uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Asa, S L
    et al.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Chanson, P
    Delgrange, E
    Earls, P
    Ezzat, S
    Grossman, A
    Ikeda, H
    Inoshita, N
    Karavitaki, N
    Korbonits, M
    Laws, E R
    Lopes, M B
    Maartens, N
    McCutcheon, I E
    Mete, O
    Nishioka, H
    Raverot, G
    Roncaroli, F
    Saeger, W
    Syro, L V
    Vasiljevic, A
    Villa, C
    Wierinckx, A
    Trouillas, J
    From pituitary adenoma to pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (PitNET): an International Pituitary Pathology Club proposal2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 4, p. C5-C8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classification of neoplasms of adenohypophysial cells is misleading because of the simplistic distinction between adenoma and carcinoma, based solely on metastatic spread and the poor reproducibility and predictive value of the definition of atypical adenomas based on the detection of mitoses or expression of Ki-67 or p53. In addition, the current classification of neoplasms of the anterior pituitary does not accurately reflect the clinical spectrum of behavior. Invasion and regrowth of proliferative lesions and persistence of hormone hypersecretion cause significant morbidity and mortality. We propose a new terminology, pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (PitNET), which is consistent with that used for other neuroendocrine neoplasms and which recognizes the highly variable impact of these tumors on patients.

  • 2.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Kolling Inst Med Res, Canc Diag & Pathol Res Grp, St Leonards, NSW, Australia..
    Sidhu, Stan
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Norlen, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Endocrine Unit, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Dina, Roberto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Histopathol, London, England..
    Palazzo, F. Fausto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Endocrine Surg, London, England..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A role for TET2 in parathyroid carcinoma2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is rarely caused by parathyroid carcinoma (PC, <1-5% of pHPT cases). The TET proteins oxidize the epigenetic mark 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and inactivation by mutation or epigenetic deregulation of TET1 and TET2 play important roles in various cancers. Recently, we found that 5hmC was severely reduced in all of the analyzed PCs and with deranged expression of TET1 for the majority of PCs. Here, we have examined the expression of the TET2 protein in 15 5hmC-negative PCs from patients who had local invasion or metastases. Cell growth and cell migratory roles for TET2 as well as epigenetic deregulated expression were addressed. Immunohistochemistry revealed very low/undetectable expression of TET2 in all PCs and verified for two PCs that were available for western blotting analysis. Knockdown of TET2 in the parathyroid cell line sHPT-1 resulted in increased cell growth and increased cell migration. DNA sequencing of TET2 in PCs revealed two common variants and no obvious inactivating mutations. Quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing analysis of the TET2 promoter CpG island revealed higher CpG methylation level in the PCs compared to that in normal tissues and treatment of a PC primary cell culture with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine caused increased expression of the methylated TET2 gene. Hence, the data suggest that deregulated expression of TET2 by DNA hypermethylation may contribute to the aberrantly low level of 5hmC in PCs and further that TET2 plays a cell growth and cell migratory regulatory role and may constitute a parathyroid tumor suppressor gene.

  • 3.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ex vivo activity of cytotoxic drugs and targeted agents in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors2018In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 471-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are generally considered resistant to systemic treatment. To date, predictive markers for drug activity are lacking. Tumor samples from 27 patients with SI-NETs were analyzed ex vivo for sensitivity to a panel of cytotoxic drugs and targeted agents using a short-term total cell kill assay. Samples of renal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC), ovarian cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were included for comparison. For the SI-NET subset, drug sensitivity was analyzed in relation to clinicopathological variables and pre-treatment biomarkers. For cytotoxic drugs, SI-NETs demonstrated similar or higher sensitivity to 5-FU, platinum, gemcitabine and doxorubicin compared with CRC. For several of the targeted kinase inhibitors, SI-NET was among the most sensitive solid tumor types. CLL and ovarian cancer were generally the most sensitive tumor types to both cytotoxic drugs and protein kinase inhibitors. SI-NET was more sensitive to the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus than the other solid tumor types tested. Individual SI-NET samples demonstrated great variability in ex vivo sensitivity for most drugs. Cross-resistance between different drugs also varied considerably, being higher among protein kinase inhibitors. Age, stage, grade, peritoneal carcinomatosis and extra-abdominal metastases as well as serum chromogranin A and urine 5-HIAA concentrations at diagnosis did not correlate to drug sensitivity ex vivo. SI-NETs exhibit intermediate sensitivity ex vivo to cytotoxic and targeted drugs. Clinicopathological factors and currently used biomarkers are not clearly associated to ex vivo sensitivity, challenging these criteria for treatment decisions in SI-NET. The great variability in drug sensitivity calls for individualized selection of therapy.

  • 4.
    Delgado Verdugo, Alberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Starker, Lee F
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Global DNA methylation patterns in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs)2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 1, p. L5-L7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are rare hormone producing tumors and are often diagnosed at advanced stage. The genetic and epigenetic background of SI-NETs are poorly understood, but several reports have indicated chromosomal losses at 18.21-qter and 11q22-q23. The aim of this study was to characterize CpG DNA methylation status of primary SI-NETs and the corresponding lymph node metastases. We used the commercially available HumanMethylation27 Beadchip array (Illumina), which covers 27578 CpG sites spanning over 14495 genes, and analyzed a discovery cohort of 10 primary SI-NETs with matched metastases. Messenger- mRNA, were determined for selected genes in a 47 tumors. In comparison to the primary tumors, the metastases showed 2697 statistically significant differentially genes. Metastases were generally less methylated than primary tumors. The relative mRNA expression level of the differentially methylated genes AXL, CRMP1, FGF5, and APOBEC3C largely reflected the methylation status. MAPK4, RUNX3, TP73, CCND1, CHFR, AHRR, and Rb1 known to be hypermethylated in other cancer types, displayed overall high methylation level (β-value ≥ 0.9). Methylation (β -value >0,7) at 18q21-qter and 11q22-q23 were detected in genes SETBP1, ELAC1, MBD1, MAPK4, TCEB3C and ARVC1, MMP8, BTG4, APOA1, FAM89B, HSPB1, respectively. Furthermore unsupervised clustering of the tumors identified three distinct clusters, one with a highly malignant behavior. Our data supports involvement of CpG DNA methylation in metastatic progression of SI-NETs and this could present a possibility to identify more aggressive tumors based on DNA methylation.

  • 5.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Rasi, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ali, Abir S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Grönberg, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Grønbæk, Henning
    Cunningham, Janet L
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    A MUTYH germline mutation is associated with small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 427-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetics behind predisposition to small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is largely unknown, but there is growing awareness of a familial form of the disease. We aimed to identify germline mutations involved in the carcinogenesis of SI-NETs. The strategy included next-generation sequencing of exome- and/or whole-genome of blood DNA, and in selected cases, tumor DNA, from 24 patients from 15 families with the history of SI-NETs. We identified seven candidate mutations in six genes that were further studied using 215 sporadic SI-NET patients. The result was compared with the frequency of the candidate mutations in three control cohorts with a total of 35,688 subjects. A heterozygous variant causing an amino acid substitution p.(Gly396Asp) in the MutY DNA glycosylase gene (MUTYH) was significantly enriched in SI-NET patients (minor allele frequencies 0.013 and 0.003 for patients and controls respectively) and resulted in odds ratio of 5.09 (95% confidence interval 1.56-14.74; P value = 0.0038). We also found a statistically significant difference in age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic SI-NETs. MUTYH is involved in the protection of DNA from mutations caused by oxidative stress. The inactivation of this gene leads to specific increase of G:C- > T:A transversions in DNA sequence and has been shown to cause various cancers in humans and experimental animals. Our results suggest that p.(Gly396Asp) in MUTYH, and potentially other mutations in additional members of the same DNA excision-repair pathway (such as the OGG1 gene) might be involved in driving the tumorigenesis leading to familial and sporadic SI-NETs.

  • 6.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ahmad, Tanveer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Janson, Eva T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    TCEB3C a putative tumor suppressor gene of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 275-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs), formerly midgut carcinoids, are rare and slow-growing neoplasms. Frequent loss of one copy of chromosome 18 in primary tumors and metastases has been observed. The aim of the study was to investigate a possible role of TCEB3C (Elongin A3), currently the only imprinted gene on chromosome 18, as a tumor suppressor gene in SI-NETs, and whether its expression is epigenetically regulated. Primary tumors, metastases, the human SI-NET cell line CNDT2.5, and two other cell lines were included. Immunohistochemistry, gene copy number determination by PCR, colony formation assay, Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, RNA interference, and quantitative CpG methylation analysis by pyrosequencing were performed. The large majority of tumors (33/43) showed very low to undetectable Elongin A3 expression and as expected 89% (40/45) displayed one TCEB3C gene copy. The DNA hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine induced TCEB3C expression in CNDT2.5 cells, in primary SI-NET cells prepared directly after surgery, but not in two other cell lines. Also siRNA to DNMT1 and treatment with the general histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A induced TCEB3C expression in a cell type-specific way. CpG methylation at the TCEB3C promoter was observed in all analyzed tissues and thus not related to expression. Overexpression of TCEB3C resulted in a 50% decrease of clonogenic survival of CNDT2.5 cells, but not of control cells. The results support a putative role of TCEB3C as a tumor suppressor gene in SI-NETs. Epigenetic repression of TCEB3C seems to be tumor cell type-specific and involves both DNA and histone methylation.

  • 7.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Different gene expression profiles in metastasizing midgut carcinoid tumors2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 479-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic events leading the progression of midgut carcinoid tumors are largely unknown. The disease course varies from patient to patient, and there is a lack of reliable prognostic markers. In order to identify genes involved in tumor progression, gene expression profiling was performed on tumor specimens. Samples comprised 18 primary tumors, 17 lymph node (LN) metastases, and seven liver metastases from a total of 19 patients. Patients were grouped according to clinical data and histopathology into indolent or progressive course. RNA was subjected to a spotted oligo microarray and B-statistics were performed. Differentially expressed genes were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. Self-organizing maps demonstrated three clusters: 11 primary tumors separated in one cluster, five LN metastases in another cluster, whereas all seven liver metastases, seven primary, and 12 LN metastases formed a third cluster. There was no correlation between indolent and progressive behavior. The primary tumors with Ki67>5%, with low frequency of the carcinoid syndrome, and a tendency toward shorter survival grouped together. Primary tumors differed in expression profile from their associated LN metastases; thus, there is evidence for genetic changes from primary tumors to metastases. ACTG2, GREM2, REG3A, TUSC2, RUNX1, TPH1, TGFBR2, and CDH6 were differentially expressed between clusters and subgroups of tumors. The expression profile that assembles tumors as being genetically similar on the RNA expression level may not be concordant with the clinical disease course. This study reveals differences in gene expression profiles and novel genes that may be of importance in midgut carcinoid tumor progression.

  • 8. Ekeblad, Sara
    et al.
    Nilsson, Bengt
    Lejonklou, Margareta Halin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Johansson, Térèse
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Ahlman, Håkan
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors express the orexigen ghrelin2006In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 963-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expression of the neuroendocrine marker synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) has been reported in a few cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The goal of the present study was to assess the relevance of this finding and identify a possible hormone production in these tumors. We chose to study the orexigen ghrelin and its receptor, since these patients are seldom cachexic, even in advanced disease stages. We investigated ghrelin expression by means of immunohistochemistry on frozen or paraffin-embedded sections from 22 GISTs from a well-characterized patient material. Expression of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, the ghrelin receptor, was investigated in a subset of lesions. In six tumors, mRNA levels of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor, and SV2 were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Totally 17 out of 22 tumors showed immunoreactivity for ghrelin. Five out of ten tumors were immunoreactive for the ghrelin receptor, and all of these co-expressed ghrelin. All tumors expressed ghrelin, ghrelin receptor, and SV2 mRNA. GISTs frequently express SV2, ghrelin, and its receptor, indicating the presence of autocrine/paracrine loops.

  • 9. Frilling, A.
    et al.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Falconi, M.
    Pavel, M.
    Ramos, J.
    Kidd, M.
    Modlin, I. M.
    Neuroendocrine tumor disease: An evolving landscape2012In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 19, no 5, p. R163-R185Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) represent a heterogenous group of tumors arising from a variety of neuroendocrine cell types. The incidence and prevalence of GEP-NENs have markedly increased over the last three decades. Symptoms are often absent in early disease, or vague and nonspecific even in advanced disease. Delayed diagnosis is thus common. Chromogranin A is the most commonly used biomarker but has limitations as does the proliferative marker Ki-67%, which is often used for tumor grading and determination of therapy. The development of amultidimensional prognostic nomogrammay be valuable in predicting tumor behavior and guiding therapy but requires validation. Identification of NENs that express somatostatin receptors (SSTR) allows for SSTR scintigraphy and positron emission tomography imaging using novel radiolabeled compounds. Complete surgical resection of limited disease or endoscopic ablation of small lesions localized in stomach or rectum can provide cure; however, the majority of GEP-NENs are metastatic (most frequently the liver and/or mesenteric lymph nodes) at diagnosis. Selected patients with metastatic diseasemay benefit from advanced surgical techniques including hepatic resection or liver transplantation. Somatostatin analogs are effective for symptomatic treatment and exhibit some degree of antiproliferative activity in small intestinal NENs. There is a place for streptozotocin, temozolomide, and capecitabine in the management of pancreatic NENs, while new agents targeting either mTOR (everolimus) or angiogenic (sunitinib) pathways have shown efficacy in these lesions.

  • 10. Johanson, Viktor
    et al.
    Ahlman, Håkan
    Bernhardt, Peter
    Jansson, Svante
    Kölby, Lars
    Persson, Fredrik
    Stenman, Göran
    Swärd, Christina
    Wängberg, Bo
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Ola
    A transplantable human medullary thyroid carcinoma as a model for RET tyrosine kinase-driven tumorigenesis2007In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 433-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is caused by germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, resulting in constitutive activation of the RET tyrosine kinase. A substantial proportion of sporadic MTCs also have RET mutations, making the RET tyrosine kinase a potential therapeutic target in MTC. We have established a transplantable MTC in nude mice from a sporadic human MTC carrying a RET C634R mutation. Transplanted tumors had an exponential growth rate with an approximate doubling time of about 3 weeks, and expressed a neuroendocrine phenotype characteristic of MTC, e.g., expression of calcitonin, chromogranin A (CgA), synaptophysin, synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), vesicular monoamine transporter-1 and -2, carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 8/18, epithelial cadherin, and neural cell adhesion molecule. Plasma calcitonin and CgA levels were elevated in tumor-bearing mice and correlated with tumor size. Cytogenetic analysis, including spectral karyotyping, confirmed the human origin of the xenografted tumors and demonstrated an abnormal, near triploid karyotype. Treatment of tumor-bearing nude mice with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD6474, which specifically inhibits RET, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinases, resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth. Oral ZD6474 given once daily (250 mg/kg, 5 days/week) reduced tumor volume to 11% when compared with controls after 4 weeks. Our results show that this transplantable MTC, designated GOT2, represents a novel and useful model for studies of MTC and RET tyrosine kinase-dependent tumor growth.

  • 11. Jonkers, Y. M. H.
    et al.
    Claessen, S. M. H.
    Perren, A.
    Schmitt, A. M.
    Hofland, L. J.
    de Herder, W.
    de Krijger, R. R.
    Verhofstad, A. A. J.
    Hermus, A .R.
    Kummer, J .A.
    Skogseid, Britt M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Volante, M.
    Voogd, A. C.
    Ramaekers, F. C. S.
    Speel, E. J. M.
    DNA copy number status is a powerful predictor of poor survival in endocrine pancreatic tumor patients2007In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 769-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical behavior of endocrine pancreatic tumors (EPTs) is difficult to predict in the absence of metastases or invasion to adjacent organs. Several markers have been indicated as potential predictors of metastatic disease, such as tumor size 2 cm, Ki67 proliferative index 2%, cytokeratin (CK) 19 status, and recently in insulinomas, chromosomal instability (CIN). The goal of this study was to evaluate the value of these markers, and in particular of the CIN, to predict tumor recurrence or progression and tumor-specific death, using a series of 47 insulinomas and 24 non-insulinoma EPTs. From these EPT cases, a genomic profile has been generated and follow-up data have been obtained. The proliferative index has been determined in 68 tumors and a CK19 expression pattern in 50 tumors. Results are statistically analyzed using Kaplan–Meier plots and the log-rank statistic. General CIN, as well as specific chromosomal alterations such as 3p and 6q loss and 12q gain, turned out to be the most powerful indicators for poor tumor-free survival (P0.0004) and tumor-specific death (P0.0113) in insulinomas. The CIN, chromosome 7q gain, and a proliferative index 2% were reliable in predicting a poor tumor-free survival in non-insulinoma EPTs (P0.0181, whereas CK19 expression was the most optimal predictor of tumor-specific death in these tumors. In conclusion, DNA copy number status is the most sensitive and efficient marker of adverse clinical outcome in insulinomas and of potential interest in non-insulinoma EPTs. As a consequence, this marker should be considered as a prognosticator to improve clinical diagnosis, most practically as a simple multi-target test.

     

  • 12.
    Kaltsas, Gregory
    et al.
    Department of Pathophysiology, National University of Athens, Athens 11527, Greece..
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Falkmer, Sture
    Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology, the Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Expression of connective tissue growth factor and IGF1 in normal and neoplastic gastrointestinal neuroendocrine cells and their clinico-pathological significance2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and IGF1 are both expressed in a variety of tumours and are involved in tumourigenesis. However, information about their expression in the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine (NE) cells and tumours is mainly limited, with the exception of midgut carcinoids where abundant CTGF expression has been demonstrated. Normal mucosa specimens from stomach and ileum, as well as tumour tissue specimens from gastric NE tumours (GNETs; n=58) and midgut NETs (n=38) were included. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate the possible expression of CTGF and IGF1 in GI NE cells and tumours. The latter results were correlated with various clinico-biochemical and histopathological variables. CTGF was expressed in a proportion of NE cells of the normal GI mucosa but not in enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, whereas IGF1 was undetectable. CTGF was absent in the foci of ECL cell hyperplasia, and in most of the poorly differentiated carcinomas, but present in some GNETs (mainly in type III ECL cell carcinoids (ECL-CCs)) and in all but one midgut NETs. CTGF correlated with tumour stage in well-differentiated GNETs and with size larger than 1  cm but only in the subgroup of type I ECL-CCs. IGF1 was detected in the foci of ECL cell hyperplasia and in all GI NETs. These findings suggest that both CTGF and IGF1 may be involved in the neoplastic transformation of GI NE cells, whereas IGF1 may play an important role even at early stage.

  • 13. Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y.
    et al.
    Jackson, Nicole E.
    Conaglen, John V.
    Whittle, Denis E.
    Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy
    Chen, Herbert
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Sandgren, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Khanafshar, Elham
    Shibru, Daniel
    Duh, Quan-Yang
    Clark, Orlo H.
    Kebebew, Electron
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Clifton-Bligh, Rory
    Robinson, Bruce G.
    Benn, Diana E.
    Sidhu, Stan B.
    MicroRNA profiling of benign and malignant pheochromocytomas identifies novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets2010In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 835-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (similar to 22 bp) that post-transcriptionally regulate protein expression and are found to be differentially expressed in a number of human cancers. There is increasing evidence to suggest that miRNAs could be useful in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. We performed miRNA microarray expression profiling on a cohort of 12 benign and 12 malignant pheochromocytomas and identified a number of differentially expressed miRNAs. These results were validated in a separate cohort of ten benign and ten malignant samples using real-time quantitative RT-PCR; benign samples had a minimum follow-up of at least 2 years. It was found that IGF2 as well as its intronic miR-483-5p was over-expressed, while miR-15a and miR-16 were under-expressed in malignant tumours compared with benign tumours. These miRNAs were found to be diagnostic and prognostic markers for malignant pheochromocytoma. The functional role of miR-15a and miR-16 was investigated in vitro in the rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line, and these miRNAs were found to regulate cell proliferation via their effect on cyclin D1 and apoptosis. These data indicate that miRNAs play a pivotal role in the biology of malignant pheochromocytoma, and represent an important class of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets warranting further investigation.

  • 14.
    Sandgren, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Diaz de Ståhl, T
    Andersson, R
    Menzel, U
    Piotrowski, A
    Nord, H
    Bäckdahl, M
    Kiss, N
    Braukhoff, M
    Komorowski, J
    Dralle, H
    Hessman, O
    Larsson, C
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Bruder, C
    Dumanski, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Recurrent genomic alterations in benign and malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas revealed by whole-genome array-CGH analysis.2010In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 17, p. 561-579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sandgren, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Diaz de Ståhl, Teresita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Andersson, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Menzel, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz
    Nord, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bäckdahl, Martin
    Kiss, Nimrod B.
    Brauckhoff, Michael
    Komorowski, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Dralle, Henning
    Hessman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Bruder, Carl
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Recurrent genomic alterations in benign and malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas revealed by whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization analysis2010In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 561-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheochromocytomas and abdominal paragangliomas are adrenal and extra-adrenal catecholamine-producing tumours. They arise due to heritable cancer syndromes, or more frequently occur sporadically due to an unknown genetic cause. The majority of cases are benign, but malignant tumours are observed. Previous comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and loss of heterozygosity studies have shown frequent deletions of chromosome arms 1p, 3q and 22q in pheochromocytomas. We applied high-resolution whole-genome array CGH on 53 benign and malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas to narrow down candidate regions as well as to identify chromosomal alterations more specific to malignant tumours. Minimal overlapping regions (MORs) were identified on 16 chromosomes, with the most frequent MORs of deletion (> or = 32%) occurring on chromosome arms 1p, 3q, 11p/q, 17p and 22q, while the chromosome arms 1q, 7p, 12q and 19p harboured the most common MORs of gain (> or = 14%). The most frequent MORs (61-75%) in the pheochromocytomas were identified at 1p, and the four regions of common losses encompassed 1p36, 1p32-31, 1p22-21 and 1p13. Tumours that did not show 1p loss generally demonstrated aberrations on chromosome 11. Gain of chromosomal material was significantly more frequent among the malignant cases. Moreover, gain at 19q, trisomy 12 and loss at 11q were positively associated with malignant pheochromocytomas, while 1q gain was commonly observed in the malignant paragangliomas. Our study revealed novel and narrow recurrent chromosomal regions of loss and gain at several autosomes, a prerequisite for identifying candidate tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes involved in the development of adrenal and extra-adrenal catecholamine-producing tumours.

  • 16.
    Strosberg, Jonathan R.
    et al.
    Univ S Florida, H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Tampa, FL 33682 USA..
    Yao, James C.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Gastrointestinal Med Oncol, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Bajetta, Emilio
    Policlin Monza, Ist Oncol, Monza, Italy..
    Aout, Mounir
    Novartis Int AG, Basel, Switzerland..
    Bakker, Bert
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hainsworth, John D.
    Sarah Cannon Res Inst, Nashville, TN USA..
    Ruszniewski, Philippe B.
    Univ Paris 07, Paris, France.;Hop Beaujon, Paris, France..
    Van Cutsem, Eric
    Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Digest Oncol, Leuven, Belgium.;KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium..
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Pavel, Marianne E.
    Charite, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    Efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable in neuroendocrine tumors: RADIANT-2 placebo arm post hoc analysis2015In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 933-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) have demonstrated antiproliferative activity in addition to efficacy for carcinoid symptom control in functional neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Apost hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the RAD001 In Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors-2 (RADIANT-2) study was conducted to assess the efficacy of octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Out of 213 patients randomized to placebo plus octreotide LAR in RADIANT-2, 196 patients with foregut, midgut, or hindgut NETwere considered for present analysis. Of these, 41 patients were SSA-treatment naive and 155 had received SSA therapy before study entry. For SSA-naive patients, median PFS by adjudicated central review was 13.6 (95% CI 8.2-22.7) months. For SSA-naive patients with midgut NET (nZ24), median PFS was 22.2 (95% CI 8.3-29.5) months. For patients who had received SSA previously, the median PFS was 11.1 (95% CI 8.4-14.3) months. Among the SSA-pretreated patients who had midgut NET (nZ119), the median PFS was 12.0 (95% CI 8.4-19.3) months. Median OS was 35.8 (95% CI 32.5-48.9) months for patients in the placebo plus octreotide LAR arm; 50.6 (36.4 -not reached) months for SSA-naive patients and 33.5 (95% CI 27.5-44.7) months for those who had received prior SSA. This post hoc analysis of the placebo arm of the large phase 3 RADIANT-2 study provides data on PFS and OS among patients with progressive NET treated with octreotide therapy.

  • 17.
    Svedlund, Jessica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    The histone methyltransferase EZH2, an oncogene common to benign and malignant parathyroid tumors2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) resulting from parathyroid tumors is a common endocrine disorder with incompletely understood etiology. In renal failure, secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) occurs with multiple tumor development as a result of calcium and vitamin D regulatory disturbance. The aim of the study was to investigate a potential role of the histone 3 lysine 27 methyltransferase EZH2 in parathyroid tumorigenesis. Parathyroid tumors from patients with pHPT included adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperplastic parathyroid glands from patients with HPT secondary to uremia, and normal parathyroid tissue specimens were included in the study. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting, bisulfite pyrosequencing, colony formation assay, and RNA interference was used. EZH2 was overexpressed in a subset of the benign and in all malignant parathyroid tumors as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. Overexpression was explained by EZH2 gene amplification in a large fraction of tumors. EZH2 depletion by RNA interference inhibited sHPT-1 parathyroid cell line proliferation as determined by tritium-thymidine incorporation and colony formation assay. EZH2 depletion also interfered with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by increased expression of growth-suppressive Axin 2, a negative regulator of β-catenin stability. Indeed, EZH2 contributed to the total level of aberrantly accumulated transcriptionally active (nonphosphylated) β-catenin in the parathyroid tumor cells. To our knowledge EZH2 gene amplification presents the first genetic aberration common to parathyroid adenomas, secondary hyperplastic parathyroid glands, and parathyroid carcinomas. This supports the possibility of a common pathway in parathyroid tumor development.

  • 18. Vilar, Eduardo
    et al.
    Salazar, Ramón
    Pérez-García, Jose
    Cortes, Javier
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tabernero, Josep
    Chemotherapy and role of the proliferation marker Ki-67 in digestive neuroendocrine tumors2007In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 221-232Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the digestive tract are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies. Three major subgroups can be defined: pancreatic endocrine tumors, carcinoid tumors, and poorly differentiated gastroenteropancreatic NETs. Classically, digestive NETS have been considered to have an indolent course characterized for prolonged stabilizations or slow progressions, but there are clear differences in terms of aggressiveness, clinical course, and response to treatment among them. Retrospective studies have identified several clinicopathological and immunohistochemical factors as angioinvasion and proliferative index assessed by Ki-67 expression, which predict biological behavior and correlate with survival. Chemotherapy regimens based on the combination of several active drugs such as streptozocin, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, dacarbazine, and temozolomide show low response rates, which sets the need to improve the results of the medical treatment of these malignancies. This review will analyze the role of Ki-67 in digestive NETs under a clinical perspective and will suggest future fields for development of this approach that enable a better patient selection for chemotherapy. Also a comprehensive review of the literature about chemotherapy in NETs is presented.

  • 19. Walenkamp, Annemiek
    et al.
    Crespo, Guillermo
    Fierro Maya, Felipe
    Fossmark, Reidar
    Igaz, Peter
    Rinke, Anja
    Tamagno, Gianluca
    Vitale, Giovanni
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Meyer, Tim
    Hallmarks of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours: implications for treatment2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 6, p. R445-R460Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years, there have been advances in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and improvements in our understanding of NET biology. However, the benefits to patients have been relatively modest and much remains yet to be done. The 'Hallmarks of Cancer', as defined by Hanahan and Weinberg, provide a conceptual framework for understanding the aberrations that underlie tumourigenesis and to help identify potential targets for therapy. In this study, our objective is to review the major molecular characteristics of NETs, based on the recently modified 'Hallmarks of Cancer', and highlight areas that require further research.

  • 20. Walsh, Kyle M.
    et al.
    Choi, Murim
    Öberg, Kjell E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kulke, Matthew H.
    Yao, James C.
    Wu, Chengqing
    Jurkiewicz, Magdalena
    Hsu, Ling-I
    Hooshmand, Susanne M.
    Hassan, Manal
    Janson, Eva T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vosburgh, Evan
    Sackler, Richard S.
    Lifton, Richard P.
    Dewan, Andrew T.
    Hoh, Josephine
    A pilot genome-wide association study shows genomic variants enriched in the non-tumor cells of patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the ileum2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 171-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic studies of midgut carcinoid cancer have exclusively focused on genomic changes of the tumor cells. We investigated the role of constitutional genetic polymorphisms in predisposing individuals to ileal carcinoids. In all, 239 cases and 110 controls were collected from three institutions: the Uppsala University Hospital; the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and the MD Anderson Cancer Center, and were genotyped using microarrays assaying >300 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Association with rs2208059 in KIF16B approached statistical significance (Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio=2.42, P=4.16×10−7) at a Bonferroni-corrected level (<1.62×10−7). Using two computational algorithms, four copy-number variants (CNVs) were identified in multiple cases that were absent in study controls and markedly less frequent in ∼1500 population-based controls. Of these four constitutional CNVs identified in blood-derived DNA, a 40 kb heterozygous deletion in Chr18q22.1 corresponded with a region frequently showing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in ileal carcinoid tumor cells based on our meta-analysis of previously published cytogenetic studies (69.7% LOH, 95% confidence interval=60.0–77.9%). We analyzed the constitutional 40 kb deletion on chr18 in our study samples with a real-time quantitative PCR assay; 14/226 cases (6.19%) and 2/97 controls (2.06%) carried the CNV, although the exact boundaries of each deletion have not been determined. Given the small sample size, our findings warrant an independent cohort for a replication study. Owing to the rarity of this disease, we believe these results will provide a valuable resource for future work on this serious condition by allowing others to make efficient use of their samples in targeted studies.

  • 21.
    Åkerström, Tobias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Willenberg, Holger Sven
    Cupisti, Kenko
    Ip, Julian
    Backman, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Moser, Ana
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Robinson, Bruce
    Iwen, K Alexander
    Dralle, Henning
    D Volpe, Cristina
    Bäckdahl, Martin
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Walz, Martin K
    Lehnert, Hendrik
    Sidhu, Stan
    Zedenius, Jan
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Novel somatic mutations and distinct molecular signature in aldosterone-producing adenomas.2015In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 735-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) are found in 1.5-3.0% of hypertensive patients in primary care and can be cured by surgery. Elucidation of genetic events may improve our understanding of these tumors and ultimately improve patient care. Approximately 40% of APAs harbor a missense mutation in the KCNJ5 gene. More recently, somatic mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3, also important for membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) regulation, were observed in APAs. In this study, we analyzed 165 APAs for mutations in selected regions of these genes. We then correlated mutational findings with clinical and molecular phenotype using transcriptome analysis, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative PCR. Somatic mutations in CACNA1D in 3.0% (one novel mutation), ATP1A1 in 6.1% (six novel mutations) and ATP2B3 in 3.0% (two novel mutations) were detected. All observed mutations were located in previously described hotspot regions. Patients with tumors harboring mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 were operated at an older age, were more often male and had tumors that were smaller than those in patients with KCNJ5 mutated tumors. Microarray transcriptome analysis segregated KCNJ5 mutated tumors from ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors and those without mutation. We observed significant transcription upregulation of CYP11B2, as well as the previously described glomerulosa-specific gene NPNT, in ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors compared to KCNJ5 mutated tumors. In summary, we describe novel somatic mutations in proteins regulating the membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) levels, and also a distinct mRNA and clinical signature, dependent on genetic alteration.

  • 22.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Circulating biomarkers in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18 Suppl 1, p. S17-S25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Neuroendocrine tumors: recent progress in diagnosis and treatment2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18, p. E3-E6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Öberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Lamberts, Steven W. J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Somatostatin analogues in acromegaly and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: past, present and future2016In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 23, no 12, p. R551-R566Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that arises when the pituitary gland secretes excess growth hormone (GH), which in turn stimulates a concomitant increase in serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET) constitute a heterogeneous group of tumours that can secrete serotonin and a variety of peptide hormones that may cause characteristic symptoms known as carcinoid syndrome or other symptoms and hormonal hypersecretion syndromes depending on the tumour's site of origin. Current medical therapy for the treatment of acromegaly and GEP-NET involves the administration of somatostatin analogues that effectively suppress excess hormone secretion. After its discovery in 1979, octreotide became the first synthetic biologically stable somatostatin analogue with a short-acting formulation of octreotide introduced into clinical practice in the late 1980s. Lanreotide, another somatostatin analogue, became available in the mid-1990s initially as a prolonged-release formulation administered every 10 or 14 days. Long-acting release formulations of both octreotide (Sandostatin LAR and Novartis) and lanreotide (Somatuline Autogel, Ipsen), based on microparticle and nanoparticle drug-delivery technologies, respectively, were later developed, which allowed for once-monthly administration and improved convenience. First-generation somatostatin analogues remain one of the cornerstones of medical therapy in the management of pituitary and GEP-NET hormone hypersecretion, with octreotide having the longest established efficacy and safety profile of the somatostatin analogue class. More recently, pasireotide (Signifor), a next-generation multireceptor-targeted somatostatin analogue, has emerged as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of acromegaly. This review summarizes the development and clinical success of somatostatin analogues.

1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf