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  • 1.
    Abdulla, Salim
    et al.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Bassat, Quique
    Univ Barcelona, Ctr Invest Saude Manhica Manhica Mozamb & ISGloba, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Bethell, Delia
    AFRIMS, Dept Immunol & Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Magdeburg, Sch Med, D-39106 Magdeburg, Germany..
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Inst Trop Med, Unit Malariol, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium.;MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia..
    Dahal, Prabin
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Day, Nicholas P.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Diakite, Mahamadou
    Univ Bamako, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Dondorp, Arjen M.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Duong, Socheat
    Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Edstein, Michael D.
    Fairhurst, Rick M.
    NIAID, Lab Malaria & Vector Res, NIH, Rockville, MD USA..
    Faiz, M. Abul
    Malaria Res Grp MRG & Dev Care Fdn, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Falade, Catherine
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    Monash Univ, Sch Math Sci, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Fogg, Carole
    Univ Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hants, England..
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica Manhica Mozamb, Barcelona, Spain.;CRESIB, Barcelona, Spain..
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, London WC1, England..
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Epicentre, Paris, France..
    Hamed, Kamal
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hien, Tran Tinh
    Htut, Ye
    Dept Med Res, Lower Myanmar, Yangon, Myanmar..
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Lim, Pharath
    NIAID, Lab Malaria & Vector Res, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.;US & Natl Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Cell & Tumour Biol, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mayxay, Mayfong
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahosot Hosp, Lao Oxford Mahosot Hosp, Wellcome Trust Res Unit LOMWRU, Viangchan, Laos.;Univ Hlth Sci, Fac Postgrad Studies, Viangchan, Laos..
    Mokuolu, Olugbenga A.
    Univ Ilorin, Dept Paediat & Child Hlth, Ilorin, Nigeria..
    Moreira, Clarissa
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Newton, Paul
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahosot Hosp, Lao Oxford Mahosot Hosp, Wellcome Trust Res Unit LOMWRU, Viangchan, Laos..
    Noedl, Harald
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Specif Prophylaxis & Trop Med, Vienna, Austria..
    Nosten, Francois
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, US Army Med Res Unit, Kisumu, Kenya..
    Onyamboko, Marie A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Kinshasa Sch Publ Hlth, Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO..
    Owusu-Agyei, Seth
    Kintampo Hlth Res Ctr, Kintampo, Ghana..
    Phyo, Aung Pyae
    Mahidol Univ, Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Premji, Zul
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Price, Ric N.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Global & Trop Hlth Div, Darwin, NT, Australia.;Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia..
    Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Ramharter, Michael
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Infect Dis & Trop Med, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Tubingen, Inst Tropenmed, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Sagara, Issaka
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Odontostomatol, Dept Epidemiol Parasit Dis, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Se, Youry
    AFRIMS, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Suon, Seila
    Natl Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Ward, Stephen A.
    Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    White, Nicholas J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Winstanley, Peter A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Baseline data of parasite clearance in patients with falciparum malaria treated with an artemisinin derivative: an individual patient data meta-analysis2015In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, 359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum manifests as slow parasite clearance but this measure is also influenced by host immunity, initial parasite biomass and partner drug efficacy. This study collated data from clinical trials of artemisinin derivatives in falciparum malaria with frequent parasite counts to provide reference parasite clearance estimates stratified by location, treatment and time, to examine host factors affecting parasite clearance, and to assess the relationships between parasite clearance and risk of recrudescence during follow-up. Methods: Data from 24 studies, conducted from 1996 to 2013, with frequent parasite counts were pooled. Parasite clearance half-life (PC1/2) was estimated using the WWARN Parasite Clearance Estimator. Random effects regression models accounting for study and site heterogeneity were used to explore factors affecting PC1/2 and risk of recrudescence within areas with reported delayed parasite clearance (western Cambodia, western Thailand after 2000, southern Vietnam, southern Myanmar) and in all other areas where parasite populations are artemisinin sensitive. Results: PC1/2 was estimated in 6975 patients, 3288 of whom also had treatment outcomes evaluate d during 28-63 days follow-up, with 93 (2.8 %) PCR-confirmed recrudescences. In areas with artemisinin-sensitive parasites, the median PC1/2 following three-day artesunate treatment (4 mg/kg/day) ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 h and the proportion of patients with PC1/2 > 5 h from 0 to 10 %. Artesunate doses of 4 mg/kg/day decreased PC1/2 by 8.1 % (95 % CI 3.2-12.6) compared to 2 mg/kg/day, except in populations with delayed parasite clearance. PC1/2 was longer in children and in patients with fever or anaemia at enrolment. Long PC1/2 (HR = 2.91, 95 % CI 1.95-4.34 for twofold increase, p < 0.001) and high initial parasitaemia (HR = 2.23, 95 % CI 1.44-3.45 for tenfold increase, p < 0.001) were associated independently with an increased risk of recrudescence. In western Cambodia, the region with the highest prevalence of artemisinin resistance, there was no evidence for increasing PC1/2 since 2007. Conclusions: Several factors affect PC1/2. As substantial heterogeneity in parasite clearance exists between locations, early detection of artemisinin resistance requires reference PC1/2 data. Studies with frequent parasite count measurements to characterize PC1/2 should be encouraged. In western Cambodia, where PC1/2 values are longest, there is no evidence for recent emergence of higher levels of artemisinin resistance.

  • 2. Adern, Bengt
    et al.
    Stenvinkel, Christer
    Sahlqvist, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tegelberg, Ake
    Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction and pain in adult general practice patients2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, 585-590 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders and related pain (TMD-pain) among adult recall patients in general dental practice. Materials and methods. From November 2006 to September 2008, all adults attending a Swedish Public Dental Service (PDS) clinic for recall examination were asked two standardized questions about temporomandibular pain and dysfunction. Mouth-opening capacity was measured. The responses to the questions and mouth-opening capacity were combined to give a TMD-pain score, on a scale of 0-3. The patients' acceptance of their TMD condition was also noted. Results. The subjects comprised 2837 adults (53% females, 47% men). Of the total sample, 4.9% reported a TMD-pain score of 1-3. The gender difference was significant: women predominated (p < 0.003). Forty-three per cent of those with TMD-pain scores of 1-3 (36% men, 47% women) considered that the condition warranted treatment, especially those registering a pain score (significant difference between pain and dysfunction groups, p < 0.000). Conclusions. The TMD-pain score shows promise as a useful instrument for detecting and recording TMD-pain. The prevalence of TMD disclosed in the study is high enough to be considered a public health concern. Most of the subjects with lower scores on the TMD-pain scale accepted their condition as not severe enough to require treatment.

  • 3. Adjuik, Martin A.
    et al.
    Allan, Richard
    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Ba, Mamadou S.
    Barennes, Hubert
    Barnes, Karen I.
    Bassat, Quique
    Baudin, Elisabeth
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Bompart, Francois
    Bonnet, Maryline
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Brasseur, Philippe
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    Checchi, Francesco
    Cot, Michel
    Dahal, Prabin
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Deloron, Philippe
    Desai, Meghna
    Diap, Graciela
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Dorsey, Grant
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    Etard, Jean-Francois
    Fanello, Caterina I.
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    Faye, Babacar
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    Gaye, Oumar
    Gething, Peter W.
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Grandesso, Francesco
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Hamour, Sally
    Hasugian, Armedy Ronny
    Hay, Simon I.
    Humphreys, Georgina S.
    Jullien, Vincent
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kamya, Moses R.
    Karema, Corine
    Kiechel, Jean R.
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Krishna, Sanjeev
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Ibrahim, Laminou M.
    Lee, Sue J.
    Lell, Bertrand
    Martensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Massougbodji, Achille
    Menan, Herve
    Menard, Didier
    Menendez, Clara
    Meremikwu, Martin
    Moreira, Clarissa
    Nabasumba, Carolyn
    Nambozi, Michael
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Nikiema, Frederic
    Nsanzabana, Christian
    Ntoumi, Francine
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    Olliaro, Piero
    Osorio, Lyda
    Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco
    Penali, Louis K.
    Pene, Mbaye
    Pinoges, Loretxu
    Piola, Patrice
    Price, Ric N.
    Roper, Cally
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Rwagacondo, Claude Emile
    Same-Ekobo, Albert
    Schramm, Birgit
    Seck, Amadou
    Sharma, Bhawna
    Sibley, Carol Hopkins
    Sinou, Veronique
    Sirima, Sodiomon B.
    Smith, Jeffery J.
    Smithuis, Frank
    Some, Fabrice A.
    Sow, Doudou
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    Swarthout, Todd D.
    Sylla, Khadime
    Talisuna, Ambrose O.
    Tarning, Joel
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    Temu, Emmanuel A.
    Thwing, Julie I.
    Tjitra, Emiliana
    Tine, Roger C. K.
    Tinto, Halidou
    Vaillant, Michel T.
    Valecha, Neena
    Van den Broek, Ingrid
    White, Nicholas J.
    Yeka, Adoke
    Zongo, Issaka
    The effect of dosing strategies on the therapeutic efficacy of artesunate-amodiaquine for uncomplicated malaria: a meta-analysis of individual patient data2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) is one of the most widely used artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) to treat uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa. We investigated the impact of different dosing strategies on the efficacy of this combination for the treatment of falciparum malaria. Methods: Individual patient data from AS-AQ clinical trials were pooled using the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) standardised methodology. Risk factors for treatment failure were identified using a Cox regression model with shared frailty across study sites. Results: Forty-three studies representing 9,106 treatments from 1999-2012 were included in the analysis; 4,138 (45.4%) treatments were with a fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (FDC), 1,293 (14.2%) with a non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 25 mg/kg (loose NFDC-25), 2,418 (26.6%) with a non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (loose NFDC-30), and the remaining 1,257 (13.8%) with a co-blistered non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (co-blistered NFDC). The median dose of AQ administered was 32.1 mg/kg [IQR: 25.9-38.2], the highest dose being administered to patients treated with co-blistered NFDC (median = 35.3 mg/kg [IQR: 30.6-43.7]) and the lowest to those treated with loose NFDC-25 (median = 25.0 mg/kg [IQR: 22.7-25.0]). Patients treated with FDC received a median dose of 32.4 mg/kg [IQR: 27-39.0]. After adjusting for reinfections, the corrected antimalarial efficacy on day 28 after treatment was similar for co-blistered NFDC (97.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 97.0-98.8%]) and FDC (98.1% [95% CI: 97.6%-98.5%]; P = 0.799), but significantly lower for the loose NFDC-25 (93.4% [95% CI: 91.9%-94.9%]), and loose NFDC-30 (95.0% [95% CI: 94.1%-95.9%]) (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). After controlling for age, AQ dose, baseline parasitemia and region; treatment with loose NFDC-25 was associated with a 3.5-fold greater risk of recrudescence by day 28 (adjusted hazard ratio, AHR = 3.51 [95% CI: 2.02-6.12], P < 0.001) compared to FDC, and treatment with loose NFDC-30 was associated with a higher risk of recrudescence at only three sites. Conclusions: There was substantial variation in the total dose of amodiaquine administered in different AS-AQ combination regimens. Fixed dose AS-AQ combinations ensure optimal dosing and provide higher antimalarial treatment efficacy than the loose individual tablets in all age categories.

  • 4. Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Johansson, Gun
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: A cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, 546-551 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 5.
    Andell, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tomson, Torbjorn
    Carlsson, Sofia
    Hellebro, Eva
    Andersson, Tomas
    Adelow, Cecilia
    Amark, Per
    The incidence of unprovoked seizures and occurrence of neurodevelopmental comorbidities in children at the time of their first epileptic seizure and during the subsequent six months2015In: Epilepsy Research, ISSN 0920-1211, E-ISSN 1872-6844, Vol. 113, 140-150 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of unprovoked seizures in children and the prevalence of related neurodevelopmental comorbidities at the time of the presumed first seizure and six months thereafter. Methods: The medical records of all children (0-18 years of age) seeking medical attention as the result of a first unprovoked seizure between September 1, 2001 and December 31, 2006, and registered in the population-based Stockholm Incidence Registry of Epilepsy (SIRE) were reviewed. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities were evaluated on the basis of the medical records from this first visit and from other healthcare during the following six months. Results: The incidence of unprovoked seizures was between 30 and 204/100,000 person years (n=766) in the different age groups. It was highest among the youngest children and lowest among the 18-year-olds with small gender differences. The most common neurodevelopment comorbidities were developmental delay (22%, CI: 19-25%), speech/language and learning difficulties (23%, CI: 20-26%) and intellectual disability (16%, CI: 13-18%). The types of neurodevelopmental comorbidity varied by age at the time of seizure onset, with cerebral palsy being more common among the 0-5-year-olds, attention deficits among the 6-16-year-olds, and autism and psychiatric diagnosis among the older children. An associated neurodevelopmental comorbidity was more common among those experiencing recurrent than single seizures during follow-up six months from the index seizure (42% versus 66%). In 68% (CI: 64-71%) of the children there was no known or suspected neurodevelopmental comorbidity. Conclusion: The incidence of unprovoked, non-febrile seizures among 0-18-year-olds included in the SIRE was 67/100,000 person-years. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities were common already at the time of onset of the seizure disorder, indicating that neither seizure treatment nor seizures were the underlying cause of other neurodevelopmental symptoms in these patients during the period studied.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Martin, Lene
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Strand Brodd, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Almqvist, Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term2017In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 67, 82-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Children born preterm are at risk of neonatal complications but the long-term consequences for everyday functioning is not well known. The study aimed to identify patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term in relation to perinatal data, neonatal risk factors, behaviour, and socioeconomic status. Registry data and data from parent rated questionnaires were collected for 331 children.

    Method: A person-oriented approach with a cluster analysis was used.

    Results: A seven cluster solution explained 65.91% of the variance. Most children (n = 232) showed patterns of strong everyday functioning. A minority of the children (n = 99), showed diverse patterns of weak everyday functioning. Perinatal characteristics, neonatal risk factors and socio-economics did not predict cluster group membership. Children born preterm were represented in all clusters.

    Conclusion, implications: Most preschool children are perceived by their parents with strong everyday functioning despite being born preterm. However small groups of children are, for various reasons, perceived with weak functioning, but preterm birth is not the sole contributor to patterns of weak everyday functioning. More critical for all children's everyday functioning is probably the interaction between individual factors, behavioural factors and contextual factors. To gain a broader understanding of children's everyday functioning. Child Health Services need to systematically consider aspects of body function, activity and in addition participation and environmental aspects.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Västeras, Sweden.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Drottninggatan 16A, SE-63220 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strand Brodd, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Welf, Box 883, SE-72123 Västeras, Sweden.
    Predictors for everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term.2016In: Early Human Development, ISSN 0378-3782, E-ISSN 1872-6232, Vol. 103, 147-153 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Mälardalens högskola.
    Differences between heart failure clinics and primary health care2013In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, E-ISSN 2052-2215, Vol. 18, no 6, 288-292 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a paucity of knowledge concerning how people with heart failure experience differences between specialised heart failure clinics and primary healthcare in Sweden. This study aimed to describe differences regarding information and follow-up in heart failure clinics and primary healthcare. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2011. Four people (three men, one woman; aged 60 to 84) with heart failure (NYHA II) were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed after referral from the heart failure clinic to primary healthcare, follow-ups were omitted. Still, the patients needed care, support and information. The findings are illuminated in four themes. The patients' varying and individual needs can be difficult to recognise and manage unless they are followed-up from either HFC or PHC on a regular basis.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Eriksson, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Mälardalens högskola.
    Living with heart failure without realising: A qualitative patient study2012In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, E-ISSN 2052-2215, Vol. 17, no 12, 630, 632-637 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure is an important problem in Swedish primary healthcare as in the U.K. In spite of that little is known about how people with heart failure experience support from primary healthcare. This paper investigates how people with heartfailure experience support in primary healthcare. Semi structured interviews were conducted with five men and five women, born 1922-1951. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis in accordance with Graneheim and Lundman (2004). The participants experienced they had not received information about their diagnosis or about the cause of their condition. They had not been informed they had heart failure. Instead the participants believed their symptoms were caused by age, thus being part of normal ageing. They did not experience they needed care or support to cope with illness or disease. Instead their main needs for support in daily life concerned help with practical matters.There is a risk primary healthcare abandons people with heart failure meaning the patients are forced to develop strategies on their own in order to manage symptoms. When inadequately informed there is also a risk they make up their own explanations signifying possible difficulties to handle their health situation.

  • 10.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Collaborat Palliat Care, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, 1703-1712 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients' experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 11.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western Univ, Sch Nursing, Langley, BC, Canada.;Providence Hlth Care Res Inst, Ctr Hlth Evaluat & Outcome Sci, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, 954-958 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 12.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Sahlqvist, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wingren, Gun
    A cross-sectional study of victimisation of bullying among schoolchildren in Sweden: background factors and self-reported health complaints2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 3, 270-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine background factors for bullying and associations between bullying victimisation and health problems. Methods: A cross-sectional study on all pupils in grades 7 and 9 in a Swedish county was conducted in 2011 (n=5248). Data have been analysed with bi- and multivariate models. Results: 14% of the children reported that they had been bullied during the past 2 months. Background factors for bullying were: gender (girls more often); age (younger students more often); disability/disease; high body mass index, and having parents born abroad. There were strong associations between being bullied and poor health and self-harm. Associations with poor general health for boys and girls and mental health problems for girls showed stronger associations with higher frequency of bullying than with lower. For boys, physical bullying had stronger correlations with poor general health than written-verbal bullying. Conclusions: Bullying is a serious public health problem among young people and healthcare professionals have an important task in identifying exposed children. Children who are "different" are more exposed to bullying, which implies that school personnel, parents, and other adults in these children's social networks can play an important role in paying attention to and preventing the risk of bullying.

  • 13. Aplenc, Richard
    et al.
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Sung, Lillian
    Zhu, Xiaochun
    Ho, Vincent T
    Cooke, Kenneth
    Dvorak, Christopher
    Hale, Gregory
    Isola, Luis M
    Lazarus, Hillard M
    McCarthy, Philip L
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Pulsipher, Michael
    Pasquini, Marcelo C
    Bunin, Nancy
    Effect of body mass in children with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 123, no 22, 3504-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rising incidence of pediatric obesity may significantly affect bone marrow transplantation (BMT) outcomes. We analyzed outcomes in 3687 children worldwide who received cyclophosphamide-based BMT regimens for leukemias between 1990 and 2007. Recipients were classified according to age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles as underweight (UW), at risk of UW (RUW), normal, overweight (OW), or obese (OB). Median age and race were similar in all groups. Sixty-one percent of OB children were from the United States/Canada. Three-year relapse-free and overall survival ranged from 48% to 52% (P = .54) and 55% to 58% (P = .81) across BMI groups. Three-year leukemia relapses were 33%, 33%, 29%, 25%, and 21% in the UW, RUW, normal, OW, and OB groups, respectively (P < .001). Corresponding cumulative incidences for transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18%, 19%, 21%, 22%, and 28% (P < .01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a decreased risk of relapse compared with normal BMI (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; P < .01) and a trend toward higher TRM (RR = 1.28; P = .014). BMI in children is not significantly associated with different survival after BMT for hematologic malignancies. Obese children experience less relapse posttransplant compared with children with normal BMI; however, this benefit is offset by excess in TRM.

  • 14. Arai, Sally
    et al.
    Arora, Mukta
    Wang, Tao
    Spellman, Stephen R
    He, Wensheng
    Couriel, Daniel R
    Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro
    Cutler, Corey S
    Bacigalupo, Andrea A
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    Flowers, Mary E
    Juckett, Mark B
    Lee, Stephanie J
    Loren, Alison W
    Klumpp, Thomas R
    Prockup, Susan E
    Ringdén, Olle T H
    Savani, Bipin N
    Socié, Gérard
    Schultz, Kirk R
    Spitzer, Thomas
    Teshima, Takanori
    Bredeson, Christopher N
    Jacobsohn, David A
    Hayashi, Robert J
    Drobyski, William R
    Frangoul, Haydar A
    Akpek, Görgün
    Ho, Vincent T
    Lewis, Victor A
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Koreth, John
    Chao, Nelson J
    Aljurf, Mahmoud D
    Cooper, Brenda W
    Laughlin, Mary J
    Hsu, Jack W
    Hematti, Peiman
    Verdonck, Leo F
    Solh, Melhelm M
    Norkin, Maxim
    Reddy, Vijay
    Martino, Rodrigo
    Gadalla, Shahinaz
    Goldberg, Jenna D
    McCarthy, Philip L
    Pérez-Simón, José A
    Khera, Nandita
    Lewis, Ian D
    Atsuta, Yoshiko
    Olsson, Richard F
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Saber, Wael
    Waller, Edmund K
    Blaise, Didier
    Pidala, Joseph A
    Martin, Paul J
    Satwani, Prakash
    Bornhäuser, Martin
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Weisdorf, Daniel J
    Horowitz, Mary M
    Pavletic, Steven Z
    Increasing incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic transplantation: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.2015In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 21, no 2, 266-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although transplant practices have changed over the last decades, no information is available on trends in incidence and outcome of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) over time. This study used the central database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to describe time trends for cGVHD incidence, nonrelapse mortality, and risk factors for cGVHD. The 12-year period was divided into 3 intervals, 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2003, and 2004 to 2007, and included 26,563 patients with acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome. Multivariate analysis showed an increased incidence of cGVHD in more recent years (odds ratio = 1.19, P < .0001), and this trend was still seen when adjusting for donor type, graft type, or conditioning intensity. In patients with cGVHD, nonrelapse mortality has decreased over time, but at 5 years there were no significant differences among different time periods. Risk factors for cGVHD were in line with previous studies. This is the first comprehensive characterization of the trends in cGVHD incidence and underscores the mounting need for addressing this major late complication of transplantation in future research.

