uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Almqvist, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sjöström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jensen, Holger J.
    Danmark.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    In vitro characterization of 211 At-labeled antibody A33: a potential therapeutic agent against metastatic colorectal carcinoma2005In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 514-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The humanized antibody A33 binds to the A33 antigen, expressed in 95% of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. The restricted pattern of expression in normal tissue makes this antigen a possible target for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal micrometastases. In this study, the A33 antibody was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At using N-succinimidyl para-(tri-methylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The in vitro characteristics of the 211At-benzoate-A33 conjugate (211At-A33) were investigated and found to be similar to those of 125I-benzoate-A33 (125I-A33) in different assays. Both conjugates bound with high affinity to SW1222 cells (Kd = 1.7 ± 0.2 nM, and 1.8 ± 0.1 nM for 211At-A33 and 125I-A33, respectively), and both showed good intracellular retention (70% of the radioactivity was still cell associated after 20 hours). The cytotoxic effect of 211At-A33 was also confirmed. After incubation with 211At-A33, SW1222 cells had a survival of approximately 0.3% when exposed to some 150 decays per cell (DPC). The cytotoxic effect was found to be dose-dependent, as cells exposed to only 56 DPC had a survival of approximately 5%. The 211At-A33 conjugate shows promise as a potential radioimmunotherapy agent for treatment of micrometastases originating from colorectal carcinoma.

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Steffen, Ann-Charlott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jensen, Holger
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Biodistribution of At-211-Labeled humanized monoclonal antibody A332007In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 480-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) could be a possible adjuvant treatment method for patients with colorectal carcinoma. The A33 antigen is a promising RIT target, as it is highly and homogenously expressed in 95% of all colorectal carcinomas. In this study, the humanized monoclonal antibody A33 (huA33), targeting the A33 antigen, was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At, and the biodistribution and in vivo targeting ability of the conjugate was investigated in an athymic mouse xenograft model. There was an accumulation of 211At in tumor tissue over time, but no substantial accumulation was seen in any organ apart from the skin and thyroid, indicating no major release of free 211At in vivo. At all time points, the uptake of 211At-huA33 was higher in tumor tissue than in most organs, and at 8 hours postinjection (p.i.), no organ had a higher uptake than tumor tissue. The tumor-to-blood ratio of 211At-huA33 increased with time, reaching 2.5 after 21 hours p.i. The highest absorbed dose was found in the blood, but the tumor received a higher dose than any organ other than the thyroid. An in vivo blocking experiment showed that 211At-huA33 binds specifically to human tumor xenografts in athymic mice. In conclusion, the favorable biodistribution and specific in vivo targeting ability of 211At-huA33 makes it a potential therapeutic agent for the RIT of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  • 3.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Varasteh, Zohreh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Eek, Annemarie
    Boerman, Otto
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    In Vivo and In Vitro Studies on Renal Uptake of Radiolabeled Affibody Molecules for Imaging of HER2 Expression in Tumors2013In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules (6-7 kDa) are a new class of small robust three-helical scaffold proteins. Radiolabeled subnanomolar anti-HER2 affibody Z(HER2:342) was developed for imaging of HER2 expression in tumors, and a clinical study has demonstrated that the In-111- and Ga-68-labeled affibody molecules can efficiently detect HER2 expressing metastases in breast cancer patients. However, a significant renal accumulation of radioactivity after systemic injection of a radiolabeled anti-HER2 affibody conjugate is observed. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of renal reabsorption of anti-HER2 affibody at the molecular level. Renal accumulation of radiolabeled anti-HER2 affibody molecules was studied in a murine model and in vitro using opossum-derived proximal tubule (OK) cells. It was found that kidney reabsorption of affibody molecule was not driven by megalin/cubilin. Amino acids in the target-binding side of affibody molecule were involved in binding to OK cells. On OK cells, two types of receptors for anti-HER2 affibody molecule were found: K-D1 = 0.8 nM, B-max1 = 71,500 and K-D2 = 9.2 nM, B-max2 = 367,000. The results of the present study indicate that affibody molecule and other scaffold-based targeting proteins with a relatively low kidney uptake can be selected using in vitro studies with tubular kidney cells.

  • 4.
    Edgren, Maliha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Westlin, J E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Kälkner, K M
    Sundin, Anders
    Nilsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    [111In-DPTA-D-Phe1] - Octreotide Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma1999In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 59-64Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using the 111In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (Octreoscan) was performed in 9 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In total 11 scintigraphies were performed. Positive tumor uptakes were observed in 9 patients. The results of the octreotide scans were correlated to diagnostic CT and/or X-ray images. Forty (59%) out of 68 known tumor localizations were visualized with the octreotide scan. A second scan following therapy was performed in two patients. These patients showed progressive disease despite treatment and also exhibited intensified uptakes at octreotide scintigraphy. One false positive lesion was observed in the 40 lesions visualized in scintigraphy.

    It was concluded that renal cell carcinoma expresses somatostatin receptors, as could be visualized with Octreoscan scintigraphy. The scintigraphic technique can be used as an instrument for in vivo characterization of the disease. The data could also form a basis for future investigations regarding the possible therapeutic effect of octreotide in the management of renal cell cancer.

  • 5. Evans-Axelsson, Susan
    et al.
    Ulmert, David
    Orbom, Anders
    Peterson, Pernilla
    Nilsson, Olle
    Wennerberg, Johan
    Strand, Joanna
    Wingårdh, Karin
    Olsson, Tomas
    Hagman, Zandra
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bjartell, Anders
    Lilja, Hans
    Strand, Sven-Erik
    Targeting free prostate-specific antigen for in vivo imaging of prostate cancer using a monoclonal antibody specific for unique epitopes accessible on free prostate-specific antigen alone2012In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the feasibility of targeting the free, unbound forms of prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) for in vivo imaging of prostate adenocarcinomas (PCa), as PSA is produced and secreted at abundance during every clinical stage and grade of PCa, including castration-resistant disease. We injected 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody PSA30 (specific for an epitope uniquely accessible on fPSA alone) intravenously in male nude mice carrying subcutaneous xenografts of LNCaP tumors (n=36). Mice were sacrificed over a time course from 4 hours to 13 days after injecting 125I-labeled PSA30. Tissue uptake of 125I-PSA30 at 48 and 168 hours after intravenous injection was compared with two clinically used positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals, 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) or 18F-choline, in cryosections using Digital AutoRadiography (DAR) and also compared with immunohistochemical staining of PSA and histopathology. On DAR, the areas with high 125I-PSA30 uptake corresponded mainly to morphologically intact and PSA-producing LNCaP cells, but did not associate with the areas of high uptake of either 18F-FDG or 18F-choline. Biodistribution of 125I-PSA30 measured in dissected organs ex vivo during 4 to 312 hours after intravenous injection demonstrated maximum selective tumor uptake 24–48 hours after antibody injection. Our data showed selective uptake in vivo of a monoclonal antibody highly specific for fPSA in LNCaP cells. Hence, in vivo imaging of fPSA may be feasible with putative usefulness in disseminated PCa.

  • 6.
    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    (125)I-Labeled Quercetin as a Novel DNA-Targeted Radiotracer2011In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 469-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quercetin is a major flavonoid that is found in most plants; it can intercalate with DNA. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiolabeling of qurecetin with (125)I, DNA binding and cellular process. In this work, quercetin was labeled with Auger emitting nuclide (125)I using chloramine-T. DNA binding of (125)I-quercetin ((125)I-Q) was investigated using cell-free in vitro assay with naked human genomic DNA in agarose plugs. Cellular uptake and nuclei accumulation were evaluated in human prostate cancer cell lines (DU 145). The internalization of (125)I-Q was evaluated with fluorescence microscopy. Cellular damage was monitored by using apoptosis assay. Quercetin was successfully labeled with (125)I, and it was taken up rapidly with cells and accumulated in the cellular nuclei. (125)I-Q-DNA binding was tight with long retention time, and it potentially induced DNA damage. These findings provide for using of (125)I-labeled quercetin as a carrier of Auger electron emitting radionuclide to the cell nuclei for targeted radiotherapy.

