs were reduced in Npc1−/− mouse serum and hepatocytes. In Npc1−/− hepatocytes, the incorporation of [3H]oleic acid and [3H]acetate into TG was decreased, but shunting of oleic acid- or acetate-derived [3H]carbons into cholesterol was increased. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis normalized TG synthesis, content, and secretion in Npc1−/− hepatocytes, suggesting increased hepatic cholesterol neogenesis as a cause for the reduced TG content and secretion. We found a significant association between serum TG levels and 5 common NPC1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 1053 men, with the lowest P=8.7×10−4 for the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1429934. The association between the rs1429934 A allele and higher TG levels was replicated in 2 additional cohorts, which included 8041 individuals.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study provides evidence of the following: (1) in mice, loss of NPC1 function reduces hepatocyte TG content and secretion by increasing the metabolic flux of carbons into cholesterol synthesis; and (2) common variation in NPC1 contributes to serum TG levels in humans.

  • 42. Vantler, Marius
    et al.
    Jesus, Joana
    Leppaenen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Scherner, Maximilian
    Berghausen, Eva Maria
    Mustafov, Lenard
    Chen, Xin
    Kramer, Tilmann
    Zierden, Mario
    Gerhardt, Maximilian
    ten Freyhaus, Henrik
    Blaschke, Florian
    Sterner-Kock, Anja
    Baldus, Stephan
    Zhao, Jean J.
    Rosenkranz, Stephan
    Class IA Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Isoform p110 alpha Mediates Vascular Remodeling2015In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 1434-1444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-Neointima formation after vascular injury remains a significant problem in clinical cardiology, and current preventive strategies are suboptimal. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase is a central downstream mediator of growth factor signaling, but the role of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase isoforms in vascular remodeling remains elusive. We sought to systematically characterize the precise role of catalytic class IA phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase isoforms (p110 alpha, p110 beta, p110 delta), which signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases, for vascular remodeling in vivo. Approach and Results-Western blot analyses revealed that all 3 isoforms are abundantly expressed in smooth muscle cells. To analyze their significance for receptor tyrosine kinases-dependent cellular responses, we used targeted gene knockdown and isoform-specific small molecule inhibitors of p110 alpha (PIK-75), p110 beta (TGX-221), and p110 delta (IC-87114), respectively. We identified p110 alpha to be crucial for receptor tyrosine kinases signaling, thus affecting proliferation, migration, and survival of rat, murine, and human smooth muscle cells, whereas p110 beta and p110 delta activities were dispensable. Surprisingly, p110 delta exerted noncatalytic functions in smooth muscle cell proliferation, but had no effect on migration. Based on these results, we generated a mouse model of smooth muscle cell-specific p110 alpha deficiency (sm-p110 alpha(-/-)). Targeted deletion of p110 alpha in sm-p110 alpha(-/-) mice blunted growth factor-induced cellular responses and abolished neointima formation after balloon injury of the carotid artery in mice. In contrast, p110 delta deficiency did not affect vascular remodeling in vivo. Conclusions-Receptor tyrosine kinases-induced phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase signaling via the p110 alpha isoform plays a central role for vascular remodeling in vivo. Thus, p110 alpha represents a selective target for the prevention of neointima formation after vascular injury, whereas p110 beta and p110 delta expression and activity do not play a significant role.

  • 43. Velagaleti, Raghava S.
    et al.
    Gona, Philimon
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Larson, Martin G.
    Siwik, Deborah
    Colucci, Wilson S.
    Benjamin, Emelia J.
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    Relations of biomarkers of extracellular matrix remodeling to incident cardiovascular events and mortality2010In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 2283-2288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-: To evaluate if biomarkers reflecting left ventricular/vascular extracellular matrix remodeling are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death in the community. METHODS AND RESULTS-: In 922 Framingham Study participants (mean age, 58 years; 56% women), we related circulating concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (binary variable: detectable versus undetectable), log of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and log of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide (PIIINP) to incident CVD and death. On follow-up (mean, 9.9 years), 51 deaths and 81 CVD events occurred. Each SD increment of log of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and log-PIIINP was associated with multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios of 1.72 (95% CI, 1.30 to 2.27) and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.96), respectively, for mortality risk. Log-PIIINP concentrations were also associated with CVD risk (hazard ratio [95% CI] per SD, 1.35 [1.05 to 1.74]). Death and CVD incidence rates were 2-fold higher in participants with both biomarkers higher than the median (corresponding hazard ratio [95% CI], 2.78 [1.43 to 5.40] and 1.77 [1.04 to 3.03], respectively) compared with those with either or both less than the median. The inclusion of both biomarkers improved the C-statistic (for predicting mortality) from 0.78 to 0.82 (P=0.03). Matrix metalloproteinase-9 was unrelated to either outcome. CONCLUSION-: Higher circulating tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and PIIINP concentrations are associated with mortality, and higher PIIINP is associated with incident CVD, in the community.

  • 44.
    Wallgard, Elisabet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och biofysik.
    Larsson, Erik
    He, Liqun
    Hellström, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och biofysik.
    Armulik, Annika
    Nisancioglu, Maya H
    Genove, Guillem
    Lindahl, Per
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Identification of a core set of 58 gene transcripts with broad and specific expression in the microvasculature.2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1469-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Pathological angiogenesis is an integral component of many diseases. Antiangiogenesis and vascular targeting are therefore promising new therapeutic principles. However, few endothelial-specific putative drug targets have been identified, and information is still limited about endothelial-specific molecular processes. Here we aimed at determining the endothelial cell-specific core transcriptome in vivo.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Analysis of publicly available microarray data identified a mixed vascular/lung cluster of 132 genes that correlated with known endothelial markers. Filtering against kidney glomerular/nonglomerular and brain vascular/nonvascular microarray profiles separated contaminating lung markers, leaving 58 genes with broad and specific microvascular expression. More than half of these have not previously been linked to endothelial functions or studied in detail before. The endothelial cell-specific expression of a selected subset of these, Eltd1, Gpr116, Ramp2, Slc9a3r2, Slc43a3, Rasip1, and NM_023516, was confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and/or immunohistochemistry.

    CONCLUSIONS: We have used a combination of publicly available and own microarray data to identify 58 gene transcripts with broad yet specific expression in microvascular endothelium. Most of these have unknown functions, but many of them are predicted to be cell surface expressed or implicated in cell signaling processes and should therefore be explored as putative microvascular drug targets.

  • 45.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Golledge, Jonathan
    James Cook Univ, Coll Med & Dent, Vasc Biol Unit, Queensland Res Ctr Peripheral Vasc Dis, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.;Townsville Hosp, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Townsville, Qld, Australia..
    Surrogate Markers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression2016In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The natural course of many abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is to gradually expand and eventually rupture and monitoring the disease progression is essential to their management. In this publication, we review surrogate markers of AAA progression. AAA diameter remains the most widely used and important marker of AAA growth. Standardized reporting of reproducible methods of measuring AAA diameter is essential. Newer imaging assessments, such as volume measurements, biomechanical analyses, and functional and molecular imaging, as well as circulating biomarkers, have potential to add important information about AAA progression. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use in clinical practice.

  • 46. Wiman, B
    et al.
    Andersson, T
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy.
    Reuterwall, C
    Ahlbom, A
    deFaire, U
    Plasma levels of tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex and von Willebrand factor are significant risk markers for recurrent myocardial infarction in the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP) study.2000In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 2019-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An impaired fibrinolytic function due to elevated plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 activity or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen is correlated with the development of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with manifest coronary heart disease. Recently, methods for determining the specific tPA/inhibitor complexes constituting tPA antigen in plasma have become available. In the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP) study, 86 of 1212 MI patients, subjected to blood sampling in a metabolically stable period, suffered reinfarction before the end of 1996. These individuals have been compared with an approximately equal number of matched MI patients without recurrence and a group of matched healthy control subjects regarding the plasma concentrations of some hemostatic factors. The hemostatic compounds studied (fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, tPA antigen, PAI-1, and the tPA/PAI-1 complex) were typically higher in the groups (men and women) with recurrence of MI compared with those without. The plasma concentrations were also typically higher in the pooled groups of patients compared with the groups of healthy control subjects. The largest between-group differences were found for the plasma tPA/PAI-1 complex. The crude odds ratio for reinfarction associated with higher concentration (>/=75th percentile among the control subjects) of tPA/PAI-1 was 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.1); the corresponding crude odds ratio for von Willebrand factor was 2.3 (1. 3 to 4.0). The tPA/PAI-1 complex correlated strongly with PAI-1 and tPA antigen in all groups and with serum triglycerides and body mass index in all groups except for women with reinfarction. An increased plasma level of tPA/PAI-1 complex is a novel risk marker for recurrent MI in men and women. Most likely, increased plasma levels of tPA/PAI-1 complex reflect impaired fibrinolysis, because the correlation with PAI-1 is strong. Further support is obtained indicating that the plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor is also an important risk marker for recurrent MI.

  • 47.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ruge, Toralph
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Serum endostatin and risk of mortality in the elderly: findings from 2 community-based cohorts2013In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 2689-2695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Experimental data imply that endostatin, a proteolytically cleaved fragment of collagen XVIII, could be involved in the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prospective data concerning the relation between circulating endostatin and mortality are lacking. Accordingly, we aimed to study associations between circulating endostatin and mortality risk.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS:

    Serum endostatin was analyzed in 2 community-based cohorts: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; women 50%, n=931; mean age, 70 years; median follow-up, 7.9 years) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n=748; mean age, 77 years; median follow-up, 9.7 years). During follow-up, 90 participants died in PIVUS (1.28/100 person-years at risk), and 417 participants died in ULSAM (6.7/100 person-years at risk). In multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for age and established cardiovascular risk factors, 1 SD higher ln(serum endostatin level) was associated with a hazard ratio of mortality of 1.39 and 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.53, on average in both cohorts. In the ULSAM cohort, serum endostatin was also associated with cardiovascular mortality (177 deaths; hazard ratio per SD of ln[endostatin] 1.45, 95% confidence interval [1.25-1.71]) and cancer mortality (115 deaths; hazard ratio per SD of ln[endostatin] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [1.10-1.66]).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    High serum endostatin was associated with increased mortality risk in 2 independent community-based cohorts of the elderly. Our observational data support the importance of extracellular matrix remodeling in the underlying pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and cancer.

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