  • 15.
    Ardern, Clare L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Physiotherapy, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.;Aspetar Orthopaed & Sports Med Hosp, Doha, Qatar.;La Trobe Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Physiotherapy, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Physiotherapy, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Rehab Vast, Motala, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Motala, Sweden..
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Physiotherapy, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Satisfaction With the Outcome of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 8, 640-649 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial.

    BACKGROUND: Patient perception of the benefits gained from treatment is important, yet satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has not been investigated.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic WAD changed over time, and whether there were group differences.

    METHODS: Two hundred sixteen people with chronic WAD (66% women; mean age, 40.4 years) participated in a 3-month program of physical therapist-led neck-specific exercises with or without a behavioral approach, or received a prescription of general physical activity. The main outcome was satisfaction with the outcome of treatment, assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months later. Additional outcomes were enablement and expectation fulfillment.

    RESULTS: Satisfaction improved over time in the 3 groups (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.20; P < .001). There was a significant group-by-time interaction (P < 001), with increased odds of being satisfied in the groups receiving neck-specific exercises compared to general physical activity. Enablement increased after completion of the intervention in all groups (P < .001). People who received neck-specific exercises reported greater enablement and expectation fulfillment than people prescribed general physical activity (P < .01).

    CONCLUSION: Exercise interventions for chronic WAD led to increased satisfaction for 12 months following treatment that was unrelated to the type of exercise intervention received.

  • 16.
    Ardern, Clare L.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden.;Aspetar Orthopaed & Sports Med Hosp, Doha, Qatar.;La Trobe Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Österberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sonesson, Sofi
    Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Orthopaed, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Satisfaction With Knee Function After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Is Associated With Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Returning to the Preinjury Physical Activity2016In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 32, no 8, 1631-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess whether patient-reported outcomes (psychological factors, appraisals of knee function, and physical activity participation) were associated with satisfaction with knee function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: Participants who were aged 18 to 45 years and a minimum 12 months post primary ACL reconstruction completed a questionnaire battery evaluating knee self-efficacy, knee-related quality of life, self-reported function, and physical activity participation. Participants' responses to the question "If you were to spend the rest of your life with your knee just the way it has been in the last week, would you feel.... (7-point ordinal scale; 1 = happy, 7 = unhappy)" were categorized as satisfied, mostly satisfied, or dissatisfied and used as the primary outcome. Ordinal regression was used to examine associations between independent variables and the primary outcome. Results: A total of 177 participants were included at an average of 3 years after primary ACL reconstruction. At follow-up, 44% reported they would be satisfied, 28% mostly satisfied, and 28% dissatisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction. There were significant differences in psychological responses and appraisal of knee function between the 3 groups (P = .001), and significantly more people in the satisfied group had returned to their preinjury activity (58%) than in the mostly satisfied (28%) and dissatisfied (26%) groups (P = .001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the odds of being satisfied increased by a factor of 3 with higher self-efficacy, greater knee-related quality of life, and returning to the preinjury activity. Conclusions: People who had returned to their preinjury physical activity and who reported higher knee-related self-efficacy and quality of life were more likely to be satisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction.

  • 17. Ardern, Clare L.
    et al.
    Österberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tagesson, Sofi
    Gauffin, Hakan
    Webster, Kate E.
    Kvist, Joanna
    The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 22, 1613-U50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1-7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity. Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related. Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • 18.
    Askling, Helena H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Communicable Dis Control & Prevent, SE-11891 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Clin Therapy Res Inflammatory Dis ClinTRID, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallén, Ingemar
    Karlstad Cty Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, SE-65185 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Thörner, Åke
    Malar Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, SE-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Nordin, Margareta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herzog, Christian
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, CH-4051 Basel, Switzerland.
    Kantele, Anu
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, FI-00029 Huch Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Dept Med, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Hepatitis A vaccine for immunosuppressed patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective, open-label, multi-centre study2014In: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, ISSN 1477-8939, E-ISSN 1873-0442, Vol. 12, no 2, 134-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis A vaccine is the most frequently used travel vaccine, yet data are scarce about its ability to induce protection in patients with concurrent immunosuppressive treatment. We assessed the immunogenicity of this vaccine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with tumour necrosis factor-inhibitors (TNFi) and/or methotrexate (MTX).

    METHODS: Hepatitis A vaccine was administered to non-immune RA patients at 0 and 6 months. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies were assessed at 0, 1, 6, 7, 12, and 24 months with a quantitative Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA) for HAV-IgG. Samples from month 1, 6, and 7 were, in addition, analysed with a microparticle EIA (MEIA) for anti-HAV IgM + IgG.

    RESULTS: The final study population consisted of 53 patients treated with TNFi (n = 15), TNFi + MTX (n = 21) or MTX (n = 17). One and six months after the first dose, 10% and 33% of the patients had attained seroprotection. One and six months after the second dose 83% and 72% were seroprotected. At month 24, 86% of the vaccinees showed protective levels.

    CONCLUSIONS: Two doses of hepatitis A vaccine at a 6-month interval provided protection for most immunosuppressed RA patients. A single dose does not seem to afford sufficient protection to this group of patients.

  • 19.
    Ayas, Mouhab
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia..
    Eapen, Mary
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Le-Rademacher, Jennifer
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Carreras, Jeanette
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Alter, Blanche P.
    NCI, Clin Genet Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Anderlini, Paolo
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    NHLBI, Hematol Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Bierings, Marc
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Pediat Hematol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Buchbinder, David K.
    Childrens Hosp Orange Cty, Div Pediat Hematol, Orange, CA 92668 USA..
    Bonfim, Carmem
    Univ Fed Parana, Hosp Clin, BR-80060000 Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Camitta, Bruce M.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Midwest Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA..
    Fasth, Anders L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hematol Res Ctr, Div Expt Med, Dept Med, London, England..
    Lee, Michelle A.
    Dana Farber Boston Childrens Canc & Blood Disorde, Dept Pediat Oncol, Boston, MA USA..
    Lund, Troy C.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Pediat, Med Ctr, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Myers, Kasiani C.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Bone Marrow Transplant & Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Page, Kristin M.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Pediat Blood & Marrow Transplant, Durham, NC USA..
    Prestidge, Tim D.
    Starship Childrens Hosp, Blood & Canc Ctr, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Radhi, Mohamed
    Childrens Mercy Hosp, Pediat Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Transplantat, Kansas City, MO 64108 USA..
    Shah, Ami J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Pediat, Mattel Childrens Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Schultz, Kirk R.
    Univ British Columbia, British Columbias Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Bone Marrow Transplan, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada..
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Wagner, John E.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Pediat, Med Ctr, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Deeg, H. Joachim
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Fanconi Anemia and Bone Marrow Failure2015In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 21, no 10, 1790-1795 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the sole salvage option for individuals who develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. Here we report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n = 81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplantations were performed between 1990 and 2012. The timing of the second HCT predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second HCT was performed less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between the first HCT and second HCT was less than 3 months, compared with 23% when the interval was longer (P < .001). Consequently, the 1-year survival rate was substantially lower when the interval between the first and second HCTs was less than 3 months compared with longer (23% vs 58%; P = .001). The corresponding 5-year probability of survival was 16% and 45%, respectively (P = .006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than one-half of patients with FA undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce the rate of graft failure after first HCT.

  • 20. Aydin-Schmidt, Berit
    et al.
    Xu, Weiping
    González, Iveth J
    Polley, Spencer D
    Bell, David
    Shakely, Delér
    Msellem, Mwinyi I
    Björkman, Anders
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) accurately detects malaria DNA from filter paper blood samples of low density parasitaemias2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, e103905- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) provides an opportunity for improved, field-friendly detection of malaria infections in endemic areas. However data on the diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for active case detection, particularly low-density parasitaemias, are lacking. We therefore evaluated the performance of a new LAMP kit compared with PCR using DNA from filter paper blood spots.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS:

    Samples from 865 fever patients and 465 asymptomatic individuals collected in Zanzibar were analysed for Pan (all species) and Pf (P. falciparum) DNA with the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf kit. Samples were amplified at 65°C for 40 minutes in a real-time turbidimeter and results were compared with nested PCR. Samples with discordant results between LAMP and nested PCR were analysed with real-time PCR. The real-time PCR corrected nested PCR result was defined as gold standard. Among the 117 (13.5%) PCR detected P. falciparum infections from fever patients (mean parasite density 7491/µL, range 6-782,400) 115, 115 and 111 were positive by Pan-LAMP, Pf-LAMP and nested PCR, respectively. The sensitivities were 98.3% (95%CI 94-99.8) for both Pan and Pf-LAMP. Among the 54 (11.6%) PCR positive samples from asymptomatic individuals (mean parasite density 10/µL, range 0-4972) Pf-LAMP had a sensitivity of 92.7% (95%CI 80.1-98.5) for detection of the 41 P. falciparum infections. Pan-LAMP had sensitivities of 97% (95%CI 84.2-99.9) and 76.9% (95%CI 46.2-95) for detection of P. falciparum and P. malariae, respectively. The specificities for both Pan and Pf-LAMP were 100% (95%CI 99.1-100) in both study groups.

    CONCLUSION:

    Both components of the Loopamp MALARIA Pan/Pf detection kit revealed high diagnostic accuracy for parasite detection among fever patients and importantly also among asymptomatic individuals of low parasite densities from minute blood volumes preserved on filter paper. These data support LAMPs potential role for improved detection of low-density malaria infections in pre-elimination settings.

  • 21.
    Baker, Tim
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Div Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Blixt, Jonas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Div Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lugazia, Edwin
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Schell, Carl Otto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Sormland Cty Council, Nykoping Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Nykoping, Sweden..
    Mulungu, Moses
    Muhimbili Natl Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Milton, Anna
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Div Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Castegren, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Eriksen, Jaran
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Konrad, David
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Div Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Single Deranged Physiologic Parameters Are Associated With Mortality in a Low-Income Country2015In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 43, no 10, 2171-2179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether deranged physiologic parameters at admission to an ICU in Tanzania are associated with in-hospital mortality and compare single deranged physiologic parameters to a more complex scoring system. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study of patient notes and admission records. Data were collected on vital signs at admission to the ICU, patient characteristics, and outcomes. Cutoffs for deranged physiologic parameters were defined a priori and their association with in-hospital mortality was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Setting: ICU at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Patients: All adults admitted to the ICU in a 15-month period. Measurements and Main Results: Two hundred sixty-nine patients were included: 54% female, median age 35 years. In-hospital mortality was 50%. At admission, 69% of patients had one or more deranged physiologic parameter. Sixty-four percent of the patients with a deranged physiologic parameter died in hospital compared with 18% without (p < 0.001). The presence of a deranged physiologic parameter was associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 4.64; 95% CI, 1.95-11.09). Mortality increased with increasing number of deranged physiologic parameters (odds ratio per deranged physiologic parameter, 2.24 [1.53-3.26]). Every individual deranged physiologic parameter was associated with mortality with unadjusted odds ratios between 1.92 and 16.16. A National Early Warning Score of greater than or equal to 7 had an association with mortality (odds ratio, 2.51 [1.23-5.14]). Conclusion: Single deranged physiologic parameters at admission are associated with mortality in a critically ill population in a low-income country. As a measure of illness severity, single deranged physiologic parameters are as useful as a compound scoring system in this setting and could be termed danger signs. Danger signs may be suitable for the basis of routines to identify and treat critically ill patients.

  • 22.
    Baker, Tim
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schell, Carl Otto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Nykoping Hosp, Sormland Cty Council, Dept Internal Med, Nykoping, Sweden..
    Lugazia, Edwin
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Blixt, Jonas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mulungu, Moses
    Muhimbili Natl Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Castegren, Markus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksen, Jaran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Univ, Huddinge Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med,Div Clin Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Konrad, David
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Intens Care & Surg Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, e0144801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs) have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Tanzania. Methods and Findings Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001). A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 4.9 (2.9-8.3)). Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5-16.2)). In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02) giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94). Conclusion The introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved the acute treatment of abnormal vital signs in an ICU in a low-income country. Mortality rates were reduced for patients with hypotension at admission but not for all patients.

  • 23.
    Belachew, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Eurenius, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Three-dimensional ultrasound does not improve diagnosis of retained placental tissue compared to two-dimensional ultrasound2015In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 1, 112-116 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study objective was to improve ultrasonic diagnosis of retained placental tissue by measuring the volume of the uterine body and cavity using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. Twenty-five women who were to undergo surgical curettage due to suspected retained placental tissue were included. The volume of the uterine body and cavity was measured using the VOCAL imaging program. Twenty-one women had retained placental tissue histologically verified. Three of these had uterine volumes exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. Seventeen of the 21 women had a uterine cavity volume exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. In all 14 cases examined 28 days or more after delivery the cavity volume exceeded the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. A large cavity volume estimated with 3D ultrasound is indicative of retained placental tissue. However, 3D ultrasound adds little or no diagnostic power compared to 2D ultrasound.

  • 24.
    Belachew, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Cnattingius, S
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Eurenius, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Risk of retained placenta in women previously delivered by caesarean section: a population-based cohort study.2014In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 121, no 2, 224-229 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether women with a caesarean section at their first delivery have an increased risk of retained placenta at their second delivery.

    DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

    SETTING: Sweden.

    POPULATION: All women with their first and second singleton deliveries in Sweden during the years 1994-2006 (n = 258 608). Women with caesarean section or placental abruption in their second pregnancy were not included in the study population.

    METHODS: The risk of retained placenta at second delivery was estimated for women with a first delivery by caesarean section (n = 19 458), using women with a first vaginal delivery as reference (n = 239 150). Risks were calculated as odds ratios by unconditional logistic regression analysis with 95% confidence intervals (95%) after adjustments for maternal, delivery, and infant characteristics.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Retained placenta with normal (≤1000 ml) and heavy (>1000 ml) bleeding.

    RESULTS: The overall rate of retained placenta was 2.07%. In women with a previous caesarean section and in women with previous vaginal delivery, the corresponding rates were 3.44% and 1.96%, respectively. Compared with women with a previous vaginal delivery, women with a previous caesarean section had an increased risk of retained placenta (adjusted OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.32-1.59), and the association was more pronounced for retained placenta with heavy bleeding (adjusted OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.44-1.79).

    CONCLUSIONS: Our report shows an increased risk for retained placenta in women previously delivered by caesarean section, a finding that should be considered in discussions of mode of delivery.

  • 25.
    Belachew, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Eurenius, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Placental location, postpartum hemorrhage and retained placenta in women with a previous cesarean section delivery: a prospective cohort study.2017In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 3, 185-189 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Women previously giving birth with cesarean section have an increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and retained placenta. The objective of this study was to determine if anterior placental location increased the risk of PPH and retained placenta in such women.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study on 400 women with cesarean section delivery in a previous pregnancy. Ultrasound examinations were performed at gestational week 28-30, and placental location, myometrial thickness, and three-dimensional vascularization index (VI) were recorded. Data on maternal age, parity, BMI, smoking, gestational week at delivery, induction, delivery mode, oxytocin, preeclampsia, PPH, retained placenta, and birth weight were obtained for all women. Outcome measures were PPH (≥1,000 mL) and retained placenta.

    RESULTS: The overall incidence of PPH was 11.0% and of retained placenta 3.5%. Twenty-three women (11.8%) with anterior placenta had PPH compared to 12 (6.9%) with posterior or fundal locations. The odds ratio was 1.94, but it did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant risk increase for retained placenta in women with anterior placentae. Seven of eight women with placenta previa had PPH, and four had retained placenta.

    CONCLUSIONS: The overall risk of PPH and retained placenta was high for women with previous cesarean section. Anterior location of the placenta in such women tended to impose an increased risk for PPH but no risk increase of retained placenta. Placenta previa in women with previous cesarean section is associated with a high risk for PPH and retained placenta.

  • 26.
    Berg, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lindberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Possible gender differences in the quality of life and choice of therapy in acne2011In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, no 8, 969-972 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Acne is a very common skin disease that has major impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the disease has been extensively studied we still need more knowledge of factors influencing the decisions for choice of therapy. Objective To evaluate the relationships between clinical severity, patients' self-reported quality of life, treatment choice and the outcome of therapy in a structured out-patient acne clinic. Methods In total 211 consecutive patients (143 females, 68 males) at a structured acne clinic were included. At the first visit a clinical assessment was conducted, therapy was initiated and the patients answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI). A follow up was performed after six months, when patients once again answered the DLQI questionnaire and the clinical outcome was assessed by the physician. Results The quality of life was improved after treatment at a group level. At the first visit, the quality of life showed a gender difference (females scoring worse) but did not correlate to the clinical grading nor to the choice of therapy. At six months the DLQI correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with isotretinoin therapy showed a significantly greater improvement in quality of life. There was a tendency to gender difference in the choice of therapy, as in females 32% of the patients were treated with isotretinoin although they were clinically graded as moderate. The corresponding figure for males was 23%. A correlation was found between the initial clinical grading and gender, age and the choice of therapy. Conclusion DLQI can be used to evaluate treatment effects in acne. However, the self-reported quality of life will depend on several factors including age, gender, psychosocial factors and clinical severity.

  • 27. Bernhoff, Gabriella
    et al.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bertilson, Bo Christer
    Elf, Madeleine
    Peolsson, Anneli
    The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, 397-404 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement.

    DESIGN: This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study.

    PATIENTS: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (≥6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study.

    METHODS: The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings.

    RESULTS: Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa =0.11, 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa =0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76).

    CONCLUSION: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries.

  • 28.
    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Jansson, Inger
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Prevalence and quality of clinical pathways in Swedish intensive care units: a national survey2014In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 20, no 1, 48-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

    To identify the prevalence of clinical pathways (CPs) in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs) and to explore the quality, content and evidence base of the documents.

    METHODS

    A descriptive and explorative survey of all Swedish ICUs (N84) and a review of submitted examples of CPs (n12) were conducted.

    RESULTS

    CPs were in use at 20% of the Swedish ICUs. There was a significant geographic variation but no relationship between the use of CPs and category of hospital, type of ICU, size of ICU or type of health record applied. In total, 56 CPs were reported within a range of scopes and extensions. The content of the ICUs' CPs, as well as the degree to which they were interprofessional, evidence based, and renewed varied.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Progress has been made in relation to CPs in recent years, but there is potential for further improvements. None of the ICUs had CPs that contained all key characteristics of a high-quality, interprofessional and evidence-based CP identified in the literature. Greater knowledge sharing and cooperation within the field would be beneficial, and further research is needed.

  • 29.
    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Jansson, Inger
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Hlth & Caring Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Balancing intertwined responsibilities: A grounded theory study of teamwork in everyday intensive care unit practice2017In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 31, no 2, 233-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe and explain teamwork and factors that influence team processes in everyday practice in an intensive care unit (ICU) from a staff perspective. The setting was a Swedish ICU. Data were collected from 38 ICU staff in focus groups with registered nurses, assistant nurses, and anaesthetists, and in one individual interview with a physiotherapist. Constant comparative analysis according to grounded theory was conducted, and to identify the relations between the emerged categories, the paradigm model was applied. The core category to emerge from the data was balancing intertwined responsibilities. In addition, eleven categories that related to the core category emerged. These categories described and explained the phenomenon's contextual conditions, causal conditions, and intervening conditions, as well as the staff actions/interactions and the consequences that arose. The findings indicated that the type of teamwork fluctuated due to circumstantial factors. Based on the findings and on current literature, strategies that can optimise interprofessional teamwork are presented. The analysis generated a conceptual model, which aims to contribute to existing frameworks by adding new dimensions about perceptions of team processes within an ICU related to staff actions/interactions. This model may be utilised to enhance the understanding of existing contexts and processes when designing and implementing interventions to facilitate teamwork in the pursuit of improving healthcare quality and patient safety.

  • 30.
    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Mälardalens högskola.
    Jansson, Inger
    Factors affecting the implementation process of clinical pathways: A mixed method study within the context of Swedish intensive care2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, 255-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Clinical pathways (CPs) can improve quality of care on intensive care units (ICUs), but are infrequently utilized and of varying quality. Knowledge regarding factors that facilitate versus hinder successful implementation of CPs is insufficient and a better understanding of the activities and individuals involved is needed. The aim of this study was to explore the implementation process of CPs within the context of ICUs.

    METHODS: An exploratory design with a sequential mixed method was used. A CP survey, including all Swedish ICUs, was used to collect quantitative data from ICUs using CPs (n = 15) and interviews with key informants (n = 10) were used to collect qualitative data from the same ICUs. Descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis were used, and the quantitative and qualitative findings were integrated.

    RESULTS: The CP implementation was conceptualized according to two interplaying themes: a process to realize the usefulness of CPs and create new habits; and a necessity of enthusiasm, support and time. Multiple factors affected the process and those factors were organized in six main categories and 14 subcategories.

    CONCLUSIONS: Bottom-up initiatives, interprofessional project groups and small ICUs seem to enhance successful implementation of CPs while inadequate electronic health record systems, insufficient support and time constrains can be barriers. Support regarding the whole implementation process from centralized units at the local hospitals, as well as cooperation between ICUs and national guidance, has the potential to raise the quality of CPs and benefit the progress of CP implementation.

  • 31.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Björkegren, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Bardel, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Evaluation of sun holiday, diet habits, origin and other factors as determinants of vitamin D status in Swedish primary health care patients: a cross-sectional study with regression analysis of ethnic Swedish and immigrant women2013In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 14, 129- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Determinants of vitamin D status measured as 25-OH-vitamin D in blood are exposure to sunlight and intake of vitamin D through food and supplements. It is unclear how large the contributions are from these determinants in Swedish primary care patients, considering the low radiation of UVB in Sweden and the fortification of some foods. Asian and African immigrants in Norway and Denmark have been found to have very low levels, but it is not clear whether the same applies to Swedish patients. The purpose of our study was to identify contributors to vitamin D status in Swedish women attending a primary health care centre at latitude 60°N in Sweden.

    Methods

    In this cross-sectional, observational study, 61 female patients were consecutively recruited between January and March 2009, irrespective of reason for attending the clinic. The women were interviewed about their sun habits, smoking, education and food intake at a personal appointment and blood samples were drawn for measurements of vitamin D and calcium concentrations.

    Results

    Plasma concentration of 25-OH-vitamin D below 25 nmol/L was found in 61% (19/31) of immigrant and 7% (2/30) of native women. Multivariate analysis showed that reported sun holiday of one week during the last year at latitude below 40°N with the purpose of sun-bathing and native origin, were significantly, independently and positively associated with 25-OH-vitamin D concentrations in plasma with the strongest association for sun holiday during the past year.

    Conclusions

    Vitamin D deficiency was common among the women in the present study, with sun holiday and origin as main determinants of 25-OH-vitamin D concentrations in plasma. Given a negative effect on health this would imply needs for vitamin D treatment particularly in women with immigrant background who have moved from lower to higher latitudes.

    Keywords: Vitamin D; Sun habits; Immigrant; Women; Primary health care

  • 32.
    Burke, Michael J.
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol Blood & Marrow Transplant, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Verneris, Michael R.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Pediat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Le Rademacher, Jennifer
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    He, Wensheng
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Abraham, Allistair A.
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Auletta, Jeffery J.
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol Bone Marrow Transplantat & Infe, Columbus, OH USA..
    Ayas, Mouhab
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Brown, Valerie I.
    Penn State Hershey Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Oncol Hematol, Hershey, PA USA.;Penn State Univ, Milton S Hershey Med Ctr, Coll Med, Hershey, PA 17033 USA..
    Cairo, Mitchell S.
    New York Med Coll, Dept Pediat, Valhalla, NY 10595 USA..
    Chan, Ka Wah
    Texas Transplant Inst, Dept Pediat, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Diaz Perez, Miguel A.
    Hosp Infantil Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain..
    Dvorak, Christopher C.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Pediat, Med Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Egeler, R. Maarten
    Hosp Sick Children, Dept Hematol Oncol, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada..
    Eldjerou, Lamis
    Univ Florida, Dept Pediat, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Frangoul, Haydar
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Sch Med, Nashville, TN USA..
    Guilcher, Gregory M. T.
    Alberta Childrens Prov Gen Hosp, Sect Paediat Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplant, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Hayashi, Robert J.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    Makassed Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, Beiruit, Lebanon..
    Kasow, Kimberly A.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Leung, Wing H.
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, Div Bone Marrow Transplantat, Memphis, TN 38105 USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pulsipher, Michael A.
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Shah, Niketa
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Phoenix, AZ USA.;Phoenix Childrens Hosp, Phoenix, AZ USA..
    Shah, Nirali N.
    Natl Canc Inst NIH, Pediat Oncol Branch, Ctr Canc Res, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Thiel, Elizabeth
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Talano, Julie-An
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol Blood & Marrow Transplant, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Kitko, Carrie L.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Pediat, Stem Cell Transplant Program, Nashville, TN USA..
    Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research2015In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 21, no 12, 2154-2159 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P =.005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted. (c) 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  • 33. Calissendorff, Jan
    et al.
    Mikulski, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Larsen, Erik H
    Möller, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    A Prospective Investigation of Graves' Disease and Selenium: Thyroid Hormones, Auto-Antibodies and Self-Rated Symptoms.2015In: European thyroid journal, ISSN 2235-0640, Vol. 4, no 2, 93-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In Graves' thyrotoxicosis tachycardia, weight loss and mental symptoms are common. Recovery takes time and varies between patients. Treatment with methimazole reduces thyroid hormone levels. According to previous research, this reduction has been faster if selenium (Se) is added.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate whether supplementing the pharmacologic treatment with Se could change the immune mechanisms, hormone levels and/or depression and anxiety.

    METHODS: We prospectively investigated 38 patients with initially untreated thyrotoxicosis by measuring the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyroid receptor antibodies and thyroid peroxidase auto-antibodies before medication and at 6, 18 and 36 weeks after commencing treatment with methimazole and levo-thyroxine, with a randomized blinded oral administration of 200 µg Se/day or placebo. The selenoprotein P concentration was determined in plasma at inclusion and after 36 weeks. The patients were also assessed with questionnaires about depression, anxiety and self-rated symptoms before medication was started and after 36 weeks.

    RESULTS: FT4 decreased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (14 vs. 17 pmol/l compared to the placebo group, p = 0.01) and also at 36 weeks (15 vs. 18 pmol/l, p = 0.01). The TSH increased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (0.05 vs. 0.02 mIU/l, p = 0.04). The depression and anxiety scores were similar in both groups. In the Se group, the depression rates correlated negatively with FT3 and positively with TSH. This was not seen in the placebo group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Se supplementation can enhance biochemical restoration of hyperthyroidism, but whether this could shorten clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and reduce mental symptoms must be investigated further.

  • 34. Carlsson, Anja M
    et al.
    Ngasala, Billy E
    Dahlström, Sabina
    Membi, Christopher
    Veiga, Isabel M
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Abdulla, Salim
    Premji, Zul
    Gil, J Pedro
    Björkman, Anders
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Plasmodium falciparum population dynamics during the early phase of anti-malarial drug treatment in Tanzanian children with acute uncomplicated malaria2011In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 10, 380- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    This study aimed to explore Plasmodium falciparum population dynamics during the early phase of anti-malarial drug treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy in children with clinical malaria in a high transmission area in Africa.

    METHODS:

    A total of 50 children aged 1-10 years with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Bagamoyo District, Tanzania, were enrolled. Participants were hospitalized and received supervised standard treatment with artemether-lumefantrine according to body weight in six doses over 3 days. Blood samples were collected 11 times, i.e. at time of diagnosis (-2 h) and 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h after initiation of treatment. Parasite population dynamics were assessed using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-genotyping of merozoite surface protein (msp) 1 and 2.

    RESULTS:

    PCR-analyses from nine sequential blood samples collected after initiation of treatment identified 20 and 21 additional genotypes in 15/50 (30%) and 14/50 (28%) children with msp1 and msp2, respectively, non-detectable in the pre-treatment samples (-2 and 0 h combined). Some 15/20 (75%) and 14/21 (67%) of these genotypes were identified within 24 h, whereas 17/20 (85%) and 19/21 (90%) within 48 h for msp1 and msp2, respectively. The genotype profile was diverse, and varied considerably over time both within and between patients, molecular markers and their respective families.

    CONCLUSION:

    PCR analyses from multiple blood samples collected during the early treatment phase revealed a complex picture of parasite sub-populations. This underlines the importance of interpreting PCR-outcomes with caution and suggests that the present use of PCR-adjustment from paired blood samples in anti-malarial drug trials may overestimate assessment of drug efficacy in high transmission areas in Africa.The study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov with identifier NCT00336375.

  • 35.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Englund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Early multidisciplinary assessment was associated with longer periods of sick leave: A randomized controlled trial in a primary health care centre2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, no 3, 141-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To study the effects on sick leave from an early multidisciplinary assessment at a primary health care centre. Design. Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting

    Patients who saw GPs at a primary health care centre in mid-Sweden and asked for a sickness certificate for psychiatric or musculoskeletal diagnoses were invited to participate. Patients included were sick-listed for less than four weeks; 33 patients were randomized either to an assessment within a week by a physiotherapist, a psychotherapist, and an occupational therapist or to "standard care". The therapists used methods and tools they normally use in their clinical work.

    Main outcome measure

    Proportion of patients still sick-listed three months after randomization, total and net days on sick leave, and proportion who were on part-time sick leave.

    Results

    At follow-up after three months, in contrast to the pre-trial hypothesis, there was a trend toward a higher proportion of patients still sick-listed in the intervention group (7/18) as compared with the control group (3/15). The intervention group also had significantly longer sick-listing periods (mean 58 days) than the control group (mean 36 days) (p = 0.038). The proportion of patients who were part time sick-listed was significantly higher in the intervention group (10/18) than in the control group (2/15) (p = 0.027).

    Conclusions

    In this study an early multidisciplinary assessment was associated with longer periods on sick leave and more individuals on part-time sick leave.

  • 36.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Anderzén, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    Motivation for return to work and actual return to work among people on long-term sick leave due to pain syndrome or mental health conditionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Lännerström, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Holmström, Inger Knutsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    General practitioners' perceptions of working with the certification of sickness absences following changes in the Swedish social security system: a qualitative focus-group study2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many physicians in Sweden, as well as in other countries, find the matter of certification of sickness absence (COSA) particularly burdensome. The issuing of COSAs has also been perceived as a work-environment problem among physicians. Among general practitioners (GPs) are the highest proportion of physicians in Sweden who experience difficulties with COSA. Swedish authorities have created several initiatives, by changing the social security system, to improve the rehabilitation of people who are ill and decrease the number of days of sick leave used. The aim of this study was to describe how GPs in Sweden perceive their work with COSA after these changes. Methods: A descriptive design with a qualitative, inductive focus-group discussion (FGD) approach was used. Results: Four categories emerged from the analysis of FGDs with GPs in Sweden: 1) Physicians' difficulties in their professional role; 2) Collaboration with other professionals facilitates the COSA; 3) Physicians' approach in relation to the patient; 4) An easier COSA process. Conclusions: Swedish GPs still perceived COSA to be a burdensome task. However, system changes in recent years have facilitated work related to COSA. Cooperation with other professionals on COSA was perceived positively.

  • 38.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Patient Information Websites About Medically Induced Second-Trimester Abortions: A Descriptive Study of Quality, Suitability, and Issues2017In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 19, no 1, e8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients undergoing medically induced second-trimester abortions feel insufficiently informed and use the Web for supplemental information. However, it is still unclear how people who have experience with pregnancy termination appraise the quality of patient information websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions, whether they consider the websites suitable for patients, and what issues they experience with the websites.

    Objective: Our objective was to investigate the quality of, suitability of, and issues with patient information websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions and potential differences between websites affiliated with the health care system and private organizations.

    Methods: We set out to answer the objective by using 4 laypeople who had experience with pregnancy termination as quality assessors. The first 50 hits of 26 systematic searches were screened (N=1300 hits) using search terms reported by the assessors. Of these hits, 48% (628/1300) were irrelevant and 51% (667/1300) led to websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions. After correcting for duplicate hits, 42 patient information websites were included, 18 of which were affiliated with the health care system and 24 with private organizations. The 4 assessors systematically assessed the websites with the DISCERN instrument (total score range 16-80), the Ensuring Quality Information for Patients (EQIP) tool (total score range 0-100), as well as questions concerning website suitability and perceived issues.

    Results: The interrater reliability was 0.8 for DISCERN and EQIP, indicating substantial agreement between the assessors. The total mean score was 36 for DISCERN and 40 for EQIP, indicating poor overall quality. Websites from the health care system had greater total EQIP (45 vs 37, P>.05) and reliability scores (22 vs 20, P>.05). Only 1 website was recommended by all assessors and 57% (24/42) were rated as very unsuitable by at least one assessor. The most reported issues with the websites involved lack of information (76%, 32/42), and poor design (36%, 15/42).

    Conclusions: The high number of irrelevant hits and poor quality of patient information websites are considerable issues that must be addressed and considered when consulting patients awaiting medically induced second-trimester abortions. In clinical encounters, health professionals should initiate discussions concerning websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions and inform patients about the issues and quality deficits associated with these websites.

  • 39.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Melander, Marttala Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetric research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare. Institutionen för Vårdvetenskap, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Högskola.
    Quality of Patient Information Websites About Congenital Heart Defects: Mixed-Methods Study of Perspectives Among Individuals With Experience of a Prenatal Diagnosis2017In: Interactive Journal of Medical Research, E-ISSN 1929-073X, Vol. 6, no 2, e15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When a heart defect is prenatally diagnosed in the fetus, expectant parents experience a great need for information about various topics. After the diagnosis, the Web is used for supplemental information, and the scarcity of research calls attention to the need to explore patient information websites from the perspectives of the intended consumers.

    Objective: The overarching aim of this study was to explore the quality of Swedish patient information websites about congenital heart defects, from the perspectives of individuals with experience of a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect in the fetus.

    Methods: This was a mixed-methods study of websites identified through systematic searches in the two most used Web-based search engines. Of the total 80 screened hits, 10 hits led to patient information websites about congenital heart defects. A quality assessment tool inspired by a previous study was used to evaluate each website’s appearance, details, relevance, suitability, information about treatment choices, and overall quality. Answers were given on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1, representing the lowest score, to 5, representing the highest score. Each website was assessed individually by persons with experience of continued (n=4) and terminated (n=5) pregnancy following a prenatal diagnosis. Assessments were analyzed with Kendall’s coefficient of concordance W, Mann-Whitney U test, Friedman’s test, and a Wilcoxon-Nemenyi-McDonald-Thompson test. In addition, each assessor submitted written responses to open-ended questions in the quality assessment tool, and two joint focus group discussions were conducted with each group of assessors. The qualitative data were analyzed with inductive manifest content analysis.

    Results: Assessments represented a low score (median=2.0) for treatment choices and moderate scores (median=3.0) for appearance, details, relevance, suitability, and overall quality. No website had a median of the highest achievable score for any of the questions in the quality assessment tool. Medians of the lowest achievable score were found in questions about treatment choices (n=4 websites), details (n=2 websites), suitability (n=1 website), and overall quality (n=1 website). Websites had significantly different scores for appearance (P=.01), details (P<.001), relevance (P<.001), suitability (P<.001), treatment choices (P=.04), and overall quality (P<.001). The content analysis of the qualitative data generated six categories: (1) advertisements, (2) comprehensiveness, (3) design, (4) illustrations and pictures, (5) language, and (6) trustworthiness. Various issues with the included websites were highlighted, including the use of inappropriate advertisements, biased information, poor illustrations, complex language, and poor trustworthiness.

    Conclusions: From the perspectives of the intended consumers, patient information websites about congenital heart defects are, to a large extent, inadequate tools for supplemental information following a prenatal diagnosis. Health professionals should initiate discussions with patients about their intentions to use the Web, inform them about the varied quality in the Web-based landscape, and offer recommendations for appropriate Web-based sources.

  • 40.
    Castegren, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Jonasson, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Castegren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lipcsey, Miklós
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Sjölin, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Initial levels of organ failure, microbial findings and mortality in intensive care-treated primary, secondary and tertiary sepsis2015In: CRITICAL CARE AND RESUSCITATION, ISSN 1441-2772, Vol. 17, no 3, 174-181 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Analysis of whether patients with primary, secondary and tertiary sepsis, defined by the presence or absence of recent systemic inflammation-inducing events before the onset of sepsis, differ in clinical presentation, microbiological test results, treatment received and outcome. Design, setting and participants: A retrospective observational study in a single, general intensive care unit, of all patients treated for severe sepsis or septic shock from 2006 to 2011. Patients with haematological malignancies, with immunosuppressive diseases or being treated with immunosuppressive drugs were excluded. Interventions: None. Main outcome measures: Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, incidence of organ failure, microbiological results of blood cultures and mortality. Results: We included 213 patients, who were classified as having primary (n = 121), secondary (n = 65) or tertiary sepsis (n = 27). The groups differed significantly in SOFA score, the incidence of kidney failure and coagulation failure at onset of sepsis in the ICU, as well as in blood culture findings. No differences in 7-day or 28-day mortality were seen, but the time of death occurred earlier among non-survivors in the primary sepsis group. Conclusions: Inflammatory insults before the onset of sepsis affect the clinical picture, blood microbial findings, and in non-survivors, the time of death. These results could, if validated in a prospective study, form a basis for a novel and simple strategy for stratifying patients in clinical studies for immunomodulation therapies in sepsis.

  • 41.
    Chaudhury, Sonali
    et al.
    Ann & Robert H Lurie Childrens Hosp Chicago, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplanta, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Sparapani, Rodney
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hu, Zhen-Huan
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL 33612 USA..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Malone, Adriana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Bone Marrow & Stem Cell Transplantat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Froedtert Mem Lutheran Hosp, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Daly, Andrew
    Univ Calgary, Tom Baker Canc Ctr, Cumming Sch Med, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Bacher, Ulrike
    Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg, Interdisciplinary Clin Stem Cell Transplantat, Hamburg, Germany..
    Wirk, Baldeep M.
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Div Hematol & Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Gale, Robert P.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ N Carolina, Div Hematol Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Hale, Gregory
    Univ S Florida, All Childrens Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, St Petersburg, FL 33701 USA..
    Wiernik, Peter H.
    Canc Res Fdn New York, Bronx, NY USA..
    Hashmi, Shahrukh K.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Rochester, MN USA..
    Marks, David
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Pediat Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Ustun, Celalettin
    Univ Minneapolis, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Munker, Reinhold
    Louisiana State Univ Hlth Shreveport, Dept Internal Med, Sect Hematol Oncol, Shreveport, LA USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Alyea, Edwin
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Div Hematol Malignancies, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Popat, Uday
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Sobecks, Ronald
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Kalaycio, Matt
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Maziarz, Richard
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, Adult Blood & Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Hijiya, Nobuko
    Ann & Robert H Lurie Childrens Hosp Chicago, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplanta, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A CIBMTR Cohort Analysis2016In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 22, no 6, 1056-1064 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in children and young adults is uncommon. Young patients have long life expectancies and low morbidity with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Prolonged tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) use may cause significant morbidity. In addition, indication for HCT in patients in the first chronic phase is not established. We hence retrospectively evaluated outcomes in 449 CML patients with early disease receiving myeloablative HCT reported to the CIBMTR. We analyzed various factors affecting outcome, specifically the effect of age and pre-HCT TKI in pediatric patients (age < 18 years, n = 177) and young adults (age 18 to 29 years, n = 272) with the goal of identifying prognostic factors. Post-HCT probability rates of 5-year overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) were 75% and 59%, respectively. Rates of OS and LFS were 76% and 57% in <18-year and 74% and 60% in 18- to 29-year group, respectively, by univariate analysis (P = .1 and = .6). Five-year rates of OS for HLA matched sibling donor (MSD) and bone marrow (BM) stem cell source were 83% and 80%, respectively. In multivariate analysis there was no effect of age (<18 versus 18 to 29) or pre-HCT TKI therapy on OS, LFS, transplant related mortality, or relapse. Favorable factors for OS were MSD (P < .001) and recent HCT (2003 to 2010; P = .04). LFS was superior with MSD (P < .001), BM as graft source (P = .001), and performance scores > 90 (P = .03) compared with unrelated or mismatched peripheral blood stem cells donors and recipients with lower performance scores. Older age was associated with increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P = .0002). In the current era, HCT outcomes are similar in young patients and children with early CML, and best outcomes are achieved with BM grafts and MSD.

  • 42. Chavannes, Niels
    et al.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Roman, Miguel
    Moran, Ana
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    Crockett, Alan
    Cave, Andrew
    Williams, Siân
    Jones, Rupert
    Tsiligianni, Ioanna
    van der Molen, Thys
    Price, David
    UNLOCK: Uncovering and Noting Long-term Outcomes in COPD to enhance Knowledge2010In: Primary Care Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1471-4418, E-ISSN 1475-1534, Vol. 19, no 4, 408- p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Chen, Y-B
    et al.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Yawkey 9E 9052 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Wang, T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Hemmer, M. T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Brady, C.
    Natl Marrow Donor Program Be Match, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Couriel, D. R.
    Marrow Transplant Program, Utah Blood, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Alousi, A.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Med, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Pidala, J.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Res Inst, Tampa, FL USA..
    Urbano-Ispizua, A.
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Inst Res Josep Carreras, Dept Hematol, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Choi, S. W.
    Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Nishihori, T.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Teshima, T.
    Univ Hosp, Fukuoka, Japan..
    Inamoto, Y.
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Wirk, B.
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Marks, D. I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Abdel-Azim, H.
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Marrow Transplantat, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Lehmann, L.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA USA..
    Yu, L.
    Louisiana State Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Childrens Hosp,Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders,HSC, New Orleans, LA USA..
    Bitan, M.
    Tel Aviv Sourasky Med Ctr, Tel Aviv, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Cairo, M. S.
    New York Med Coll, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, Stem Cell Transplantat, Dept Pediat, Valhalla, NY USA..
    Qayed, M.
    Emory Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Atlanta, GA, Australia..
    Salit, R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA USA..
    Gale, R. P.
    Imperial Coll London, Hematol Res Ctr, Div Expt Med, Dept Med, London, England..
    Martino, R.
    Hosp Santa Creu St Pau, Div Clin Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Jaglowski, S.
    Ohio State Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Bajel, A.
    Royal Melbourne Hosp City Campus, Melbourne, Australia..
    Savani, B.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Nashville, TN USA..
    Frangoul, H.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Pediat, Nashville, TN USA..
    Lewis, I. D.
    Royal Adelaide Hosp, Haematol & Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Storek, J.
    Univ Calgary, Dept Med, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Askar, M.
    Baylor Univ, Med Ctr, Dallas, TX USA..
    Kharfan-Dabaja, M. A.
    H Lee Mofitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Aljurf, M.
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Ringden, O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reshef, R.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Columbia Ctr Translat Immunol, New York, NY USA..
    Olsson, R. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hashmi, S.
    Mayo Clin Rochester, Rochester, MN USA..
    Seo, S.
    Nat Canc Res Ctr, East Hosp, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan..
    Spitzer, T. R.
    MacMillan, M. L.
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Lazaryan, A.
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Spellman, S. R.
    Arora, M.
    Cutler, C. S.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Dept Med Oncol, Boston, MA USA..
    GvHD after umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute leukemia: an analysis of risk factors and effect on outcomes2017In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 52, no 3, 400-408 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) registry, we analyzed 1404 umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) patients (single (>= 18 years) = 810, double (< 18 years) = 594) with acute leukemia to define the incidence of acute GvHD (aGvHD) and chronic GvHD (cGvHD), analyze clinical risk factors and investigate outcomes. After single UCBT, 100-day incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD was 39% (95% confidence interval (CI), 36-43%), grade III-IV aGvHD was 18% (95% CI, 15-20%) and 1-year cGvHD was 27% (95% CI, 24-30%). After double UCBT, 100-day incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD was 45% (95% CI, 41-49%), grade III-IV aGvHD was 22% (95% CI, 19-26%) and 1-year cGvHD was 26% (95% CI, 22-29%). For single UCBT, multivariate analysis showed that absence of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was associated with aGvHD, whereas prior aGvHD was associated with cGvHD. For double UCBT, absence of ATG and myeloablative conditioning were associated with aGvHD, whereas prior aGvHD predicted for cGvHD. Grade III-IV aGvHD led to worse survival, whereas cGvHD had no significant effect on disease-free or overall survival. GvHD is prevalent after UCBT with severe aGvHD leading to higher mortality. Future research in UCBT should prioritize prevention of GvHD.

  • 44.
    Cheng, Yee Chung
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Shi, Yushu
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Brazauskas, Ruta
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hemmer, Michael T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Bishop, Michael R.
    Univ Chicago Hosp, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Nieto, Yago
    Univ Texas, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Stadtmauer, Edward
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ayash, Lois
    Karmanos Canc Inst, Detroit, MI USA.;Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Univ Hosp, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Holmberg, Leona
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Lill, Michael
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA..
    Olsson, R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wirk, Baldeep Mona
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Seattle, WA USA..
    Arora, Mukta
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Ueno, Naoto
    Univ Texas, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Long-Term Outcome of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Compared to Non-Inflammatory Breast Cancer in the Setting of High-Dose Chemotherapy with Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation2017In: Journal of Cancer, ISSN 1837-9664, E-ISSN 1837-9664, Vol. 8, no 6, 1009-1017 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare aggressive form of breast cancer. It is well known that the long-term survival and progression-free survival of IBC are worse than that of non-IBC. We report the long term outcomes of patients with IBC and non-IBC who had undergone high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT).

    Methods: All 3387 patients with IBC or non-IBC who underwent HDC with AHCT between1990-2002 and registered with CIBMTR were included in this analysis. Transplant-related mortality (TRM), disease relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two cohorts. Multivariate Cox regression model was used to determine the independent impact of stage on outcomes.

    Results: 527 patients with IBC and 2,860 patients with non-IBC were included; the median age at transplantation (47 vs 46 years old) and median follow-up period in the 2 groups (167 vs 168 months) were similar. The most common conditioning regimen was cyclophosphamide and carboplatin based in both groups (54% in IBC and 50% in non-IBC). AHCT was well tolerated in both groups. TRM was similar in both groups (one year TRM was 2% for IBC and 3% for non-IBC, p= 0.16). The most common cause of death was disease progression or relapse (81% in IBC and 75% in non-IBC). The median survival for both IBC and non-IBC was the same at 40 months. The PFS at 10 years was 27% (95% CI: 23-31%) for IBC and 24% (95% CI: 22-26%) for non-IBC (p= 0.21), and the OS at 10 years was 31% (95% CI: 27-35%) for IBC and 28% (95% CI: 26-30%) for non-IBC (p= 0.16). In univariate analysis, patients with stage III IBC and no active diseases at transplantation had lower PFS and OS than that in non-IBC. In multivariate analysis, controlling for age, disease status at AHCT, hormonal receptor status, time from HR 1.16, 95% CI: 1- 1.34, p=0.0459), worse PFS (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.01-1.36, p= 0.0339) and higher risk of disease relapse/progression (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06- 1.45, p= 0.0082) as compared to stage III non-IBC. Amongst all patients a higher stage disease was associated with worse PFS, OS and disease relapse/ progression.

    Conclusions: Long-term outcomes of stage III IBC patients who underwent AHCT were poorer than that in non-IBC patients confirming that the poor prognosis of IBC even in the setting of HDC with AHCT.

  • 45.
    Chlibek, Roman
    et al.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Pauksens, Karlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    van Rijckevorsel, Gini
    Publ Hlth Serv Amsterdam, Dept Infect Dis, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Richardus, Jan H.
    Municipal Publ Hlth Serv Rotterdam Rijnmond, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Plassmann, Georg
    Unterfrintroper Hausarztzentrum, Essen, Germany..
    Schwarz, Tino F.
    Stiftung juliusspital, Cent Lab, Wurzburg, Germany.;Stiftung juliusspital, Vaccinat Ctr, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Catteau, Gregory
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Lal, Himal
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Heineman, Thomas C.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Long-term immunogenicity and safety of an investigational herpes zoster subunit vaccine in older adults2016In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 34, no 6, 863-868 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An investigational subunit vaccine containing the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) and the AS01(B) adjuvant system is being evaluated for the prevention of herpes zoster (HZ) in older adults. A phase II trial evaluating different formulations of this vaccine (containing 25 mu g, 50 mu g, or 100 mu g gE) was conducted in adults >= 60 years of age and showed that all formulations elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses for up to 3 years after vaccination. In this follow-up study in subjects who received two doses of the 50 mu g gE/AS01(B) formulation (HZ/su), we assessed the persistence of the immune responses for up to 6 years after vaccination. Methods: This phase II, open-label, multicenter, single-group trial conducted in the Czech Republic, Germany, Sweden, and the Netherlands followed 129 subjects who had received two doses (2 months apart) of HZ/su during the initial trial. Vaccine-induced immune responses (frequencies of gE-specific CD4(+) T cells expressing >= 2 activation markers and serum anti-gE antibody concentrations) were evaluated at 48, 60, and 72 months after the first HZ/su dose. Results: Six years after vaccination with HZ/su, gE-specific cell-mediated immune responses and anti-gE antibody concentrations had decreased by 20-25% from month 36, but remained higher than the prevaccination values. At month 72, the gE-specific cell-mediated immune response was 3.8 times higher than the prevaccination value (477.3 vs. 119.4 activated gE-specific CD4(+) T cells per 10(6) cells), and the anti-gE antibody concentration was 7.3 times higher than the prevaccination value (8159.0 vs. 1121.3 mIU/mL). No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported between months 36 and 72. Conclusions: gE-specific cellular and humoral immune responses persisted for 6 years after two-dose vaccination with HZ/su in healthy older adults. No safety concerns were identified.

  • 46. Cook, Jackie
    et al.
    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit
    Gonzalez, Iveth J.
    Bell, David
    Edlund, Elin
    Nassor, Majda H.
    Msellem, Mwinyi
    Ali, Abdullah
    Abass, Ali K.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for point-of-care detection of asymptomatic low-density malaria parasite carriers in Zanzibar2015In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, 43- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Asymptomatic, low parasite density malaria infections are difficult to detect with currently available point-of-care diagnostics. This study piloted a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) kit for field-friendly, high-throughput detection of asymptomatic malaria infections during mass screening and treatment (MSAT) in Zanzibar, a malaria pre-elimination setting. Methods: Screening took place in three known hotspot areas prior to the short rains in November. Finger-prick blood was taken for screening by rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and LAMP and collected on filter paper for subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. LAMP results were compared to RDT and to PCR using McNemar's test. Results: Approximately 1,000 people were screened. RDT detected ten infections (1.0% (95% CI 0.3-1.6)) whilst both LAMP and PCR detected 18 (1.8% (95% CI 0.9-2.6)) infections. However, PCR identified three infections that LAMP did not detect and vice versa. LAMP testing was easy to scale-up in field conditions requiring minimal training and equipment, with results ready one to three hours after screening. Conclusions: Despite lower than expected prevalence, LAMP detected a higher number of infections than the currently used diagnostic, RDT. LAMP is a field-friendly, sensitive diagnostic test that could be useful for MSAT malaria campaigns which require quick results to enable prompt treatment.

  • 47. Cook, Jackie
    et al.
    Xu, Weiping
    Msellem, Mwinyi
    Vonk, Marlotte
    Bergström, Beatrice
    Gosling, Roly
    Al-Mafazy, Abdul-Wahid
    McElroy, Peter
    Molteni, Fabrizio
    Abass, Ali K
    Garimo, Issa
    Ramsan, Mahdi
    Ali, Abdullah
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Björkman, Anders
    Mass Screening and Treatment on the Basis of Results of a Plasmodium falciparum-Specific Rapid Diagnostic Test Did Not Reduce Malaria Incidence in Zanzibar2015In: The Internet Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1528-8366, Vol. 211, no 9, 1476-1483 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Seasonal increases in malaria continue in hot spots in Zanzibar. Mass screening and treatment (MSAT) may help reduce the reservoir of infection; however, it is unclear whether rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect a sufficient proportion of low-density infections to influence subsequent transmission.

    METHODS:

    Two rounds of MSAT using Plasmodium falciparum-specific RDT were conducted in 5 hot spots (population, 12 000) in Zanzibar in 2012. In parallel, blood samples were collected on filter paper for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Data on confirmed malarial parasite infections from health facilities in intervention and hot spot control areas were monitored as proxy for malaria transmission.

    RESULTS:

    Approximately 64% of the population (7859) were screened at least once. P. falciparum prevalence, as measured by RDT, was 0.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], .1%-.3%) in both rounds, compared with PCR measured prevalences (for all species) of 2.5% (95% CI, 2.1%-2.9%) and 3.8% (95% CI, 3.2%-4.4%) in rounds 1 and 2, respectively. Two fifths (40%) of infections detected by PCR included non-falciparum species. Treatment of RDT-positive individuals (4% of the PCR-detected parasite carriers) did not reduce subsequent malaria incidence, compared with control areas.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostic tools for detection of all human malaria species are needed to make MSAT an effective strategy in settings where malaria elimination programs are in the pre-elimination phase.

  • 48.
    Cornell, Robert F.
    et al.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Bachanova, Veronika
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Bone & Marrow Transplant Program, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    D'Souza, Anita
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Woo-Ahn, Kwang
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Martens, Michael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Huang, Jiaxing
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Al-Homsi, A. Samer
    Spectrum Hlth, Blood & Marrow Transplant, Grand Rapids, MI USA..
    Chhabra, Saurabh
    Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Med, Charleston, SC USA..
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Diaz, Miguel-Angel
    Hosp Infanta Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain..
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    Texas Transplant Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Div Hematol & Oncol, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA..
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard
    Univ Kentucky, Div Hematol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Markey Canc Ctr, Lexington, KY USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    H Lee Moffitt Canc & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila
    Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Div Hematol Oncol, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Usmani, Saad
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Vesole, David H.
    Hackensack UMC, John Theurer Canc Ctr, Hackensack, NJ USA..
    Yared, Jean
    Univ Maryland, Dept Med, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Div Hematol Oncol,Greenebaum Canc Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Mark, Tomer
    Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Med, New York, NY USA..
    Nieto, Yago
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Allogeneic Transplantation for Relapsed Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma2017In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 23, no 1, 60-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL) is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic proliferation, lymph node and spleen enlargement, bone marrow involvement, and IgM production. Treatment varies based on the extent and biology of disease. In some patients, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may have curative potential. We evaluated long-term outcomes of 144 patients who received adult alloHCT for WM/LPL. Data were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database (2001 to 2013). Patients received myeloablative (n = 67) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC; n = 67). Median age at alloHCT was 53 years, and median time from diagnosis to transplantation was 41 months. Thirteen percent (n = 18) failed prior autologous HCT. About half (n = 82, 57%) had chemosensitive disease at the time of transplantation, whereas 22% had progressive disease. Rates of progression-free survival, overall survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 5 years were 46%, 52%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. Patients with chemosensitive disease and better pretransplant disease status experienced significantly superior overall survival. There were no significant differences in progression-free survival based on conditioning (myeloablative, 50%, versus RIC, 41%) or graft source. Conditioning intensity did not impact treatment-related mortality or relapse. The most common causes of death were primary disease and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AlloHCT yielded durable survival in select patients with WM/LPL. Strategies to reduce mortality from GVHD and post-transplant relapse are necessary to improve this approach.

  • 49. Cornell, Robert F
    et al.
    D'Souza, Anita
    Kassim, Adetola A
    Costa, Luciano J
    Innis-Shelton, Racquel D
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Huang, Jiaxing
    Abidi, Muneer
    Aiello, Jack
    Akpek, Gorgun
    Bashey, Asad
    Bashir, Qaiser
    Cerny, Jan
    Comenzo, Raymond
    Diaz, Miguel Angel
    Freytes, César
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Hashmi, Shahrukh
    Holmberg, Leona
    Hossain, Nasheed
    Kamble, Rammurti T
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila
    Kyle, Robert
    Kumar, Shaji
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Lee, Cindy
    Maiolino, Angelo
    Marks, David I
    Meehan, Kenneth
    Mikhael, Joe
    Nath, Rajneesh
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Ramanathan, Muthalagu
    Saad, Ayman
    Seo, Sachiko
    Usmani, Saad
    Vesole, David
    Vij, Ravi
    Vogl, Dan
    Wirk, Baldeep M
    Yared, Jean
    Krishnan, Amrita
    Mark, Tomer
    Nieto, Yago
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Maintenance versus Induction Therapy Choice on Outcomes after Autologous Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma2017In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 23, no 2, 269-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bortezomib (V), lenalidomide (R), cyclophosphamide (C), and dexamethasone (D) are components of the most commonly used modern doublet (RD, VD) or triplet (VRD, CVD) initial induction regimens before autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) in the United States. In this study we evaluated 693 patients receiving "upfront" AHCT after initial induction therapy with modern doublet or triplet regimens using data reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 2008 to 2013. Analysis was limited to those receiving a single AHCT after 1 line of induction therapy within 12 months from treatment initiation for MM. In multivariate analysis, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were similar irrespective of induction regimen. However, high-risk cytogenetics and nonreceipt of post-transplant maintenance/consolidation therapy were associated with higher risk of relapse. Patients receiving post-transplant therapy had significantly improved 3-year PFS versus no post-transplant therapy (55% versus 39%, P = .0001). This benefit was most evident in patients not achieving at least a complete response post-AHCT (P = .005). In patients receiving upfront AHCT, the choice of induction regimen (doublet or triplet therapies) appears to be of lower impact than use of post-transplant therapy.

  • 50.
    Cunningham, A. L.
    et al.
    Westmead Inst Med Res, Westmead, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Lal, H.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Kovac, M.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Chlibek, R.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Hwang, S. -J
    Diez-Domingo, J.
    Fdn Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed, Vaccine Res Unit, Valencia, Spain..
    Godeaux, O.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Levin, M. J.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Pediat, Anschutz Med Campus, Aurora, CO USA.;Univ Colorado, Dept Med, Anschutz Med Campus, Aurora, CO USA..
    McElhaney, J. E.
    Hlth Sci North Res Inst, Sudbury, ON, Canada..
    Puig-Barbera, J.
    Fdn Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed, Vaccine Res Unit, Valencia, Spain..
    Abeele, C. Vanden
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Vesikari, T.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Watanabe, D.
    Aichi Med Univ, Dept Dermatol, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan..
    Zahaf, T.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Ahonen, A.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Athan, E.
    Deakin Univ, Barwon Hlth, Dept Infect Dis, Geelong, Vic, Australia..
    Barba-Gomez, J. F.
    Inst Dermatol Jalisco Dr Jose Barba Rubio, Zapopan, Mexico..
    Campora, L.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    de Looze, F.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Med, AusTrials, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Sch Med, Discipline Gen Practice, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Downey, H. J.
    Jacksonville Ctr Clin Res, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Ghesquiere, W.
    Univ British Columbia, Infect Dis Sect, Victoria, BC, Canada..
    Gorfinkel, I.
    PrimeHlth Clin Res, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Korhonen, T.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Leung, E.
    United Christian Hosp, Dept Med & Geriatr, Div Geriatr Med, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    McNeil, S. A.
    Dalhousie Univ, IWK Hlth Ctr, Canadian Ctr Vaccinol, Halifax, NS, Canada.;Dalhousie Univ, Nova Scotia Hlth Author, Halifax, NS, Canada..
    Oostvogels, L.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Sormland Cty Council, Clin Res Ctr, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Smetana, J.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Weckx, L.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Ctr Referencia Imunobiol Especiais, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Yeo, W.
    Univ Wollongong, Grad Sch Med, Illawarra Hlth & Med Res Inst, Wollongong, NSW, Australia..
    Heineman, T. C.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Efficacy of the Herpes Zoster Subunit Vaccine in Adults 70 Years of Age or Older2016In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 375, no 11, 1019-1032 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND A trial involving adults 50 years of age or older (ZOE-50) showed that the herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) containing recombinant varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01(B) adjuvant system was associated with a risk of herpes zoster that was 97.2% lower than that associated with placebo. A second trial was performed concurrently at the same sites and examined the safety and efficacy of HZ/su in adults 70 years of age or older (ZOE-70). METHODS This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial was conducted in 18 countries and involved adults 70 years of age or older. Participants received two doses of HZ/su or placebo (assigned in a 1: 1 ratio) administered intramuscularly 2 months apart. Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia was assessed in participants from ZOE-70 and in participants pooled from ZOE-70 and ZOE-50. RESULTS In ZOE-70, 13,900 participants who could be evaluated (mean age, 75.6 years) received either HZ/su (6950 participants) or placebo (6950 participants). During a mean follow-up period of 3.7 years, herpes zoster occurred in 23 HZ/su recipients and in 223 placebo recipients (0.9 vs. 9.2 per 1000 person-years). Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.2 to 93.7; P<0.001) and was similar in participants 70 to 79 years of age (90.0%) and participants 80 years of age or older (89.1%). In pooled analyses of data from participants 70 years of age or older in ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 (16,596 participants), vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 91.3% (95% CI, 86.8 to 94.5; P<0.001), and vaccine efficacy against postherpetic neuralgia was 88.8% (95% CI, 68.7 to 97.1; P<0.001). Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after injection were more frequent among HZ/su recipients than among placebo recipients (79.0% vs. 29.5%). Serious adverse events, potential immune-mediated diseases, and deaths occurred with similar frequencies in the two study groups. CONCLUSIONS In our trial, HZ/su was found to reduce the risks of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia among adults 70 years of age or older. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 ClinicalTrials.govnumbers, NCT01165177 and NCT01165229.)

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