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  • 1.
    Axelsson, R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Lindblad, P
    The genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are transcribed as two polycistronic operonsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Axelsson, R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Lindblad, P
    Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc hydrogenases: Effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and nickel2002In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 61, p. 444-447Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Axelsson, R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Oxelfelt, F
    Lindblad, P
    Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc uptake hydrogenase1999In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 170, p. 77-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Axelsson, R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Rittner, N
    Baum, M
    Lindblad, P
    Wünschiers, R
    Expression analysis of genes in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 during nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen fixing conditionsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Axelsson, Rikard
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Cyanobacterial Hydrogen Metabolism: Transcriptional Regulation of the Hydrogenases in Filamentous Strains2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are a heterogeneous group of phototrophic microorganisms. Many cyanobacteria have the capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen. During the process of nitrogen fixation, molecular hydrogen is produced. Three enzymes are directly involved in hydrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria. A nitrogenase, evolving hydrogen during nitrogen-fixation, an uptake hydrogenase, recycling the hydrogen produced by nitrogenase, and a bidirectional hydrogenase that has the capacity to both take up and produce hydrogen. The main objective in this thesis was to examine the transcriptional regulation of both the uptake and the bidirectional hydrogenase in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    The transcriptional regulation of the uptake hydrogenase was demonstrated to be influenced by external conditions in Nostoc muscorum and Nostoc punctiforme. Nickel, molecular hydrogen, and anaerobic conditions all induced the relative amount of uptake hydrogenase transcript. In addition, a transcript could be detected in nitrogen-fixing, but not in non-nitrogen fixing conditions.

    The transcriptional regulation of the bidirectional hydrogenase in N. muscorum and Anabaena PCC 7120 was also examined. The relative amount of transcript from the bidirectional hydrogenase in both strains was demonstrated to increase during anaerobic conditions. Moreover, experiments using N. muscorum demonstrated that addition of nickel also increase the amount of transcript. However, no change in the relative amount of transcript from the bidirectional hydrogenase could be observed by additional hydrogen or during a shift from non-nitrogen fixing to nitrogen fixing conditions.

    The genes responsible for maturation of the hydrogenase were identified, cloned and sequenced in N. punctiforme. The transcription of the genes was examined and all genes were located on a single transcript. Like the uptake hydrogenase, a transcript could be detected under nitrogen-fixing but not under non-nitrogen fixing conditions.

    Initial studies, using microarrays, were used to analyse and compare the transcription of a large set of Anabaena PCC 7120 genes under non-nitrogen and nitrogen-fixing conditions. Both up- and down-regulated genes could be identified.

    This thesis advances the knowledge about the transcriptional regulation of the hydrogenases in filamentous cyanobacteria and can be used as a platform for further experiments aiming at a modified hydrogen metabolism.

    List of papers
    1. Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc uptake hydrogenase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc uptake hydrogenase
    1999 In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 170, p. 77-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90843 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc hydrogenases: Effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and nickel
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptional regulation of Nostoc hydrogenases: Effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and nickel
    2002 In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 61, p. 444-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90844 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain 73102
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain 73102
    Show others...
    2001 In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 201, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90845 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17Bibliographically approved
    4. The genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are transcribed as two polycistronic operons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are transcribed as two polycistronic operons
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90846 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Expression analysis of genes in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 during nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen fixing conditions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression analysis of genes in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 during nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen fixing conditions
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90847 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    6. Hydrogenases and hydrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogenases and hydrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria
    Show others...
    2002 In: Microbiology and Molecular Reviews, Vol. 66, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90848 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-17 Created: 2003-09-17Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    MADS-Box Gene Phylogeny and the Evolution of Plant Form: Characterisation of a Family of Regulators of Reproductive Development from the Conifer Norway Spruce, Picea abies2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary relationships between the angiosperm floral organs and the reproductive organs of other seed plants is not known. Flower organ development requires transcription factors encoded by the MADS-box genes. Since the evolution of novel morphology likely involve changes in developmental regulators, I have analysed MADS-box genes from the conifer Norway spruce, Picea abies, a representative of the gymnosperm group of seed plants.

    The results show that the MADS-box gene family has evolved via gene duplications and subsequent diversifications in correlation in time with the evolution of morphological novelties along the seed-plant lineage.

    Angiosperm MADS-box genes that determine petal and stamen development have homologues in the conifers, that are specifically active in pollen cones. It is, therefore, likely that the common ancestor of these genes controlled the development of the pollen-bearing organs in the early seed plants, and later were recruited for petal development in the angiosperms.

    Norway spruce set cones at an age of 15-20 years. One of the spruce MADS-box genes analysed may have a function in the control of the transition to reproductive phase, supported by expression data and the effect of the gene on development of transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Two of the spruce genes identified are not closely related to any known angiosperm gene. These may have roles in gymnosperm-specific developmental processes, possibly in the patterning of the conifer cones, as suggested by their expression patterns.

    The molecular regulation of cone- and flower development in fundamental aspects is highly conserved between conifers and angiosperms, however, differences detected may be informative regarding the origin of morphological complexity.

    List of papers
    1. MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Developmental Genetics, ISSN 0192-253X, E-ISSN 1520-6408, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The reproductive organs of conifers, the pollen cones and seed cones, differ in morphology from the angiosperm flower in several fundamental respects. In this report we present evidence to suggest that the two plant groups, in spite of these morphological differences and the long evolutionary distance between them, share important features in regulating the development of the reproductive organs. We present the cloning of three genes, DAL11, DAL12, and DAL13, from Norway spruce, all of which are related to the angiosperm B-class of homeotic genes. The B-class genes determine the identities of petals and stamens. They are members of a family of MADS-box genes, which also includes C-class genes that act to determine the identity of carpels and, in concert with B genes specify stamens in the angiosperm flower. Phylogenetic analyses and the presence of B-class specific C-terminal motifs in the DAL protein sequences imply homology to the B-class genes. Specific expression of all three genes in developing pollen cones suggests that the genes are involved in one aspect of B function, the regulation of development of the pollen-bearing organs. The different temporal and spatial expression patterns of the three DAL genes in the developing pollen cones indicate that the genes have attained at least in part distinct functions. The DAL11, DAL12, and 13 expression patterns in the pollen cone partly overlap with that of the previously identified DAL2 gene, which is structurally and functionally related to the angiosperm C-class genes. This result supports the hypothesis that an interaction between B- and C-type genes is required for male organ development in conifers like in the angiosperms. Taken together, our data suggests that central components in the regulatory mechanisms for reproductive organ development are conserved between conifers and angiosperms and, thus, among all seed plants.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89833 (URN)10.1002/(SICI)1520-6408(1999)25:3<253::AID-DVG8>3.0.CO;2-P (DOI)10528266 (PubMedID)
    Note

    De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2002-04-29 Created: 2002-04-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce Picea abies belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subgroup of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed- and pollen cones
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce Picea abies belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subgroup of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed- and pollen cones
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89834 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-04-29 Created: 2002-04-29 Last updated: 2016-04-25Bibliographically approved
    3. The MADS-box gene DAL1 is a potential mediator of the juvenile to adult transition in the conifer Norway spruce, Picea abies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The MADS-box gene DAL1 is a potential mediator of the juvenile to adult transition in the conifer Norway spruce, Picea abies
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89835 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-04-29 Created: 2002-04-29 Last updated: 2016-04-25Bibliographically approved
    4. Evolutionary diversification of the MADS-box gene family; an analysis of nine novel genes from the conifer Norway spruce
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolutionary diversification of the MADS-box gene family; an analysis of nine novel genes from the conifer Norway spruce
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89836 (URN)
    Available from: 2002-04-29 Created: 2002-04-29 Last updated: 2016-04-25Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Izquierdo, Liz
    Sundström, Jens
    Engström, Peter
    Evolutionary diversification of the MADS-box gene family; an analysis of nine novel genes from the conifer Norway spruceManuscript (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Sundström, Jens
    Tandre, Karolina
    Englund, Marie
    Kvarnheden, Anders
    Johanson, Urban
    Engström, Peter
    The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce Picea abies belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subgroup of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed- and pollen conesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Johanson, Urban
    Englund, Marie
    Engström, Peter
    The MADS-box gene DAL1 is a potential mediator of the juvenile to adult transition in the conifer Norway spruce, Picea abiesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Cerenius, Lage
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Physiological characterization of Saprolegnia parasitica isolates from brown trout1996In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 247-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saprolegnia parasitica has caused large mortalities in brown trout, Salmo trutta, in Spain. Several strains of Saprolegnia parasitica have been isolated from these epizootics and characterized regarding their physiological adaptation and genetic diversity

  • 11. Fridborg, Ingela
    et al.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Sundberg, Eva
    The Arabidopsis dwarf mutant shi exhibits reduced gibberellin responses conferred by overexpression of a new putative zinc finger protein1999In: Plant Cell, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 1019-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Fridborg, Ingela
    et al.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Robertson, Masumi
    Sundberg, Eva
    The Arabidopsis protein SHI represses gibberellin responses in Arabidpsis and Barley.2001In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Hansel, A
    et al.
    Axelsson, R
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Lindberg, P
    Troshina, O
    Wünschiers, R
    Lindblad, P
    Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain 731022001In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 201, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Hansel, Alfred
    et al.
    Axelsson, Rikard
    Lindberg, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Troshina, Olga
    Wünschiers, Röbbe
    Lindblad, Peter
    Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 731022001In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, Vol. 201, no 1, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Hjellström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Drought Stress Signal Transduction by the HD-Zip Transcription Factors ATHB6 and ATHB72002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the regulation of drought stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana and adresses the roles of the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors in this regulation. The characteristics of ATHB6 and ATHB7, two genes encoding class I HD-Zip transcription factors were analysed.

    Expression of ATHB6 and ATHB7 was transcriptionally activated in plants subjected to water deficit or exogenous treatment with abscisic acid (ABA).

    Transgenic plants constitutively expressing the ATHB7 gene displayed a delayed elongation growth of the main inflorescence stem after transition to reproductive development. This phenotype is consistent with ATHB7 acting as a negative regulator of growth and development of the elongating stem in response to water availability.

    Transgenic abi1-1 mutant plants constitutively expressing the ATHB7 gene displayed a reduced wiltiness as compared to monogenic abi1-1 mutants. These data are consistent with the ATHB7 protein having a central role in the drought stress response, regulating the water balance of the plant, and acting downstream to ABI1. Furthermore, the data is consistent with ATHB7 acting as a positive regulator of the drought stress response.

    The ABA-induced expression of the ATHB7 gene displayed a dependence on the phytochrome system, suggesting an interplay between light and osmotic stress signaling in the regulation of the ATHB7 gene.

  • 16.
    Johansson, M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Patarroyo, M
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Myeloperoxidase mediates cell adhesion via the alpha M beta 2 integrin (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18)1997In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 110, no 9, p. 1133-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myeloperoxidase is a leukocyte component able to generate potent microbicidal substances. A homologous invertebrate blood cell protein, peroxinectin, is not only a peroxidase but also a cell adhesion ligand. We demonstrate in this study that human myeloperoxidase also mediates cell adhesion. Both the human myeloid cell line HL-60, when differentiated by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or retinoic acid, and human blood leukocytes, adhered to myeloperoxidase; however, undifferentiated HL-60 cells showed only minimal adhesion. No cells adhered to horseradish peroxidase, and cell adhesion to myeloperoxidase was not decreased by catalase, thus showing that peroxidase activity, per se, was neither sufficient nor necessary for the adhesion activity. Mannan, which has been reported to inhibit the binding of peroxidases to cells, did not affect adhesion to myeloperoxidase. However, adhesion to myeloperoxidase was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to alpha M (CD11b) or to beta2 (CD18) integrin subunits, but not by antibodies to alpha L (CD11a), alpha M (CD11c), or to other integrins. Native myeloperoxidase mediated dose-dependent cell adhesion down to relatively low concentrations, and denaturation abolished the adhesion activity. It is evident that myeloperoxidase supports cell adhesion, a function which may be of considerable importance for leukocyte migration and infiltration in inflammatory reactions, that alpha M beta2 integrin (Mac-1 or CD11b/CD18) mediates this adhesion, and that the alphaM beta2 integrin-mediated adhesion to myeloperoxidase is distinct from the previously reported ability of this integrin to bind to certain denatured proteins at high concentrations.

  • 17.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Control of Pistil Development in Arabidopsis thaliana by a Novel Class of Regulatory Genes2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pistil, or the gynoecium, is the female reproductive organ of the angiosperm flower and its ontogeny has been studied in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The mature Arabidopsis gynoecium consists of a basal ovary that contains the ovules, a short style and an apical stigma that serves as the site of pollen adherence and germination. This thesis describes the identification and functional characterisation of genes with roles in the regulation of Arabidopsis gynoecium development.

    Mutant analyses and sequence similarity database searches led to the identification of a small Arabidopsis gene family, denoted the SHI gene family, the ten members of which encode proteins with zinc finger-like motifs. This class of genes is novel and appears to be unique to plants.

    Double, triple and quadruple mutant analyses revealed that at least six of the SHI-related genes, STY1, STY2, SHI, SRS4, SRS5, and LRP1, redundantly contribute to the formation of stylar and stigmatic tissues in developing gynoecia. Several of the genes appear also to influence carpel fusion and vascular patterning in the gynoecium. Gynoecia of transgenic plants that express STY1 or STY2 constitutively develop ectopic style cells, confirming a role for the genes in the promotion of style formation. STY1, STY2, SHI and SRS5 are expressed in the apical parts of the developing gynoecium and, hence, likely act cell autonomously. As judged from mutant and overexpression analyses, the SHI-related genes appear also to regulate leaf development. Possibly, SHI family members act in concert with the plant growth hormones gibberellin and auxin.

    List of papers
    1. The Arabidopsis dwarf mutant shi exhibits reduced gibberellin responses conferred by overexpression of a new putative zinc finger protein
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Arabidopsis dwarf mutant shi exhibits reduced gibberellin responses conferred by overexpression of a new putative zinc finger protein
    1999 In: Plant Cell, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 1019-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90220 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-15 Created: 2003-04-15Bibliographically approved
    2. The Arabidopsis protein SHI represses gibberellin responses in Arabidpsis and Barley.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Arabidopsis protein SHI represses gibberellin responses in Arabidpsis and Barley.
    2001 In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90221 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-15 Created: 2003-04-15Bibliographically approved
    3. STY1 and STY2 promote the formation of apical tissues during Arabidopsis gynoecium development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>STY1 and STY2 promote the formation of apical tissues during Arabidopsis gynoecium development
    Show others...
    2002 In: Development, Vol. 129, no 20, p. 4707-4717Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90222 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-15 Created: 2003-04-15Bibliographically approved
    4. Control of gynoecium development by STYLISH genes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control of gynoecium development by STYLISH genes
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90223 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-15 Created: 2003-04-15 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Auxin and STY genes in Arabidopsis gynoecium development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auxin and STY genes in Arabidopsis gynoecium development
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90224 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-15 Created: 2003-04-15 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 18.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Sohlberg, Joel
    Long, Jeff
    Fridborg, Ingela
    Sundberg, Eva
    STY1 and STY2 promote the formation of apical tissues during Arabidopsis gynoecium development2002In: Development, Vol. 129, no 20, p. 4707-4717Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Sohlberg, Joel
    Sundberg, Eva
    Control of gynoecium development by STYLISH genesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lindberg, Pia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Cyanobacterial Hydrogen Metabolism - Uptake Hydrogenase and Hydrogen Production by Nitrogenase in Filamentous Cyanobacteria2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular hydrogen is a potential energy carrier for the future. Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic microorganisms with the inherent ability to produce molecular hydrogen via the enzyme complex nitrogenase. This hydrogen is not released, however, but is recaptured by the bacteria using an uptake hydrogenase. In this thesis, genes involved in cyanobacterial hydrogen metabolism were examined, and the possibility of employing genetically modified cyanobacteria for hydrogen production was investigated.

    Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 (ATCC 29133) is a nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium containing an uptake hydrogenase encoded by hupSL. The transcription of hupSL was characterised, and putative regulatory elements in the region upstream of the transcription start site were identified. One of these, a binding motif for the global nitrogen regulator NtcA, was further investigated by mobility shift assays, and it was found that the motif is functional in binding NtcA. Also, a set of genes involved in maturation of hydrogenases was identified in N. punctiforme, the hypFCDEAB operon. These genes were found to be situated upstream of hupSL in the opposite direction, and they were preceded by a previously unknown open reading frame, that was found to be transcribed as part of the same operon.

    The potential for hydrogen production by filamentous cyanobacteria was investigated by studying mutant strains lacking an uptake hydrogenase. A mutant strain of N. punctiforme was constructed, where hupL was inactivated. It was found that cultures of this strain evolve hydrogen during nitrogen fixation. Gas exchange in the hupL- mutant and in wild type N. punctiforme was measured using a mass spectrometer, and conditions under which hydrogen production from the nitrogenase could be increased at the expense of nitrogen fixation were identified. Growth and hydrogen production in continuous cultures of a Hup- mutant of the related strain Nostoc PCC 7120 were also studied.

    This thesis advances the knowledge about cyanobacterial hydrogen metabolism and opens possibilities for further development of a process for hydrogen production using filamentous cyanobacteria.

    List of papers
    1. hupS and hupL constitute a transcription unit in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 73102
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>hupS and hupL constitute a transcription unit in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 73102
    2000 In: Archives of Microbiology, ISSN 0302-8933, Vol. 174, no 1-2, p. 129-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90731 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2015-08-13
    2. Binding of the transcription factor NtcA to a part of the Nostoc punctiforme hupSL promoter region
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Binding of the transcription factor NtcA to a part of the Nostoc punctiforme hupSL promoter region
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90732 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. A hydrogen-producing, hydrogenase-free mutant strain of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A hydrogen-producing, hydrogenase-free mutant strain of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133
    2002 In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, ISSN 0360-3199, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1291-1296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90733 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2015-08-13
    4. Gas exchange in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 and its hydrogenase deficient mutant strain NHM5
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gas exchange in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 and its hydrogenase deficient mutant strain NHM5
    (English)In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90734 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2015-08-13
    5. Photoproduction of H2 by wildtype Anabaena PCC 7120 and a hydrogen uptake deficient mutant: From laboratory experiments to outdoor culture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photoproduction of H2 by wildtype Anabaena PCC 7120 and a hydrogen uptake deficient mutant: From laboratory experiments to outdoor culture
    Show others...
    2002 In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, ISSN 0360-3199, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1271-1281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90735 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2015-08-13
    6. Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 73102
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cloning and characterization of a hyp gene cluster in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 73102
    Show others...
    2001 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, Vol. 201, no 1, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90736 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2013-10-11
    7. Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria
    Show others...
    2002 In: Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews, ISSN 1092-2172, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90737 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-09-04 Created: 2003-09-04 Last updated: 2015-08-13
  • 21.
    Lindberg, Pia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Hansel, Alfred
    Lindblad, Peter
    hupS and hupL constitute a transcription unit in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 731022000In: Archives of Microbiology, ISSN 0302-8933, Vol. 174, no 1-2, p. 129-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lindberg, Pia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Schütz, Kathrin
    Happe, Thomas
    Lindblad, Peter
    A hydrogen-producing, hydrogenase-free mutant strain of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 291332002In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, ISSN 0360-3199, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1291-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lindberg, Pia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Wisén, Susanne
    Mannervik, Bengt
    Lindblad, Peter
    Binding of the transcription factor NtcA to a part of the Nostoc punctiforme hupSL promoter regionManuscript (Other academic)
  • 24. Lindblad, Peter
    et al.
    Christensson, Kjell
    Lindberg, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Fedorov, Alexander
    Lopes Pinto, Fernando
    Tsygankov, Anatoly
    Photoproduction of H2 by wildtype Anabaena PCC 7120 and a hydrogen uptake deficient mutant: From laboratory experiments to outdoor culture2002In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, ISSN 0360-3199, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1271-1281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Sohlberg, Joel
    et al.
    Kuusk, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Sundberg, Eva
    Auxin and STY genes in Arabidopsis gynoecium developmentManuscript (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Sundström, Jens
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Svensson, Mats E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Svenson, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Johanson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Engström, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms1999In: Developmental Genetics, ISSN 0192-253X, E-ISSN 1520-6408, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reproductive organs of conifers, the pollen cones and seed cones, differ in morphology from the angiosperm flower in several fundamental respects. In this report we present evidence to suggest that the two plant groups, in spite of these morphological differences and the long evolutionary distance between them, share important features in regulating the development of the reproductive organs. We present the cloning of three genes, DAL11, DAL12, and DAL13, from Norway spruce, all of which are related to the angiosperm B-class of homeotic genes. The B-class genes determine the identities of petals and stamens. They are members of a family of MADS-box genes, which also includes C-class genes that act to determine the identity of carpels and, in concert with B genes specify stamens in the angiosperm flower. Phylogenetic analyses and the presence of B-class specific C-terminal motifs in the DAL protein sequences imply homology to the B-class genes. Specific expression of all three genes in developing pollen cones suggests that the genes are involved in one aspect of B function, the regulation of development of the pollen-bearing organs. The different temporal and spatial expression patterns of the three DAL genes in the developing pollen cones indicate that the genes have attained at least in part distinct functions. The DAL11, DAL12, and 13 expression patterns in the pollen cone partly overlap with that of the previously identified DAL2 gene, which is structurally and functionally related to the angiosperm C-class genes. This result supports the hypothesis that an interaction between B- and C-type genes is required for male organ development in conifers like in the angiosperms. Taken together, our data suggests that central components in the regulatory mechanisms for reproductive organ development are conserved between conifers and angiosperms and, thus, among all seed plants.

  • 27. Tamagnini, P
    et al.
    Axelsson, R
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Lindberg, P
    Oxelfelt, F
    Wünschiers, R
    Lindblad, P
    Hydrogenases and hydrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria2002In: Microbiology and Molecular Reviews, Vol. 66, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Tamagnini, Paula
    et al.
    Axelsson, Rikard
    Lindberg, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Oxelfelt, Fredrik
    Wünschiers, Röbbe
    Lindblad, Peter
    Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria2002In: Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews, ISSN 1092-2172, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 28 of 28
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