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  • 1.
    Boije, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ring, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Fard, Shahrzad Shirazi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Grundberg, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallbook, Finn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Alternative Splicing of the Chromodomain Protein Morf4l1 Pre-mRNA Has Implications on Cell Differentiation in the Developing Chicken Retina2013In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 615-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation of progenitor cells are controlled by several different factors. The chromodomain protein mortality factor 4-like 1 (Morf4l1) has been ascribed a role in both proliferation and differentiation. Little attention has been given to the existence of alternative splice variants of the Morf4l1 mRNA, which encode two Morf41l isoforms: a short isoform (S-Morf4l1) with an intact chromodomain and a long isoform (L-Morf4l1) with an insertion in or in the vicinity of the chromodomain. The aim of this study was to investigate if this alternative splicing has a function during development. We analysed the temporal and spatial distribution of the two mRNAs and over-expressed both isoforms in the developing retina. The results showed that the S-Morf4l1 mRNA is developmentally regulated. Over-expression of S-Morf4l1 using a retrovirus vector produced a clear phenotype with an increase of early-born neurons: retinal ganglion cells, horizontal cells and cone photoreceptor cells. Over-expression of L-Morf4l1 did not produce any distinguishable phenotype. The over-expression of S-Morf4l1 but not L-Morf4l1 also increased apoptosis in the infected regions. Our results suggest that the two Morf4l1 isoforms have different functions during retinogenesis and that Morf4l1 functions are fine-tuned by developmentally regulated alternative splicing. The data also suggest that Morf4l1 contributes to the regulation of cell genesis in the retina.

  • 2.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    C6ORF192 forms a unique evolutionary branch among solute carriers (SLC16, SLC17, and SLC18) and is abundantly expressed in several brain regions2010In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 230-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About one third of all known human proteins are membrane proteins, which constitute several large families. The solute carriers with over 300 known members are probably the second largest family with additional members frequently being identified. We recently found a new putative solute carrier, C6ORF192, belonging to the major facilitator superfamily type of proteins. The gene is evolutionary highly conserved with a single copy present in each of the genomes from mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish, tetraodon, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster. C6ORF192 forms a novel evolutionary branch of solute carriers and is most closely related to the solute carrier families 16, 17, and 18, all members of the major facilitator superfamily. Ten of the 25 members of these families show amino acid identity with C6ORF192 ranging from 21% to 27%. C6ORF192 differs however, structurally from these families and does not share key motifs in the transmembrane domains. Expression profiling by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization showed that C6ORF192 transcript can be detected in several tissues, both in the central nervous system and the periphery.

  • 3.
    Lesniak, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sacharczuk, Mariusz
    Pick, Chaim G.
    Lipkowski, Andrzej W.
    Biphalin Protects Against Cognitive Deficits in a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI)2014In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 53, p. S151-S152Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Levi, Freund Y.
    et al.
    Vedin, I
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Basun, H.
    Irving, Faxen G.
    Jonhagen, Eriksdotter M.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Wahlund, L. O.
    Salem, N., Jr.
    Palmblad, J.
    Effects of a DHA rich omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for Alzheimer disease patients on fatty acid composition in cerebrospinal fluid, disease biomarkers and cognition: The OmegAD study2012In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 48, no S1, p. S36-S36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Perland, Emelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hellsten, Sofie V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lekholm, Emilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Eriksson, Mikaela M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Arapi, Vasiliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The Novel Membrane-Bound Proteins MFSD1 and MFSD3 are Putative SLC Transporters Affected by Altered Nutrient Intake2017In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 199-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane-bound solute carriers (SLCs) are essential as they maintain several physiological functions, such as nutrient uptake, ion transport and waste removal. The SLC family comprise about 400 transporters, and we have identified two new putative family members, major facilitator superfamily domain containing 1 (MFSD1) and 3 (MFSD3). They cluster phylogenetically with SLCs of MFS type, and both proteins are conserved in chordates, whileMFSD1 is also found in fruit fly. Based on homology modelling, we predict 12 transmembrane regions, a common feature for MFS transporters. The genes are expressed in abundance in mice, with specific protein staining along the plasma membrane in neurons. Deprivingm ouse embryonic primary cortex cells of amino acids resulted in upregulation of Mfsd1, whereas Mfsd3 is unaltered. Furthermore, in vivo, Mfsd1 and Mfsd3 are down-regulated in anterior brain sections in mice subjected to starvation, while upregulated specifically in brainstem. Mfsd3 is also attenuated in cerebellum after starvation. In mice raised on high-fat diet, Mfsd1 was specifically downregulated in brainstem and hypothalamus, while Mfsd3 was reduced consistently throughout the brain.

  • 6. Pichler, Irene
    et al.
    Schwienbacher, Christine
    Zanon, Alessandra
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    Serafin, Alice
    Facheris, Maurizio F.
    Marroni, Fabio
    Pattaro, Cristian
    Shen, Yiping
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gusella, James F.
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Fine-Mapping of Restless Legs Locus 4 (RLS4) Identifies a Haplotype over the SPATS2L and KCTD18 Genes2013In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 600-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sleep-related movement disorder that affects up to 15 % of the population. Linkage studies have identified several genomic loci in single families (12q, 14q, 9p, 2q, 20p and 16p, respectively). However, confirmation of these loci has not always been achieved, and causative mutations have not yet been identified. The locus on chromosome 2q33 (RLS4) was identified in two South Tyrolean families who shared a haplotype of microsatellite marker alleles across an 8.2-cM region. To pinpoint the gene localisation within RLS4, additional families from the same geographic region were evaluated, and linkage was replicated in one family. Within the candidate region, we initially found a haplotype of 23 single nucleotide polymorphism markers spanning 131.6 Kb shared by all affected members of the three linked families. Using a next generation sequencing approach, we further restricted the shared candidate region to 46.9 Kb over the potassium channel-related gene KCTD18 and exons 10-13 of SPATS2L.

  • 7. Spalding, Kl
    et al.
    Bergmann, O.
    Alkass, K.
    Buchholz, B.
    Salehpour, Mehran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    Liebl, J.
    Steier, P.
    Kutschera, W.
    Bernard, S.
    Druid, H.
    Frisen, J.
    Radiocarbon analysis of neurogenesis in the adult human brain2013In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 51, no S1, p. S117-S117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Sundberg, Björn E
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Wååg, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rumaks, Juris
    Svirskis, Simons
    Alsiö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Klusa, Vija
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The evolutionary history and tissue mapping of amino acid transporters belonging to solute carrier families SLC32, SLC36, and SLC382008In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 0895-8696, E-ISSN 1559-1166, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 179-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Members of the solute carrier families (SLC) 32, 36, and 38, together also designated the beta-group of SLCs, are known to transport neutral amino acids. In this paper, we show that these three families were present before the split of the animal lineage and that they are likely to share a common decent. We also show that the APF transporters found in plants are most likely homologous to the mammalian beta-group, suggesting that this type of transporters arouse early in the evolution of eukaryotes. We performed detailed tissue expression analysis of all the members of the beta-group in rat and found several examples of highly specific expression patterns, with SLC38A7 being exclusively found in liver, SLC38A5 in blood, and SLC38A4 in muscle and liver. Moreover, we found that SLC38A10 is expressed in several endocrine organs. We also found that SLC38A1 is highly up regulated in the cortex from rats treated with diazepam and that SLC38A2 is significantly down regulated in the same tissue. In addition, we performed a detailed expression analysis of SLC38A1 and SLC38A6 in mouse brain using in situ hybridization, which showed that both these transporters are widely expressed in the brain.

1 - 8 of 8
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