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  • 1.
    Bergström, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Cui, Tao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Nystrand, Mats
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Microarray Immunoassay Development to Specifically Detect Autoantibodies in Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumor (SI-NET) Patients2013In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 369-370Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Caplin, M. E.
    et al.
    Baudin, E.
    Ferolla, P.
    Filosso, P.
    Garcia-Yuste, M.
    Lim, E.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Pelosi, G.
    Perren, A.
    Rossi, R. E.
    Travis, W. D.
    Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors: European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society expert consensus and recommendations for best practice for typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoids2015In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1604-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pulmonary carcinoids (PCs) are rare tumors. As there is a paucity of randomized studies, this expert consensus document represents an initiative by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society to provide guidance on their management. Patients and methods: Bibliographical searches were carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review of the relevant literature was carried out, followed by expert review. Results: PCs are well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and include low-and intermediate-grade malignant tumors, i.e. typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), respectively. Contrast CT scan is the diagnostic gold standard for PCs, but pathology examination is mandatory for their correct classification. Somatostatin receptor imaging may visualize nearly 80% of the primary tumors and is most sensitive for metastatic disease. Plasma chromogranin A can be increased in PCs. Surgery is the treatment of choice for PCs with the aim of removing the tumor and preserving as much lung tissue as possible. Resection of metastases should be considered whenever possible with curative intent. Somatostatin analogs are the first-line treatment of carcinoid syndrome and may be considered as first-line systemic antiproliferative treatment in unresectable PCs, particularly of low-grade TC and AC. Locoregional or radiotargeted therapies should be considered for metastatic disease. Systemic chemotherapy is used for progressive PCs, although cytotoxic regimens have demonstrated limited effects with etoposide and platinum combination the most commonly used, however, temozolomide has shown most clinical benefit. Conclusions: PCs are complex tumors which require a multidisciplinary approach and long-term follow-up.

  • 3. Castano, J. P.
    et al.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Maecke, H. R.
    Villabona, C.
    Vazquez-Albertino, R.
    Navarro, E.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs): new diagnostic and therapeutic challenges2014In: Cancer Metastasis Review, ISSN 0167-7659, E-ISSN 1573-7233, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 353-359Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes the current understanding of the biology of somatostatin receptor (sst), role of immunotherapy in neuroendocrine tumor (NET), new agents for PPRT, and methods to assess response and clinical benefit in NET. One of the most interesting aspects of sst biology is the recent discovery of truncated variants of the sst5 receptor subtype with unique tissue distribution and response to somatostatin (SST). These truncated receptors are associated with bad patient prognosis, decreased response to SST analogs, and may be new targets for diagnoses and treatment. IFN remains a cost-effective agent, particularly in classic mid gut carcinoids, and there is interest to continue examining immunotherapy's in this disease. PRRT remains a key strategy for treatment and imaging. In addition to the classic agents, there are a series of new agents targeting other receptors such as the incretin receptors (GLP-1R; GIPR) and other G-protein coupled receptors with great potential. With regards to therapy monitoring, the most commonly used criteria are Response Criteria Evaluation in Solid Tumors (RECIST). However, for different reasons, these criteria are not very useful in NET. Incorporation of other criteria such as Choi as well as functional imaging assessment with PET would be of great interest in this area.

  • 4.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Kozlovacki, Gordana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Treatment, prognostic markers and survival in thymic neuroendocrine tumours: A study from a single tertiary referral centre2013In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 289-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thymic neuroendocrine tumours (TNETs) are uncommon but malignant neoplasms, usually associated with a poor prognosis. The number of cases reported is limited to a few hundreds and there are few prognostic factors available. All 28 patients (22 male, 6 female; median age 46.5 years) with thymic neuroendocrine tumour, treated at the Department of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden between 1985 and 2011 were studied. The overall 3, 5 and 10-year survival was 89%, 79% and 41% respectively. Ki67<10% (p=0.018) as well as surgical resection (p=0.001) and macroscopically radical primary surgery (p=0.034) was associated with increased survival. Staging & grading according to Masaoka and ENETS systems did not correlate with survival. However, a modified ENETS grading showed a positive correlation (p=0.015). Median time to progression was 20.5 months with Temozolomide and 18 months with platinum based therapy. Partial responses were noted in three patients (38%) treated with platinum based therapy and in two patients (20%) treated with Temozolomide based therapy. High proliferative rate, measured by Ki67 index, and absence of macroscopically radical primary resection as well as no surgical resection are three negative prognostic factors in patients with TNETs. Temozolomide or Platinum based chemotherapy should be considered as first-line medical therapy in patients with metastatic or non-resectable tumours.

  • 5.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Fanola, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lindholm, Daniel P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Effect of Temozolomide in Patients with Metastatic Bronchial Carcinoids2013In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 151-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Metastatic bronchial carcinoids are rare neoplasms, where efforts of medical treatment so far have been disappointing. A previous study from our center indicated that temozolomide might be of value. Materials and Methods: All patients with progressive metastatic bronchial carcinoid treated with tennozolomide as monotherapy at our center between 2004 and 2010 (n = 31) were included in this retrospective study. 14 tumors were classified as typical and 15 as atypical carcinoids, whereas 2 tumors could not be classified. Temozolomide was given on 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks. Toxicity was evaluable in 28 of 31 patients, and 22 patients were evaluable by RECIST 1.1. Results: There were no complete responses. A partial response was seen in 3 patients (14%), stable disease in 11(52%) and progressive disease in 7 patients (33%). Median progression-free survival was 5.3 months and median overall survival was 23.2 months from the start of temozolomide. Toxcities grade 3-4 were noted in 4 patients, thrombocytopenia (n =3) and leukopenia (n = 1). Conclusion: Temozolomide as monotherapy shows activity in metastatic bronchial carcinoids. Regimens combining tennozolomide with other agents (e.g. capecitabine and/or bevacizumab, everolimus, radiolabeled somatostatin analogues) should be further studied in these patients. Copyright (C) 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 6.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumors to the Breast Are More Common than Previously Thought. A Diagnostic Pitfall?2013In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1701-1706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the breast have been described as a rare phenomenon. Presentation, imaging results, and cytopathologic findings of these tumours may closely mimic those of a mammary carcinoma. This study was a retrospective review of 661 patients with metastatic NETs, of whom 280 were females, treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Patients with pathological breast lesions were identified. Histopathological slides from available NET breast lesions were analyzed for mammary carcinoma and neuroendocrine markers. We have identified 20 female patients with NET metastases to the breast, 11/235 with small intestinal NETs, 8/55 with lung NETs, and 1/6 with thymic NETs. There were no male patients with NET metastatic to the breast. Four patients had their breast lesion initially diagnosed as mammary carcinoma. Retrospectively, these lesions showed negative staining for mammary carcinoma markers. Metastases to the breast from neuroendocrine tumors may be more common than previously thought. Patients with a lesion to the breast and symptoms typical for NET may benefit from additional histopathological investigation, because NET metastases and mammary carcinoma have different immunohistochemical profiles.

  • 7.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Bioinformatic Challenges in Clinical Diagnostic Application of Targeted Next Generation Sequencing: Experience from Pheochromocytoma2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e0133210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated equal quality of targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) compared to Sanger Sequencing. Whereas these novel sequencing processes have a validated robust performance, choice of enrichment method and different available bioinformatic software as reliable analysis tool needs to be further investigated in a diagnostic setting. Methods DNA from 21 patients with genetic variants in SDHB, VHL, EPAS1, RET, (n=17) or clinical criteria of NF1 syndrome (n=4) were included. Targeted NGS was performed using Truseq custom amplicon enrichment sequenced on an Illumina MiSEQ instrument. Results were analysed in parallel using three different bioinformatics pipelines; (1) Commercially available MiSEQ Reporter, fully automatized and integrated software, (2) CLC Genomics Workbench, graphical interface based software, also commercially available, and ICP (3) an in-house scripted custom bioinformatic tool. Results A tenfold read coverage was achieved in between 95-98% of targeted bases. All workflows had alignment of reads to SDHA and NF1 pseudogenes. Compared to Sanger sequencing, variant calling revealed a sensitivity ranging from 83 to 100% and a specificity of 99.9-100%. Only MiSEQ reporter identified all pathogenic variants in both sequencing runs. Conclusions We conclude that targeted next generation sequencing have equal quality compared to Sanger sequencing. Enrichment specificity and the bioinformatic performance need to be carefully assessed in a diagnostic setting. As acceptable accuracy was noted for a fully automated bioinformatic workflow, we suggest that processing of NGS data could be performed without expert bioinformatics skills utilizing already existing commercially available bioinformatics tools.

  • 8.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Delgado Verdugo, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    MAX mutations status in Swedish patients with pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma tumours2014In: Familial Cancer, ISSN 1389-9600, E-ISSN 1573-7292, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 121-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and Paraganglioma are rare tumours originating from neuroendocrine cells. Up to 60 % of cases have either germline or somatic mutation in one of eleven described susceptibility loci, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, RET, NF1, TMEM127 and MYC associated factor-X (MAX). Recently, germline mutations in MAX were found to confer susceptibility to PCC and paraganglioma (PGL). A subsequent multicentre study found about 1 % of PCCs and PGLs to have germline or somatic mutations in MAX. However, there has been no study investigating the frequency of MAX mutations in a Scandinavian cohort. We analysed tumour specimens from 63 patients with PCC and PGL treated at Uppsala University hospital, Sweden, for re-sequencing of MAX using automated Sanger sequencing. Our results show that 0 % (0/63) of tumours had mutations in MAX. Allele frequencies of known single nucleotide polymorphisms rs4902359, rs45440292, rs1957948 and rs1957949 corresponded to those available in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database. We conclude that MAX mutations remain unusual events and targeted genetic screening should be considered after more common genetic events have been excluded.

  • 9.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Nordling, Margareta
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Integrative Genetic Characterization and Phenotype Correlations in Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Tumours2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e86756-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About 60% of Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and Paraganglioma (PGL) patients have either germline or somatic mutations in one of the 12 proposed disease causing genes; SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, RET, NF1, TMEM127, MAX and H-RAS. Selective screening for germline mutations is routinely performed in clinical management of these diseases. Testing for somatic alterations is not performed on a regular basis because of limitations in interpreting the results. Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate genetic events and phenotype correlations in a large cohort of PCC and PGL tumours. Methods: A total of 101 tumours from 89 patients with PCC and PGL were re-sequenced for a panel of 10 disease causing genes using automated Sanger sequencing. Selected samples were analysed with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and/or SNParray. Results: Pathogenic genetic variants were found in tumours from 33 individual patients (37%), 14 (16%) were discovered in constitutional DNA and 16 (18%) were confirmed as somatic. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed in 1/1 SDHB, 11/11 VHL and 3/3 NF1-associated tumours. In patients with somatic mutations there were no recurrences in contrast to carriers of germline mutations (P = 0.022). SDHx/VHL/ EPAS1 associated cases had higher norepinephrine output (P = 0.03) and lower epinephrine output (P<0.001) compared to RET/NF1/H-RAS cases. Conclusion: Somatic mutations are frequent events in PCC and PGL tumours. Tumour genotype may be further investigated as prognostic factors in these diseases. Growing evidence suggest that analysis of tumour DNA could have an impact on the management of these patients.

  • 10.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Verdugo, Alberto Delgado
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Next-generation sequencing in the clinical genetic screening of patients with pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma2013In: Endocrine connections, ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Recent findings have shown that up to 60% of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are caused by germline or somatic mutations in one of the 11 hitherto known susceptibility genes: SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, HIF2A (EPAS1), RET, NF1, TMEM127 and MAX. This list of genes is constantly growing and the 11 genes together consist of 144 exons. A genetic screening test is extensively time consuming and expensive. Hence, we introduce next-generation sequencing (NGS) as a time-efficient and cost-effective alternative.

    METHODS:

    Tumour lesions from three patients with apparently sporadic PCC were subjected to whole exome sequencing utilizing Agilent Sureselect target enrichment system and Illumina Hi seq platform. Bioinformatics analysis was performed in-house using commercially available software. Variants in PCC and PGL susceptibility genes were identified.

    RESULTS:

    We have identified 16 unique genetic variants in PCC susceptibility loci in three different PCC, spending less than a 30-min hands-on, in-house time. Two patients had one unique variant each that was classified as probably and possibly pathogenic: NF1 Arg304Ter and RET Tyr791Phe. The RET variant was verified by Sanger sequencing.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    NGS can serve as a fast and cost-effective method in the clinical genetic screening of PCC. The bioinformatics analysis may be performed without expert skills. We identified process optimization, characterization of unknown variants and determination of additive effects of multiple variants as key issues to be addressed by future studies.

  • 11.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Verdugo, Alberto Delgado
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stalberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Somatic Mutations in H-RAS in Sporadic Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Identified by Exome Sequencing2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 7, p. E1266-E1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Up to 60% of pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are associated with either somatic or germline mutations in established PCC and PGL susceptibility loci. Most unexplained cases are characterized by an increased activity of the RAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathway. Mutations in RAS subtypes H, K, and N are common in human cancers; however, previous studies have been inconsistent regarding the mutational status of RAS in PCC and PGL. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify novel disease causing genes in PCC and PGL tumors. Design, setting, and participants: Four benign and sporadic PCC and PGL tumors were subjected to whole exome sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq Platform. Sequences were processed by CLC genomics 4.9 bioinformatics software and the acquired list of genetic variants was filtered against the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Findings were validated in an additional 78 PCC and PGL tumor lesions. Results: Exome sequencing identified 2 cases with somatic mutations in the H-RAS. In total, 6.9% (n = 4/58) of tumors negative for mutations in major PCC and PGL loci had mutations in H-RAS: G13R, Q61K, and Q61R. There were 3 PCC and 1 PGL; all had sporadic presentation with benign tumor characteristics and substantial increases in norepinephrine and/or epinephrine. H-RAS tumors were exclusively found in male patients (P = .007). Conclusions: We identified recurrent somatic H-RAS mutations in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Tumors with H-RAS mutations had activation of the RAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathway and were associated with male PCC patients having benign and sporadic disease characteristics. H-RAS could serve as a prognostic and predictive marker as well as a novel therapeutic target.

  • 12.
    Cui, Tao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Novel Circulating and Tissue Biomarkers for Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumors and Lung Carcinoids2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) and lung carcinoids (LCs) are relatively indolent tumors, which originate from neuroendocrine (NE) cells of the diffuse NE system. Metastases can spread before diagnosis. Thus, potential cures become unavailable, which entitles new biomarker development. Indeed, we aimed at developing Ma2 autoantibodies and olfactory receptor 51E1 (OR51E1) as potential novel biomarkers and exploring other candidate protein markers in patients’ serum.

    First, we established a sensitive, specific and reliable anti-Ma2 indirect ELISA to distinguish SI-NET patients from healthy controls. We detected longer progression-free and recurrence-free survivals in patients expressing low anti-Ma2 titers. Moreover, a high anti-Ma2 titer was more sensitive than chromogranin A for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of SI-NET patients.

    We then investigated OR51E1 expression in SI-NETs and LCs. OR51E1 mRNA expression, analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, was high in microdissected SI-NET cells, in LC cell lines and in frozen LC specimens. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed abundant OR51E1 protein expression in SI-NETs. OR51E1 co-expressed with vesicular-monoamine-transporter-1 in the majority of normal and neoplastic enterochromaffin cells.

    Furthermore, the study on LCs revealed that OR51E1, somatostatin receptor (SSTR) 2, SSTR3, and SSTR5 are expressed in 85%, 71%, 25% and 39% of typical carcinoids (TCs), whereas in 86%, 79%, 43% and 36% of atypical carcinoids (ACs). Based on the proposed IHC scoring system, in the LC cases, where all SSTR subtypes were absent, membrane OR51E1 expression was detected in 10 out of 17 TCs and 1 out of 2 ACs. Moreover, higher OR51E1 scores were detected in 5 out of 6 OctreoScan-negative LC lesions.

    In addition, the last presented study used a novel suspension bead array, which targeted 124 unique proteins, by using Human Protein Atlas antibodies, to profile biotinylated serum samples from SI-NET patients and healthy controls. We showed 9 proteins, IGFBP2, IGF1, SHKBP1, ETS1, IL1α, STX2, MAML3, EGR3 and XIAP as significant contributors to tumor classification.

    In conclusion, we proposed Ma2 autoantibodies as a sensitive circulating marker for SI-NET recurrence; OR51E1 as a candidate therapeutic target for SI-NETs; whereas as a novel diagnostic marker for LCs and 9 serum proteins as novel potential SI-NET markers.

    List of papers
    1. Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 12, p. e16010-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2) as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. Methodology/Principal Findings: A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC), to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. Conclusion: Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA) for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

     

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-140192 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0016010 (DOI)000285793600058 ()21209860 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-01-04 Created: 2011-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Olfactory receptor 51E1 protein as a potential novel tissue biomarker for small intestine neuroendocrine carcinomas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Olfactory receptor 51E1 protein as a potential novel tissue biomarker for small intestine neuroendocrine carcinomas
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 168, no 2, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Late diagnosis hinders proper management of small intestine neuroendocrine carcinoma (SI-NEC) patients. The olfactory receptor, family 51, subfamily E, member 1 (OR51E1) has been reported as a potential novel SI-NEC marker, without protein expression recognition. Thus, we further studied whether the encoded protein may be a novel SI-NEC clinical biomarker.

    DESIGN: OR51E1 coding sequence was cloned using total RNA from SI-NEC patient specimens. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis explored OR51E1 expression in laser capture microdissected SI-NEC cells and adjacent microenvironment cells. Moreover, immunohistochemistry investigated OR51E1 protein expression on operation and biopsy material from primary SI-NECs, mesentery, and liver metastases from 70 patients. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence studies explored the potential co-localization of the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (SLC18A1, generally referred to as VMAT1) and OR51E1 in the neoplastic cells and in the intestinal mucosa adjacent to the tumor.

    RESULTS: OR51E1 coding sequence analysis showed absence of mutation in SI-NEC patients at different stages of disease. OR51E1 expression was higher in microdissected SI-NEC cells than in the adjacent microenvironment cells. Furthermore, both membranous and cytoplasmic OR51E1 immunostaining patterns were detected in both primary SI-NECs and metastases. Briefly, 18/43 primary tumors, 7/28 mesentery metastases, and 6/18 liver metastases were 'positive' for OR51E1 in more than 50% of the tumor cells. In addition, co-localization studies showed that OR51E1 was expressed in >50% of the VMAT1 immunoreactive tumor cells and of the enterochromaffin cells in the intestinal mucosa adjacent to the tumor.

    CONCLUSION: OR51E1 protein is a potential novel clinical tissue biomarker for SI-NECs. Moreover, we suggest its potential therapeutic molecular target development using solid tumor radioimmunotherapy.

    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology Cancer and Oncology Endocrinology and Diabetes Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205136 (URN)10.1530/EJE-12-0814 (DOI)000315577400023 ()23184910 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-08-14 Created: 2013-08-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Olfactory Receptor 51E1 as a Novel Target for Diagnosis in Somatostatin Receptor Negative Lung Carcinoids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Olfactory Receptor 51E1 as a Novel Target for Diagnosis in Somatostatin Receptor Negative Lung Carcinoids
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0952-5041, E-ISSN 1479-6813, Vol. 51, p. 277-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) may be used in lung carcinoids (LCs) for diagnosis and therapy, although additional targets are clearly warranted. This study aimed to investigate whether olfactory receptor 51E1 (OR51E1) may be a potential target for LCs. OR51E1 coding sequence was analyzed in LC cell lines, NCI-H727 and NCI-H720. OR51E1 transcript expression was investigated in LC cell lines and frozen specimens by quantitative real-time PCR. OR51E1, SSTR2, SSTR3, and SSTR5 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded sections of 73 typical carcinoids (TCs), 14 atypical carcinoids (ACs) and 11 regional/distant metastases, and compared to OctreoScan data. Immunohistochemistry results were rendered semiquantitatively on a scale from 0 to 3+, taking into account the cellular compartmentalization (membrane vs. cytoplasm) and the percentage of tumor cells (<50% vs. >50%). Our results showed that wild-type OR51E1 transcript was expressed in both LC cell lines. OR51E1 mRNA was expressed in 9/12 TCs and 7/9 ACs (p=NS). Immunohistochemically, OR51E1, SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5 were detected in 85%, 71%, 25% and 39% of TCs, and in 86%, 79%, 43% and 36% of ACs, respectively. OR51E1 immunohistochemical scores were higher or equal compared to SSTRs in 79% of TCs and 86% of ACs. Furthermore, in the LC cases where all SSTR subtypes were lacking, membrane OR51E1 expression was detected in 10/17 TCs and 1/2 ACs. Moreover, higher OR51E1 immunohistochemical scores were detected in 5/6 OctreoScan-negative LC lesions. Therefore, the high expression of OR51E1 in LCs makes it a potential novel diagnostic target in SSTR-negative tumors.

    Keyword
    Olfactory receptor 51E1, lung carcinoids, novel target for diagnosis, somatostatin receptors, OctreoScan
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology Cancer and Oncology Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Research subject
    Endocrinology and Diabetology; Lung Medicine; Molecular Biology; Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205526 (URN)10.1530/JME-13-0144 (DOI)000329207100012 ()23969981 (PubMedID)
    Note

    De två första författarna delar första författarskapet.

    Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Identification of Candidate Serum Proteins for Classifying Well-Differentiated Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of Candidate Serum Proteins for Classifying Well-Differentiated Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, p. e81712-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patients with well-differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (WD-SI-NET) are most often diagnosed at a metastatic stage of disease, which reduces possibilities for a curative treatment. Thus new approaches for earlier detection and improved monitoring of the disease are required.

    Materials and methods

    Suspension bead arrays targeting 124 unique proteins with antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were used to profile biotinylated serum samples. Discoveries from a cohort of 77 individuals were followed up in a cohort of 132 individuals both including healthy controls as well as patients with untreated primary WD-SI-NETs, lymph node metastases and liver metastases.

    Results

    A set of 20 antibodies suggested promising proteins for further verification based on technically verified statistical significance. Proceeding, we assessed the classification performance in an independent cohort of patient serum, achieving, classification accuracy of up to 85% with different subsets of antibodies in respective pairwise group comparisons. The protein profiles of nine targets, namely IGFBP2, IGF1, SHKBP1, ETS1, IL1α, STX2, MAML3, EGR3 and XIAP were verified as significant contributors to tumor classification.

    Conclusions

    We propose new potential protein biomarker candidates for classifying WD-SI-NET at different stage of disease. Further evaluation of these proteins in larger sample sets and with alternative approaches is needed in order to further improve our understanding of their functional relation to WD-SI-NET and their eventual use in diagnostics.

    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Cell and Molecular Biology Cancer and Oncology Endocrinology and Diabetes Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Research subject
    Endocrinology and Diabetology; Molecular Biology; Molecular Biotechnology; Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205549 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0081712 (DOI)000327543500120 ()
    Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Cui, Tao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hurtig, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Elgue, Graciela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Veronesi, Giulia
    Essaghir, Ahmed
    Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste
    Pelosi, Giuseppe
    Alimohammadi, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 12, p. e16010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2) as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. Methodology/Principal Findings: A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC), to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. Conclusion: Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA) for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

     

  • 14.
    Cui, Tao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olfactory Receptor 51E1 is a Potential Novel Tissue Biomarker for the Diagnosis of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumors2013In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 373-373Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Cui, Tao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olfactory receptor 51E1 is a potential novel tissue biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors2012In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 177, no Suppl, p. S18-S18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Cui, Tao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Cunningham, Janet L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olfactory receptor 51E1 protein as a potential novel tissue biomarker for small intestine neuroendocrine carcinomas2013In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 168, no 2, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Late diagnosis hinders proper management of small intestine neuroendocrine carcinoma (SI-NEC) patients. The olfactory receptor, family 51, subfamily E, member 1 (OR51E1) has been reported as a potential novel SI-NEC marker, without protein expression recognition. Thus, we further studied whether the encoded protein may be a novel SI-NEC clinical biomarker.

    DESIGN: OR51E1 coding sequence was cloned using total RNA from SI-NEC patient specimens. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis explored OR51E1 expression in laser capture microdissected SI-NEC cells and adjacent microenvironment cells. Moreover, immunohistochemistry investigated OR51E1 protein expression on operation and biopsy material from primary SI-NECs, mesentery, and liver metastases from 70 patients. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence studies explored the potential co-localization of the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (SLC18A1, generally referred to as VMAT1) and OR51E1 in the neoplastic cells and in the intestinal mucosa adjacent to the tumor.

    RESULTS: OR51E1 coding sequence analysis showed absence of mutation in SI-NEC patients at different stages of disease. OR51E1 expression was higher in microdissected SI-NEC cells than in the adjacent microenvironment cells. Furthermore, both membranous and cytoplasmic OR51E1 immunostaining patterns were detected in both primary SI-NECs and metastases. Briefly, 18/43 primary tumors, 7/28 mesentery metastases, and 6/18 liver metastases were 'positive' for OR51E1 in more than 50% of the tumor cells. In addition, co-localization studies showed that OR51E1 was expressed in >50% of the VMAT1 immunoreactive tumor cells and of the enterochromaffin cells in the intestinal mucosa adjacent to the tumor.

    CONCLUSION: OR51E1 protein is a potential novel clinical tissue biomarker for SI-NECs. Moreover, we suggest its potential therapeutic molecular target development using solid tumor radioimmunotherapy.

  • 17.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Janson, Eva T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    The biological hallmarks of ileal carcinoids2011In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1353-1360Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endocrine tumours derived from the small intestine, ileal carcinoids, produce and secrete the hormones tachykinins and serotonin, which induces the specific symptoms related to the tumour. Because of their low proliferation rate, they are often discovered at late stages when metastases have occurred. The biology that characterizes these tumours differs in many ways from what is generally recognized for other malignancies. In this overview, the current knowledge on the development and progression of ileal carcinoids is described.

  • 18.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Agarwal, Smriti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Tachykinins in endocrine tumors and the carcinoid syndrome2008In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 159, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    A new antibody, active against the common tachykinin (TK) C-terminal. was used to study TK expression in patients with endocrine tumors and a possible association between plasma-TK levels and symptoms of diarrhea and flush in patients with metastasizing ileocecal serotonin-producing carcinoid tumors (MSPCs).

    Method

    TK, serotonin and chromogranin A (CgA) immunoreactivity (IR) was studied by immunohistochemistry in tissue samples from 33 midgut carcinoids and 72 other endocrine tumors. Circulating TK (P-TK) and urinary-5 hydroxyindoleacetic acid (U-5HIAA) concentrations were measured in 42 patients with MSPCs before treatment and related to symptoms in patients with the carcinoid syndrome. Circulating CgA concentrations were also measured in 39 out of the 42 patients.

    Results

    All MSPCs displayed serotonin and strong TK expression. TK-IR was also seen in all serotonin-producing lung and appendix carcinoids. None of the other tumors examined contained TK-IR cells. Concentrations of P-TK, P-CgA, and U-5HIAA were elevated in patients experiencing daily episodes of either flush or diarrhea, when compared with patients experiencing occasional or none of these symptoms. In a Spearman partial rank test, the correlation of P-TK with daily diarrhea was independent of both U-5HIAA and CgA levels.

    Conclusion

    We found that TK synthesis occurs in serotonin-IR tumors and that P-TK levels are significantly correlated with symptoms of flush and diarrhea in patients with MSPCs. This is. to our knowledge, the first report demonstrating an independent correlation of P-TKs with carcinoid diarrhea, a symptom that is customarily regarded as serotonin mediated. Further investigations may present opportunities for new therapeutic possibilities.

  • 19.
    Darmanis, Spyros
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cui, Tao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Identification of Candidate Serum Proteins for Classifying Well-Differentiated Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, p. e81712-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patients with well-differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (WD-SI-NET) are most often diagnosed at a metastatic stage of disease, which reduces possibilities for a curative treatment. Thus new approaches for earlier detection and improved monitoring of the disease are required.

    Materials and methods

    Suspension bead arrays targeting 124 unique proteins with antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were used to profile biotinylated serum samples. Discoveries from a cohort of 77 individuals were followed up in a cohort of 132 individuals both including healthy controls as well as patients with untreated primary WD-SI-NETs, lymph node metastases and liver metastases.

    Results

    A set of 20 antibodies suggested promising proteins for further verification based on technically verified statistical significance. Proceeding, we assessed the classification performance in an independent cohort of patient serum, achieving, classification accuracy of up to 85% with different subsets of antibodies in respective pairwise group comparisons. The protein profiles of nine targets, namely IGFBP2, IGF1, SHKBP1, ETS1, IL1α, STX2, MAML3, EGR3 and XIAP were verified as significant contributors to tumor classification.

    Conclusions

    We propose new potential protein biomarker candidates for classifying WD-SI-NET at different stage of disease. Further evaluation of these proteins in larger sample sets and with alternative approaches is needed in order to further improve our understanding of their functional relation to WD-SI-NET and their eventual use in diagnostics.

  • 20.
    Ebeling-Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Garske-Roman, Ulrike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nyman, Rickard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Radioembolization with 90Y-Labelled Resin Microspheres in Patients with Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumors2015In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 102, no 1-2, p. 136-137Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Eriksson, B
    et al.
    Örlefors, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Westlin, J E
    Bergström, Mats
    Långström, Bengt
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    [PET in neuroendocrine tumors].1998In: Nordisk Medicin, ISSN 0029-1420, Vol. 113, no 9, p. 308-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    With the radionuclide tracers available today, 50-90 per cent of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastro-intestinal tract can be visualised with PET (positron-emission tomography). PET also enables the effect of tumour treatment to be monitored in terms of biochemical and functional variables, which is not possible with other radiological techniques. Owing to the very good tumour resolution possible with PET, it serves as a complement to other routine methods such as computed tomography and ultrasonography, and can be used to screen the chest and abdomen for small primary tumours that can not be detected with other methods. In several pre-operative trials PET has been shown to demonstrate more changes in the pancreas and liver than was possible with other methods. In the near future it will be possible to demonstrate the presence of and quantify growth factor receptors, hormones, enzymes, DNA synthesis, mRNA synthesis and protein synthesis. Access to these tumour biological data will be of crucial importance to the individualisation of treatment.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Bergström, Mats
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Juhlin, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Örlefors, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. onk endo.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    The role of PET in localization of neuroendocrine and adrenocortical tumors2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 970, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron emission tomography (PET) supplies a range of labeled compounds to be used for the characterization of tumor biochemistry. Some of these have proved to be of value for clinical diagnosis, treatment follow up, and clinical research. The first routinely used PET tracer in oncology, 18F-labeled deoxyglucose (FDG), was successfully used for diagnosis of cancer, reflecting increased expression of glucose transporter in cancerous tissue. This tracer, however, usually does not show sufficient uptake in well-differentiated tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors. We developed a tracer more specific to neuroendocrine tumors—the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) labeled with 11C—and demonstrated increased uptake and irreversible trapping of this tracer in carcinoid tumors. The uptake was so selective and the resolution was so high that we could detect more liver and lymph node metastases with PET than with CT or octreotide scintigraphy. To further improve the method, especially to reduce the high renal excretion of the tracer producing streaky artifacts in the area of interest, we introduced premedication by the decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, leading to a six-fold decreased renal excretion while the tumor uptake increased three-fold, hence improving the visualization of the tumors.

    11C-labeled l-DOPA was evaluated as an alternative tracer, especially for endocrine pancreatic tumors, which usually do not demonstrate enhanced urinary serotonin metabolites. However, only half of the EPTs, mainly functioning tumors, could be detected with l-DOPA. Instead 5-HTP seems to be a universal tracer for EPT and foregut carcinoids. With new, more sensitive PET cameras, larger field of view and procedures for whole-body coverage, the PET examination with 5-HTP is now routinely performed as reduced whole-body PET examinations with coverage of the thorax and abdomen. With this method we have been able to visualize small neuroendocrine lesions in the pancreas and thorax (e.g., ACTH-producing bronchial carcinoids) not detectable by any other method, including octreotide scintigraphy, MRI, and CT. Another tracer, the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor, metomidate labeled with 11C, was developed to simplify diagnosis and follow-up of patients with incidentalomas. A large series of patients with incidentally found adrenal masses have been investigated and so far all lesions of adrenocortical origin have been easily identified because of exceedingly high uptake of 11C-metomidate, whereas noncortical lesions showed very low uptake. In addition, adrenocortical cancer shows high uptake, suggesting that this PET tracer can be used for staging purposes.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Örlefors, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Långstrom, Bengt
    Bergström, Mats
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Positron emission tomography in neuroendocrine tumours1999In: The Italian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1125-8055, Vol. Suppl 2, p. S167-S171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron emission tomography is an in vivo tracer and imaging technique that utilizes short-lived positron emitting radionuclides (11C, 15O, 13N, 18F) with half-lives ranging between 2 min and 2 hours. These radionuclides are interesting from the labelling viewpoint since they are natural constituents of most biologically active compounds. The short half-life is an advantage with regard to the irradiation dose to the patient but it is also a limitation since it requires the production of these radionuclides in close vicinity to the positron emission tomography camera.

  • 24.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Örlefors, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bergström, Mats
    Långström, Bengt
    PET Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Developments in PET for the detection of endocrine tumours2005In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research. Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, ISSN 1521-690X, E-ISSN 1532-1908, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 311-324Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron emission tomography (PET) supplies a range of labelled compounds to be used for the characterization of tumour biochemistry. Some of these have proved to be of value for clinical diagnosis, treatment follow-up, and clinical research. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET scanning is now a widely accepted imaging approach in clinical oncology, reflecting increased expression of glucose transporters in cancerous tissue. This tracer, however, does not show sufficient uptake in well-differentiated tumours such as neuroendocrine tumours. Endocrine tumours have the unique characteristics of taking up and decarboxylating amine precursors. These so-called APUD characteristics offer highly specific targets for PET tracers. Using this approach, radiopharmaceuticals such as [11C]-5-hydroxytryptophan and [11C]-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine for localization of carcinoid and endocrine pancreatic tumours, 6-[18F]-fluorodopamine and [11C]-hydroxyephedrine for phaeochromocytomas, and [11C]-metomidate for adrenal cortical tumours have been developed. Functional imaging with PET using these compounds is now being employed to complement rather than replace other imaging modalities. Development of new PET radiopharmaceuticals may in the future allow in vivo detection of tumour biological properties, such as malignant potential and responsiveness to treatment.

  • 25. Fazio, Nicola
    et al.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Grossman, Ashley
    Saletan, Stephen
    Klimovsky, Judith
    Panneerselvam, Ashok
    Wolin, Edward M.
    Everolimus Plus Octreotide Long-Acting Repeatable in Patients With Advanced Lung Neuroendocrine Tumors Analysis of the Phase 3, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled RADIANT-2 Study2013In: Chest, ISSN 0012-3692, E-ISSN 1931-3543, Vol. 143, no 4, p. 955-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has increased approximately fivefold since the 1980s. A similar increase in the incidence of lung NETs has been reported, but therapy has not been optimized. Methods: This exploratory subanalysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of everolimus plus octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAIR) in a cohort of patients with low- to intermediate-grade advanced lung NET from the phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled RADIANT-2 (RAD001 in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors) study. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included objective response rate, overall survival, change from baseline in biomarker levels, and safety outcomes. Results: Patients were randomly assigned to everolimus plus octreotide LAIR (n = 33) or placebo plus octreotide LAIR (n = 11). Median PFS was 13.63 months in the everolimus plus octreotide LAIR arm compared with 5.59, months in the placebo plus octreotide LAIR arm (relative risk for progression: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.31-1.68; P = .228). More patients receiving everolimus plus octreotide LAR (67%) experienced minor tumor shrinkage (not partial response as per RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors]) than those receiving placebo plus octreotide LAIR (27%). Most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) included stomatitis, rash, diarrhea, and asthenia. This was consistent with the overall RADIANT-2 trial and the safety profile of everolimus. Conclusions: This exploratory subgroup analysis of the RADIANT-2 trial indicates that in patients with advanced lung NET, the addition of everolimus to octreotide LAIR improves median PFS by 2.4-fold compared with placebo plus octreotide LAIR. These clinically significant observations support the continued evaluation of everolimus treatment regimens in this patient population. Trial registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00412061; PRL: www.clinicaltrials.gov CHEST 2013; 143(4):955-962

  • 26.
    Fjällskog, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Ludvigsen, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Janson, Eva T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes 1 to 5 in tumor tissue and intratumoral vessels in malignant endocrine pancreatic tumors2003In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin analogs are well established in the treatment of malignant endocrine pancreatic tumors (EPTs). Our goal is to individualize their treatment using receptor-subtype-specific analogs and, therefore, exploring the receptor expression is highly important. We have examined the expression of somatostatin receptor (sst) subtypes 1–5 on tumor cells and in intratumoral vessels in 28 tumor tissues from malignant EPTs with immunohistochemistry using sst-subtype-specific polyclonal antibodies. We found that sst2 and sst4 stained positive in 90% and sst1 in 70% of the tumor tissues, whereas sst3 and sst5 stained positive in only 50% of the tumor tissues. Sst expression in intratumoral vessels was high for sst2 and sst4 (80%), moderate for sst1 (40%), and low for sst3 and sst5 (10%). The ssts were evenly distributed among the different tumor subtypes. However, tumors belonging to the same subgroup of EPTs showed a variable expression of receptor subtypes. No differences in receptor-subtype expression could be seen between poorly and well-differentiated tumors, nor between primary tumors and metastases. Prior medical treatment did not influence sst expression pattern. In conclusion, sst2 and sst4 were expressed in most tumor tissues and intratumoral vessels from EPTs. However, sst3 and sst5 were lacking in half of the tumor tissues and in most of the intratumoral vessels. These differences indicate the importance of determining each tumor’s subset of receptors before treatment with receptor-subtype-specific analogs is initiated. The importance of sst expression in intratumoral vessels is not yet known.

  • 27.
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Rasi, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Malmqvist, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Pasupulati, Saichand
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Pakalapati, Geeta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandgren, Johanna
    de Stahl, Teresita Diaz
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Score, Joannah
    Cross, Nicholas C. P.
    Absher, Devin
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Mosaic loss of chromosome Y in peripheral blood is associated with shorter survival and higher risk of cancer2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 624-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incidence and mortality for sex-unspecific cancers are higher among men, a fact that is largely unexplained(1,2). Furthermore, age-related loss of chromosome Y (LOY) is frequent in normal hematopoietic cells(3,4), but the phenotypic consequences of LOY have been elusive(5-10). From analysis of 1,153 elderly men, we report that LOY in peripheral blood was associated with risks of all-cause mortality (hazards ratio (HR) = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-3.13; 637 events) and non-hematological cancer mortality (HR = 3.62, 95% CI = 1.56-8.41; 132 events). LOY affected at least 8.2% of the subjects in this cohort, and median survival times among men with LOY were 5.5 years shorter. Association of LOY with risk of all-cause mortality was validated in an independent cohort (HR = 3.66) in which 20.5% of subjects showed LOY. These results illustrate the impact of post-zygotic mosaicism on disease risk, could explain why males are more frequently affected by cancer and suggest that chromosome Y is important in processes beyond sex determination. LOY in blood could become a predictive biomarker of male carcinogenesis.

  • 28.
    Georgantzi, Kleopatra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Jakobson, Åke
    Department of Womeńs and Childreńs Health, Astrid Lindgren Childreńs Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christofferson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Differentiated expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes in experimental models and clinical neuroblastoma2011In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 584-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a solid tumor of childhood originating from the adrenal medulla or sympathetic nervous system. Somatostatin (SS) is an important regulator of neural and neuroendocrine function, its actions being mediated through five specific membrane receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the different somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) in NB tumor cells that may form targets for future therapeutic development.

    PROCEDURE:

    Tumor specimens from 11 children with stage II-IV disease were collected before and/or after chemotherapy. Experimental tumors derived from five human NB cell lines were grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Expression of SSRTs, the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A (CgA) and SS was detected by immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies.

    RESULTS:

    SSTR2 was detected in 90%, SSTR5 in 79%, SSTR1 in 74%, SSTR3 in 68% whereas SSTR4 was expressed in 21% of the clinical tumors. The experimental tumors expressed SSTRs in a high but variable frequency. All clinical tumors showed immunoreactivity for CgA but not for SS.

    CONCLUSION:

    The frequent expression of SSTRs indicates that treatment with unlabeled or radiolabeled SS analogs should be further explored in NB.

  • 29.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cui, Tao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pelosi, Giuseppe
    European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Olfactory Receptor 51E1 as a Novel Target for Diagnosis in Somatostatin Receptor Negative Lung Carcinoids2013In: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0952-5041, E-ISSN 1479-6813, Vol. 51, p. 277-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) may be used in lung carcinoids (LCs) for diagnosis and therapy, although additional targets are clearly warranted. This study aimed to investigate whether olfactory receptor 51E1 (OR51E1) may be a potential target for LCs. OR51E1 coding sequence was analyzed in LC cell lines, NCI-H727 and NCI-H720. OR51E1 transcript expression was investigated in LC cell lines and frozen specimens by quantitative real-time PCR. OR51E1, SSTR2, SSTR3, and SSTR5 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded sections of 73 typical carcinoids (TCs), 14 atypical carcinoids (ACs) and 11 regional/distant metastases, and compared to OctreoScan data. Immunohistochemistry results were rendered semiquantitatively on a scale from 0 to 3+, taking into account the cellular compartmentalization (membrane vs. cytoplasm) and the percentage of tumor cells (<50% vs. >50%). Our results showed that wild-type OR51E1 transcript was expressed in both LC cell lines. OR51E1 mRNA was expressed in 9/12 TCs and 7/9 ACs (p=NS). Immunohistochemically, OR51E1, SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5 were detected in 85%, 71%, 25% and 39% of TCs, and in 86%, 79%, 43% and 36% of ACs, respectively. OR51E1 immunohistochemical scores were higher or equal compared to SSTRs in 79% of TCs and 86% of ACs. Furthermore, in the LC cases where all SSTR subtypes were lacking, membrane OR51E1 expression was detected in 10/17 TCs and 1/2 ACs. Moreover, higher OR51E1 immunohistochemical scores were detected in 5/6 OctreoScan-negative LC lesions. Therefore, the high expression of OR51E1 in LCs makes it a potential novel diagnostic target in SSTR-negative tumors.

  • 30.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Modlin, Irvin M.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Khan, Mohid S.
    Millar, Robert P.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Borlak, Jurgen
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Nielsen, Bengt
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Waterton, John C.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Improving the Diagnosis and Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors: Utilizing New Advances in Biomarker and Molecular Imaging Science2013In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 16-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are malignant solid tumors that arise in hormone-secreting tissue of the diffuse neuroendocrine system or endocrine glands. Although traditionally understood to be a rare disease, the incidence and prevalence of NET have increased greatly in the past 3 decades. However, during this time, progress in diagnosis and outcome of NET has generally been modest. In order to achieve improved outcome in NET, a better understanding of NET biology combined with more reliable serum markers and better techniques to identify tumor localization and small lesions are needed. Although some NET biomarkers exist, sensitive and specific markers that predict tumor growth and behavior are generally lacking. In addition, the integration of new molecular imaging technologies in patient diagnosis and follow-up has the potential to enhance care. To discuss developments and issues required to improve diagnostics and management of NET patients, with specific focus on the latest advances in molecular imaging and biomarker science, 17 global leaders in the fields of NET, molecular imaging and biomarker technology gathered to participate in a 2-day meeting hosted by Prof. Kjell Oberg at the University of Uppsala in Sweden. During this time, findings were presented regarding methods with potential prognostic and treatment applications in NET or other types of cancers. This paper describes the symposium presentations and resulting discussions.

  • 31. Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona
    et al.
    Thomas, Dimitrios
    Strosberg, Jonathan R.
    Pape, Ulrich-Frank
    Felder, Stephan
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Alexandraki, Krystallenia I.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Saiegh, Leonard
    Reissman, Petachia
    Kaltsas, Gregory
    Gross, David J.
    Metastatic type 1 gastric carcinoid: A real threat or just a myth?2013In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 19, no 46, p. 8687-8695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe disease characteristics and treatment modalities in a group of rare patients with metastatic gastric carcinoid type 1 (GCA1).

    METHODS:

    Information on clinical, biochemical, radiological, histopathological findings, the extent of the disease, as well as the use of different therapeutic modalities and the long-term outcome were recorded. Patients' data were assessed at presentation, and thereafter at 6 to 12 monthly intervals both clinically and biochemically, but also endoscopically and histopathologically. Patients were evaluated for the presence of specific symptoms; the presence of autoimmune disorders and the presence of other gastrointestinal malignancies in other family members were also recorded. The evaluation of response to treatment was defined using established WHO criteria.

    RESULTS:

    We studied twenty consecutive patients with a mean age of 55.1 years. The mean follow-up period was 83 mo. Twelve patients had regional lymph node metastases and 8 patients had liver metastases. The primary tumor mean diameter was 20.13 +/- 10.83 mm (mean +/- SD). The mean Ki-67 index was 6.8% +/- 11.2%. All but one patient underwent endoscopic or surgical excision of the tumor. The disease was stable in all but 3 patients who had progressive liver disease. All patients remained alive during the follow-up period.

    CONCLUSION:

    Metastatic GCA1 carries a good overall prognosis, being related to a tumor size of >= 1 cm, an elevated Ki-67 index and high serum gastrin levels. (C) 2013 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Grönberg, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Saras, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Neuroendocrine markers are expressed in human mammary glands2010In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 160, no 1-3, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Regulatory peptides have previously been detected in epithelial cells of human mammary glands. As these peptides are produced by scattered neuroendocrine cells in the epithelium of other tissues the aim of this study was to investigate whether the mammary glands express molecular markers for neuroendocrine cells.

    Material and methods

    Specimens from 28 human mammary glands were retrieved. The distribution of immunoreactive cells was determined using immunohistochemistry with antibodies versus a set of endocrine markers including peptide hormones, chromogranins/secretogranins, vesicular monoamine transporters, synaptophysin, serotonin and synaptic vesicle protein 2.

    Results

    Cells of the luminal epithelium of ducts and lobules of human mammary glands expressed vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and chromogranin B, as well as the previously reported regulatory peptides obestatin, ghrelin, adrenomedullin and apelin. Using consecutive sections, it was revealed that the immunoreactivity patterns of the regulatory peptides and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 were similar. Interestingly, immunoreactivity for secretogranin II, secretogranin III and chromogranin B was identified in myoepithelial cells. No immunoreactivity was detected for chromogranin A or synaptophysin.

    Conclusion

    Specific cells in the epithelium and myoepithelium of mammary glands express neuroendocrine markers suggesting that mammary glands may have neuroendocrine functions.

  • 33.
    Grönberg, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Tsolakis, Apostolos V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Holmbäck, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Janson, Eva T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Ghrelin and Obestatin in Human Neuroendocrine Tumors: Expression and Effect on Obestatin Levels after Food Intake2013In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 291-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Ghrelin and obestatin are derived from the same peptide hormone precursor and are mainly produced by the gastric mucosa. Ghrelin is involved in many biological processes, whereas the physiological function of obestatin needs further investigation. The aims of the present study were to establish the incidence of ghrelin- and obestatin-immunoreactive cells in a comprehensive panel of human neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and to investigate if blood obestatin concentrations are influenced during a standardized meal stimulation test in healthy individuals and patients with NETs.

    Materials and Methods:

    The expression of ghrelin and obestatin was investigated in NETs (n = 149) and other endocrine-related disorders (n = 3) using immunohistochemistry with specific polyclonal antibodies. Coexpression of the peptides was evaluated by double immunofluorescence. Concentrations of obestatin in blood were measured during a meal test in 6 healthy individuals and 5 patients with pancreatic NETs.

    Results:

    Ghrelin and obestatin were expressed in 14/152 and 19/152 tumor tissues, respectively, mainly representing NETs of foregut origin and in pancreatic tissue from a nesidioblastosis patient. Double immunofluorescence staining showed colocalization of the peptides. During the meal test, obestatin levels in blood were unchanged in all patients but decreased significantly in the healthy individuals.

    Conclusion:

    Only a minority of NETs express ghrelin and obestatin. However, analysis of patients with tumors originating from tissues that express the peptides in normal conditions could be of importance. The results from the meal test indicate that the hormone levels are affected by food intake in healthy individuals, whereas obestatin levels remained unchanged in pancreatic NET patients.

  • 34.
    Hellerstedt-Börjesson, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Arving, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Fjällskog, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Holmström-Knutsson, Iinger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Women with breast cancer: Experiences and impact of chemotherapy-induced pain on daily life2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, no S2, p. S108-S108Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Federspiel, Birgitte
    Grønbæk, Henning
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ladekarl, Morten
    Langer, Seppo W
    Mortensen, Jann
    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Sundlöv, Anna
    Thiis-Evensen, Espen
    Knigge, Ulrich
    Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 10, p. 1284-1297Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤ 2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumours and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index > 20%, G3. Aim. These Nordic guidelines summarise the Nordic Neuroendocrine Tumour Group's current view on how to diagnose and treat NEN-patients and are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling these patients.

  • 36.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Chromogranin A is a Sensitive Marker for Detection of Recurrence in Neuroendocrine Tumors2010In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 63-63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Kulke, Matthew H.
    et al.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Hoersch, Dieter
    Zentralklin Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany..
    Caplin, Martyn
    Royal Free Hosp, Pond St, London NW3 2QG, England..
    Anthony, Lowell
    Univ Kentucky, Lexington, KY USA..
    Bergsland, Emily
    UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Warner, Richard
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Lombard-Bohas, Catherine
    Hos Civils Lyon, Hop Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France..
    Kunz, Pamela
    Stanford Univ, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA..
    Grande, Enrique
    Hosp Univ Ramon & Cajal, Madrid, Spain..
    Valle, Juan W.
    Univ Manchester, Christie NHS Fdon Trust, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Fleming, Douglas
    Ipsen BioSci, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Lapuerta, Pablo
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Banks, Phillip
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Jackson, Shanna
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Wheeler, Darren
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Zambrowicz, Brian
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Sands, Arthur
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Pavel, Marianne
    Charite, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    Telotristat Etiprate Shows Benefit in Treating Patients With Carcinoid Syndrome That is Inadequately Controlled by Somatostatin Analog Therapy in the Phase 3 TELESTAR Clinical Trial2016In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 478-478Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38. Kvols, Larry K
    et al.
    Öberg, Kjell E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    O'Dorisio, Thomas M
    Mohideen, Pharis
    de Herder, Wouter W
    Arnold, Rudolf
    Hu, Ke
    Zhang, Yilong
    Hughes, Gareth
    Anthony, Lowell
    Wiedenmann, Bertram
    Pasireotide (SOM230) shows efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors refractory or resistant to octreotide LAR: results from a phase II study2012In: Endocrine-related cancer, ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 657-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pasireotide (SOM230) is a novel multireceptor-targeted somatostatin (sst) analog with high binding affinity for sst receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 (sst(1,2,3)) and sst(5). Because of this binding profile, pasireotide may offer symptom control in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and carcinoid syndrome no longer responsive to octreotide LAR. This was a phase II, open-label, multicenter study of pasireotide in patients with advanced NET whose symptoms of carcinoid syndrome (diarrhea/flushing) were inadequately controlled by octreotide LAR. Patients received s.c. pasireotide 150 μg twice daily (bid), escalated to a maximum dose of 1200 μg bid until a clinical response was achieved. Forty-four patients were evaluated for efficacy and 45 for tolerability. Pasireotide 600-900 μg s.c. bid effectively controlled the symptoms of diarrhea and flushing in 27% of patients. Evaluation of tumor response in 23 patients showed 13 with stable disease and ten with progressive disease at study end. The most common drug-related adverse events were nausea (27%), abdominal pain (20%), weight loss (20%), and hyperglycemia (16%) and most were of mild or moderate severity. Pasireotide 600-900 μg s.c. bid was effective and generally well tolerated in controlling the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome in 27% of patients with advanced NET refractory or resistant to octreotide LAR therapy.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Dhana E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hassan, Saadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    The Cytotoxic Effect of Emetine and CGP-74514A Studied with the Hollow Fiber Model and ArrayScan Assay in Neuroendocrine Tumors In Vitro2012In: ANTI-CANCER AGENT ME, ISSN 1871-5206, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 783-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emetine and CGP-74514A have previously shown antitumor activity in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of the drugs in a three-dimensional model and to study if the mechanism of the cytotoxic activity was induction of apoptosis. An in vitro hollow fiber model was used to study the cytotoxic effect and a multiparametric high-content screening assay was used for measurement of apoptosis. The human pancreatic carcinoid cell line, BON-1 and the human typical and atypical bronchial carcinoid cell lines NCI-H727 and NCI-H720 were tested. Emetine and CGP-74514A showed higher antitumor activity on NCI-H720 compared to NCI-H727 and 3 day cultures were more sensitive than the 14 day cultures. A time-and dose-dependent activation of caspase-3 and increase in nuclear fragmentation and condensation were observed for the drugs in NCI-H727 and BON-1 using a multiparametric apoptosis assay. These results were confirmed with nuclear morphological examinations on microscopic slides. Emetine and CGP-74514A showed antitumor activity and induced caspase-3 activation with modest changes in nuclear morphology, indicating induction of apoptosis.

  • 40.
    Li, Su-Chen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Essaghir, Ahmed
    Martijn, Cécile
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Lloyd, Ricardo V
    Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Global microRNA profiling of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors.2013In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 685-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors are rare malignancies. They arise from enterochromaffin cells and very little is known about differential microRNA (miRNA) expression. The aim of this study was to identify the miRNA profile of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, which may have a critical role in tumor development, progression and potentially develop miRNAs as novel clinical biomarkers. Specimens from two test groups, 24 small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor specimens at different stages of malignancy, are included in this study. Total RNA from the first test group, five primary tumors, five mesentery metastases and five liver metastases was hybridized onto the Affymetrix Genechip miRNA arrays to perform a genome-wide profile. The results were validated by using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and northern blot analyses. We then expanded the investigation to laser capture microdissected small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor cells and immuno-laser capture microdissected normal enterochromaffin cells of the first test group. Furthermore, a second test group, three primary tumors, three mesentery metastases and three liver metastases, was included in the study. Thus, two independent test groups validated the data by QRT-PCR. Moreover, we characterized nine miRNAs, five (miR-96, -182, -183, -196a and -200a), which are upregulated during tumor progression, whereas four (miR-31, -129-5p, -133a and -215) are downregulated. Several online software programs were used to predict potential miRNA target genes to map a number of putative target genes for the aberrantly regulated miRNAs, through an advanced and novel bioinformatics analysis. Our findings provide information about pivotal miRNAs, which may lead to further insights into tumorigenesis, progression mechanisms and novel therapeutic targets recognition.

  • 41.
    Li, Su-Chen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Khan, Mohid
    Caplin, Martyn
    Meyer, Tim
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Somatostatin Analogs Treated Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients Circulating MicroRNAs2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0125553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously detected and investigated nine altered microRNAs in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor (SI-NET) tissues at different stages of disease. The aims of this study are to: 1) analyze whether SI-NET tissue microRNAs can be also detected in patient serum samples, 2) investigate a potential somatostatin analogs (SSAs) role on microRNA levels regulation in SSA-treated patient samples and 3) elucidate whether the serum microRNA levels in samples collected in different hospitals are predictable and steady. Our results show that tissue microRNAs are detectable in patient serum samples, and miR-96, -182, -183, -196a and -200a levels are lower in SI-NET untreated patients than in SSA-treated patients at all different stages. Conversely, miR-31, -129-5p, -133a and -215 levels do not show any difference in untreated SI-NET patients and SSA-treated patients at all different stages. Our findings also show that miR-200a exhibits an atypical behavior with high levels in both untreated and SSA-treated patients at liver metastasis stage, and unequivocally never at the earlier stages. Serum samples collected in two hospitals keep alike microRNA level pattern, elucidating that the results are not dependent on samples handling. In conclusion, SI-NET tissue microRNAs are always detectable in untreated and SSA-treated patient serum samples, SSAs play an unknown role in eliciting SSA-treated patients' microRNA levels higher than in untreated patients, and this study enlightens that miR-200a might be involved in the liver metastasis during SI-NET progression.

  • 42.
    Li, Su-Chen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Martijn, Cecile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Essaghir, Ahmed
    Lloyd, Ricardo V.
    Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    B12Global MicroRNA Profiling of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumors (SI-NETs) and Establishment of a Method to Study Serum MicroRNA Expression From the Same Tumors2013In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 377-377Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Li, Su-Chen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Martijn, Cécile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cui, Tao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Essaghir, Ahmed
    Luque, Raúl M.
    Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste
    Castaño, Justo P.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    The Somatostatin Analogue Octreotide Inhibits Growth of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumour Cells2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 10, p. e48411-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Octreotide is a widely used synthetic somatostatin analogue that significantly improves the management of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Octreotide acts through somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). However, the molecular mechanisms leading to successful disease control or symptom management, especially when SSTRs levels are low, are largely unknown. We provide novel insights into how octreotide controls NET cells. CNDT2.5 cells were treated from 1 day up to 16 months with octreotide and then were profiled using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses were used to validate microarray profiling in silico data. WST-1 cell proliferation assay was applied to evaluate cell growth of CNDT2.5 cells in the presence or absence of 1 μM octreotide at different time points. Moreover, laser capture microdissected tumour cells and paraffin embedded tissue slides from SI-NETs at different stages of disease were used to identify transcriptional and translational expression. Microarrays analyses did not reveal relevant changes in SSTR expression levels. Unexpectedly, six novel genes were found to be upregulated by octreotide: annexin A1 (ANXA1), rho GTPase-activating protein 18 (ARHGAP18), epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), TGF-beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) and tumour necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15). Furthermore, these novel genes were expressed in tumour tissues at transcript and protein levels. We suggest that octreotide may use a potential novel framework to exert its beneficial effect as a drug and to convey its action on neuroendocrine cells. Thus, six novel genes may regulate cell growth and differentiation in normal and tumour neuroendocrine cells and have a role in a novel octreotide mechanism system.

  • 44.
    Ludvigsen, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Janson, Eva T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo2011In: Experimental Diabetes Research, ISSN 1687-5214, E-ISSN 1687-5303, Vol. 2011, p. 623472-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5). We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  • 45.
    Niederle, B.
    et al.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept Surg, Vienna, Austria..
    Pape, U. -F
    Costa, F.
    Hosp Sirio Libanes, Ctr Oncol, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Gross, D.
    Hadassah Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Mevasseret Tsion, Israel..
    Kelestimur, F.
    Erciyes Univ, Sch Med, Dept Endocrinol, Kayseri, Turkey..
    Knigge, U.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Neuroendocrine Tumor Ctr Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Pavel, M.
    Charite, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Campus Virchow Klinikum, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    Perren, A.
    Univ Bern, Inst Pathol, Bern, Switzerland..
    Toumpanakis, C.
    Royal Free Hosp, Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Pond St, London NW3 2QG, England..
    O'Connor, J.
    Inst Alexander Fleming, Dept Clin Oncol, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    O'Toole, D.
    St Vincents Univ, Natl NET Ctr, Dublin, Ireland.;St James Hosp, Dept Clin Med, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Univ Dublin Trinity Coll, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Krenning, E.
    Erasmus MC, Div Nucl Med, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Reed, N.
    Gartnavel Royal Hosp, Beatson Oncol Ctr, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Kianmanesh, R.
    CHU Robert Debre, Dept Surg, Reims, France..
    ENETS Consensus Guidelines Update for Neuroendocrine Neoplasms of the Jejunum and Ileum2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Norlén, Olov
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Indication for Liver Transplantation in Young Patients with Small Intestinal NETs Is Rare?2014In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 742-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A majority of patients with small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) present with or develop liver metastases (LM). A number of treatments for LM are used clinically, including liver transplantation (LTx). Indications for LTx are under debate; young age (<65 years), absence of extrahepatic disease, resected primary tumor and limited extent of LM have been suggested as inclusion criteria for LTx with the aim to optimize outcome.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    From our series of 672 patients with SI-NET treated at the University Hospital in Uppsala between 1985 and 2012, we identified 78 patients according to the following criteria: <65 years of age, locoregional surgery (LRS) of the primary tumor and mesenteric metastases successfully performed, LM present but no extrahepatic disease. Baseline was chosen as the first date the following points were met: First visit to our center, LRS performed, LM present. The patients underwent treatment according to the standard clinical protocols at our center, and during this time period we did not perform or refer any SI-NET patients for LTx. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed in three different groups based on hypothetical criteria for LTx.

    RESULTS:

    Five-year overall survival rates for patients <65 years (n = 78) and <55 years (n = 36) of age were 84 ± 8 and 92 ± 9 %, respectively. For patients fulfilling the Milan criteria (n = 33) the 5-year survival was 97 ± 6 %.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Most young patients (<65 years) with SI-NET and LM have a favorable survival with standardized multimodality treatment. Indeed, most survival figures reported after LTx of NET do not surpass these figures.

  • 47.
    Oberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Leyden, J.
    Unicorn Fdn, Mosman, Australia..
    Sissons, M.
    NET Patient Fdn, Hockley Heath, W Midlands, England..
    Kolarova, T.
    APOZ & Friends, Sofia, Bulgaria..
    Goldstein, G.
    Carcinoid Canc Fdn, White Plains, NY USA..
    Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) in Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET) Management: Results from the First Global NET Patient (pt) Survey - A Collaboration between the International Neuroendocrine Cancer Alliance (INCA) and Novartis Pharmaceuticals2015In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 102, no 1-2, p. 159-160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48. Pape, U. -F
    et al.
    Niederle, B.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept Surg, Vienna, Austria..
    Costa, F.
    Hosp Sirio Libanes, Ctr Oncol, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Gross, D.
    Hadassah Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Mevasseret Tsion, Israel..
    Kelestimur, F.
    Erciyes Univ, Sch Med, Dept Endocrinol, Kayseri, Turkey..
    Kianmanesh, R.
    CHU Robert Debre, Dept Surg, Reims, France..
    Knigge, U.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Neuroendocrine Tumor Ctr Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Pavel, M.
    Charite, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Campus Virchow Klinikum, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    Perren, A.
    Univ Bern, Inst Pathol, Bern, Switzerland..
    Toumpanakis, C.
    Royal Free Hosp, Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Pond St, London NW3 2QG, England..
    O'Connor, J.
    Inst Alexander Fleming, Dept Clin Oncol, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Krenning, E.
    Erasmus MC, Div Nucl Med, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Reed, N.
    Gartnavel Royal Hosp, Beatson Oncol Ctr, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    O'Toole, D.
    St Vincents Univ, Natl NET Ctr, Dublin, Ireland.;St James Hosp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Univ Dublin Trinity Coll, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    ENETS Consensus Guidelines for Neuroendocrine Neoplasms of the Appendix (Excluding Goblet Cell Carcinomas)2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 144-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Pavel, M.
    et al.
    Charite, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Augustenburger Pl 1, DE-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    O'Toole, D.
    St Vincents Univ, NET Ctr, Dublin, Ireland.;St James Hosp, Dept Clin Med, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Univ Dublin Trinity Coll, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Costa, F.
    Oncoclin Med Associados SS Ltda, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Capdevila, J.
    Vall dHebron Univ Hosp, Inst Oncol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Gross, D.
    Hadassah Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Mevasseret Tsion, Israel..
    Kianmanesh, R.
    CHU Robert Debre, Dept Surg, Reims, France..
    Krenning, E.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Knigge, U.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Neuroendocrine Tumor Ctr Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Salazar, R.
    Pape, U. -F
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology. Inst Catala Oncol, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Med Sci, Endocrine Oncol Unit, Uppsala, Sweden..
    ENETS Consensus Guidelines Update for the Management of Distant Metastatic Disease of Intestinal, Pancreatic, Bronchial Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) and NEN of Unknown Primary Site2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 172-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this paper is to update a more extensive review and guidelines paper published in 2012 [1] . Gen-erally, any pertinent update pertaining to the diagnosis and staging of individual primary tumors is provided in the relevant papers published elsewhere in this issue of updated guideline reviews. More specific issues with re-spect to therapy of stage IV neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) (focusing on grade1/2 tumors) are given below. A separate guideline is provided for poorly differentiated neoplasms (grade 3 NEN). As some new large phase III trials have been published since the previous guidelines, this has indeed led to specific modifications in our ap-proach to therapy.

  • 50. Pavel, M.
    et al.
    Wiedenmann, B.
    Capdevila, J.
    Valle, J. W.
    De Herder, W. W.
    Metzer, C.
    Salazar, R.
    Horsch, D.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Ramsete: a single-arm, multicenter, single-stage phase ii trial of rad001 (everolimus) in advanced and metastatic silent neuro-endocrine tumours in europe: analysis by tumor origin2012In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 23, no S9, p. 377-377Article in journal (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 90
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