  • 7.
    Liljegren Sundberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    [111In]-DTPA-hEGF and [111In]-Bz-DTPA-hEGF: preparation and in vitro studies of two anti- glioblastoma conjugates with residualising labels2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 354-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8. Norrgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Sjölin, Maria
    Björkman, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Division of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Therapy.
    Areberg, Johan
    Johnsson, Anders
    Johansson, L
    Mattsson, Sören
    Comparative renal, hepatic, and bone marrow toxicity of Cisplatin and radioactive Cisplatin (191Pt) in Wistar rats2006In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 528-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the possibility to increase the therapeutic gain of the cytotoxic agent, cisplatin, by incorporation of radioactive platinum. In this study, we investigated how organs at risk (i.e., kidneys, bone marrow, and liver) are affected by treatment with 191Pt-cisplatin, compared to treatment with conventional cisplatin. Rats (total, n = 69) were divided into three groups and given 5 mg/kg 191Pt-cisplatin and 5 mg/kg nonradioactive cisplatin or saline. The weight of the animals and blood samples, including analysis of creatinine, bilirubin, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases and platelet count, was followed for 6 weeks after treatment. Histopathology examinations of kidney and liver tissues were performed. An initial decrease in weight gain was seen from 3 days after treatment with cisplatin and 191Pt-cisplatin and for 1 week onward; thereafter, the weight gain continued, following the same pattern as for the control group. Concentration of plasma creatinine was increased for both cisplatin groups but with no significant difference between treatment groups. No other significant differences in effect parameters were found. There was no increase in toxicity for radioactive cisplatin on liver, kidneys, and bone marrow, compared to conventional cisplatin. Further experimental and clinical studies on preparations of this type are thus warranted.

  • 9.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Feldwisch, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Abrahmsén, Lars
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Update: Affibody molecules for molecular imaging and therapy for cancer2007In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 573-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules are scaffold proteins, having a common frame of amino acids determining the overall fold or tertiary structure, but with each member characterized by a unique amino acid composition in an exposed binding surface determining binding specificity and affinity for a certain target. Affibody molecules represent a new class of affinity proteins based on a 58-amino acid residue protein domain, derived from one of the IgG binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. They combine small size ( approximately 6.5 kDa) with high affinity and specificity. Affibody molecules with nanomolar affinities were selected from an initial library (3 x 10(9) members) and, after affinity maturation, picomolar binders were obtained. The small size and simple structure of affibody molecules allow their production by chemical synthesis with homogeneous site-specific incorporation of moieties for further labeling using a wide range of labeling chemistries. The robustness and the refolding properties of affibody molecules make them amenable to labeling conditions that denature most proteins, including incubation at pH 11 at 60 degrees C for up to 60 minutes. Affibody molecules meet the requirements which are key for successful clinical use as imaging agents: high-affinity binding to the chosen target; short plasma half-life time; rapid renal clearance for nonbound drug substance and, high, continuously increasing tumor-to-organ ratios, resulting in high-contrast in vivo images shortly after injection of the diagnostic agent.

  • 10.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Höglund, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lebeda, Ondrej
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Comparative biodistribution of the radiohalogenated (Br, I and At) antibody A33: Implications for in vivo dosimetry2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 385-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alpha-emitter astatine-211 (T(1/2) = 7.2 h) has great potential for use in targeted radionuclide therapy. Its potent alpha-radiation makes (211)At unsuitable for dose planning. Its x-rays can be used for gamma-camera monitoring of the radioactivity distribution during therapy but not for accurate estimation of absorbed dose in critical organs. This study was intended to establish whether the absorbed dose delivered by astatinated antibody could be accurately determined by analogue labeling with radiohalogens, better suited for quantitative measurements in vivo. PET facilitates quantitative pharmacokinetics; possible halogen labels are, e.g., (76)Br (T(1/2) = 16.2 h) and (124)I (T(1/2) = 4.18 d). Antibody A33 was labeled with (76)Br, (125)I and (211)At using N-succinimidyl-p-halobenzoates. The conjugates were co-injected into Sprague-Dawley rats. Radioactivity concentrations in different organs and tissues were measured at three time points. Pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate absorbed doses. (125)I and (76)Br reflected the biokinetics of astatine reasonably well. The absorbed doses in bladder, kidney, pancreas, liver, bone and brain were determined with 10% accuracy. The absorbed doses in stomach, spleen and thyroid were underestimated by a factor 2-3. Positron-emitting analogues can be used to predict the astatine-derived dose in critical organs. Correction factors should be used for stomach, spleen and thyroid.

  • 11.
    Persson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Cellular processing of iodinated and astatinated trastuzumab in cultured SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, p. 353-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Persson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sivaev, Igor
    Winberg, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    In vitro evaluation of two polyhedral boron anion derivatives as linkers for attachment of radioiodine to the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab2007In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 585-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving intracellular retention is important for the use of radiohalogens in radionuclide therapy usinginternalizing antibodies. Two putative linkers for residualization of radioiodine labels, 7-(4-isothiocyanato-phenyl)undecahydro-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1Ϫ) ion (NBI) and (4-isothiocyanato-benzylammo-nio)undecahydro-closo-dodecaborate(1Ϫ) (DABI), were analyzed. The anti-HER-2 antibody, trastuzumab,was labeled with iodine-125 using NBI and DABI linkers, and, for comparison, with the para-[125I]iodoben-zoate (PIB), and Chloramine-T (CAT) methods. The different labels were tested for residualizing prop-erties using the HER-2 overexpressing SKBR-3 cells. The cellular radioactivity retention showed thatDABI provided a 55% better retention than CAT and was 42% better than PIB after 20 hours. NBI didnot improve retention. Accumulation tests up to 21 hours showed that the HER-2-specific accumulationof radioactivity delivered with DABI was, on average, 33% higher than with the use of PIB. These DABI-dependent improvements could, with high probability, be attributed to the good residualizing propertiesof DABI. The affinity of DABI-labeled trastuzumab to SKBR-3 cells was not better than the affinity of thePIB labeled (3.2 Ϯ 1.9 nM and 0.77 Ϯ 0.39 nM, respectively). In conclusion, the use of the DABI linkerimproved intracellular retention in vitro in comparison with the other labeling methods.

  • 13.
    Sandström, Karl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Haylock, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Kareem, Heewa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Improved Tumor-to-Organ Ratios of a Novel 67Ga-Human Epidermal Growth Factor Radionuclide Conjugate with Preadministered Antiepidermal Growth Factor Receptor Affibody Molecules2011In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 593-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The over-expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is associated with poor prognosis. Targeted nuclear imaging of the EGFR expression could improve the diagnostics in patients with HNSCC. However, the high expression of EGFR in normal organs may conceal the tumor uptake and therefore limit the use.

    In this study, we have assessed the biodistribution of a novel hEGF radionuclide conjugate after pre-injection with anti-EGFR Affibody molecules. hEGF was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and labeled with 67Ga. The biodistribution of [67Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF in nude mice with EGFR-expressing xenografts was evaluated either alone or 45 minutes after pre-injection with one of the anti-EGFR Affibody molecules ZEGFR:1907, (ZEGFR:1907)2 or (ZEGFR:955)2.

    The novel radioimmunoconjugate, [67Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF demonstrated high stability in vitro and specific binding to hEGF in vitro and in vivo. Pre-injection with anti-EGFR Affibody molecules improved the tumor-to-organ ratio in the liver, salivary glands and colon. Overall, the dimeric high affinity Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 exhibited the best results.

    These findings show that pre-blocking with an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule is a promising tool that could improve the outcome of radionuclide-based imaging of EGFR-expressing tumors.

  • 14.
    Steffen, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wikman, Maria
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Adams, Gregory P.
    Nilsson, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    In vitro characterization of a bivalent anti-HER-2 affibody with potential for radionuclide-based diagnostics2005In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 185 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) (p185/neu, c-ErbB-2) is overexpressed in breast and ovarian cancers. Overexpression in breast cancer correlates with poor patient prognosis, and visualization of HER-2 expression might provide valuable diagnostic information influencing patient management. We have previously described the generation of a new type of affinity ligand, a 58-amino-acid affibody (Z(HER2:4)) with specific binding to HER-2. In order to benefit from avidity effects, we have created a bivalent form of the affibody ligand, (Z(HER2:4))2. The monovalent and bivalent ligands were compared in various assays. The new bivalent affibody has a molecular weight of 15.6 kDa and an apparent affinity (K(D)) against HER-2 of 3 nM. After radioiodination, using the linker molecule N-succinimidyl p-(trimethylstannyl) benzoate (SPMB), in vitro binding assays showed specific binding to HER-2 overexpressing cells. Internalization of 125I was shown after delivery with both the monovalent and the bivalent affibody. The cellular retention of 125I was longer after delivery with the bivalent affibody when compared to delivery with the monovalent affibody. With approximately the same affinity as the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) but only one tenth of the size, this new bivalent molecule is a promising candidate for radionuclide-based detection of HER-2 expression in tumors. 125I was used in this study as a surrogate marker for the diagnostically relevant radioisotopes 123I for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/gamma-camera imaging and 124I for positron emission tomography (PET).

  • 15.
    Sundberg, Åsa Liljegren
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy.
    [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF: Preclinical characterization of a potential radionuclide targeting agent against glioma2004In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 195-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme have a poor prognosis due to recurrences originating from spread cells. The use of radionuclide targeting might increase the chance of inactivating single tumor cells with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. As a target, overexpressed epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) may be used. A natural ligand to EGFR, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an attractive targeting agent due to its low molecular weight (6 kDa) and high affinity for EGFR. 177Lu (T(1/2) = 6.7 days) is a radionuclide well suited for treatment of small tumor cell clusters, since it emits relatively low-energy beta particles. The goal of this study was to prepare and preclinically evaluate both in vitro and in vivo the [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF conjugate. The conjugate was characterized in vitro for its cell-binding properties, and in vivo for its pharmacokinetics and ability to target EGFR. [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF bound to cultured U343 glioblastoma cells with an affinity of 1.9 nM. Interaction with EGFR led to rapid internalization, and more than 70% of the cell-associated radioactivity was internalized after 30 minutes of incubation. The retention of radioactivity was good, with more than 65% of the 177Lu still cell-associated after 2 days. Biodistribution studies of i.v. injected [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF in NMRI mice demonstrated a rapid blood clearance. Most of the radioactivity was found in the liver and kidneys. The liver uptake was receptor-mediated, since it could be significantly reduced by preinjection of unlabeled EGF. In conclusion, [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF seems to be a promising candidate for locoregional treatment of glioblastoma due to its high binding affinity, low molecular weight, and ability to target EGFR in vivo.

  • 16.
    Sundberg, Åsa Liljegren
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Orlova, Anna
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Gedda, Lars
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Blomquist, Erik
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    [111In]Bz-DTPA-hEGF: Preparation and in vitro characterization of a potential anti-glioblastoma targeting agent2003In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 643-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR, in glioblastomas is well documented. Hence, the EGFR can be used as target structure for a specific targeting of glioblastomas. Both radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibodies and the natural ligand EGF are candidate agents for targeting. However, EGF, which has a rather low molecular weight (6 kDa), might have better tissue penetration properties through both normal tissue and tumors in comparison with anti-EGF antibodies and their fragments. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate in vitro an EGF-based antiglioma conjugate with residualizing label. Human recombinant EGF (hEGF) was coupled to isothiocyanate-benzyl-DTPA. The conjugate was purified from unreacted chelator using solid-phase extraction and labeled with (111)In. The labeling yield was 87% +/- 7%. The label was reasonably stable; the transchelation of (111)In to serum proteins was about 5% after incubation at 37 degrees C during 24 hours. The obtained [(111)In]benzyl-DTPA-hEGF conjugate was characterized in vitro using the EGFR expressing glioma cell line U343MGaCl2:6. The binding affinity, internalization, and retention of the conjugate were studied. The conjugate had receptor specific binding and the radioactivity was quickly internalized. The intracellular retention of radioactivity after interrupted incubation with conjugate was 71% +/- 1% and 59% +/- 1.5% at 24 and 45 hours, respectively. The dissociation constant was estimated to 2.0 nM. The results indicate that [(111)In]benzyl-DTPA-hEGF is a potential candidate for targeting glioblastoma cells, possibly using locoregional injection.

  • 17. Swärd, Christina
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Peter
    Johanson, Viktor
    Schmitt, Anneli
    Ahlman, Hakan
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Forssell-Aronsson, Eva
    Nilsson, Ola
    Kolby, Lars
    Comparison of [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-Octreotate and [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-Octreotide for Receptor-Mediated Radiation Therapy of the Xenografted Human Midgut Carcinoid Tumor GOT12008In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the tumor uptake versus time and the tumor response in nude mice transplanted with a human midgut carcinoid (GOT1), when treated with either [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotide or [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate and to evaluate if plasma chromogranin A (P-CgA) was a reliable marker of tumor response. The tumor uptake and retention of activity of a single intravenous (i.v.) dose (15 MBq) of [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate or [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotide were compared in nude mice xenografted with GOT1. The activity concentration 24 hours after injection was significantly higher in animals given [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate versus [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotide (16% ± 1.4% of injected activity per gram [%IA/g] vs. 8.1% ± 2.1% IA/g, mean ± standard error of the mean) (p = 0.00061). The mean absorbed dose was higher in animals given [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate (46 ± 4.3 vs. 17 ± 3.4 Gy). The reduction of tumor volume was accordingly more prominent in animals given [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate than in animals given [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotide (p = 0.003). The mean tumor volume for animals given [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]-octreotate was reduced to 3% of its initial value. P-CgA values were strongly correlated with tumor volume. Octreotate seems to be a more suitable somatostatin analog than octreotide for receptor-mediated radiation therapy. P-CgA is a simple, accurate method for the estimation of tumor response in this animal model.

  • 18.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Winberg, K. J.
    Sivaev, Igor
    Persson, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The use of derivatives of polyhedral boron anions (PHA), closo-dodecaborate and nido-carborate, for radiobromination of anti-HER-2 antibody Herceptin for immunoPET2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, p. 353-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wei, Qichun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Comparative biodistribution of potential anti-glioblastoma conjugates [111In]DTPA-hEGF and [111In]Bz-DTPA-hEGF in normal mice2004In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 491-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EGF-receptors (EGFR) are overexpressed in gliomas, as well as in tumors of breast, lung, and urinary bladder. For this reason, EGFR may be an attractive target for both visualization and therapy of malignant tumors using radioactive nuclides. Natural ligand of EGFR, epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a small 53-amino-acid protein. Low molecular weight of EGF may enable better intratumoral penetration in comparison to antibodies. [111In]DTPA-EGF was proposed for the targeting of glioblastoma and breast cancer, and its tumor-seeking properties were confirmed in animal studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the substitution of heptadentate DTPA for octadentate benzyl-DTPA (Bz-DTPA) effects the biodistribution of indium-labeled human EGF (hEGF) in normal NMRI mice. [111In]DTPA-hEGF and [111In]Bz-DTPA-hEGF, obtained by the coupling of ITC-benzyl-DTPA to hEGF, were injected into the tail vein. At 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 hours postinjection, the animals were sacrificed, and radioactivity in different organs was measured. The blood clearance of both conjugates was fast. The uptake of both conjugates in the liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, intestines, and submaxillary gland was most likely receptor-mediated. The uptake in a majority of organs was similar. However, indium uptake in the case of [111In]DTPA-hEGF was significantly higher in the kidneys and bones. In conclusion, [111In]Bz-DTPA-hEGF seems to have more favourable in vivo distribution in comparison to [111In]DTPA-hEGF.

  • 20. Wållberg, Helena
    et al.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Slow internalization of anti-HER2 synthetic affibody monomer 111In-DOTA-ZHER2:342-pep2: implications for development of labeled tracers2008In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 435-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules are a novel class of targeting proteins, demonstrating promising results in the molecular imaging of tumor markers. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processing of Affibody molecules bound to human epidermal growth-factor-receptor type 2 (HER2). Cellular processing of the synthetic Affibody molecule, DOTA-Z(HER2:342-pep2) (K(D) = 65 (p)M) labeled with indium-111, was studied both during continuous and interrupted incubation with HER2-expressing cell lines (SKOV-3, SKBR-3, and BT474). The internalized and membrane bound fractions of Affibody molecule were discriminated by treatment with 4 M of urea solution in 0.2 M of glycine buffer (pH 2.0). Incubation media collected after an interrupted incubation was analyzed for the presence of radiocatabolites. Continuous incubation of tumor cells with (111)In-DOTA-Z(HER2:342-pep2) led to the saturation of HER2 and slow internalization. Sixty (60)- to 80% of the radioactivity remained cell associated 24 hours after interrupted incubation. The rate of Affibody molecule internalization was the same after interrupted incubation, as in the continuous incubation experiments. Internalization of (111) In-DOTA-Z(HER2:342-pep2) was relatively slow. A high level of cellular retention of the tracer was provided by strong binding to cell-surface receptors. These data suggest that good tumor targeting with anti-HER Affibody molecules may be obtained by using short-lived, nonresidualizing labels.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf