uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 2.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Mi, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Musunuri, Sravani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Proteomic Differences Between Focal And Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury In Human Brain Tissue2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A238-A239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Cao, Y.
    et al.
    Sköld, Mattias K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Malm, E.
    Sonden, A.
    Risling, M.
    Hypothermia and in Vitro High-Energy Trauma2014In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 31, no 12, p. A105-A105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Dahlin, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Chu, Jiangtao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Kaller, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    During, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Novel Microdialysis Method to Study The Acute Cytokine Response to Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat2014In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 31, no 5, p. A19-A19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hansson, Hans-Arne
    Gothenburg Univ, Biomed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reduced Intracranial Pressure After Treatment With Anti-Secretory Factor 16 In A Rat Model Of Traumatic Brain Injury2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A195-A196Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    T Lymphocyte trafficking: A novel target for neuroprotection in traumatic brain injury2007In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 1295-1307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infiltration of T lymphocytes is a key feature in transplant rejection and in several autoimmune disorders, but the role of T lymphocytes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is largely unknown. Here we studied trafficking of immune cells in the brain after experimental TBI. We found that scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the endothelial level dramatically reduced the infiltration of activated T lymphocytes. Immune cell infiltration was studied 12 h to 7 days after controlled cortical contusion in rats by ex vivo propagation of T lymphocytes (TcR+, CD8+), neutrophils (MPO+), and macrophages/microglia (ED-1+) from biopsies taken from injured cortex and analyzed by flow cytometry, as well as by quantitative immunohistochemistry. T lymphocyte and neutrophil infiltration peaked at 24 h and macrophages/microglia at 7 days post-injury. Pretreatment with 2-sulfophenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (S-PBN) produced a dramatic reduction of TcR+ T lymphocytes and a significantly smaller attenuation of neutrophil infiltration at 24 h post-injury, but did not affect CD8+ T lymphocytes or macrophages/microglia. S-PBN significantly reduced the expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM at 24 h for following TBI. We conclude that ROS inhibition at the endothelial level influenced T lymphocyte and neutrophil infiltration following TBI. We submit that the reduction of T lymphocyte infiltration is a key feature in improving TBI outcome after S-PBN treatment. Our data suggest that targeting T lymphocyte trafficking to the injured brain at the microvascular level is a novel concept of neuroprotection in TBI and warrants further exploration.

  • 7.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Acute Inflammatory Biomarker Responses to Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat Monitored by a Novel Microdialysis Technique2019In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 201-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroinflammation is a major contributor to the progressive brain injury process induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI), and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of axonal injury. The immediate neuroinflammatory cascade cannot be characterized in the human setting. Therefore, we used the midline fluid percussion injury model of diffuse TBI in rats and a novel microdialysis (MD) method providing stable diffusion-driven biomarker sampling. Immediately post-injury, bilateral amphiphilic tri-block polymer coated MD probes (100 kDa cut off membrane) were inserted and perfused with Dextran 500 kDa-supplemented artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to optimize protein capture. Six hourly samples were analyzed for 27 inflammatory biomarkers (9 chemokines, 13 cytokines, and 5 growth factors) using a commercial multiplex biomarker kit. TBI (n = 6) resulted in a significant increase compared with sham-injured controls (n = 6) for five chemokines (eotaxin/CCL11, fractalkine/CX3CL1, LIX/CXCL5, monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]1α/CCL2, macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]1α /CCL3), 10 cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17α, IL-18, interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), and four growth factors (epidermal growth factor [EGF], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], leptin, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). Therefore, diffuse TBI was associated with an increased level of 18 of the 27 inflammatory biomarkers at one through six time points, during the observation period whereas the remaining 9 biomarkers were unaltered. The study shows that diffuse TBI induces an acute increase in a number of inflammatory biomarkers. The novel MD technique provides stable MD sampling suitable for further studies on the early neuroinflammatory cascade in TBI.

  • 8.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Interstitial F2-Isoprostane 8-Iso-PGF As a Biomarker of Oxidative Stress after Severe Human Traumatic Brain Injury2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 766-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxidative stress is a major contributor to the secondary injury process after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The importance of oxidative stress in the pathobiology of human TBI is largely unknown. The F(2)-isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-iso-PGF(2α)), synthesized in vivo through non-enzymatic free radical catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid, is a widely used biomarker of oxidative stress in multiple disease states, including TBI and cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Our hypothesis is that harvesting of biomarkers directly in the injured brain by cerebral microdialysis (MD) is advantageous because of its high spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood or cerebrospinal fluid sampling. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of measuring 8-iso-PGF(2α) in MD, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF), and plasma samples collected from patients with severe TBI, and to compare the MD signals with MD-glycerol, implicated as a biomarker of oxidative stress, as well as MD-glutamate, a biomarker of excitotoxicity. Six patients (4 men, 2 women) were included in the study, three of whom had a focal/mixed TBI, and three a diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Following the bedside analysis of routine MD biomarkers (glucose, lactate:pyruvate ratio, glycerol, and glutamate), two 12-h MD samples per day were used to analyze 8-iso-PGF(2α) from 24 h up to 8 days post-injury. The interstitial levels of 8-iso-PGF(2α) were markedly higher than the levels obtained from plasma and vCSF (p<0.05), supporting our hypothesis. The MD-8-iso-PGF(2α) levels correlated strongly (p<0.05) with MD-glycerol and MD-glutamate, which are widely used biomarkers of membrane phospholipid degradation/oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing 8-iso-PGF(2α) in MD samples from the human brain. Our results support a close relationship between oxidative stress and excitotoxicity following human TBI. MD-8-iso-PGF(2α) in combination with MD-glycerol may be useful biomarkers of oxidative stress in the neurointensive care setting.

  • 9.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The nitrone free radical scavenger NXY-059 is neuroprotective when administered after traumatic brain injury in the rat2008In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1449-1457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important contributors to the secondary injury cascade following traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ROS inhibition has consistently been shown to be neuroprotective following experimental TBI. NXY-059, a nitrone free radical trapping compound, has been shown to be neuroprotective in models of ischemic stroke but has not been evaluated in experimental TBI. In the present study, a continuous 24-h intravenous infusion of NXY-059 or vehicle was initiated 30min following a severe lateral fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) in adult rats (n=22), and histological and behavioral outcomes were evaluated. Sham-injured animals (n=22) receiving identical drug infusion were used as controls. Visuospatial learning was evaluated in the Morris water maze at post-injury days 11–14, followed by a probe trial (memory test) at day 18. The animals were sacrificed at day 18, and loss of hemispheric brain tissue was measured in microtubule-associated protein (MAP)–2stained sections. Brain-injured, NXY-059-treated animals showed a significant reduction of visuospatial learning deficits when compared to the brain-injured, vehicle-treated control animals (p<0.05). NXY-059-treated animals significantly reduced the loss of hemispheric tissue compared to brain-injured controls (43.0±11mm3 versus 74.4±19mm3, respectively; p<0.01). The results show that post-injury treatment with NXY-059 significantly attenuated the loss of injured brain tissue and improved cognitive outcome, suggesting a major role for ROS in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  • 10.
    Dyhrfort, Philip
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, Sect Neurosurg, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Måns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Stat, Uppsala, Sweden;Univ Edinburgh, Sch Math, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Univ Edinburgh, Maxwell Inst Math Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Enblad, Per
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Monitoring of Protein Biomarkers of Inflammation in Human Traumatic Brain Injury Using Microdialysis and Proximity Extension Assay Technology in Neurointensive Care2019In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 2872-2885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is followed by secondary injury mechanisms strongly involving neuroinflammation. To monitor the complex inflammatory cascade in human TBI, we used cerebral microdialysis (MD) and multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) technology and simultaneously measured levels of 92 protein biomarkers of inflammation in MD samples every three hours for five days in 10 patients with severe TBI under neurointensive care. One mu L MD samples were incubated with paired oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies binding to each protein, allowing quantification by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Sixty-nine proteins were suitable for statistical analysis. We found five different patterns with either early (<48 h; e.g., CCL20, IL6, LIF, CCL3), mid (48-96 h; e.g., CCL19, CXCL5, CXCL10, MMP1), late (>96 h; e.g., CD40, MCP2, MCP3), biphasic peaks (e.g., CXCL1, CXCL5, IL8) or stable (e.g., CCL4, DNER, VEGFA)/low trends. High protein levels were observed for e.g., CXCL1, CXCL10, MCP1, MCP2, IL8, while e.g., CCL28 and MCP4 were detected at low levels. Several proteins (CCL8, -19, -20, -23, CXCL1, -5, -6, -9, -11, CST5, DNER, Flt3L, and SIRT2) have not been studied previously in human TBI. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that LIF and CXCL5 may play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. This study provides a unique data set with individual temporal trends for potential inflammatory biomarkers in patients with TBI. We conclude that the combination of MD and PEA is a powerful tool to map the complex inflammatory cascade in the injured human brain. The technique offers new possibilities of protein profiling of complex secondary injury pathways.

  • 11.
    Ekmark-Lewén, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Meyerson, Bengt J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The Multivariate Concentric Square Field Test Reveals Behavioral Profiles of Risk Taking, Exploration, and Cognitive Impairment in Mice Subjected to Traumatic Brain Injury2010In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1643-1655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for more efficient tests to evaluate functional outcome following experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), reflecting deficits in cognitive, sensory, and motor functions that are seen in TBI patients. The Multivariate Concentric Square Field (TM) (MCSF) test is a relatively new behavioral model that measures exploration, risk taking, risk assessment, and shelter seeking, all of which are evolutionarily-conserved strategies for survival. The multivariate design enables scoring of different functional domains in a single test situation, with a free choice of optional environmental settings. Furthermore, repeated trials permits cognitive effects to be measured. In the present study, 11 anesthetized C57BL6 mice received controlled cortical injury (CCI) (0.5mm and 3.3 m/sec) over the right parietal cerebral cortex or sham surgery (n - 12). Naive mice (n 12) not subjected to any surgical procedure were also included. The animals were evaluated in the MCSF test at 2 and 7 days post-surgery, and behavioral profiles were analyzed. The results revealed differences in risk taking and explorative behavior between the sham animals and the animals subjected to trauma. Animals subjected to trauma were characterized by taking more risks and had a higher level of exploration activity, but they sought less shelter. Repeated exposure to the MCSF caused a general decrease in activity in the naive and sham group, while a more specific behavioral impairment was seen in injured mice, suggesting cognitive dysfunction. We submit that the MCSF test is a useful complementary tool for functional outcome evaluation in experimental TBI.

  • 12.
    Flygt, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ruscher, Karsten
    Novartis Inst Biomed Res, Basel, Switzerland.
    Norberg, Amanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Mir, Anis
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurosurg, Lund, Sweden.
    Gram, Hermann
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurosurg, Lund, Sweden.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurosurg, Lund, Sweden.
    Neutralization of Interleukin-1 beta following Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury in the Mouse Attenuates the Loss of Mature Oligodendrocytes2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 23, p. 2837-2849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly results in injury to the components of the white matter tracts, causing post-injury cognitive deficits. The myelin-producing oligodendrocytes (OLs) are vulnerable to TBI, although may potentially be replaced by proliferating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). The cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) is a key mediator of the complex inflammatory response, and when neutralized in experimental TBI, behavioral outcome was improved. To evaluate the role of IL-1 beta on oligodendrocyte cell death and OPC proliferation, 116 adult male mice subjected to sham injury or the central fluid percussion injury (cFPI) model of traumatic axonal injury, were analyzed at two, seven, and 14 days post-injury. At 30 min post-injury, mice were randomly administered an IL-1 beta neutralizing or a control antibody. OPC proliferation (5-ethynyl 2 '- deoxyuridine (EdU)/Olig2 co-labeling) and mature oligodendrocyte cell loss was evaluated in injured white matter tracts. Microglia/macrophages immunohistochemistry and ramification using Sholl analysis were also evaluated. Neutralizing IL-1 beta resulted in attenuated cell death, indicated by cleaved caspase-3 expression, and attenuated loss of mature OLs from two to seven days post-injury in brain-injured animals. IL-1 beta neutralization also attenuated the early, two day post-injury increase of microglia/macrophage immunoreactivity and altered their ramification. The proliferation of OPCs in brain-injured animals was not altered, however. Our data suggest that IL-1 beta is involved in the TBI-induced loss of OLs and early microglia/macrophage activation, although not the OPC proliferation. Attenuated oligodendrocyte cell loss may contribute to the improved behavioral outcome observed by IL-1 beta neutralization in this mouse model of diffuse TBI.

  • 13.
    Glushakova, Olena Y.
    et al.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Neurosurg, Richmond, VA USA.
    Glushakov, Andriy O.
    Univ S Florida, Neurosurg, Coll Med, Tampa, FL USA.
    Korol, Tetyana Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Acosta, Sandra
    Univ S Florida, Neurosurg, Coll Med, Tampa, FL USA.
    Borlongan, Cesar V.
    Univ S Florida, Neurosurg, Coll Med, Tampa, FL USA.
    Valadka, Alex B.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Neurosurg, Richmond, VA USA.
    Hayes, Ronald L.
    Banyan Biomarkers Inc, Alachua, FL USA.
    Glushakov, Alexander V.
    Single Breath Inc, Midlothian, VA USA.
    Cleaved-Caspase-3, Caspase-3-Cleaved Tau And Chronic Microvascular Reorganization In The Thalamus After Tbi2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A119-A120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hanell, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Djupsjö, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Vallstedt, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Patra, Kalicharan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Israelsson, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Larhammar, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Björk, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Paixao, Sonia
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Functional and Histological Outcome after Focal Traumatic Brain Injury Is Not Improved in Conditional EphA4 Knockout Mice2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 17, p. 2660-2671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of the axon guidance molecule EphA4 following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. Neutralization of EphA4 improved motor function and axonal regeneration following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that genetic absence of EphA4 could improve functional and histological outcome following TBI. Using qRT-PCR in wild-type (WT) mice, we evaluated the EphA4 mRNA levels following controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI or sham injury and found it to be downregulated in the hippocampus (p < 0.05) but not the cortex ipsilateral to the injury at 24 h post-injury. Next, we evaluated the behavioral and histological outcome following CCI using WT mice and Emx1-Cre-driven conditional knockout (cKO) mice. In cKO mice, EphA4 was completely absent in the hippocampus and markedly reduced in the cortical regions from embryonic day 16, which was confirmed using Western blot analysis. EphA4 cKO mice had similar learning and memory abilities at 3 weeks post-TBI compared to WT controls, although brain-injured animals performed worse than sham-injured controls (p < 0.05). EphA4 cKO mice performed similarly to WT mice in the rotarod and cylinder tests of motor function up to 29 days post-injury. TBI increased cortical and hippocampal astrocytosis (GFAP immunohistochemistry, p < 0.05) and hippocampal sprouting (Timm stain, p < 0.05) and induced a marked loss of hemispheric tissue (p < 0.05). EphA4 cKO did not alter the histological outcome. Although our results may argue against a beneficial role for EphA4 in the recovery process following TBI, further studies including post-injury pharmacological neutralization of EphA4 are needed to define the role for EphA4 following TBI.

  • 15. Hanell, Anders
    et al.
    Hedin, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Facilitated assessment of tissue loss following experimental traumatic brain injury2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 10, p. A154-A154Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hillered, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Dahlin, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Purins, Karlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Wetterhall, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    New Microdialysis Method for Protein Biomarker Sampling in the Neurointensive Care Setting2014In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 31, no 5, p. A22-A22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hussain, Zubair Muhammad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fitting, Sylvia
    Watanabe, Hiroyuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Usynin, Ivan
    Yakovleva, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Knapp, Pamela E.
    Scheff, Stephen W.
    Hauser, Kurt F.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lateralized Response of Dynorphin A Peptide Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1785-1793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a cascade of primary and secondary events resulting in impairment of neuronal networks that eventually determines clinical outcome. The dynorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, have been implicated in secondary injury and neurodegeneration in rodent and human brain. To gain insight into the role of dynorphins in the brain's response to trauma, we analyzed short-term (1-day) and long-term (7-day) changes in dynorphin A (Dyn A) levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, induced by unilateral left-side or right-side cortical TBI in mice. The effects of TBI were significantly different from those of sham surgery (Sham), while the sham surgery also produced noticeable effects. Both sham and TBI induced short-term changes and long-term changes in all three regions. Two types of responses were generally observed. In the hippocampus, Dyn A levels were predominantly altered ipsilateral to the injury. In the striatum and frontal cortex, injury to the right (R) hemisphere affected Dyn A levels to a greater extent than that seen in the left (L) hemisphere. The R-TBI but not L-TBI produced Dyn A changes in the striatum and frontal cortex at 7 days after injury. Effects of the R-side injury were similar in the two hemispheres. In naive animals, Dyn A was symmetrically distributed between the two hemispheres. Thus, trauma may reveal a lateralization in the mechanism mediating the response of Dyn A-expressing neuronal networks in the brain. These networks may differentially mediate effects of left and right brain injury on lateralized brain functions.

  • 18.
    Hånell, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Björk, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Jansson, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Philipson, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Nilsson, Lars N. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Weinreb, Paul H.
    Lee, Daniel
    McIntosh, Tracy K.
    Gimbel, David A.
    Strittmatter, Stephen M.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Genetic Deletion and Pharmacological Inhibition of Nogo-66 Receptor Impairs Cognitive Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice2010In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1297-1309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional recovery is markedly restricted following traumatic brain injury (TBI), partly due to myelin-associated inhibitors including Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), that all bind to the Nogo-66 receptor-1 (NgR1). In previous studies, pharmacological neutralization of both Nogo-A and MAG improved outcome following TBI in the rat, and neutralization of NgR1 improved outcome following spinal cord injury and stroke in rodent models. However, the behavioral and histological effects of NgR1 inhibition have not previously been evaluated in TBI. We hypothesized that NgR1 negatively influences behavioral recovery following TBI, and evaluated NgR1(-/-) mice (NgR1(-/-) study) and, in a separate study, soluble NgR1 infused intracerebroventricularly immediately post-injury to neutralize NgR1 (sNgR1 study) following TBI in mice using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model. In both studies, motor function, TBI-induced loss of tissue, and hippocampal beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry were not altered up to 5 weeks post-injury. Surprisingly, cognitive function (as evaluated with the Morris water maze at 4 weeks post-injury) was significantly impaired both in NgR1(-/-) mice and in mice treated with soluble NgR1. In the sNgR1 study, we evaluated hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting using the Timm stain and found it to be increased at 5 weeks following TBI. Neutralization of NgR1 significantly increased mossy fiber sprouting in sham-injured animals, but not in brain-injured animals. Our data suggest a complex role for myelin-associated inhibitors in the behavioral recovery process following TBI, and urge caution when inhibiting NgR1 in the early post-injury period.

  • 19.
    Israelsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Bengtsson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kylberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Distinct cellular patterns of upregulated chemokine expression supporting a prominent inflammatory role in traumatic brain injury2008In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 959-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral gene expressions change in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI), and future trauma treatment may improve with increased knowledge about these regulations. We subjected C57BL/6J mice to injury by controlled cortical impact (CCI). At various time points post-injury, mRNA from neocortex and hippocampus was isolated, and transcriptional alterations studied using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene array analysis. Spatial distribution of enhanced expression was characterized by in situ hybridization. Products of the upregulated transcripts serve functions in a range of cellular mechanisms, including stress, inflammation and immune responses, and tissue remodeling. We also identified increased transcript levels characterizing reactive astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia, and furthermore, we demonstrated a novel pattern of scattered cell clusters expressing the chemokine Cxcl10. Notably, a sustained increase in integrin alpha X (Itgax), characterizing antigen-presenting dendritic cells, was found with the transcript located to similar cell clusters. In contrast, T-cell receptor alpha transcript showed only a modest increase. The induced P-selectin (Selp) expression level in endothelial cells, and chemokines from microglia, may guide perivascular accumulation of extravasating inflammatory monocytes differentiating into dendritic cells. In conclusion, our study shows that following TBI, secondary injury chiefly involves inflammatory processes and chemokine signaling, which comprise putative targets for pharmaceutical neuroprotection.

  • 20.
    Israelsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Wang, Yun
    Kylberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Pick, Chaim G
    Hoffer, Barry
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Closed head injury in a mouse model results in molecular changes indicating inflammatory responses2009In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1307-1314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral gene expression changes in response to traumatic brain injury will provide useful information in the search for future trauma treatment. In order to characterize the outcome of mild brain injury, we studied C57BL/6J mice in a weight-drop (30 g), closed head injury model. At various times post-injury, mRNA was isolated from neocortex and hippocampus and transcriptional alterations were studied using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and gene array analysis. At three days post-injury, the results showed unilateral injury responses, both in neocortex and hippocampus, with the main effect seen on the side of the skull hit by the dropping weight. Upregulated transcripts encoded products characterizing reactive astrocytes, phagocytes, microglia and immune-reactive cells. Markers for oligodendrocytes and T-cells were not altered. Notably, strong differences in the responses among individual mice were seen, e.g. for the Gfap transcript expressed by reactive astrocytes and the chemokine Ccl3 transcript expressed by activated microglial cells. In conclusion, mild TBI chiefly activates transcripts leading to tissue remodeling, inflammatory processes and chemokine signalling, as in focal brain injury, suggesting putative targets for drug development.

  • 21.
    Lewén, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Dyhrfort, Philip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    A Dedicated 21-Plex Pea Panel For High-Sensitive Protein Biomarker Detection Using Micro-Dialysis In Traumatic Brain Injury2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A130-A130Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Linder, Lars Kihlstrom Burenstam
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Neurosurg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Birgersson, Ulrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biomat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    In-Situ Bone Regeneration Of Cranial Defects Using Synthetic Ceramic Implant2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A79-A80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lukoyanov, Nikolay
    et al.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Dept Biomed, Porto, Portugal.
    Carvalho, Liliana
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, Inst Invest & Inovacao Saude, Inst Biol Mol & Celular,Dept Biomed, Porto, Portugal.
    Watanabe, Hiroyuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Zhang, Mengliang
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Sarkisyan, Daniil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Kononenko, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Bazov, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Iakovleva, Tatiana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Schouenborg, Jens
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Contralesional Hindlimb Motor Response Induced By Unilateral Brain Injury: Evidence For Extra Spinal Mechanism2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A201-A201Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lööv, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nadadhur, Aishwarya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Erlandsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extracellular Ezrin - a Novel Biomarker for Traumatic Brain Injury2015In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a heterogeneous disease, and the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic TBI biomarkers is highly desirable in order to individualize patient care. We have previously published a study in which we identified possible TBI biomarkers by mass spectrometry 24 h after injury in a cell culture model. Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins were found abundantly in the medium after trauma, and in the present study we have identified extracellular ezrin as a possible biomarker for brain trauma by analyzing cell culture medium from injured primary neurons and glia and by measuring ezrin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from both rats and humans. Our results show that extracellular ezrin concentration was substantially increased in cell culture medium after injury, but that the intracellular expression of the protein remained stable over time. Controlled cortical impact injured rats showed an increased amount of ezrin in CSF at both day 3 and day 7 after trauma. Moreover, ezrin was present in all ventricular CSF samples from seven humans with severe TBI. In contrast to intracellular ezrin, which is distinctly activated following TBI, extracellular ezrin is nonphosphorylated. This is the first report of extracellular ERM proteins in human and experimental models of TBI, providing a scientific foundation for further assessment of ezrin as a potential biomarker.

  • 25.
    Marklund, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Farrokhnia, Nina
    Hanell, Anders
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Monitoring of amyloid-beta dynamics after human traumatic brain injury2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 10, p. A185-A185Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Marklund, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Farrokhnia, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hånell, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Vanmechelen, Eugeen
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Monitoring of beta-Amyloid Dynamics after Human Traumatic Brain Injury2014In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological evidence links severe or repeated traumatic brain injury (TBI) to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) occurs with high frequency after TBI, particularly in injured axons, and APP may be cleaved to amyloid- (A) peptides playing key pathophysiological roles in AD. We used cerebral microdialysis (MD) to test the hypothesis that interstitial A levels are altered following TBI and are related to the injury type, cerebral energy metabolism, age of the patient, and level of consciousness. In the present report, we evaluated 10 mechanically ventilated patients (7 male, 3 female, ages 18-76 years) with a severe TBI, who had intracranial pressure and MD monitoring. Each MD sample was analyzed for hourly routine energy metabolic biomarkers (MD-lactate, MD-pyruvate, MD-glucose, and MD-lactate/pyruvate ratio), cellular distress biomarkers (MD-glutamate, MD-glycerol), and MD-urea. The remaining MD samples were analyzed for A1-40 (A40; n=765 samples) and A1-42 (A42; n=765 samples) in pooled 2h fractions up to 14 days post-injury, using the Luminex xMAP technique, allowing detection with high temporal resolution of the key A peptides A40 and A42. Data are presented using medians and 25th and 75th percentiles. Both A40 and A42 were consistently higher in patients with predominately diffuse axonal injury compared with patients with focal TBI at days 1-6 post- injury, A42 being significantly increased at 113-116h post-injury (p<0.05). The A levels did not correlate with the interstitial energy metabolic situation, age of the patient, or the level of consciousness. These results support that interstitial generation of potentially toxic A species may occur following human TBI, particularly related to axonal injury.

  • 27.
    Marklund, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Sihver, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hovda, David
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Watanabe, Yasuyoshi
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Bergström, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Increased Cerebral Uptake of [18F]Fluoro-Deoxyglucose but not [1-14C]Glucose Early following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats2009In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1281-1293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI), the local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (lCMRGlc) is commonly estimated using the 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) method. The adequate estimation of lCMRGlc using FDG requires a correction factor, the lumped constant (LC), to convert FDG net uptake into lCMRGlc. The LC, and thus lCMRGlc calculations, requires a "steady state" that may be disrupted following TBI. In the present report, we hypothesized that [1-14C]glucose uptake would accurately reflect glucose dynamics early post-injury and was compared to the regional uptake of FDG in 44 rats subjected to moderate (2.4-2.6 atm) lateral fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) or sham injury. Cortical energy state and adenylate (ATP, ADP, AMP) levels were also measured. Early (7-42 min) after FPI, FDG uptake was increased in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus (p<0.05). In contrast, no change in [1-14C]glucose uptake (7 and 17 min) or cortical adenylate content (42 min post-injury) was observed. At 12 hours following FPI, the ipsilateral FDG and [1-14C]glucose uptake was decreased in the cortex and hippocampus and the ipsilateral cortical ATP concentration was decreased in comparison to sham-injured controls (p<0.05). Under the present experimental conditions, the rate of cerebral uptake of FDG and of [1-14C]glucose differs, and indicate that following TBI, regional changes in the LC may occur in the immediate, but not in the late, post-injury phase. These results should be considered when interpreting results obtained using FDG for the estimation of lCMRGlc early following experimental TBI.

  • 28. Mattsson, Per
    et al.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neuroanatomy.
    Svensson, Mikael
    The novel pyrrolopyrimidine PNU-101033-E improves facial motor neuron survival following intracranial axotomy of the facial nerve in the adult rat1999In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 793-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuronal survival is important to functional restitution following axotomy. Proximal lesions of the facial nerve, due to head trauma or tumor growth, for example, may cause long-standing or even permanent facial nerve palsy. Betamethasone has been used by several neurosurgical clinics for the treatment of postoperative facial nerve palsy; however, this practice is based only on clinical experience. The aim of the present study was to explore the putative effect on facial motor neuron survival of a novel lazaroid (pyrrolopyrimidine, PNU-101033-E) and furthermore to compare the effects with those of betamethasone, following intracranial transection of the facial nerve in adult rats. Both agents are known to inhibit lipid peroxidation by free radical scavenging. The lesion model used has recently been reported to induce massive neuronal cell death with a relative survival of 26.8 +/- 11.3% 1 month after lesion. Oral administration of lazaroids or daily injections of betamethasone followed surgery for 1 month, after which quantification of motor neuronal profiles was performed in the facial nucleus. Lazaroid-treated animals showed a significantly enhanced neuronal survival (68.0 +/- 9.8%), whereas no significant difference was found in betamethasone-treated animals (33.1 +/- 11.7%). The microglial and astrocytic responses in the facial nucleus were intense on the operated sides in betamethasone-treated as well as lazaroid-treated animals, and no differences in comparison with untreated animals were found. In conclusion, we found that the novel pyrrolopyrimidine PNU-101033-E, but not betamethasone, significantly enhanced nerve cell survival. This agent may therefore serve as a useful neuroprotective agent following intracranial trauma to the facial nerve and should be further evaluated for clinical use.

  • 29. Plantman, Stefan
    et al.
    Zelano, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Risling, Marten
    Cullheim, Staffan
    Neuronal Myosin-X is upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and mediates laminin-induced growth of neurites2012In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 29, no 10, p. A178-A178Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Rostami, Elham
    et al.
    Davidsson, Johan
    Gyorgy, Andrea
    Agoston, Denes V.
    Risling, Mårten
    Bellander, Bo-Michael
    The terminal pathway of the complement system is activated in focal penetrating but not in mild diffuse traumatic brain injury2013In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 30, no 23, p. 1954-1965Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Sköld, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunther, M.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ventral root avulsion and replantation - description of different gene expression patterns in acute and delayed replantation2016In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 33, no 3, p. A12-A13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Svedung-Wettervik, Teodor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Temporal Neurophysiological Dynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury: Role of Pressure Reactivity and Optimal Cerebral Perfusion Pressure for Predicting Outcome2019In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1818-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and the pressure reactivity index (PRx) have been shown to correlate with outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but their temporal evolution is less studied. Optimal CPP (CPPopt; i.e., the CPP with the lowest [optimal] PRx value) has been proposed as a dynamic, individualized CPP target. Our aim was to map the temporal course of these parameters and their relation to outcome, in particular the extent and impact of CPP insults based both on fixed CPP thresholds and on divergence from CPPopt. Data from 362 TBI patients with ICP-monitoring treated at the neurointensive care unit of Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, between 2008-2016 were retrospectively analyzed for the temporal course of ICP, mean arterial blood pressure, CPP, PRx, PRx55-15 (a variant of PRx), and CPPopt the first 10 days post-injury. PRx and PRx55-15 showed significantly lower/better values for those with favorable outcome, most pronounced on Days 2 to 5. PRx55-15 gave better separation between the two groups. In the univariate analysis, CPP insults (both fixed and CPPopt-thresholds) were significantly correlated with outcome on these days. Multi-variate logistic regression showed that age, Glasgow Coma Score Motor, pupillary abnormality at admission, CPP > CPPopt, and PRx55-15 were significant independent outcome predictors. PRx was significant when PRx55-15 was excluded. High PRx55-15 and high grade of monitoring time with CPP > CPPopt, but not the traditional fixed CPP thresholds, were strong predictors for worse clinical outcome. The study supports the concept that CPPopt is an important parameter in TBI management.

  • 33.
    Vedung, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, PET Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala Univ, PET Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fahlström, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Persistent Decrease Of Cerebral Blood Flow In Traumatic Brain Injury And Sports-Related Concussion2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 34, no 13, p. A8-A9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Vedung, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hanni, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Lulea Univ Technol, Hlth Sci, Lulea, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    CONCUSSION INCIDENCE IN SWEDISH ELITE SOCCER2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A270-A270Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Vedung, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lanni, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Fahlström, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Localized Injury Along White Matter Tracts In Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury Affects Memory Functions In Chronic State2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A140-A141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Watanabe, Hiroyuki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Zhang, Mengliang
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Sarkisyan, Daniil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Kononenko, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Iakovleva, Tatiana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Asymmetric Hindlimb Motor Response To Focal Traumatic Brain Injury Is Controlled By Side-Specific Opioid Mechanism2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A79-A79Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Wicher, Grzegorz K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wallenquist, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lei, Ying
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Enoksson, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Li, Xiaofei
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fuchs, Barbara
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology. Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Interleukin-33 Promotes Recruitment of Microglia/Macrophages in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 34, no 22, p. 3173-3182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating condition, often leading to life-long consequences for patients. Even though modern neurointensive care has improved functional and cognitive outcomes, efficient pharmacological therapies are still lacking. Targeting peripherally derived, or resident inflammatory, cells that are rapid responders to brain injury is promising, but complex, given that the contribution of inflammation to exacerbation versus improved recovery varies with time post-injury. The injury-induced inflammatory response is triggered by release of alarmins, and in the present study we asked whether interleukin-33 (IL-33), an injury-associated nuclear alarmin, is involved in TBI. Here, we used samples from human TBI microdialysate, tissue sections from human TBI, and mouse models of central nervous system injury and found that expression of IL-33 in the brain was elevated from nondetectable levels, reaching a maximum after 72 h in both human samples and mouse models. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were the main producers of IL-33. Post-TBI, brains of mice deficient in the IL-33 receptor, ST2, contained fewer microglia/macrophages in the injured region than wild-type mice and had an altered cytokine/chemokine profile in response to injury. These observations indicate that IL-33 plays a role in neuroinflammation with microglia/macrophages being cellular targets for this interleukin post-TBI.

  • 38.
    Yaka, Cane
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Björk, Per
    Schönberg, Tommy
    Erlandsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    A novel in vitro injury model based on microcontact printing demonstrates negative effects of hydrogen peroxide on axonal regeneration both in absence and presence of glia.2013In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 392-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular processes involved in axonal regeneration following traumatic brain injury (TBI) are still not fully understood. In this study we have established a novel in vitro injury model of TBI based on microcontact printing (µCP) that enables close up investigations of injured neurons. The model is also suitable for quantitative measurements of axonal outgrowth, making it a useful tool in the studies of basic mechanisms behind axonal regeneration. Cortical neurons from mouse embryos are cultured on µCP cover slips for 8 days and the neurons are then injured in a precise manner using a thin plastic tip that do not affect the µCP pattern of extracellular matrix proteins. By close-up time-lapse experiments and immunostainings we show that the neurons have a tremendous capacity to regenerate their neurites after injury. The cut induces growth cone formation and the regenerating axons strictly follow the µCP pattern. Moreover, by using the injury model we demonstrate that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decreases axonal regeneration after injury without affecting the neurons ability to form growth cones. Co-culture with glial cells does not rescue the axonal regeneration, indicating that the mechanism by which H2O2 affects axonal regeneration differ from its cytotoxic effect.

  • 39.
    Zhang, Mengliang
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Watanabe, Hiroyuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sarkisyan, Daniil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Thelin, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Schouenborg, Jens
    Lund Univ, Dept Expt Med Sci, Neuronano Res Ctr, Lund, Sweden.
    Bakalkin, Georgy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Uppsala Univ, Pharmaceut Biosci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    ASYMMETRIC HINDLIMB POSTURE AND WITHDRAW REFLEXES INDUCED BY UNILATERAL BRAIN INJURY ARE ENCODED IN SPINAL CORD2018In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 35, no 16, p. A208-A208Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf