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  • 1.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Greiner, Ted
    Regarding the review article by Erlanson-Albertsson and Zetterström, Acta Paediatr 2005;94:1523-312006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 623-624Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hofvander, Yngve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gebre-Medhin, Meharigm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Growth under privileged conditions of healthy Swedish infants exclusively breastfed from birth to 4-6 months:  a longitudinal prospective study based on daily records of feeding2003In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    In most studies the methodology used to study growth in relation to breastfeeding patterns cannot ensure that exclusive breastfeeding has in fact occurred since birth. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth of healthy infants in Sweden in whom exclusive breastfeeding for the first 4–6 mo was ascertained through daily feeding records and to compare the results with the World Health Organization (WHO) “12-month breastfed pooled data set” and the Euro-Growth references for exclusively breastfed infants, as well as with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO reference.

    Methods:

    147 exclusively breastfed infants and 325 non-exclusively breastfed Swedish infants, with a birthweight of ≥3 kg, were included. The mothers had previous breastfed at least one infant for at least 4 mo. Weight was recorded fortnightly and length monthly.

    Results:

    Infants exclusively breastfed since birth showed similar growth in weight and height to that of the non-exclusively breastfed infants. During the first 6 mo of life the growth of exclusively breastfed infants was also similar to that of the infants regularly receiving formula at 12–16 wk of age, mostly in addition to breast milk. The monthly growth increments were fairly similar to those of the “WHO pooled breastfed data set” and the Euro-Growth references for exclusively breastfed infants.

    Conclusion:

    In an affluent society truly exclusively breastfed infants seem to have the same growth during the first half year of life as non-exclusively breastfed infants with a high breastfeeding rate.

  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Females born large for gestational age have a doubled risk of giving birth to large for gestational age infants2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 358-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To analyse if females born large for gestational age (LGA) have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants and to study anthropometric characteristics in macrosomic infants of females born LGA.Methods: The investigation was performed as an intergenerational retrospective study of women born between 1973 and 1983, who delivered their first infant between 1989 and 1999. Birth characteristics of 47 783 females, included in the Swedish Birth Register both as newborns and mothers were analysed. LGA was defined as >2 SD in either birth weight or length for gestational age. The infants were divided into three subgroups: born tall only, born heavy only and born both tall and heavy for gestational age. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed.Results: Females, born LGA with regard to length or weight, had a two-fold (adjusted OR 1.96, 95% Cl 1.54-2.48) increased risk to give birth to an LGA infant. Females, born LGA concerning weight only, had a 2.6 (adjusted OR 2.63, 95%, 1.85-3.75) fold increased risk of having an LGA offspring heavy only and no elevated risk of giving birth to an offspring that was tall only, compared to females born not LGA. In addition, maternal obesity was associated with a 2.5 (adjusted OR 2.56, 95%, 2.20-2.98) fold increased risk of having an LGA newborn, compared to mothers with normal weight.Conclusion: Females, born LGA, have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants, compared to mothers born not LGA. Maternal overweight increases this risk even further.

  • 4.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Haglund, Bengt
    Gestational diabetes and offspring body disproportion2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:   It has been demonstrated that females born large for gestational age   (LGA) in weight but not length are at increased risk of being obese at   childbearing age. We addressed the question whether women with   gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk of giving   birth to such infants.   Methods:   Birth characteristics of 884 267 infants of non-diabetic mothers and   7817 of mothers with GDM were analysed. LGA was defined as birth weight   or birth length > 2 standard deviation scores for gestational age.   Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed.   Results:   The odds ratio (OR) for a woman with GDM to give birth to an LGA infant   that was heavy alone was four times increased (OR: 3.71, 95% CI:   3.41-4.04). Furthermore, in the population of mothers giving birth to   LGA infants, the proportion heavy alone was 68% in the group of women   with GDM compared with 64.4% in the group of non-diabetic women. The   risks were independent of gender of the foetus.   Conclusion:   Women with GDM have an almost four times higher risk of delivering an   LGA infant that is heavy alone. The noted disproportion between weight   and length in infants of such mothers may have an impact on the risk of   later obesity.

  • 5.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Posttraumatic stress among children in Kurdistan2008In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 97, no 7, p. 884-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify a posttraumatic stress disorder profile for the Child Behaviour Checklist. Method: Checklist item scores for 806 school-aged children in Iraqi Kurdistan (201 randomly selected from the general population, 241 orphans, 199 primary medical care visitors and 165 hospital in-patients) were analysed against the Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale for Children (PTSS-C) scores, estimating not only stress diagnoses, but also nonstress-related, child-specific posttraumatic symptoms. Results: Twenty checklist items, which revealed significant correlations with the stress diagnoses, formed the checklist-stress profile with acceptable reliability and validity, and significant correlation to the PTSS-C estimates. Conclusion: A child-specific stress profile for the checklist is recommended for use as a screening instrument.

  • 6.
    Akkawi, Ranaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Eksborg, Staffan
    Andersson, Asa
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Bartocci, Marco
    Effect of oral naloxone hydrochloride on gastrointestinal transit in premature infants treated with morphine2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 442-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Opioids are common drugs for pain treatment in preterm newborn infants, in spite of several adverse effects. Constipation is a frequent problem when opioids are used in both adults and neonates. Although several studies indicate that the oral administration of naloxone hydrochloride (NH) improves intestinal motility during opioid therapy, there is still a lack of evidence in newborns. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of NH against reduced intestinal motility during opioid treatment. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed. We analysed the medical records of fifteen infants (Group 1) treated with continuous morphine (MO) infusion and fourteen infants (Group 2) treated with both oral NH (3 mu g/kg 4 times daily) and MO. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total MO dose. Infants treated both with NH and MO had a tendency to improve their mean stool frequency/day. A statistically significant improvement was observed in the mean total food intake (mL/kg/day) of the infants treated with NH (p = 0.014). No difference in the mean food retention between the two groups was observed. Conclusion: Orally administrated NH seems to improve intestinal motility resulting in increased food intake/day and improved stool frequency/day in premature newborn infants treated with MO. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  • 7. Albinsson, Eva
    et al.
    Grönlund, Astrid Bergentz
    Paulsson, Mattias
    Wikström, Sverre
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Unpredictable supplementation of vitamin D to infants in the neonatal intensive care unit: An experimental study.2024In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Extremely premature infants receive nutrition and medication through nasogastric tubes. Breastmilk given accordingly is subject to fat loss. This study aimed to investigate whether this could also apply to vitamin D.

    METHODS: A questionnaire investigated vitamin D administration at a level III neonatal intensive care unit in Sweden in 2021. Feeding simulations with breastmilk and various vitamin D mixtures were done accordingly. After administration, vitamin D3 concentration was analysed using chromatography with mass spectrometry, followed by repeated simulations with vitamin D mixtures without breastmilk in 2023.

    RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 10 persons. Vitamin D was administered as drops using an enteral syringe and a nasogastric tube in conjunction with a breastmilk meal. In the feeding simulations, vitamin D3 concentration after administration was significantly higher using a syringe alone compared to standard administration. When vitamins were administered according to standard but without breastmilk, 100% of the vitamin D and 40% of the multivitamins were lost. The vitamins adhered to the material, mainly in the nasogastric tube.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that standard vitamin D supplementation in the neonatal intensive care unit may be unpredictable when administered by enteral syringe and nasogastric tube. We suggest using direct oral administration whenever possible.

  • 8. Amin, Leila
    et al.
    Skoglund, Charlotte
    Wester, Tomas
    Granström, Anna Löf
    Swedish national population-based study shows an increased risk of depression among patients with Hirschsprung disease.2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 10, p. 1867-1870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Hirschsprung disease is usually treated during infancy. The long-term impact on mental health has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the risk for depressive disorders in individuals with Hirschsprung disease.

    METHODS: This was a nationwide, population-based cohort study. The study exposure was Hirschsprung disease and the study outcome was depression. The exposed cohort included all individuals with Hirschsprung disease, registered in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2013 and the unexposed cohort included ten age- and sex-matched controls per patient. The diagnosis of depression was confirmed by diagnosis in the Swedish National Patient Register.

    RESULTS: The cohort included 739 (76.5% males) individuals with Hirschsprung disease and 7390 (76.5% males) controls. Among the patients with Hirschsprung disease, 35 (4.7%) of the patients had had a depressive disorder and 187 (2.5%) of controls, hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.38-2.84. The mean age at diagnosis of first depression was 21.9 years (SD ± 7) in Hirschsprung disease patients and 23.4 years (SD ± 7), p = 0.236 in the unexposed group. There were no significant gender differences.

    CONCLUSION: We found an increased risk of having depressive disorders among individuals with Hirschsprung disease compared to controls.

  • 9.
    Andell Jason, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Neuropediat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.;Reg Sormland, Nyköping Hosp, Dept Pediat, Nyköping, Sweden..
    Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric comorbidities negatively affect outcome in children with unprovoked seizures-A non-systematic review2021In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 2944-2950Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with epilepsy have at least one comorbidity in 80% of cases. This unstructured review provides insights into the most common comorbidities, their effects on seizure prognosis and treatment. We also review the epilepsy terminology and classifications. Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric comorbidities were common in children with seizures and had a negative effect on quality of life, and seizure freedom. Children with seizures were treated with drugs used for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression or psychosis, more often than the general population but less often than prevalence rates would suggested. Conclusion Multidisciplinary teams should assess comorbidities in children with epilepsy to improve their care and outcomes.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Jacob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    It is important not to assume an aetiology for the triad before the outcomes of diagnostic investigations2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 8, p. 1308-1309Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Jacob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    National study shows that abusive head trauma mortality in Sweden was at least 10 times lower than in other Western countries.2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 477-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The validity of the diagnostic criteria for abusive head trauma (AHT) and its attributes have been widely debated. This national study investigated the possibility of false positive and false negative cases of fatal AHT in Sweden.

    METHOD: This was a retrospective evaluation of the records of 733 deceased infants up to the age of 365 days who were examined during 1994-2013 at the six forensic medicine departments. All the records were scrutinised for possible cases of AHT.

    RESULTS: We included 12 cases, out of which eight had been diagnosed as AHT. Of these 12 infants, eight had a concomitant disease or perinatal illness, five were born prematurely, and three were twins. Figures from other Western countries would suggest 6-7 deaths per 100,000 per year in Sweden but in reality, there was a maximum possible incidence of 0.6 per 100,000 infants per year.

    CONCLUSION: The risk of unreported fatal AHT in Sweden was low and there may have been cases misdiagnosed as AHT. The at least 10 times lower incidence than has been reported from other Western countries, raises the question if previously reported higher incidences of fatal AHT have been exaggerated.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Between the sheets - or how to keep babies warm2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 8, p. 1300-1301Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Andersson, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    The transition to extra-uterine life by extremely preterm infants: handle with care2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 337-338Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Andersson, Dan
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Effects of delayed cord clamping on neurodevelopment and infection at four months of age: a randomised trial2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 525-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To investigate the effect that delayed and early umbilical cord clamping have on neurodevelopment, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and symptoms of infection during the first 4 months of life.

    METHODS:

    Full-term infants (n = 382) were randomised to delayed (≥180 sec) or early cord clamping (≤10 sec). The Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) was used to assess neurodevelopment at 4 months. Immunoglobulin G was measured at birth, 2-3 days and 4 months. Parents recorded any symptoms indicating infection during the first 4 months of life.

    RESULTS:

    The total scores from the ASQ did not differ between groups. However, the delayed cord clamping (DCC) group had a higher mean (SD) score in the problem-solving domain [55.3 (7.2) vs. 53.5 (8.2), p = 0.03] at 4 months and a lower mean (SD) score in the personal-social domain [49.5 (9.3) vs. 51.8 (8.1), p = 0.01]. The IgG level was higher in the DCC group at 2-3 days (11.7 vs. 11.0 g/L, p = 0.004), but did not differ between the groups at 4 months. Symptoms of infection were comparable between the groups.

    CONCLUSION:

    Delayed cord clamping did not affect overall neurodevelopment or symptoms of infection up to 4 months of age, but may have an impact on specific neurodevelopmental domains.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Åsa C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Div Paediat, ePed Cent Editorial Off, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Barnlakemedelsgruppen, Eugeniavagen 18C, plan 3, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindemalm, Synnöve
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Div Paediat, ePed Cent Editorial Off, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Onatli, Dilba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Chowdhury, Samia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Eksborg, Staffan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Div Paediat, ePed Cent Editorial Off, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Förberg, Ulrika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Falun, Sweden..
    'Working outside the box'-an interview study regarding manipulation of medicines with registered nurses and pharmacists at a Swedish paediatric hospital2023In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 12, p. 2551-2559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Studies on frequencies of manipulated medicines in paediatric care are common, but there is little knowledge of experiences of pharmacists and registered nurses in this area. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' and pharmacists' reasoning in the manipulation of medicines to paediatric inpatients.

    Methods: Semistructured interviews with twelve registered nurses and seven pharmacists were performed at a Swedish paediatric university hospital. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: Four major categories emerged from the analysis of the interviews: medicines management, knowledge, consulting others and organisation. Medicines management involved the process of drug handling, which is prescribing, reconstitution or manipulation and administration. Knowledge concerned both the knowledge base and how healthcare personnel seek information. Consulting others involved colleagues, registered nurses and pharmacists, between registered nurses, pharmacists and physicians and between registered nurses, pharmacists and caregivers. Organisation covered documentation, time and working environment.

    Conclusion: Both pharmacists and registered nurses stated that manipulation of medicines to paediatric patients was often necessary but felt unsafe due to lack of supporting guidelines. Pharmacists were natural members of the ward team, contributing with specific knowledge about medicines and formulations.

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  • 16.
    Andersson, Åsa C.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Paediatrics, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nydert, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Paediatrics, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Preparing paediatric medicines by dissolving tablets and extracting a portion may compromise dosing accuracy2023In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 12, p. 2560-2562Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 17. Andresen, Erika
    et al.
    Oras, Paola
    Norrman, Gunilla
    Målqvist, Mats
    Funkquist, Eva-Lotta
    Non-medical formula use in newborn infants still common at two Swedish hospitals after a breastfeeding support program.2023In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 10, p. 2121-2128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of a breastfeeding support programme on reducing infant formula use and to investigate indications for formula in newborn infants in Sweden.

    METHODS: A quasi-experimental study design was carried out. It included 255 mother-infant pairs in a control group, who received standard care and 254 pairs in an intervention group, who took part in a breastfeeding support programme. Data were collected by reviewing patient records from two regional hospitals in Uppsala and Gotland and recruitment took place between 2017 and 2019.

    RESULTS: Median age of mothers were 31 years (range 20-49) and median gestational age of infants were 39 + 6 weeks/days (range 37 + 0 to 42 + 4). The intervention did not reduce infant formula use. In total, 87/507 (17%) of the infants received formula. Among children receiving formula 30/87 (34%) had a medical indication, whereas 57/87 (66%) had no medical indication. Main reasons for medically indicated formula use were hypoglycaemia, 13/30 (43%), and weight loss, 13/30 (43%). Main reasons for non-medical use were mothers'/parents' wishes, 25/57 (44%) and infants' dissatisfaction, 11/57 (19%).

    CONCLUSION: Continued efforts are needed to develop effective breastfeeding interventions with increased focus on infant formula reduction.

  • 18.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Wingren, G.
    Svedin, C. G.
    Gustafsson, P. A.
    Prevalence and characteristics of child physical abuse in Sweden: findings from a population-based youth survey2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 8, p. 1229-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine prevalence rates of child physical abuse perpetrated by a parent/caretaker, abuse characteristics and the extent of disclosures. Methods: A population-based survey was carried out in 2008 amongst all the pupils in three different grades (n = 8494) in schools in Sodermanland County, Sweden. The pupils were asked about their exposure to violence and their experiences of parental intimate-partner violence. Data were analysed with bi- and multivariate models and a comparison between means of accumulating risk factors between three groups were performed. Results: A total of 15.2% of the children reported that they had been hit. There were strong associations between abuse and risk factors and there was a dose-response relationship between risks and reported abuse. It was shown that children who reported parental intimate-partner violence were at a considerably higher risk for abuse than other children and that only 7% of the children exposed to violence had disclosed this to authorities. Conclusion: Even though child abuse in Sweden has decreased markedly during the last 40 years, violence against children is still a considerable problem. It is a challenge to develop methods of assessment and interventions that will ensure that the violence and its underlying causes are directly addressed.

  • 19.
    Armuand, G.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lampic, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Wånggren, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sydsjö, G.
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.;Cty Council Ostergotland, Dept Gynecol & Obstet Linkoping, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Survey shows that Swedish healthcare professionals have a positive attitude towards surrogacy but the health of the child is a concern2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: In February 2016, Sweden upheld its ban on surrogacy following a Government enquiry. This survey investigated attitudes towards surrogacy among primary health professionals working with children and their experiences of working with families following surrogacy abroad.

    Methods: From April to November 2016, nurses, physicians and psychologist working in primary child health care in four counties in Sweden were invited to participate in a cross-sectional online survey about surrogacy.

    Results: The mean age of the 208 participants was 49.2years (range 27-68) and nearly 91% were women. Approximately 60% supported legalised surrogacy. Wanting a conscience clause to be introduced in Sweden was associated with not supporting surrogacy for any groups, while personal experiences of infertility and clinical experiences with families following surrogacy were associated with positive attitudes towards surrogacy for heterosexual couples. The majority (64%) disagreed that surrogate children were as healthy as other children, and many believed that they risked worse mental health (21%) and social stigmatisation (21%).

    Conclusion: We found that 60% supported legalised surrogacy, but many expressed concerns about the children's health and greater knowledge about the medical and psychosocial consequences of surrogacy is needed.

  • 20.
    Aronsson, Bernice
    et al.
    Dept of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjuhuset, Sach´s Children´s Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiberg, C.
    Sandstedt, P.
    Hjern, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Asylum-seeking children with severe loss of activities of daily living: clinical signs and course during rehabilitation2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1977-1981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether severe loss of activities of daily living (ADL) in asylum-seeking children is associated with physical disease or toxic influences and to describe the clinical course during the recovery process. METHODS: A total of 29 asylum-seeking children with severe loss of ADL were regularly assessed by physical examinations, laboratory tests and a structured evaluation of their ADL status during rehabilitation. RESULTS: A total of 12 children had previously recorded suicide attempts and 21 were recorded to have experienced traumatic events in their country of origin. The mean time from turning point to recovery was 6 months. Of the study participants, 22 needed enteral feeding and 18 gained weight during recovery. All children had a pulse rate and systolic blood pressure within the normal range. No sign of intoxication or physical disease was identified in laboratory tests or clinical examinations, with the exception of one case of epilepsy. CONCLUSION: Physical disease, pharmacological sedation or anorexia nervosa was not considered to be a probable cause of the loss of ADL in these children. The high rate of psychosocial risk factors and the stressful event of being in an asylum-seeking process call for further investigation of psychosomatic mechanisms.

  • 21.
    Arvidson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Söderhäll, Stefan
    Eksborg, Staffan
    Björk, Olle
    Kreuger, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Medical follow-up visits in adults 5-25 years after treatment for childhood acute leukaemia, lymphoma or Wilms' tumour2006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 8, p. 922-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: One aspect of organizing medical follow-up for adult survivors of childhood cancer is to determine to what extent the former patient experiences a need for health services. In the present paper, we studied how the healthcare needs, both subjectively and objectively, were fulfilled for our former patients. Methods: 335 survivors over 18 y of age, with a follow-up time of more than 5 y after completion of therapy, were sent a questionnaire probing their present use of health services. Results: The response rate was 73%. A majority ( 60%) of the survivors had no regular follow-up visits, and 42% of these reported that they missed not having one. More than one third were thus far dissatisfied with the follow-up programme. Only 3% of those who had regular follow-ups found them "unnecessary''. Complaints subjectively related to their diseases or treatments were reported by 47%. Out of all responders, 34% did not miss having regular follow-up visits. Neither perceived disease-related complaints nor radiation therapy was a predictor for having a scheduled follow-up visit.

  • 22.
    Arwehed, Sofia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Axelin, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, SWEDESD - Sustainability Learning and Research Centre. Department of Nursing Science University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Björklund, Lars J.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Paediatrics Lund University and Skåne University Hospital Lund Sweden.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Heiring, Christian
    Department of Neonatology Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Denmark.
    Jonsson, Baldvin
    Department of Women's and Children's Health Karolinska Institute and Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden.
    Klingenberg, Claus
    Paediatric Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT‐The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway;Department of Pediatrics and Adolescence Medicine University Hospital of North Norway Tromsø Norway.
    Metsäranta, Marjo
    Department of Pediatrics University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital (HUH) Helsinki Finland.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lehtonen, Liisa
    Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine Turku University, Hospital and University of Turku Turku Finland.
    Nordic survey showed wide variation in discharge practices for very preterm infants2023In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    We aimed to describe clinical practices and criteria for discharge of very preterm infants in Nordic neonatal units.

    Methods

    Medical directors of all 89 level-2 and level-3 units in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden were invited by e-mail to complete a web-based multiple-choice survey with the option to make additional free-text comments.

    Results

    We received responses from 83/89 units (93%). In all responding units, discharge readiness was based mainly on clinical assessment with varying criteria. In addition, 36% used formal tests of cardiorespiratory stability and 59% used criteria related to infant weight or growth. For discharge with feeding tube, parental ability to speak the national language or English was mandatory in 45% of units, with large variation among countries. Post-discharge home visits and video-consultations were provided by 59% and 51%, respectively. In 54% of units, parental preparation for discharge were not initiated until the last two weeks of hospital stay.

    Conclusion

    Discharge readiness was based mainly on clinical assessment, with criteria varying among units despite similar population characteristics and care structures. This variation indicates a lack of evidence base and may unnecessarily delay discharge; further studies of this matter are needed. Earlier parental preparation and use of interpreters might facilitate earlier discharge.

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  • 23. Aune, Anders
    et al.
    Vartdal, Gunnar
    Bergseng, Håkon
    Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Bilirubin estimates from smartphone images of newborn infants' skin correlated highly to serum bilirubin levels.2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 12, p. 2532-2538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Neonatal jaundice is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, and identifying the condition remains a challenge. This study evaluated a novel method of estimating bilirubin levels from colour-calibrated smartphone images.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional prospective study was undertaken at two hospitals in Norway from February 2017 to March 2019, with standardised illumination at one hospital and non-standardised illumination at the other hospital. Healthy term-born infants with a normal birthweight were recruited up to 15 days of age. The main outcome measures were bilirubin estimates from digital images, plus total bilirubin in serum (TSB) and transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB).

    RESULTS: Bilirubin estimates were performed for 302 newborn infants, and 76 had severe jaundice. The correlation between the smartphone estimates and TSB was measured by Pearson's r and was .84 for the whole sample. The correlation between the image estimates and TcB was 0.81. There were no significant differences between the hospitals. Sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 69% for identifying severe jaundice of more than 250 µmol/L.

    CONCLUSION: A smartphone-based tool that estimated bilirubin levels from digital images identified severe jaundice with high sensitivity and could provide a screening tool for neonatal jaundice.

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  • 24.
    Aune, Anders
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway.;Picterus AS, Trondheim, Norway..
    Vartdal, Gunnar
    Picterus AS, Trondheim, Norway..
    Bergseng, Håkon
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Trondheim, Norway.;NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Lab Med Childrens & Womens Hlth, Trondheim, Norway..
    Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Elect Syst, Trondheim, Norway..
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway.;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Response to letter to the editor2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 12, p. 2823-2823Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Austeng, Dordi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Blennow, Mats
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Fritz, Thomas
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hellström, Ann
    Holmgren, Per Ake
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Johansson, Kent
    Kallen, Karin
    Lagercrantz, Hugo
    Laurini, Ricardo
    Lindberg, Eva
    Lundqvist, Anita
    Marsal, Karel
    Nilstun, Tore
    Nordén Lindeberg, Solveig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Norman, Mikael
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Oestlund, Ingrid
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Simic, Marija
    Sjörs, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tornqvist, Kristina
    Wennergren, Margareta
    Wallin, Agneta
    Westgren, Magnus
    Incidence of and risk factors for neonatal morbidity after active perinatal care: extremely preterm infants study in Sweden (EXPRESS)2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 978-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants and to identify associated risk factors. Methods: Population based study of infants born before 27 gestational weeks and admitted for neonatal intensive care in Sweden during 2004-2007. Results: Of 638 admitted infants, 141 died. Among these, life support was withdrawn in 55 infants because of anticipation of poor long-term outcome. Of 497 surviving infants, 10% developed severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), 5.7% cystic periventricular leucomalacia (cPVL), 41% septicaemia and 5.8% necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); 61% had patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and 34% developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) stage >= 3. Eighty-five per cent needed mechanical ventilation and 25% developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Forty-seven per cent survived to one year of age without any severe IVH, cPVL, severe ROP, severe BPD or NEC. Tocolysis increased and prolonged mechanical ventilation decreased the chances of survival without these morbidities. Maternal smoking and higher gestational duration were associated with lower risk of severe ROP, whereas PDA and poor growth increased this risk. Conclusion: Half of the infants surviving extremely preterm birth suffered from severe neonatal morbidities. Studies on how to reduce these morbidities and on the long-term health of survivors are warranted.

  • 26.
    Backman, Sofia
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Clin Neurophysiol, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Rosen, Ingmar
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Clin Neurophysiol, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Blennow, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Dept New Born Med, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Englund, Marita
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flink, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Inst, Dept New Born Med, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liedholm, Lars-Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Umea, Sweden.
    Norman, Elisabeth
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Lund, Sweden.
    Sailer, Alexandra
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Umea, Sweden.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Linkoping Univ, Inst Clin & Expt Med, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Swedish consensus reached on recording, interpretation and reporting of neonatal continuous simplified electroencephalography that is supported by amplitude-integrated trend analysis2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 10, p. 1702-1709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous monitoring of electroencephalography (EEG), with a focus on amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), has been used in neonatal intensive care for decades. A number of systems have been suggested for describing and quantifying aEEG patterns. Extensive full-montage EEG monitoring is used in specialised intensive care units. The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society published recommendations for defining and reporting EEG findings in critically ill adults and infants. Swedish neonatologists and clinical neurophysiologists collaborated to optimise simplified neonatal continuous aEEG and EEG recordings based on these American documents. Conclusion: This paper describes the Swedish consensus document produced by those meetings.

  • 27.
    Baylis, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gradin, Maria
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    First-time events between parents and preterm infants are affected by the designs and routines of neonatal intensive care units2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 1045-1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Early parental bonding with preterm babies is particularly important, and the aim of our study was to explore when parents experienced what they regarded as important events for the first time while their infant was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    METHODS:

    The study was part of a longitudinal project on Kangaroo Mother Care at two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 81 infants completed questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay.

    RESULTS:

    Most parents saw and touched their infants immediately after birth, but only a few could hold them skin to skin or swaddle them. Other important events identified by parents included the first time they performed care giving activities and did so independently, interaction and closeness with the infant, signs of the infant's recovery and integration into the family. The timing of the events depended on the physical design of the NICU, whether parents' could stay with their infant round-the-clock and when they were allowed to provide care under supervision and on their own.

    CONCLUSION:

    The design and routines of the NICU dictated when parents first interacted with their infants. Clinical guidelines that facilitate early contact with preterm babies can help parents to make the transition to their parental role.

  • 28. Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Edgar, Johan
    Humble, Mats B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Poor performance in physical education - a risk factor for bully victimization A case-control study2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 413-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Poor social skills are a risk factor for becoming bullied, which could explain why this frequently occurs to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Poor social skills tend to coexist with clumsiness. According to a pilot study, poor performance in physical education (PE) was correlated with bully victimization. Methods: Sixty-nine healthy university students reported performance in PE and bully victimization in childhood. In addition, the participants responded to questionnaires for ADHD and ASDs to assess personality traits related to increased risk for bully victimization. Results: Below average performance in PE was a risk factor of being bullied in school with an odds ratio of 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.23-10.5; p = 0.017]. Strong correlations between poor performance in PE and long duration of victimization (p = 0.007) and poor performance in PE and high frequency of victimization (p = 0.008) were found. Autistic traits were related to performance below average in PE. Conclusion: Poor motor skills are a strong risk factor for becoming bullied. Prevention programmes that identify, protect and empower the clumsy children could be an important step to avoid bullying of the most vulnerable children.

  • 29.
    Berggren, Sara
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Paediat, Vitaminvagen 21,Plan 2, S-41650 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Halland Hosp Halmstad, Dept Paediat, Halmstad, Sweden.;Hlth Ctr Halland, Hlth Ctr Hyltebruk, Halmstad, Sweden..
    Andersson, Ola
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat Neonatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Paediat, Vitaminvagen 21,Plan 2, S-41650 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Roswall, Josefine
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Paediat, Vitaminvagen 21,Plan 2, S-41650 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Halland Hosp Halmstad, Dept Paediat, Halmstad, Sweden..
    Serum osteocalcin levels at 4 months of age were associated with neurodevelopment at 4 years of age in term-born children2022In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The hormone osteocalcin influenced neurodevelopment and cognition in mice models; this human study explored potential associations between total serum levels in human infants and neurodevelopment at 4 years of age.

    Methods: The data were based on two Swedish birth cohorts from 2008 to 2009. We followed 158 healthy full-term vaginal births (51% girls) by measuring serum osteocalcin in cord blood and at 4, 12 and 36 months. The values were compared with neurodevelopment tests at 4 years of age.

    Results: There was an association between osteocalcin at 4 months and later full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ; r(2) 0.031, p < 0.05). Children with osteocalcin levels in the highest quartile scored 5.6 (95% confidence interval [1.3, 9.9]) points higher than those in the lowest quartile, with mean scores of 118.8 +/- 8.8 and 113.2 +/- 9.2 (p < 0.05). They also scored higher on gross motor skills (p < 0.05) and showed greater ability during the drawing trail test (p < 0.005). Cord levels of osteocalcin were negatively associated with processing speed and fine motor development at 4 years, but levels at 12 and 36 months were not associated with later neurodevelopment.

    Conclusion: Osteocalcin levels in infancy appeared to be associated with later IQ and motor development, but more research is needed.

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  • 30.
    Bergsten, Amadeus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research.
    Larsson, Jens
    Skane Univ Hosp, Urotherapy Unit, Sect Pediat Surg, Lund, Sweden..
    Borgstrom, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Karanikas, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research.
    Predictors of response and adherence to enuresis alarm therapy: a confirmatory study2024In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 113, no 3, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To look for predictors to response and adherence to the enuresis alarm while exploring the possibility of families managing therapy independently.Methods: We used a body-worn alarm linked to a smartphone app. Subjects with enuresis were recruited both via paediatric nurses and independently as families bought the alarm and downloaded the app on their own.

    Results:

    We recruited 385 nurse-supported and 1125 independent subjects. Many (79.9%) dropped out before 8 weeks, but among adherent subjects 48.2% had a full or partial response. Age was a predictor of non-response (p = 0.019). Daytime incontinence did not influence response. If enuresis frequency did not decrease during the first 4 weeks of therapy the chance of response was very small (p < 0.001). Adherence was higher among subjects supported by a nurse (p < 0.001), but for adherent subjects the outcome was similar regardless of nurse support (p = 0.554).

    Conclusions:

    Daytime incontinence is no contraindication to enuresis alarm therapy. Treatment can be managed independently by the families, but adherence is enhanced by nurse support. Alarm treatment should be reassessed after 4 weeks. Enuresis alarm treatment guidelines need to be updated.

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  • 31.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fabian, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hjern, Anders
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Preschool children living in joint physical custody arrangements show less psychological symptoms than those living mostly or only with one parent2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 294-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Joint physical custody (JPC), where children spend about equal time in both parent's homes after parental separation, is increasing. The suitability of this practice for preschool children, with a need for predictability and continuity, has been questioned.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we used data on 3656 Swedish children aged three to five years living in intact families, JPC, mostly with one parent or single care. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, completed by parents and preschool teachers, as the outcome measure.

    RESULTS: Children in JPC showed less psychological problems than those living mostly (adjusted B 1.81; 95% CI [0.66 to 2.95]) or only with one parent (adjusted B 1.94; 95% CI [0.75 to 3.13]), in parental reports. In preschool teacher reports, the adjusted Betas were 1.27, 95% CI [0.14 to 2.40] and 1.41, 95% CI [0.24 to 2.58], respectively. In parental reports, children in JPC and those in intact families had similar outcomes, while teachers reported lower unadjusted symptom scores for children in intact families.

    CONCLUSION: Joint physical custody arrangements were not associated with more psychological symptoms in children aged 3-5, but longitudinal studies are needed to account for potential preseparation differences.

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  • 32.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies, CHESS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gebreslassie, Mihretab
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hedqvist, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Lindberg, Lene
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Global Publ Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden; Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hjern, Anders
    Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies, CHESS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Narrative review of interventions suitable for well-baby clinics to promote infant attachment security and parents' sensitivity2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1745-1757Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this narrative review was to evaluate the evidence for interventions for children's secure attachment relationships and parents’ caregiving sensitivity that could potentially be implemented in the context of a well‐baby clinic.

    Methods

    Literature search on programmes for parental caregiving sensitivity and secure attachment for infants aged 0‐24 months. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published 1995‐2018 with interventions starting from one week postpartum, and with a maximum of 12 sessions (plus potential booster session) were included.

    Results

    We identified 25 studies, of which 22 studied effects of home‐based programmes using video feedback techniques. Positive effects of these interventions in families at risk were found on parental caregiving sensitivity and to a lesser extent also on children's secure or disorganised attachment. The effects of two of these programmes were supported by several RCTs. Three intervention studies based on group and individual psychotherapy showed no significant positive effects. Most of the interventions targeted mothers only.

    Conclusion

    The review found some evidence for positive effects of selective interventions with video feedback techniques for children's secure attachment and strong evidence for positive effects on parental caregiving sensitivity. Important knowledge gaps were identified for universal interventions and interventions for fathers and parents with a non‐Western background.

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  • 33.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Svendsen, P
    Moström, U
    Pellettieri, L
    Endovascular treatment of a spinal arteriovenous malformation in a 21-month-old boy1994In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 83, no 12, p. 1326-1331Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports of spinal arteriovenous malformations in children are rare. This case report describes a 21-month-old boy whose first symptom was attacks of abdominal pain, followed gradually by neurological symptoms. The diagnosis was made using magnetic resonance imaging and spinal angiography, and the patient was successfully treated with embolization.

  • 34.
    Björkqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Källman, J
    Fjaertoft, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Xu, S
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Schollin, J
    Human neutrophil lipocalin: normal levels and use as a marker for invasive infection in the newborn2004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 534-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) as a marker of neonatal invasive infection and determine the normal serum levels of HNL in newborns.

    METHODS: HNL is released from neutrophil granulocytes and is regarded as a specific marker of neutrophil activity. In 81 newborns < or = 28 d of age with signs of infection on a total of 87 occasions, HNL and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at inclusion and on the three following days. As controls, term healthy newborns were recruited at birth (cord blood, n = 45) and at ages 3-5 d (n = 46). Serum HNL was measured by a radioimmunoassay.

    RESULTS: 25/87 episodes were classified as infection and 62 as non-proven infection. HNLmax was significantly higher in the infected group (mean 587.6 microg/l) than in the non-proven infected group (mean 217.7 microg/, p < 0.001). HNL peaked at inclusion, 1 d earlier than CRP. In the healthy controls. HNL was the same at 3-5 d of age as at birth (mean 82.4-81.7 microg/l) and similar to normal adult levels.

    CONCLUSIONS: The release of HNL is not increased in healthy newborns at birth, but neonatal neutrophils rapidly release HNL upon microbial stimulation in vivo. HNL might be useful as an early marker of neonatal infection.

  • 35.
    Bland, Richard D.
    et al.
    Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
    Jonzon, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gunnar Sedin2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 8, p. 893-893Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gradin, Maria
    Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Initiation and extent of skin-to-skin care at two Swedish neonatal intensive care units2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe initiation and extent of parents' application of skin-to-skin care (SSC) with their preterm infants at two Swedish neonatal intensive care units.

    METHODS:

    The duration of SSC was recorded in 104 infants' medical charts during their hospital stay, and the parents answered a questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Both parents were involved in the practice of SSC. Three infants experienced SSC directly after birth, 34 within 1 h, 85 within 24 h and the remaining 19 at 24-78 h postbirth. SSC commenced earlier (median age of 50 min) in infants whose first SSC was with their father instead of with their mother (median age of 649 min: p < 0.001). The earlier the SSC was initiated, the longer the infant was cared for skin-to-skin per day during his/her hospital stay (p < 0.001). The median daily duration of SSC was 403 min.

    CONCLUSION:

    Early initiation of SSC had positive impact on the extent of parents' application of SSC. Even though the infants in this study were cared for skin-to-skin to a high extent, there is a potential for extended use of SSC in this type of hospital setting for reducing separation between infants and parents.

  • 37.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Funkquist, Eva-Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Parents need support to find ways to optimise their own sleep without seeing their preterm infant's sleeping patterns as a problem2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study described how parents perceived their own sleep, and their infants', during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and after discharge. It also explored the infants' sleeping location at home.

    METHODS: The study was conducted in the NICUs of two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 86 infants - 86 mothers and 84 fathers - answered questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay, at discharge and at the infants' corrected ages of two, six and 12 months. The parents' own sleep was explored with the Insomnia Severity Index.

    RESULTS: Mothers reported more severe insomnia than fathers during their infants' hospitalisation, and these higher insomnia severity scores were associated with more severe infant sleep problems at discharge (p = 0.027) and at two months (p = 0.006) and 12 months (p = 0.002) of corrected age. During the study period, 4%-10% of the parents reported severe or very severe infant sleeping problems. The bed-sharing rate was 75% after discharge and about 60% at the corrected age of 12 months.

    CONCLUSION: Maternal insomnia during an infant's hospital stay was associated with later perceptions of sleep problems in their children. Parents need support to find solutions for optimal sleep without seeing their child's sleeping patterns as a problem.

  • 38.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Parent-infant skin-to-skin contact: how do parent records compare to nurse records?2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 773-775Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Bohman, B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, M.
    Lind, M.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forsberg, L.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Infrequent attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in conversations in Swedish child health services2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 520-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate conversations between nurses and parents in Swedish child health services and to assess to what extent attention is directed towards dietary and physical activity behaviours in children. Methods Twenty-three nurses audio-recorded one session each. Recordings were assessed and topics were classified according to predetermined categories. Results The three most frequent topics of conversation concerned physical examinations of the child (30% of session time), talking to the child to establish or maintain contact and interest (15%), and development of language skills (12%). Dietary habits came on fourth place (10%), and physical activity ranked 14 (4%). Conclusion Attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in children is infrequent in Swedish child health services. Concern is raised about the efficacy of prevention efforts against childhood obesity.

  • 40.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Somatic symptoms as a marker for severity in adolescent depression2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 1724-1730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aims to investigate the prevalence of somatic symptoms in depressed adolescents and in their healthy peers. A second aim is to investigate the correlation, in the depressed adolescents, between the number of somatic symptoms and severe concurrent symptoms, signs and life events. Methods: The total population of 16-17 year olds - in the city of Uppsala - was screened for depression and then interviewed using a structured interview questionnaire. Depressed subjects and matched controls were identified. A total of 177 pairs were used for pair-wise analyses of somatic symptoms. Severe symptoms, signs and life events were selected for analysing their relation to depression with somatic symptoms. Results: The adolescents with depressive disorders experienced considerably more somatic symptoms than their healthy controls. The duration and depth of the depression correlated with the number of somatic symptoms. There was a strong correlation between depression with many somatic symptoms and suicidal plans/thoughts, suicidal attempts, disruptive behaviour, as well as multiple stressful relationships. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that somatic symptoms are common in adolescent depression. Multiple somatic symptoms within depression imply a higher severity in terms of duration, depth and psychiatric comorbidity. The strong correlation with suicidal plans, suicidal attempts and disruptive behaviour is concerning.

  • 41.
    Bolk, Jenny
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kaul, Ylva Fredriksson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Lund Univ, Dept Psychol, Div Dev Psychol, Lund, Sweden.
    Padilla, Nelly
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Umeå, Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hellgren, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åden, Ulrika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    National population-based cohort study found that visual-motor integration was commonly affected in extremely preterm born children at six-and-a-half years2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 831-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aimed to explain the relationship between visual‐motor integration (VMI) abilities and extremely preterm (EPT) birth, by exploring the influence of perinatal variables, cognition, manual dexterity and ophthalmological outcomes.

    Methods: This was part of the population‐based national Extremely Preterm Infant Study in Sweden (EXPRESS) study. We studied 355 children, born at a gestational age of <27 weeks from April 2004 to March 2007, and 364 term‐born controls. At six‐and‐a‐half years of age, we assessed VMI, cognitive function, motor skills and vision. VMI impairment was classified as <−1 standard deviation (SD).

    Results: The mean (SD) VMI score was 87 (±12) in preterm children compared to 98 (±11) in controls (p < 0.001). VMI impairment was present in 55% of preterm infants and in 78% of children born at 22–23 weeks. Male sex and postnatal steroids showed a weak association with poorer visual‐motor performance, whereas low manual dexterity and cognitive function showed a stronger association.

    Conclusion: Poor VMI performance was common in this EXPRESS cohort of children born EPT. Its strong association to cognition and manual dexterity confirms that all of these factors need to be taken into account when evaluating risks in preterm born children.

  • 42.
    Bolk, Jenny
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Div, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Källén, Karin
    Lund Univ, Ctr Reprod Epidemiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Farooqi, Aijaz
    Univ Umeå, Inst Clin Sci, Unit Pediat, Umeå, Sweden..
    Hafström, Maria
    Univ Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Angered Hosp, Angered, Sweden..
    Fellman, Vineta
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, Lund, Sweden.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland..
    Åden, Ulrika
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Umeå, Inst Clin Sci, Unit Pediat, Umeå, Sweden.
    Perinatal risk factors for developmental coordination disorder in children born extremely preterm2023In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 4, p. 675-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Children born extremely preterm frequently have developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We aimed to evaluate perinatal risk factors for DCD.

    Methods

    Swedish national cohort study including 226 children born before 27 gestational weeks without major neurodevelopmental disabilities at 6.5 years. Outcome was DCD, defined as ≤5th percentile on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition. Perinatal risk factors were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression.

    Results

    DCD was present in 84/226 (37.2%) children. Of the risk factors known at 40 weeks gestation, independent and significant risk factors for DCD were: mother's age at delivery (odds ratio [OR] 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–2.80); pre-eclampsia (2.79, 1.14–6.80); mother born in a non-Nordic country (2.23, 1.00–4.99); gestational age per week increase (0.70, 0.50–0.99) and retinopathy of prematurity (2.48, 1.26–4.87). Of factors known at discharge, postnatal steroids exposure (2.24, 1.13–4.46) and mechanical ventilation (1.76, 1.06–2.09) were independent risk factors when added to the model in separate analyses.

    Conclusion

    The risk of DCD in children born extremely preterm was multifactorial and associated with gestational age largely mediated by ROP, maternal factors, pre-eclampsia, administration of postnatal steroids and mechanical ventilation. These risk factors are common among children born extremely preterm, contributing to their high risk of DCD.

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  • 43. Bolte, S.
    et al.
    Bartl-Pokorny, K.D.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Berggren, S.
    Zhang, D.
    Kostrzewa, E.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Einspieler, C.
    Pokorny, F. B.
    Jones, E. J. H.
    Roeyers, H.
    Charman, T.
    Marschik, P. B.
    How can clinicians detect and treat autism early? Methodological trends of technology use in research2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 137-144Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reviewed original research papers that used quantifiable technology to detect early autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and identified 376 studies from 34 countries from 1965 to 2013. Publications have increased significantly since 2000, with most coming from the USA. Electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging and eye tracking were the most frequently used technologies. Conclusion: The use of quantifiable technology to detect early ASD has increased in recent decades, but has had limited impact on early detection and treatment. Further scientific developments are anticipated, and we hope that they will increasingly be used in clinical practice for early ASD screening, diagnosis and intervention.

  • 44.
    Boman, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    The ongoing story of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 12, p. 1417-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Boman, K
    et al.
    Bodegård, G
    Long-term coping in childhood cancer survivors: influence of illness, treatment and demographic background factors2000In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 105-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 30 survivors of childhood cancer, long-term psychological coping with experience of disease and treatment was studied in relation to factors associated with illness, treatment and demographic background. Coping was assessed in a prior study, in which three groups of varying levels of coping where delineated (good, 40%; intermediate, 33%; poor, 27%, coping). The present study showed that poor individual coping was related to diagnosis, a shorter time of continuous complete remission, more severe illness and treatment impairments, and lower scores on a test of intellectual abilities. In addition, a longer time of treatment tended to be followed by poorer coping. However, no association was found for gender, parents' occupational level, age at illness onset, neuro-cranial irradiation, irradiation dose (total) or age at investigation. A tentative path-analysis was executed, displaying a model for the relationships between medical and demographic background variables, and for their influence on coping. It was concluded that a complex of factors--associated particularly with severity of disease and treatment--appears to be related to, and affects, coping with the illness experience. Patients' long-term coping with their illness trauma is most likely determined by multiple factors. Intellectual capabilities are related to coping.

  • 46. Boman, K
    et al.
    Bodegård, G
    Psychological long-term coping with experience of disease and treatment in childhood cancer survivors.1995In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 84, no 12, p. 1395-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood cancer, although cured, may have long-term psychological consequences for the adult survivor. The outcome of patients' coping with the illness and treatment experience was assessed in relation to a theoretical model describing optimal long-term coping with a potential psychic trauma of this nature. Thirty young adult childhood cancer survivors were studied. The average age at diagnosis was 8 years, and at evaluation 22 years. The average time since diagnosis was 13 years. The evaluations of coping were carried out independently by two psychologists, who rated material from semistructured in-depth interviews. By statistical cluster analysis three clusters were produced that could be interpreted as exhibiting "good," "intermediate" and "poor" coping, containing 40, 33, and 27%, respectively, of the total group. Overall cluster differences were statistically significant. Profile analysis revealed statistical stability and internal homogeneity in the good coping cluster and the poor coping cluster.

  • 47. Boman, K
    et al.
    Bodegård, G
    Psychological long-term coping with experience of disease and treatment in childhood cancer survivors.1997In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 86, no 9, p. 1026-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Boman, Krister K
    Assessing psychological and health-related quality of life (HRQL) late effects after childhood cancer2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1265-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Boman, Krister K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Future treatment and community service models must consider complex needs of families of increasing number of children receiving home mechanical ventilation2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1703-1705Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lampic, C
    Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, G
    Department of Clinical and experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Science, Linköping University.
    Bladh, Marie
    Department of Clinical and experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Science, Linköping University.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    How do lesbian couples compare with heterosexual IVF and spontaneously pregnant couples when it comes to parenting stress?2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 537-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study parenting stress in lesbian parents and to compare that stress with heterosexual parents following in vitro fertilization (IVF) or spontaneous pregnancies.

    METHODS: This survey took place during 2005 to 2008 and was part of the Swedish multi-centre study on gamete donation. It comprised 131 lesbian parents, 83 heterosexual IVF parents, who used their own gametes, and 118 spontaneous pregnancy parents. The participants responded to the questionnaire when the child was between 12 and 36-months-old and parenting stress was measured by the Swedish Parenting Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ).

    RESULTS: Lesbian parents experienced less parenting stress than heterosexual IVF parents when it came to the General Parenting Stress measure (p=0.001) and the sub areas of Incompetence (p<0.001), Social Isolation (p=0.033) and Role Restriction (p=0.004). They also experienced less parenting stress than heterosexual spontaneous pregnancy couples, according to the Social Isolation sub area (p=0.003). Birth mothers experienced higher stress than co-mothers and fathers, according to the Role Restriction measure (p=0.041).

    CONCLUSION: These are reassuring findings, considering the known challenges that lesbian families face in establishing their parental roles and, in particular, the challenges related to the lack of recognition of the co-mother.

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