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  • 1. Bu, Zhaojun
    et al.
    Chen, Xu
    Rydin, Hakan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Wang, Shengzhong
    Ma, Jinze
    Zeng, Jing
    Performance of four mosses in a reciprocal transplant experiment: implications for peatland succession in NE China2013In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 35, p. 220-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sphagnum dominates the moss layer in northern peatlands, but its dominance has decreased while there has been an expansion of other moss genera in some peatlands of NE China since the 1960s. To discover the mechanisms underlying this succession, we performed a four-month reciprocal transplant experiment in Hani Peatland with three Sphagnum species, Sphagnum palustre, S. magellanicum, and S. fuscum and one other moss Polytrichum strictum. Performance of the four mosses and the environmental factors: height above water table (HWT), vascular plant cover and pH, electrical conductivity, base cations, and N and P concentrations in water in the four moss habitats were measured. Biomass production in S. palustre was negatively affected by HWT. Phosphorus had a positive effect on biomass production in S. magellanicum and Polytrichum. None of the environmental factors had any effect on S. fuscum. Overall, the three Sphagnum species deteriorated in P. strictum hummocks, while P. strictum exhibited a wider ecological amplitude and maintained or increased its vigour levels in Sphagnum hummocks. Biomass production in S. palustre and S. magellanicum was negatively affected by P. strictum indicating the competitive ability of P. strictum. Our results suggest that its wide ecological amplitude and competitive ability may explain why P. strictum can expand and replace Sphagnum in some northern peatlands.

  • 2.
    Campbell, Charles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    The effects of winter stress on Sphagnum specieswith contrasting macro- and microdistributions2019In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ellis, L. T.
    et al.
    Nat Hist Museum, London SW7 5BD, England..
    Ah-Peng, C.
    Univ La Reunion, St Pierre, Reunion..
    Aranda, S. C.
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, E-28006 Madrid, Spain..
    Bednarek-Ochyra, H.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Lab Bryol, Krakow, Poland..
    Borovichev, E. A.
    Russian Acad Sci, Karelian Res Ctr, Forest Res Inst, Petrozavodsk, Republic Of Kar, Russia.;RAS, Problems North Kola Sci Ctr, Inst Ind Ecol, Apatity, Murmansk Provin, Russia..
    Cykowska-Marzencka, B.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Lab Bryol, Krakow, Poland..
    Duarte, M. C.
    Inst Invest Cient Trop, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Enroth, J.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Biosci, Helsinki, Finland.;Finnish Museum Nat Hist, Helsinki, Finland..
    Erzberger, P.
    Fedosov, V.
    Moscow MV Lomonosov State Univ, Moscow 117234, Russia..
    Fojcik, B.
    Univ Silesia, Dept Bot & Nat Protect, Katowice, Poland..
    Gabriel, R.
    CE3c GBA Ctr Ecol Evolut & Environm Changes, Azorean Biodivers Grp, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal.;Univ Acores, Dept Ciencias Agr, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal..
    Coelho, M. C. M.
    CE3c GBA Ctr Ecol Evolut & Environm Changes, Azorean Biodivers Grp, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal.;Univ Acores, Dept Ciencias Agr, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal..
    Henriques, D. S. G.
    CE3c GBA Ctr Ecol Evolut & Environm Changes, Azorean Biodivers Grp, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal.;Univ Acores, Dept Ciencias Agr, Angra Do Heroismo, Portugal..
    Ilina, O. V.
    Interreg Nat Conservancy SPOK, Petrozavodsk, Republic Of Kar, Russia..
    Gil-Novoa, J. E.
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, Dept Systemat & Evolut, F-75231 Paris, France..
    Morales-Puentes, M. E.
    Univ Pedag & Tecnol Colombia, Herbario UPTC, Grp Sistemat Biol, Tunja, Boyaca, Colombia..
    Gradstein, S. R.
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, Dept Systemat & Evolut, F-75231 Paris, France..
    Gupta, R.
    Natl Bot Res Inst, CSIR, Bryol Lab, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Nath, V.
    Natl Bot Res Inst, CSIR, Bryol Lab, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Asthana, A. K.
    Natl Bot Res Inst, CSIR, Bryol Lab, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Koczur, A.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, Krakow, Poland..
    Lebouvier, M.
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, UMR 6553, F-35014 Rennes, France..
    Mesterhazy, A.
    Mogro, F.
    Mezaka, A.
    Rezekne Higher Educ Inst, Res Inst Reg Studies, Riga, Latvia..
    Nemeth, Cs.
    Corvinus Univ Budapest, Dept Hort Sci, Chair Bot & Bot Garden Soroksar, Budapest, Hungary..
    Orgaz, J. D.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Grad Sch Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 724, Japan..
    Sakamoto, Y.
    Hiroshima Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Grad Sch Sci, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 724, Japan..
    Paiva, J.
    Univ Coimbra, P-3000 Coimbra, Portugal..
    Sales, F.
    Univ Coimbra, P-3000 Coimbra, Portugal.;Royal Bot Gardens, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Pande, N.
    Kumaun Univ, Dept Bot, Naini Tal, India..
    Sabovljevic, M. S.
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Inst Bot, Belgrade 11001, Serbia.;Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Bot Garden, Belgrade 11001, Serbia..
    Pantivic, J.
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Inst Bot, Belgrade 11001, Serbia.;Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Bot Garden, Belgrade 11001, Serbia..
    Sabovljevic, A. D.
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Inst Bot, Belgrade 11001, Serbia.;Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Bot Garden, Belgrade 11001, Serbia..
    Perez-Haase, A.
    Univ Barcelona, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Vegetal, Barcelona, Spain..
    da Costa, D. Pinheiro
    Inst Pesquisas Jardim Bot Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil..
    Plasek, V.
    Univ Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic..
    Sawicki, J.
    Univ Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.;Univ Warmia & Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Szczecinska, M.
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Chmielewski, J.
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Potemkin, A.
    Russian Acad Sci, Komarov Bot Inst, Moscow 117901, Russia..
    Schaefer-Verwimp, A.
    Herdwangen Schonach, Tubingen, Germany..
    Schofield, W. B.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Bot, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Sergio, C.
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Museo Nacl Hist Nat & Ciencia, P-1200 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Sim-Sim, M.
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Fac Ciencias, P-1200 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Sjögren, S.
    Uppsala University.
    Spitale, D.
    MuSe Museo Sci Corso Lavoro & Sci, Trento, Italy..
    Stebel, A.
    Med Univ Silesia, Dept Pharmaceut Bot, Sosnowiec, Poland..
    Stefanut, S.
    Romanian Acad, Inst Biol Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania..
    Suarez, G. M.
    UNT, CONICET, Fac Ciencias Nat & IML, San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina..
    Flores, J. R.
    UNT, CONICET, Fac Ciencias Nat & IML, San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina..
    Thouvenot, L.
    Vana, J.
    Charles Univ Prague, Dept Bot, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Yoon, Y. -J
    Kim, J. H.
    Korea Polar Res Inst, Inchon, South Korea..
    Zubel, R.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Bot & Mycol, Lublin, Poland..
    New national and regional bryophyte records, 452015In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 308-329Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Kudo, Gaku
    Variation in responses to temperature treatments ex situ of the moss Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid.) Mitt. originating from eight altitude sites in Hokkaido, Japan2014In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal acclimatisations are important for the survival and growth of individuals and populations but seldom studied for different populations of bryophytes. The aims of this study were to (I) investigate if responses to temperature treatments were independent of the site sampled or if the intra- and inter-population variation in responses were larger than the responses to the temperature treatments (control, press, and pulse), and to (II) examine if experimental responses varied, depending on the sampled sites. We collected samples of the circumpolar bryophyte species, Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid.) Mitt., originating from eight altitude sites on Mt. Oakan in Hokkaido, Japan, and exposed them to three different temperature treatments ex situ for four weeks. Thermal acclimatisation was estimated by measuring responses in growth length increase, biomass increase, number of branches, and the maximum quantum yield of PS II (Fv/Fm). We found that responses to temperature treatments were dependent on the site sampled, and that differences were most pronounced in the length increase. Results also shows that the responses to experimental treatments may differ between sites. Our results therefore raise important concerns regarding the general validity of both ex situ and in situ experiments when performed on a single or a limited number of sites.

  • 5.
    Molau, U
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Alatalo, Juha
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Jägerbrandt, AK
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Responses of bryophytes to simulated environmental change at Latnjajaure, northern Sweden2003In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 25, p. 163-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We simulated a predicted environmental change in a subarctic-alpine plant community to study short-term growth in Hylocomium splendens, and three-year effects in abundance changes of the five most common bryophytes at Latnjajaure, northern Sweden. The experiment had a factorial design with increased temperature and nutrients, alone and in combination. Moss growth was measured during the 1995 growing season, and we measured species abundance before and after three years of environmental perturbation. The combined treatments of fertilizer and temperature enhancement caused a decreased growth in length and dry weight in H. splendens. There was a significant decrease in abundance of Rhytidium rugosum in the combined temperature and fertilizer treatment. The other four common bryophyte species (Aulacomnium turgidum, Dicranum groenlandicum, Hylocomium splendens, and Ptilidium ciliare) showed weaker, but not significant trends in the same direction. As the bryophytes are an important component of arctic and subarctic vegetation, we expect that they will play a key role in the impact of anticipated Global Change on the ecosystems.

  • 6.
    Mälson, Kalle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Competitive hierarchy, but no competitive exclusions in experiments with rich fen bryophytes2009In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 31, no Part 1, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competitive exclusion among species with high niche overlap has been questioned by plant ecologists over the last decades. In this study, we used a greenhouse experiment to test the role of competition for community dynamics and composition among bryophytes in boreal rich (calcareous) fens. We evaluate the rate and direction of competition between three of the most common bryophytes in these wetlands, Campylium stellatum, Scorpidium cossonii and Scorpidium scorpioides. A pair-wise experimental setup with equal amounts of initial plant material of the species was used and the experiment continued for two years. To assess the competitive outcome we measured the area expansion of one species into the part of the experimental containers covered by its competitor, and the height growth of each species. Differences were observed between tested species for total spatial expansion into the area of its competitor. C. stellatum and S. cossonii showed similar total spatial expansion, while S. scorpioides showed very low spatial expansion. The spatial expansion also depended on the identity of the other species in the combination. All three pair-wise interactions were strongly asymmetric, and in qualitative terms a competitive hierarchy could be established. However, this did not lead to competitive exclusions, even though the experimental containers were small and the two years of continuous growth in the greenhouse would correspond to several years of growth under field conditions. The results suggest that in the natural habitat, where interactions are further weakened by microtopographic niche separation and interrupted by fine-scale disturbances, competitive exclusions are probably rare, if they occur at all.

  • 7.
    Sundberg, Sebastian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecological Botany.
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecological Botany.
    Spore number in Sphagnum and its dependence on spore and capsule size1998In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spore number in eight species of Sphagnum, representing five taxonomic sections, was investigated in relation to capsule and spore size. Mean spore number ranged from 18,500 in S. tenellum to 243,000 in S. squarrosum. There was considerable intraspecific variation in spore number, which was mainly related to capsule size. The interspecific variation in spore number was determined by both capsule and spore size, with higher numbers of spores in species with large capsules and small spores. Capsule size among species seems to be positively correlated to the size of the capitulum. Spore size showed a strong, positive relationship to capsule size in three species studied, that was fitted by a quadratic regression. The smallest capsule analysed for each of the eight species always had the smallest spores, but in only two species did the largest capsule have the largest spores, further indicating a common curvilinear relationship between spore size and capsule size. The strong relationship (R2=O.98) obtained in a linear regression in which the capsule size to spore size ratio was used to predict spore number in different species, makes it possible to estimate the spore output of other species or populations of Sphagnum, from sizes of capsules and spores. The sizes of spores measured in this study agreed with results obtained in at least one previous study, but were generally smaller than those reported in several other studies. The discrepancy probably depends on the method of spore preparation. The present study identifies potential sources of errors in spore counts and measurements. Measures which help to avoid or correct for errors are evaluated to facilitate further studies.

  • 8.
    Tyler, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Biol Museum, POB 117, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Fia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Dahlberg, Carl Johan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lonnell, Niklas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallingback, Tomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reitalu, Triin
    Tallinn Univ Technol, Inst Geol, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Determinants of bryophyte species composition and diversity on the Great Alvar of oland, Sweden2018In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 12-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors driving the species richness and distribution of bryophytes are poorly studied and not well understood, particularly in grasslands. We analysed the occurrence of bryophyte species and variation in species richness across 674 plots (0.5 m x 0.5 m) in alvar vegetation (grassland on limestone pavement with thin or no soil) on oland (Sweden) in relation to substrate characteristics and chemistry, inundation frequency, grazing pressure and geographical variables. We found 148 taxa, including 11 nationally red-listed ones. Species richness per plot was significantly associated with substrate type, positively associated with pH and grazing intensity, but negatively associated with soil depth. However, richness of species typical of, or restricted to, alvar habitats responded differently to richness of species more common in other habitats. Typical alvar species were favoured by high pH, shallow soil and low phosphate availability, while generalists preferred relatively low pH, higher phosphate availability and organic or mull soil types. Distance from the alvar margin had only weak effects. Concerning the effects on individual species and community composition, inundation frequency and pH were found to have the largest effects, although other factors (substrate type, soil depth, bare soil, bare stone, phosphate availability and grazing pressure) were more important for some individual species, stressing the importance of microsite variability and variability in management for regional species richness. From a conservation perspective, it is concluded that grazing is generally positive whilst factors increasing phosphate availability may disadvantage the typical alvar species, and proximity to the alvar margin is not a major problem.

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