uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bakke, Kristin A
    et al.
    National Centre for Epilepsy, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Larsson, Pål G
    Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, Ann-Sofie
    National Centre for Epilepsy, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Levetiracetam reduces the frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep in children with ADHD2011In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 532-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more common in children with epilepsy than in the general paediatric population. Epileptiform discharges in EEG may be seen in children with ADHD also in those without seizure disorders. Sleep enhances these discharges which may be suppressed by levetiracetam.

    AIM:

    To assess the effect of levetiracetam on focal epileptiform discharges during sleep in children with ADHD.

    METHOD:

    In this retrospective study a new semi-automatic quantitative method based on the calculation of spike index in 24-h ambulatory EEG recordings was applied. Thirty-five ADHD children, 17 with focal epilepsy, one with generalised epilepsy, and 17 with no seizure disorder were evaluated. Follow-up 24-h EEG recordings were performed after a median time of four months.

    RESULTS:

    Mean spike index was 50 prior to levetiracetam treatment and 21 during treatment. Seventeen children had no focal interictal epileptiform discharges in EEG at follow-up. Five children had a more than 50% reduction in spike index. Thus, a more than 50% reduction in spike index was found in 22/35 children (63%). Out of these an improved behaviour was noticed in 13 children (59%).

    CONCLUSION:

    This study shows that treatment with levetiracetam reduces interictal epileptiform discharges in children with ADHD. There is a complex relationship between epilepsy, ADHD and epileptiform activity, why it is a need for prospective studies in larger sample sizes, also to ascertain clinical benefits.

  • 2. Brandberg, Göran
    et al.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizures in Swedish children and adolescents2004In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizures (HHGS) is an uncommon, often unrecognized, epileptic syndrome with onset of symptoms during childhood. AIM: In order to study the occurrence, clinical symptoms and different investigations of HHGS in Swedish children and adolescents, a nationwide survey was undertaken. Methods. Twelve patients, three females, aged 5 to 19 years were identified and their hospital records reviewed. MRI examinations were reinvestigated. RESULTS: Gelastic seizures were noted before the age of six months in seven patients in at least three as early as the neonatal period. During the course of disease one or more other seizure types developed in 11 patients. Behaviour disorder became subsequently obvious in ten patients, and mental retardation was diagnosed in seven. Precocious puberty was diagnosed in five patients. A total of 46 MRI examinations were performed in 11 patients, revealing hypothalamic tumors, eight of which were drooping with a broad base. Interictal and ictal EEG examinations were pathological in 10 patients with nonspecific results. Nonspecific results were also found on SPECT and PET performed in six and two patients, respectively. Available antiepileptic drugs had little or no effect on gelastic seizures, but some effect on other seizure types. Precocious puberty was treated with a GnRH-agonist. Neurosurgical treatment of the hypothalamic hamartoma, performed in three patients, had a rather good outcome concerning gelastic seizures and behaviour. Vagal nerve stimulation in five patients had no effect. CONCLUSIONS: Review of the literature and experience from this group's own cases confirms that early diagnosis of HHGS is important. Hypothalamic hamartoma should be considered in any child with laughing attacks. MRI investigation is compulsory, and neurosurgery the most important treatment.

  • 3.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kalimo, Hannu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Karin Edebol
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Jagell, Sten
    Marklund, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Simonsson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Duchenne muscular dystrophy and idiopathic hyperCKemia in the same family2008In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 404-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Familial hyperCKemia is a rare condition, and a combination with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is extremely rare. A boy showed muscle weakness from the age of 10 months and presented typical signs of DMD at the age of 18 months. The diagnosis was supported by markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) value as well as by neurophysiological and muscle biopsy findings at the age of 23 months. The diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a stop codon in exon 43 (p.2095Arg>X) of the dystrophin gene. Interestingly, the father and his near relatives had increased serum CK values without any clinical symptoms or signs, nor a defect in caveolin-3 gene. We suggest that the occurrence of familial hyperCKemia may have triggered the early onset of symptoms in our patient.

  • 4.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kristiansen, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Clinical characteristics and late effects in CNS tumours of childhood: Do not forget long term follow-up of the low grade tumours2016In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 580-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate clinical characteristics and late effects of CNS tumours in childhood with a special focus on low-grade tumours, especially low-grade astrocytoma and glib neuronal tumours. Methods: A retrospective population based study was performed at Uppsala University Children's Hospital, a tertiary referral centre for children with CNS tumours. Patients were identified from the National Brain Tumour Registry and the National Epilepsy Surgery Registry. Hospital medical records were analysed for patients with a follow up of >= 5 years after diagnosis. A re-evaluation of the neuro-pathological diagnosis was performed. Results: A total of 193 patients (age 0-17.99 years) during a twelve-year period (1995-2006) were included; 149 survived >= 5 years. Three larger subgroups could be identified: astrocytic, embryonal and glioneuronal tumours. A supratentorial location was found in 52%. Medical late effects were mainly neurological and endocrinological, affecting 81% and 26% of surviving patients. Cognitive late effects were a frequent finding in the whole group but also in low-grade astrocytoma and glioneuronal tumours (53% and 67%). Thirty per cent had some kind of pedagogic support in school. Conclusion: Late effects are common in long-term survivors of CNS tumours in childhood. Low-grade astrocytoma and glioneuronal tumours are no exception, and the findings support the need for long-term follow up.

  • 5.
    Hjartarson, Helgi Thor
    et al.
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Dept Neuropediat, Q302, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Tedroff, Kristina
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Dept Neuropediat, Q302, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Intrathecal baclofen treatment an option in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy2018In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 178-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a genetic peroxisomal disorder associated with tissue accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). In approximately one third of affected males, this causes progressive and irreversible damage to the brain white matter. Progress is often rapid with upper motor neuron damage leading to severe spasticity and dystonia. The increased muscle tone is frequently difficult to alleviate with oral drugs. Here, we describe two patients with X-ALD who have received treatment with intrathecal baclofen pumps (ITB). Case study: Both boys had a rapidly progressive cerebral form of the disorder resulting, among other things, in escalating spasticity and dystonia causing severe pain, dramatically reducing their quality of life. Both were treated with a variety of oral medications without adequate relief. Both patients tolerated ITB surgery without complications and the positive clinical effects of treatment with ITB became clear in the following weeks and months, with significantly reduced muscle tone, less pain and better sleep. Moreover, general caretaking became easier. Conclusion: The treatment of spasticity and dystonia in these patients is difficult partly due to the relentless nature of this progressive disorder. In our two patients, ITB has been effective from both a symptomatic and palliative perspective. We recommend that such treatment be considered as an early option for increased muscle tone in boys with the cerebral form of X-ALD. (C) 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Pysse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    10-year outcome of childhood epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents2011In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    A population based study of epilepsy in children from a Swedish county including all children aged 1 month to 16 years was reported in 2006.

    AIM

    To describe the medical outcome, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, treatment, individual and family history in children from this study who were well-functioning in January 1997 and the outcome after 10 years.

    METHODS

    Forty-five individuals, 11-21 years, 19 females, and their parents responded to a questionnaire and the hospital records were reviewed.

    RESULTS

    At the end of the 10-year period 75.6% of the patients were in remission. Focal seizures and focal seizures with secondary generalization were found in 57.8%. Rolandic epilepsy had been diagnosed in 33.3%, other idiopathic focal epilepsies in 11.0%, cryptogenic and symptomatic focal epilepsies in 22.2%, childhood absence epilepsy in 8.9%, juvenile absence epilepsy and Jeavons syndrome in each 2.2%, West syndrome in 4.4%, and other "generalized" epilepsies in 15.5%. The patients had a history of simple febrile seizures in 15.6% and of primary headache in 24.4%. Monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs was used by 64.4%, and valproate was the most common first drug of choice. A family history of epilepsy was found in 44.4%, febrile seizures in 17.7%, and primary headache in 57.8%. A coincidence of focal and generalized epilepsy phenotypes was found in some families.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Longitudinal studies are of importance in epilepsy epidemiology. Our results reflect the selection of only well-functioning individuals with epilepsy from the population based original study.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Pysse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Psychological and social outcome of epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents. A 10-year follow-up study2014In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 381-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: From a population based study of epilepsy in Swedish children a subgroup designated well-functioning with an epilepsy diagnosis in 1997 was worked up from a medical point of view 10 years later. Aim: To describe the psychological and social outcome in this subgroup. Methods: Thirty-one patients aged 11-22 years and their parents/partners responded to a questionnaire according to Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) to evaluate behavioural and emotional problems, and social competence. Results: Active epilepsy, diagnosed in 32%, was related to attention problems, somatic complaints, and school problems. Polytherapy, used in 16%, was related to attention problems and aggressive behaviour. School problems were found in six of seven children younger than 18 years. Internalizing, externalizing, and 'other' syndromes were found in 29% of the individuals, but a grouping of these syndromes in the clinical range only in two (6.5%), a girl with generalized tonic clonic seizures alone, and a boy with structural focal epilepsy. Both had active epilepsy and were treated with polytherapy. All ten individuals with Rolandic epilepsy were classified as normal. The answers to the ASEBA questionnaire of individuals and parents/partners were inconsistent, and parents generally stated more problems than the individuals. Summary.: This 10-year follow-up study of psychological and social outcome in well-functioning children and adolescents with childhood onset epilepsy shows some emotional, behavioural, and social problems. Thus, early information to increase knowledge about epilepsy and associated psychological co-morbidities in order to decrease risk of low self-esteem, social anxiety, and depression later in life is of importance.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Katrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    A population based study of epilepsy in children from a Swedish county2006In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies of childhood epilepsy are of importance to compare incidence and prevalence rates, age distribution, inheritance, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes and treatment strategies.

    Aim: To perform an epidemiological study on children with epilepsy in a Swedish county using current ILAE classifications and a recent proposal.

    Methods: A population-based study was performed using the hospital data register to select children aged 1 month to 16 years with the diagnosis 'convulsions' or 'epilepsy' recognized between January 1996 and December 2000. Only patients with active epilepsy were included.

    Results: Two hundred and five children met the study criteria on the prevalence day 31st December, 2000. The total prevalence rate was 3.4/1000 with a peak prevalence in the age group 8-11 years. The incidence year 2000 was 40/100,000. Additional neuroimpairments were registered in 47.3%. A majority of the patients, 54.0%, had focal or focal plus secondarily generalized seizures. A named syndrome could be diagnosed in 49.4%. The most common. syndrome was rolandic epilepsy occurring in 17.0%. Childhood absence epilepsy occurred in 5.9%. Different disorders associated with epilepsy were found in 31.7%. The most common associated phenomenon was malformation of cortical development. Antiepileptic drug treatment was used in 81.0%, the most common first choice being valproate.

    Conclusions: The prevalence and incidence rates in this strictly delineated study are lower than those found in other epidemiological studies. Together with many divergences between reported studies concerning frequencies of different items, the results apparently depend on design, e.g. differences in age groups included, inclusion criteria used, and general methodology.

  • 9. Timby, Niklas
    et al.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    Kristiansen, Ingela
    Pediatric Clinic, Östersund Hospital.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Eriksson, Anders
    Early onset autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with miosis: Four cases2008In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 38-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, at least 29 different forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been described. We describe a family with four members through three generations with autosomal dominant ataxia in combination with miosis and hyperreflexia. This family's ataxia does not match any of the previously described SCAs and is probably a novel form of SCA. To continue with the search for the genetic background of this disease, more cases are needed.

  • 10. Wickstrom, Ronny
    et al.
    Fowler, Asa
    Cooray, Gerald
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Grillner, Pernilla
    Viral triggering of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a child: An important cause for disease relapse2014In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 543-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in children is a potentially devastating condition which is occasionally complicated by a clinical relapse. An autoimmune component has long been suspected in these relapses and recent findings suggest that antibodies against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) may be part of this mechanism. We here report an 11 months old girl with acute HSE and with negative NMDAR antibody serology at presentation who after an initial response to antiviral treatment deteriorated with seizures, abnormal movements, focal neurologic deficits and psychiatric symptoms. We show that this relapse occurred as production of NMDAR antibodies developed and that clinical improvement followed immunotherapy with a concomitant decrease in NMDAR antibody titers in CSF. She also developed a characteristic 15-20 Hz activity over both hemispheres which has been previously described as an electroencephalographic presentation of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. We conclude that relapse or persisting symptoms in HSE in children may represent an immune-mediated mechanism rather than a viral reactivation and that NMDAR antibodies should be analyzed as this may be of importance for the choice of therapy. 

  • 11.
    Yates, T. Michael
    et al.
    Sheffield Childrens NHS Fdn Trust, Sheffield Clin Genet Serv, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Suri, Mohnish
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, Nottingham Clin Genet Serv, City Hosp Campus, Nottingham, England.
    Desurkar, Archana
    Sheffield Childrens NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Paediat Neurol, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Lesca, Gaetan
    CHU Lyon, Serv Genet, Hosp Civils Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Med & Clin Genet, Helsinki, Finland;Folkhaelsan Inst Genet, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hammer, Trine B.
    Danish Epilepsy Ctr Filadelfia, Dianalund, Denmark.
    Raghavan, Ashok
    Sheffield Childrens NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Radiol, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Poulat, Anne-Lise
    CHU Lyon, Serv Genet, Hosp Civils Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Möller, Rikke S.
    Danish Epilepsy Ctr Filadelfia, Dianalund, Denmark;Univ Southern Denmark, Inst Reg Hlth Res, Odense, Denmark.
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Balasubramanian, Meena
    Sheffield Childrens NHS Fdn Trust, Sheffield Clin Genet Serv, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England;Univ Sheffield, Dept Oncol & Metab, Acad Unit Child Hlth, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    SLC35A2-related congenital disorder of glycosylation: Defining the phenotype2018In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 1095-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aim to further delineate the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the SLC35A2 gene, and review all published literature to-date. This gene is located on the X chromosome and encodes a UDP-galactose transporter. Pathogenic variants in SLC35A2 cause a congenital disorder of glycosylation. The condition is rare, and less than twenty patients have been reported to-date. The phenotype is complex and has not been fully defined. Here, we present a series of five patients with de novo pathogenic variants in SLC35A2. The patients' phenotype includes developmental and epileptic encephalopathy with hypsarrhythmia, facial dysmorphism, severe intellectual disability, skeletal abnormalities, congenital cardiac disease and cortical visual impairment. Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy with hypsarrhythmia is present in most patients with SLC35A2 variants, and is drug-resistant in the majority of cases. Adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy may achieve partial or complete remission of seizures, but the effect is usually temporary. Isoelectric focusing of transferrins may be normal after infancy, therefore a congenital disorder of glycosylation should still be considered as a diagnosis in the presence of a suggestive phenotype. We also provide evidence that cortical visual impairment is part of the phenotypic spectrum.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf