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  • 1.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Hall, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Ängeby-Möller, Kristina
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Evaluation of  PET tracers [11C]D-deprenyl, [11C]L-dideuteriumdeprenyl and [18F]FDG for Visualization of Acute Inflammation in a Rat Model of Pain - Preliminary Findings.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography with the radioligand [11C]D-deprenyl has shown an increased signal at the location of pain in patients with ankle sprains, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic whiplash injury, but the mechanism of this tracer uptake and its exact binding site in inflammation or tissue injury is still unclear. The aim of this study was to further evaluate [11C]D-deprenyl´s usefulness as a marker of acute inflammation.

    Methods: An animal PET/CT study was performed three days after the induction of a rat model of inflammatory or surgical pain. Fourteen adult male Sprague-Dawley rats and three tracers [11C]D-deprenyl, [11C]L-dideuterumdeprenyl and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose were used.

    Results: No [11C]D-deprenyl accumulation was seen in a rat model of musculoskeletal pain. In the rat model of inflammatory pain all three ligands were shown to visualize the inflamed ankle joint with much lower uptake in the control ankle joint. The uptake was largest with [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L- dideuteriumdeprenyl, where approximately 1 % of the injected dose could be found in the affected ankle joint during the first minutes, whereas the uptake of [18F]FDG was approximately 0.5 % of the injected dose. However, the ratio of uptake of the injected ankle joint versus the control ankle joint was much higher for [18F]FDG (around 10 fold increase) than for the two deprenyl enantiomers (2 – 3 fold increase). The uptake pattern of [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L-dideuteriumdeprenyl did not show signs of specific binding or irreversible trapping.

    Conclusions: Contrary to our expectations, of the three tracers only [18F]FDG may be used as markers of peripheral inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory pain. However, as a high site-specificity is required, [11C]D-deprenyl and [11C]L-dideyteriumdeprenyl deserve further exploration regarding sensitivity, specificity and uptake mechanisms in human pain syndromes.

  • 2.
    Abass, Ahmed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Syntes av MPro-inhibitor2020Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    December 2019 the new pandemic Covid-19 sweeps the world and impose unmatched challenges on modern humanity, the virus started from Wuhan China and in just a few months the virus had spread to other countries and WHO (World Health Organization) called the disease a pandemic, Covid-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV -2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus2), the virus is largely spread through human-to-human transmission, today more than 263 million people have been infected with the virus while more than 5 million have died.

    SARS-CoV-2 is closely related to other viruses of the genus Betacoronavirus such as bat coronavirus BatCoV RaTG13 (~ 96% sequence identity) and SARS-CoV (~ 80% sequence identity), Coronavirus such as SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV -2 need main protease MPro (3CLPro), MPro is interesting as there are no similar proteases in humans, and it is vital for virus survival as it has essential role in processing and replicating polyproteins of viral RNA.

    ML188 is a SARS-CoV MPro inhibitor, SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV -2 have 80% sequence identity, ML188 can be used as a starting point to analyze and improve MPro inhibitors that can be used against SARS-CoV -2.

    In this study with the use of UGI reaction to synthesized and modified analog to ML188 by exchanging 3-pyridialkarboxaldehyd which is one of the 4 starting material the compound with 4-pyridilkarboxaldehyd. By changing the nitrogen position in the aromatic ring, we want to see if this change can increase or decrease the compound effectiveness and if it has deferent effect on SARS-CoV2.  

    TLC and LC-MS are analysis method that is used to monitor the reaction and determine the purity of the reaction, column chromatography is used to purify the reaction mixture, NMR analysis both proton and carbon NMR is used to confirm the structure of our synthesized product. Result from the LCMS-Analyze showed a clear high peak with the exact mass of our Sought product but it also showed that the purification of the mixture didn’t happen fully thus we still had some impurities in the mixture. both the proton and carbon NMR results data were consistent with our compound structure. Now we need to test if this new compound can result to better inhibition in SARS-CoV2.

  • 3.
    Abbas, Nasir
    et al.
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Ali, Arslan
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Kumari, Sindhia
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Iqbal, Ayesha
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Husain, Adnan
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Saeed, Talat
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Al-Ballam, Zainab Abdulamer
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Ahmed, Nisar
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.;Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.;Univ Karachi, Ind Analyt Ctr, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Halal Testing Labs, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Untargeted-metabolomics differentiation between poultry samples slaughtered with and without detaching spinal cord2020In: Arabian Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1878-5352, E-ISSN 1878-5379 , Vol. 13, no 12, p. 9081-9089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chicken meat is among the common and relatively inexpensive source of protein consumed worldwide from the poultry industry. Many communities show concern regarding the procedure of slaughtering animals for meat consumption due to ethical, religious, or cultural reasons. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) based untargeted metabolomics of 40 chicken meat samples were evaluated to differentiate meat samples based on slaughtering methods. Samples were grouped into, Zabiha (cutting neck without detaching spinal cord) and Non-Zabiha (completely detaching neck). A volcano plot reveals at least 150 features found significantly different between the two groups having >= 2-fold changes in intensities with p-values <= 0.05. Among them 05 identified and 25 unidentified metabolites have clear differences in peak intensities. The identified features can be employed to differentiate meat obtained from different slaughtering methods. A characteristic pattern based on principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was observed among the groups. The results will benefit Halal certification, food safety, and security agencies to curb food fraud. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of King Saud University.

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  • 4.
    Abd El-Gaber, Amira S.
    et al.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm, Egypt.
    El Gendy, Abdel Nasser G.
    Natl Res Ctr, Med & Aromat Plants Res Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    Elkhateeb, Ahmed
    Natl Res Ctr, Phytochem & Plant Systemat Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    Saleh, Ibrahim A.
    Natl Res Ctr, Phytochem Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm, Egypt;Univ Karachi, ICCBS, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.
    Microwave Extraction of Essential Oil from Anastatica hierochuntica (L): Comparison with Conventional Hydro-Distillation and Steam Distillation2018In: Journal of Essential Oil-Bearing Plants (JEOBP), ISSN 0972-060X, E-ISSN 0976-5026, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 1003-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article stands to introduce microwave assisted extraction (MAE) as a more effective method for extraction of Anastatica hierochuntica (L) essential oils (EOs) compared to traditional hydrodistillation (HD) and steam distillation (SD) methods. Analysis of EOs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) showed significant differences in the constituents and percentages of the obtained oils. Using MAE and HD obtained oxygenated monoterpenes 50.79 % whereas SD obtained sesquiterpene hydrocarbons 79.84 % as major contents of the extracted oils. This is the first report of EO composition of the aerials parts of A. heirochunatica. It offered several advantages of MAE technique as a green method with shorter extraction time (60 min) and better yield.

  • 5.
    Abd El-Wahed, Aida A.
    et al.
    Agr Res Ctr, Plant Protect Res Inst, Dept Bee Res, Giza 12627, Egypt..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elashal, Mohamed H.
    Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Musharraf, Syed G.
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Saeed, Aamer
    Quaid I Azam Univ, Dept Chem, Islamabad 45320, Pakistan..
    Khatib, Alfi
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Pharmacognosy Res Grp, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kulliyyah Pharm, Kuantan 25200, Pahang Darul Ma, Malaysia.;Airlangga Univ, Fac Pharm, Surabaya 60155, Indonesia..
    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Zou, Xiaobo
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Gen Zool, Hoher Weg 8, D-06120 Halle, Germany.;Tanta Univ, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Tanta 31527, Egypt..
    Mehmood, Arshad
    Beijing Technol & Business Univ, Beijing Engn & Technol Res Ctr Food Addit, Beijing 100048, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Kai
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Apicultural Res, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.;Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Cosmetic Applications of Bee Venom2021In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 810Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bee venom (BV) is a typical toxin secreted by stingers of honeybee workers. BV and BV therapy have long been attractive to different cultures, with extensive studies during recent decades. Nowadays, BV is applied to combat several skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, alopecia, vitiligo, and psoriasis. BV is used extensively in topical preparations as cosmetics and used as dressing for wound healing, as well as in facemasks. Nevertheless, the safety of BV as a therapeutic choice has always been a concern due to the immune system reaction in some people due to BV use. The documented unfavorable impact is explained by the fact that the skin reactions to BV might expand to excessive immunological responses, including anaphylaxis, that typically resolve over numerous days. This review aims to address bee venom therapeutic uses in skin cosmetics.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 6.
    Abd El-Wahed, Aida
    et al.
    Agr Res Ctr, Plant Protect Res Inst, Dept Bee Res, Giza 12627, Egypt.;Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Yosri, Nermeen
    Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.;Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Sakr, Hanem H.
    Menoufia Univ, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Du, Ming
    Dalian Polytech Univ, Sch Food Sci & Technol, Natl Engn Res Ctr Seafood, Dalian 116034, Peoples R China..
    Algethami, Ahmed F. M.
    Alnahalaljwal Fdn Saudi Arabia, POB 617, Al Jumum 21926, Makkah, Saudi Arabia..
    Zhao, Chao
    Fujian Agr & Forestry Univ, Coll Food Sci, Fuzhou 350002, Peoples R China.;Univ Macau, Inst Chinese Med Sci, State Key Lab Qual Control Chinese Med, Taipa, Macao, Peoples R China..
    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.
    Beni Suef Univ, Dept Med Chem, Fac Pharm, Bani Suwayf 62514, Egypt.;Riyadh Elm Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11681, Saudi Arabia..
    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Masry, Saad H. D.
    Abu Dhabi Food Control Author, Al Ain 52150, U Arab Emirates.;City Sci Res & Technol Applicat, Arid Lands Cultivat Res Inst ALCRI, Dept Plant Protect & Biomol Diag, Alexandria 21934, Egypt..
    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.
    Suez Canal Univ, Dept Pharmacol, Fac Vet Med, Ismailia 41522, Egypt..
    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam
    Univ Karachi, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    El-Garawani, Islam
    Menoufia Univ, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Kai, Guoyin
    Zhejiang Chinese Med Univ, Coll Pharm, Lab Med Plant Biotechnol, Hangzhou 310053, Peoples R China..
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Gen Zool, Hoher Weg 8, D-06120 Halle, Saale, Germany.;Tanta Univ, Fac Sci, Zool Dept, Tanta 31527, Egypt..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mol Biosci, Wenner Gren Inst, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Mol Biosci, Wenner Gren Inst, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Wasp Venom Biochemical Components and Their Potential in Biological Applications and Nanotechnological Interventions2021In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 206Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wasps, members of the order Hymenoptera, are distributed in different parts of the world, including Brazil, Thailand, Japan, Korea, and Argentina. The lifestyles of the wasps are solitary and social. Social wasps use venom as a defensive measure to protect their colonies, whereas solitary wasps use their venom to capture prey. Chemically, wasp venom possesses a wide variety of enzymes, proteins, peptides, volatile compounds, and bioactive constituents, which include phospholipase A2, antigen 5, mastoparan, and decoralin. The bioactive constituents have anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the limited quantities of wasp venom and the scarcity of advanced strategies for the synthesis of wasp venom's bioactive compounds remain a challenge facing the effective usage of wasp venom. Solid-phase peptide synthesis is currently used to prepare wasp venom peptides and their analogs such as mastoparan, anoplin, decoralin, polybia-CP, and polydim-I. The goal of the current review is to highlight the medicinal value of the wasp venom compounds, as well as limitations and possibilities. Wasp venom could be a potential and novel natural source to develop innovative pharmaceuticals and new agents for drug discovery.

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  • 7.
    Abd-El Azeem, Hoda H.
    et al.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Osman, Gamalat Y.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Jiangsu Univ, Jiangsu Educ Dept, Int Joint Res Lab Intelligent Agr & Agriprod Proc, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Fallatah, Ahmed M.
    Taif Univ, Coll Sci, Dept Chem, POB 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gharib, Mohamed M.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Bot, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Antifungal Activity of Soft Tissue Extract from the Garden Snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda, Mollusca)2022In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 27, no 10, article id 3170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastropods comprise approximately 80% of molluscans, of which land snails are used variably as food and traditional medicines due to their high protein content. Moreover, different components from land snails exhibit antimicrobial activities. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of soft tissue extracts from Helix aspersa against Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus brasiliensis by identifying extract components using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Two concentrations of three extracts (methanol, acetone, and acetic acid) showed antifungal activity. Both acetone (1 g/3 mL) and acetic acid extracts (1 g/mL) significantly inhibited C. albicans growth (p = 0.0001, 5.2 +/- 0.2 mm and p = 0.02, 69.7 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively). A. flavus and A. brasiliensis growth were inhibited by all extracts at 1 g/mL, while inhibition was observed for acetic acid extracts against A. brasiliensis (p = 0.02, 50.3 +/- 3.5 mm). The highest growth inhibition was observed for A. flavus using acetic acid and acetone extracts (inhibition zones = 38 +/- 1.7 mm and 3.1 +/- 0.7 mm, respectively). LC-MS-MS studies on methanol and acetone extracts identified 11-alpha-acetoxyprogesterone with a parent mass of 372.50800 m/z and 287.43500 m/z for luteolin. Methanol extracts contained hesperidin with a parent mass of 611.25400 m/z, whereas linoleic acid and genistein (parent mass = 280.4 and 271.48900 m/z, respectively) were the main metabolites.

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  • 8.
    Abdelmoniem, Amr M.
    et al.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Giza, Egypt.
    Elnagdi, Mohamed H.
    Cairo Univ, Giza, Egypt;Kuwait Univ, Safat, Kuwait.
    Elsehemy, Mohamed S.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Pharm, Giza, Egypt.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.
    Abdelhamid, Ismail A.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Giza, Egypt.
    Synthesis, Chemistry and Utilities of Diaminoazoles with Special Reference to 3,5-Diaminopyrazoles2018In: Current Organic Synthesis, ISSN 1570-1794, E-ISSN 1875-6271, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 487-514Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the chemistry of heteroaromatic monoamino azoles has been surveyed more than once in the last decade, the chemistry of the di- and triaminoazoles has not been reviewed. In this article we will survey the synthesis, chemistry and utility of the diaminoazoles. In this review, the chemistry of the diaminoazoles as well as their most important utilities will be surveyed. Objective: The review focuses on recent progress in diaminoazoles (i.e. diaminopyrazoles, diaminoimidazoles, diaminotriazoles and diaminothiazole) with especial references to diaminopyrazoles. The synthesis as well as pharmaceutical utilities are reported. There are several methods for synthesis of diaminopyrazoles. 3,5-Diaminopyrazole and its derivatives are prepared through the reaction of malononitrile or arylhydrazononitrile with hydrazine derivatives. 3,4-Diaminopyrazoles are prepared via nitration of 3-aminopyrazole with subsequent reduction of the produced compound. The diaminopyrazoles have several applications in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. They also have useful utilities as a constituent in oxidative hair dyes. Conclusion: We managed to report the common methods for the synthesis of diaminoazoles with especial reference to aminopyrazoles that are prepared through the reaction of malononitrile or hydrazononitriles with hydrazine derivatives. Some important applications that include pharmaceutical utilities such as hair dye constituents are reported.

  • 9.
    AbdelRehim, M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Karlen, A
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Zhang, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Kamel, M
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hassan, M
    Enantiomer separation of underivatized tocainide and related compounds by CGC using ammonia as carrier gas1996In: JOURNAL OF MICROCOLUMN SEPARATIONS, Vol. 8, p. 151-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Capillary gas chromatography of trichlorophenols using ammonia as carrier gas2000In: Journal of High Resolution Chromatography, Vol. 23, p. 156-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abdillahi, Suado M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Maass, Tobias
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Kasetty, Gopinath
    Lund Univ, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Strömstedt, Adam A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Baumgarten, Maria
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Tati, Ramesh
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Nordin, Sara L.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Walse, Björn
    Sarom Biostruct AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden.
    Wagener, Raimund
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Schmidtchen, Artur
    Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Biomed Sci, Copenhagen Wound Healing Ctr, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mörgelin, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Colzyx AB, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Collagen VI Contains Multiple Host Defense Peptides with Potent In Vivo Activity2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 3, p. 1007-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagen VI is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component that forms extensive microfibrillar networks in most connective tissues. In this study, we describe for the first time, to our knowledge, that the collagen VI von Willebrand factor type A like domains exhibit a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in human skin infections in vivo. In silico sequence and structural analysis of VWA domains revealed that they contain cationic and amphipathic peptide sequence motifs, which might explain the antimicrobial nature of collagen VI. In vitro and in vivo studies show that these peptides exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane disruption. Our findings shed new light on the role of collagen VI derived peptides in innate host defense and provide templates for development of peptide-based antibacterial therapies.

  • 12.
    Abosedera, Dalia A.
    et al.
    Univ Sadat City, Environm Studies & Res Inst, Dept Nat Resources, Sadat City, Egypt..
    Emara, S. A.
    Univ Sadat City, Fac Vet Med, Dept Cytol & Histol, Sadat City, Egypt..
    Tamam, Omar A. S.
    Univ Sadat City, Environm Studies & Res Inst, Dept Nat Resources, Sadat City, Egypt..
    Badr, Osama M.
    Univ Sadat City, Anim Biotechnol Dept, Genet Engn & Biotechnol Inst GEBRI, Sadat City, Egypt..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. BJiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Jiangsu Univ, Jiangsu Educ Dept, Int Joint Res Lab Intelligent Agr & Agriprod Proc, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Menoufia 32511, Egypt..
    Refaey, Mohamed S.
    Univ Sadat City, Fac Pharm, Dept Pharmacognosy, Menoufia 32897, Egypt..
    Metabolomic profile and in vitro evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of Asphodelus microcarpus against human malignant melanoma cells A3752022In: Arabian Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1878-5352, E-ISSN 1878-5379 , Vol. 15, no 10, article id 104174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanoma is a huge worldwide health problem that must be handled more effectively with better therapeutic options. As a result, new treatment drugs are required to treat this condition. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of the anthraquinone-rich fractions obtained from Asphodelus microcarpus against human melanoma cell A375. On these melanoma cell lines; the cytotoxicity of these fractions had never been studied before. Liquid chromatography linked to mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was used to determine the chemical profiles of these fractions. The cytotoxicity of the fractions studied was determined by measuring cell viability and calculating IC50 values. Both ethyl acetate (EtOAC) and the precipitate fractions (PPT) exhibited selective cytotoxicity on human melanoma A 375 cell line with IC50 values of 83 and 65 mu g/mL, respectively. The antiproliferative properties of EtOAc fraction and PPT were supported by a noticeable decrease in cell numbers during the G2/M cell cycle arrest. Our findings suggest that the anthraquinone content of A. microcarpus tubers is responsible for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic properties and that further in vivo investigations should be conducted to establish the viability of using them to treat human melanomas.

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  • 13.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Theranostic Targeting of GRPR and PSMA in Prostate Cancer2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is based on five original articles that investigated the theranostics of prostate cancer by gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeting. GRPR and PSMA are two extensively evaluated prostate cancer cell markers due to their overexpression in the majority of prostate cancer samples. Theranostic targeting of GRPR and PSMA is an attractive strategy to improve the management of prostate cancer patients.

    Papers I and II focused on the dual targeting of GRPR and PSMA. The effect of linker modification on the affinity for GRPR and PSMA and the pharmacokinetic profile was evaluated. In Paper III, the effect of the GRPR antagonist RM26 conjugation to an albumin-binding domain on the pharmacokinetic profile and its potential use in therapy was investigated. Paper IV focused on developing a GRPR antagonist that was suitable for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m. In Paper V, the GRPR antagonist developed in Paper IV was translated into a phase I clinical trial to assess safety and dosimetry.

    Modifying the linkers in GRPR and PSMA heterodimers can largely impact the affinity for both targets. This modification influenced the in vivo targeting specificity and biodistribution, with [125I]I-BO530 in Paper I and [111In]In-BQ7812 in Paper II outperforming other analogues. Our findings in Paper III indicated that the conjugation of an albumin-binding domain to RM26 increased the blood concentration of the radiotracer. This increase led to elevated and stable tumour uptake of [111In]In-DOTA-ABD-RM26 after several days of injection. However, [111In]In-DOTA-ABD-RM26 was also increasingly taken up by various healthy organs. The GRPR antagonist [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26, studied in Paper IV, showed high specificity and affinity for GRPR. This resulted in elevated GRPR-mediated uptake. Additionally, maSSS-PEG2-RM26 could be radiolabelled via a straightforward radiolabelling protocol. Clinical evaluation of [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 in prostate and breast cancer patients (Paper V) demonstrated the safety and tolerability of the radiotracer, with favourable dosimetry and no side effects.

    In conclusion, this thesis evaluated different tools for the theranostic targeting of GRPR and PSMA. The findings warrant further investigation to optimise the reported radiotracers.

    List of papers
    1. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Radio-Iodinated GRPR/PSMA Bispecific Heterodimers for the Theranostics Application in Prostate Cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Radio-Iodinated GRPR/PSMA Bispecific Heterodimers for the Theranostics Application in Prostate Cancer
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    2019 (English)In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are overexpressed in most prostate cancers. GRPR expression is higher in early stages while PSMA expression increases with progression. The possibility of targeting both markers with a single theranostics radiotracer could improve patient management. Three GRPR/PSMA-targeting bispecific heterodimers (urea derivative PSMA-617 and bombesin-based antagonist RM26 linked via X-triazolyl-Tyr-PEG2, X = PEG2 (BO530), (CH2)(8) (BO535), none (BO536)) were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. Peptides were radio-iodinated and evaluated in vitro for binding specificity, cellular retention, and affinity. In vivo specificity for all heterodimers was studied in PC-3 (GRPR-positive) and LNCaP (PSMA-positive) xenografts. [I-125]I-BO530 was evaluated in PC-3pip (GRPR/PSMA-positive) xenografts. Micro single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (microSPECT/CT) scans were acquired. The heterodimers were radiolabeled with high radiochemical yields, bound specifically to both targets, and demonstrated high degree of activity retention in PC-3pip cells. Only [I-125]I-BO530 demonstrated in vivo specificity to both targets. A biodistribution study of [I-125]I-BO530 in PC-3pip xenografted mice showed high tumor activity uptake (30%-35%ID/g at 3 h post injection (pi)). Activity uptake in tumors was stable and exceeded all other organs 24 h pi. Activity uptake decreased only two-fold 72 h pi. The GRPR/PSMA-targeting heterodimer [I-125]I-BO530 is a promising agent for theranostics application in prostate cancer.

    Keywords
    prostate cancer, GRPR, PSMA, bispecific heterodimers, theranostics, radio-iodine
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393138 (URN)10.3390/pharmaceutics11070358 (DOI)000478995100060 ()31340483 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2015-02509Swedish Research Council, 2015-02353Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2017/425Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2015/350Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2018/436
    Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2023-05-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Heterodimeric Radiotracer Targeting PSMA and GRPR for Imaging of Prostate Cancer-Optimization of the Affinity towards PSMA by Linker Modification in Murine Model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterodimeric Radiotracer Targeting PSMA and GRPR for Imaging of Prostate Cancer-Optimization of the Affinity towards PSMA by Linker Modification in Murine Model
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    2020 (English)In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are promising targets for molecular imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) lesions. Due to the heterogenic overexpression of PSMA and GRPR in PCa, a heterodimeric radiotracer with the ability to bind to both targets could be beneficial. Recently, our group reported the novel heterodimer BQ7800 consisting of a urea-based PSMA inhibitor, the peptide-based GRPR antagonist RM26 and NOTA chelator. The study reported herein, aimed to improve the affinity of BQ7800 towards PSMA by changing the composition of the two linkers connecting the PSMA- and GRPR-targeting motifs. Three novel heterodimeric analogues were synthesized by incorporation of phenylalanine in the functional linker of the PSMA-binding motif and/or shortening the PEG-linker coupled to RM26. The heterodimers were labeled with indium-111 and evaluated in vitro. In the competitive binding assay, BQ7812, featuring phenylalanine and shorter PEG-linker, demonstrated a nine-fold improved affinity towards PSMA. In the in vivo biodistribution study of [In-111]In-BQ7812 in PC3-pip tumor-bearing mice (PSMA and GRPR positive), the activity uptake was two-fold higher in the tumor and three-fold higher in kidneys than for [In-111]In-BQ7800. Herein, we showed that the affinity of a bispecific PSMA/GRPR heterodimer towards PSMA could be improved by linker modification.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2020
    Keywords
    prostate cancer, PSMA, GRPR, heterodimer, molecular imaging, SPPS
    National Category
    Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-420766 (URN)10.3390/pharmaceutics12070614 (DOI)000556488600001 ()32630176 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2019-00986Swedish Cancer Society, 2017/425
    Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2020-10-06 Last updated: 2023-05-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Preclinical Evaluation of the GRPR-Targeting Antagonist RM26 Conjugated to the Albumin-Binding Domain for GRPR-Targeting Therapy of Cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preclinical Evaluation of the GRPR-Targeting Antagonist RM26 Conjugated to the Albumin-Binding Domain for GRPR-Targeting Therapy of Cancer
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    2020 (English)In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 977Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The targeting of gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) was recently proposed for targeted therapy, e.g., radiotherapy. Multiple and frequent injections of peptide-based therapeutic agents would be required due to rapid blood clearance. By conjugation of the GRPR antagonist RM26 (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) to an ABD (albumin-binding domain), we aimed to extend the blood circulation of peptides. The synthesized conjugate DOTA-ABD-RM26 was labelled with indium-111 and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The labelled conjugate was stable in PBS and retained specificity and its antagonistic function against GRPR. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of In-nat-DOTA-ABD-RM26 in the presence of human serum albumin was 49 +/- 5 nM. [In-111]In-DOTA-ABD-RM26 had a significantly longer residence time in blood and in tumors (without a significant decrease of up to 144 h pi) than the parental RM26 peptide. We conclude that the ABD-RM26 conjugate can be used for GRPR-targeted therapy and delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, the undesirable elevated activity uptake in kidneys abolishes its use for radionuclide therapy. This proof-of-principle study justified further optimization of the molecular design of the ABD-RM26 conjugate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2020
    Keywords
    prostate cancer, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, RM26, albumin-binding domain, targeted therapy, gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) antagonist
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-425851 (URN)10.3390/pharmaceutics12100977 (DOI)000585297400001 ()33081166 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Vinnova, 2019/00104Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2017/425Swedish Cancer Society, 2018/436Swedish Cancer Society, 19 0212 Pj 01HSwedish Research Council, 2019-00986Swedish Research Council, 2015-02353Swedish Research Council, 2016-05207
    Note

    De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    De två sista författarna delar sistaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2020-11-23 Created: 2020-11-23 Last updated: 2023-05-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Preclinical Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled GRPR Antagonists maSSS/SES-PEG2-RM26 for Imaging of Prostate Cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preclinical Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled GRPR Antagonists maSSS/SES-PEG2-RM26 for Imaging of Prostate Cancer
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    2021 (English)In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is an important target for imaging of prostate cancer. The wide availability of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and the generator-produced 99mTc can be utilized to facilitate the use of GRPR-targeting radiotracers for diagnostics of prostate cancers.

    Methods: Synthetically produced mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Ser-Ser (maSSS)-PEG2-RM26 and mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Glu-Ser (maSES)-PEG2-RM26 (RM26 = d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) were radiolabeled with 99mTc and characterized in vitro using PC-3 cells and in vivo, using NMRI or PC-3 tumor bearing mice. SPECT/CT imaging and dosimetry calculations were performed for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26.

    Results: Peptides were radiolabeled with high yields (>98%), demonstrating GRPR specific binding and slow internalization in PC-3 cells. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 outperformed [99mTc]Tc-maSES-PEG2-RM26 in terms of GRPR affinity, with a lower dissociation constant (61 pM vs 849 pM) and demonstrating higher tumor uptake. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 had tumor-to-blood, tumor-to-muscle, and tumor-to-bone ratios of 97 ± 56, 188 ± 32, and 177 ± 79, respectively. SPECT/CT images of [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 clearly visualized the GRPR-overexpressing tumors. The dosimetry estimated for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 showed the highest absorbed dose in the small intestine (1.65 × 10−3 mGy/MBq), and the effective dose is 3.49 × 10−3 mSv/MBq.

    Conclusion: The GRPR antagonist maSSS-PEG2-RM26 is a promising GRPR-targeting agent that can be radiolabeled through a single-step with the generator-produced 99mTc and used for imaging of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2021
    Keywords
    prostate cancer, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist, technetium-99m, single-photon emission computed tomography, RM26
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-438735 (URN)10.3390/pharmaceutics13020182 (DOI)000622994100001 ()33573232 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2019-00986Swedish Cancer Society, 2017/425Swedish Cancer Society, 20 0815 PjFSwedish Cancer Society, 20 0814 UsF
    Available from: 2021-03-29 Created: 2021-03-29 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
    5. Phase I Trial of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26, a Bombesin Analogue Antagonistic to Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptors (GRPRs), for SPECT Imaging of GRPR Expression in Malignant Tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phase I Trial of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26, a Bombesin Analogue Antagonistic to Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptors (GRPRs), for SPECT Imaging of GRPR Expression in Malignant Tumors
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    2023 (English)In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 15, no 6, article id 1631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and in hormone-driven breast cancer (BCa). The aim of this phase I clinical trial was to evaluate safety, biodistribution, and dosimetry after the administration of the recently developed GRPR-targeting antagonistic bombesin analogue [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 in PCa and BCa patients. Planar and whole-body SPECT/CT imaging was performed in six PCa patients and seven BCa patients 2, 4, 6, and 24 h post the intravenous administration of 40 mu g of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 (600-700 MBq). No adverse events or pathological changes were observed. The rapid blood clearance of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 was observed with predominantly hepatobiliary excretion. The effective doses were 0.0053 +/- 0.0007 for male patients and 0.008 +/- 0.003 mSv/MBq for female patients. The accumulation of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 in tumors was observed in four out of six PCa and in seven out of seven BCa patients. In four BCa patients, a high uptake of the agent into the axillary lymph nodes was detected. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive GRPR expression in 60% of primary PCa, 71.4% of BCa tumors, and 50% of examined BCa lymph nodes. In conclusion, a single administration of [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 was safe and well tolerated. [Tc-99m]Tc-maSSS-PEG(2)-RM26 SPECT may be useful for tumor detection in PCa and BCa patients, pending further studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2023
    Keywords
    GRPR, antagonist, 99mTc, phase I trial
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500596 (URN)10.3390/cancers15061631 (DOI)000957432700001 ()36980517 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer Society, 20-0815 PjFSwedish Cancer Society, 20 0814 UsFSwedish Research Council, 2019-00986Swedish Research Council, 2022-00556
    Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2023-05-06Bibliographically approved
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  • 14.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Borin, Jesper
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, S-11417 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundmark, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Rybina, Anastasiya
    Russian Acad Sci, Canc Res Inst, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk 634009, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Tomsk 634050, Russia..
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, S-11417 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zelchan, Roman
    Russian Acad Sci, Canc Res Inst, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk 634009, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Tomsk 634050, Russia..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer precision medicine.
    Chernov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Canc Res Inst, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk 634009, Russia..
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The GRPR Antagonist [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 towards Phase I Clinical Trial: Kit Preparation, Characterization and Toxicity2023In: Diagnostics, ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPRs) are overexpressed in the majority of primary prostate tumors and in prostatic lymph node and bone metastases. Several GRPR antagonists were developed for SPECT and PET imaging of prostate cancer. We previously reported a preclinical evaluation of the GRPR antagonist [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 (based on [D-Phe6, Sta13, Leu14-NH2]BBN(6-14)) which bound to GRPR with high affinity and had a favorable biodistribution profile in tumor-bearing animal models. In this study, we aimed to prepare and test kits for prospective use in an early-phase clinical study. The kits were prepared to allow for a one-pot single-step radiolabeling with technetium-99m pertechnetate. The kit vials were tested for sterility and labeling efficacy. The radiolabeled by using the kit GRPR antagonist was evaluated in vitro for binding specificity to GRPR on PC-3 cells (GRPR-positive). In vivo, the toxicity of the kit constituents was evaluated in rats. The labeling efficacy of the kits stored at 4 °C was monitored for 18 months. The biological properties of [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26, which were obtained after this period, were examined both in vitro and in vivo. The one-pot (gluconic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, stannous chloride, and maSSS-PEG2-RM26) single-step radiolabeling with technetium-99m was successful with high radiochemical yields (>97%) and high molar activities (16–24 MBq/nmol). The radiolabeled peptide maintained its binding properties to GRPR. The kit constituents were sterile and non-toxic when tested in living subjects. In conclusion, the prepared kit is considered safe in animal models and can be further evaluated for use in clinics.

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  • 15.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. NCSR Demokritos, Mol Radiopharm, INRaSTES, Athens 15310, Greece..
    Gorislav, Alisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Maina, Theodosia
    NCSR Demokritos, Mol Radiopharm, INRaSTES, Athens 15310, Greece..
    Nock, Berthold A.
    NCSR Demokritos, Mol Radiopharm, INRaSTES, Athens 15310, Greece..
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Preclinical Characterization of a Stabilized Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist for Targeted Cancer Theranostics2023In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 1134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiolabeled gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonists have shown great promise for the theranostics of prostate cancer; however, their suboptimal metabolic stability leaves room for improvements. It was recently shown that the replacement of Gly(11) with Sar(11) in the peptidic [D-Phe(6),Leu(13)-NHEt,des-Met(14)]BBN(6-14) chain stabilized the [Tc-99m]Tc-DB15 radiotracer against neprilysin (NEP). We herein present DOTAGA-PEG(2)-(Sar(11))RM26 (AU-RM26-M1), after Gly(11) to Sar(11)-replacement. The impact of this replacement on the metabolic stability and overall biological performance of [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 was studied using a head-to-head comparison with the unmodified reference [In-111]In-DOTAGA-PEG(2)-RM26. In vitro, the cell uptake of [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 could be significantly reduced in the presence of a high-excess GRPR-blocker that demonstrated its specificity. The cell uptake of both radiolabeled GRPR antagonists increased with time and was superior for [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1. The dissociation constant reflected strong affinities for GRPR (500 pM for [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1). [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 showed significantly higher stability in peripheral mice blood at 5 min pi (88 & PLUSMN; 8% intact) than unmodified [In-111]In-DOTAGA-PEG(2)-RM26 (69 & PLUSMN; 2% intact; p < 0.0001). The administration of a NEP inhibitor had no significant impact on the Sar(11)-compound (91 & PLUSMN; 2% intact; p > 0.05). In vivo, [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 showed high and GRPR-mediated uptake in the PC-3 tumors (7.0 & PLUSMN; 0.7%IA/g vs. 0.9 & PLUSMN; 0.6%IA/g in blocked mice) and pancreas (2.2 & PLUSMN; 0.6%IA/g vs. 0.3 & PLUSMN; 0.2%IA/g in blocked mice) at 1 h pi, with rapid clearance from healthy tissues. The tumor uptake of [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 was higher than for [In-111]In-DOTAGA-PEG(2)-RM26 (at 4 h pi, 5.7 & PLUSMN; 1.8%IA/g vs. 3 & PLUSMN; 1%IA/g), concordant with its higher stability. The implanted PC-3 tumors were visualized with high contrast in mice using [In-111]In-AU-RM26-M1 SPECT/CT. The Gly(11) to Sar(11)-substitution stabilized [In-111]In-DOTAGA-PEG(2)-(Sar(11))RM26 against NEP without negatively affecting other important biological features. These results support the further evaluation of AU-RM26-M1 for prostate cancer theranostics after labeling with clinically relevant radionuclides.

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  • 16.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Sabahnoo, Hamideh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Chernov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Tomsk 634009, Russia; Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Preclinical Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled GRPR Antagonists maSSS/SES-PEG2-RM26 for Imaging of Prostate Cancer2021In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is an important target for imaging of prostate cancer. The wide availability of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and the generator-produced 99mTc can be utilized to facilitate the use of GRPR-targeting radiotracers for diagnostics of prostate cancers.

    Methods: Synthetically produced mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Ser-Ser (maSSS)-PEG2-RM26 and mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Glu-Ser (maSES)-PEG2-RM26 (RM26 = d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) were radiolabeled with 99mTc and characterized in vitro using PC-3 cells and in vivo, using NMRI or PC-3 tumor bearing mice. SPECT/CT imaging and dosimetry calculations were performed for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26.

    Results: Peptides were radiolabeled with high yields (>98%), demonstrating GRPR specific binding and slow internalization in PC-3 cells. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 outperformed [99mTc]Tc-maSES-PEG2-RM26 in terms of GRPR affinity, with a lower dissociation constant (61 pM vs 849 pM) and demonstrating higher tumor uptake. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 had tumor-to-blood, tumor-to-muscle, and tumor-to-bone ratios of 97 ± 56, 188 ± 32, and 177 ± 79, respectively. SPECT/CT images of [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 clearly visualized the GRPR-overexpressing tumors. The dosimetry estimated for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 showed the highest absorbed dose in the small intestine (1.65 × 10−3 mGy/MBq), and the effective dose is 3.49 × 10−3 mSv/MBq.

    Conclusion: The GRPR antagonist maSSS-PEG2-RM26 is a promising GRPR-targeting agent that can be radiolabeled through a single-step with the generator-produced 99mTc and used for imaging of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer.

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  • 17.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Seitova, Kamila
    Siberian State Med Univ, Sci & Res Lab Chem & Pharmaceut Res, Tomsk, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Tomsk, Russia..
    Lundmark, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Bodenko, Vitalina
    Siberian State Med Univ, Sci & Res Lab Chem & Pharmaceut Res, Tomsk, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Tomsk, Russia..
    Oroujeni, Maryam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Tomsk, Russia..
    Rosenström, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    177Lu-labeled PSMA targeting therapeutic with optimized linker for treatment of disseminated prostate cancer; evaluation of biodistribution and dosimetry2023In: Frontiers in Oncology, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 13, article id 1221103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    <bold>Introduction:</bold> Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), highly expressed in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), is an established therapeutic target. Theranostic PSMA-targeting agents are widely used in patient management and has shown improved outcomes for mCRPC patients. Earlier, we optimized a urea-based probe for radionuclide visualization of PSMA-expression in vivo using computer modeling. With the purpose to develop a targeting agent equally suitable for radionuclide imaging and therapy, the agent containing DOTA chelator was designed (BQ7876). The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Lu-177-labeled BQ7876 possesses target binding and biodistribution properties potentially enabling its use for radiotherapy.<bold>Methods:</bold> BQ7876 was synthesized and labeled with Lu-177. Specificity and affinity of [Lu-177]Lu-BQ7876 to PSMA-expressing PC3-pip cells was evaluated and its processing after binding to cells was studied. Animal studies in mice were performed to assess its biodistribution in vivo, target specificity and dosimetry. [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617 was simultaneously evaluated for comparison.<bold>Results:</bold> BQ7876 was labeled with Lu-177 with radiochemical yield >99%. Its binding to PSMA was specific in vitro and in vivo when tested in antigen saturation conditions as well as in PSMA-negative PC-3 tumors. The binding of [Lu-177]Lu-BQ7876 to living cells was characterized by rapid association, while the dissociation included a rapid and a slow phase with affinities K-D1 = 3.8 nM and K-D2 = 25 nM. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration for Lu-nat-BQ7876 was 59 nM that is equal to 61 nM for Lu-nat-PSMA-617. Cellular processing of [Lu-177]Lu-BQ7876 was accompanied by slow internalization. [Lu-177]Lu-BQ7876 was cleared from blood and normal tissues rapidly. Initial elevated uptake in kidneys decreased rapidly, and by 3 h post injection, the renal uptake (13 +/- 3%ID/g) did not differ significantly from tumor uptake (9 +/- 3%ID/g). Tumor uptake was stable between 1 and 3 h followed by a slow decline. The highest absorbed dose was in kidneys, followed by organs and tissues in abdomen.<bold>Discussion:</bold> Biodistribution studies in mice demonstrated that targeting properties of [Lu-177]Lu-BQ7876 are not inferior to properties of [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617, but do not offer any decisive advantages.

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  • 18.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Tano, Hanna
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nagy, Abel
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Wadeea, Fadya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Kumar, Sharmishtaa
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Westerlund, Kristina
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Research Centrum for Oncotheranostics, Research School of Chemistry and Applied Biomedical Sciences, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk 634050, Russia.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Centrum Oncotheranost, Tomsk 634050, Russia..
    Preclinical Evaluation of the GRPR-Targeting Antagonist RM26 Conjugated to the Albumin-Binding Domain for GRPR-Targeting Therapy of Cancer2020In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The targeting of gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) was recently proposed for targeted therapy, e.g., radiotherapy. Multiple and frequent injections of peptide-based therapeutic agents would be required due to rapid blood clearance. By conjugation of the GRPR antagonist RM26 (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) to an ABD (albumin-binding domain), we aimed to extend the blood circulation of peptides. The synthesized conjugate DOTA-ABD-RM26 was labelled with indium-111 and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The labelled conjugate was stable in PBS and retained specificity and its antagonistic function against GRPR. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of In-nat-DOTA-ABD-RM26 in the presence of human serum albumin was 49 +/- 5 nM. [In-111]In-DOTA-ABD-RM26 had a significantly longer residence time in blood and in tumors (without a significant decrease of up to 144 h pi) than the parental RM26 peptide. We conclude that the ABD-RM26 conjugate can be used for GRPR-targeted therapy and delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, the undesirable elevated activity uptake in kidneys abolishes its use for radionuclide therapy. This proof-of-principle study justified further optimization of the molecular design of the ABD-RM26 conjugate.

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  • 19.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Yim, Cheng-Bin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Rosenström, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Radio-Iodinated GRPR/PSMA Bispecific Heterodimers for the Theranostics Application in Prostate Cancer2019In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are overexpressed in most prostate cancers. GRPR expression is higher in early stages while PSMA expression increases with progression. The possibility of targeting both markers with a single theranostics radiotracer could improve patient management. Three GRPR/PSMA-targeting bispecific heterodimers (urea derivative PSMA-617 and bombesin-based antagonist RM26 linked via X-triazolyl-Tyr-PEG2, X = PEG2 (BO530), (CH2)(8) (BO535), none (BO536)) were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. Peptides were radio-iodinated and evaluated in vitro for binding specificity, cellular retention, and affinity. In vivo specificity for all heterodimers was studied in PC-3 (GRPR-positive) and LNCaP (PSMA-positive) xenografts. [I-125]I-BO530 was evaluated in PC-3pip (GRPR/PSMA-positive) xenografts. Micro single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (microSPECT/CT) scans were acquired. The heterodimers were radiolabeled with high radiochemical yields, bound specifically to both targets, and demonstrated high degree of activity retention in PC-3pip cells. Only [I-125]I-BO530 demonstrated in vivo specificity to both targets. A biodistribution study of [I-125]I-BO530 in PC-3pip xenografted mice showed high tumor activity uptake (30%-35%ID/g at 3 h post injection (pi)). Activity uptake in tumors was stable and exceeded all other organs 24 h pi. Activity uptake decreased only two-fold 72 h pi. The GRPR/PSMA-targeting heterodimer [I-125]I-BO530 is a promising agent for theranostics application in prostate cancer.

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  • 20.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Zedan, Wahed
    Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Altai, Mohamed
    Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Strand, Joanna
    Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Orbom, Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Co-injection of anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab does not increase efficacy of [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617 therapy in an animal model of prostate cancer2023In: American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 2160-8407, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 107-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One novel option for treating metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer is radionuclide therapy targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), e.g. [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617. Overexpression of HER2 has been found in 80% of metastatic cases of prostate cancer. Previous research showed that HER2 is elevated post irradiation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Co-treating with anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab gave less proliferation of irradiated tumor cells in vitro, and when using radionuclide therapy, also in vivo. The aim of this study is to determine whether the same holds true in PSMA-expressing PC-3 PIP cells using [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617 radionuclide therapy. PC-3 PIP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells were tested in vitro, treated with 6 Gy of x-rays with or without Trastuzumab incubation. We measured uptake of HER2-targeting affibody [Ga-68]Ga-ABY-025 and cell survival, e.g. using the WST-1 assay. Three groups (n=10 each) of male nude Balb/c mice were inoculated with PC-3 PIP xenograft tumors and treated with just [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617 (20 MBq), [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617 (20 MBq) and Trastuzumab (4 x 5 mg/kg), or left untreated. Tumor sizes and animal survival was observed. In vitro, x-ray irradiation did reduce survival in 22Rv1 but not PC-3 PIP cells, and there was no significant effect of Trastuzumab treatment. Cells expressed HER2 but not significantly elevated post irradiation. In vivo, mice co-treated with Trastuzumab had significantly longer survival than untreated mice, but not than only [Lu-177]Lu-PSMA-617. Staining of tumor sections showed similar HER2 and PSMA expression across groups. In conclusion, these results give no support for any benefit from co-treatment with anti-HER2 antibody for PSMA-targeted radioligand therapy.

  • 21.
    Aboye, Teshome L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis, Cyclization and Oxidative folding of backbone engineered Cyclotides2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Aboye, Teshome L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Strömstedt, Adam A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Gunasekera, Sunithi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Bruhn, Jan G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    A Cactus-Derived Toxin-Like Cystine Knot Peptide with Selective Antimicrobial Activity2015In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1068-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally occurring cystine knot peptides show a wide range of biological activity, and as they have inherent stability they represent potential scaffolds for peptide-based drug design and biomolecular engineering. Here we report the discovery, sequencing, chemical synthesis, three-dimensional solution structure determination and bioactivity of the first cystine knot peptide from Cactaceae (cactus) family: Ep-AMP1 from Echinopsis pachanoi. The structure of Ep-AMP1 (35 amino acids) conforms to that of the inhibitor cystine knot (or knottin) family but represents a novel diverse sequence; its activity was more than 500 times higher against bacterial than against eukaryotic cells. Rapid bactericidal action and liposome leakage implicate membrane permeabilisation as the mechanism of action. Sequence homology places Ec-AMP1 in the plant C6-type of antimicrobial peptides, but the three dimensional structure is highly similar to that of a spider neurotoxin.

  • 23.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Engineering of the Ultra-stable Cystine Knot Framework of Microproteins: Design, Chemical Synthesis and Structural Studies2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra-stable cystine knotted microproteins, in which two disulfides and their connecting backbones form a circle that is penetrated by the third disulfide bonds, have attracted high interest due to their resistance to degradation in vitro and potential for the development of peptide drugs. This thesis gives new insights into engineering of that framework of microproteins, including approaches to their chemical synthesis, backbone engineering, structural and biological evaluations.

    Synthetic and oxidative folding approaches for bracelet cyclotides, a family of cyclic cystine knotted microproteins, was developed using a model peptide, cycloviolacin O2. Following assembly of the peptide chain, protected peptide was generated by mild cleavage that was subsequently thioesterified and cyclized in solution. The cyclic peptide was oxidatively folded under optimized conditions containing co-solvent and non-ionic detergent affording native cycloviolacin O2 as a major product. To gain further insights into the heterogeneity, efficiency and kinetics of cyclotides’ oxidative folding, the intermediates that accumulate in oxidative refolding pathways of all cyclotide subfamilies: Möbius, bracelet and the hybrid cyclotides were quantitatively determined under four different folding conditions. The results were used for defining major folding pathways, which indicated that Möbius cyclotides might accumulate heterogeneous folding intermediates with one-, two- and three-disulfides, whereas bracelet tend to accumulate a homogenous intermediate with three-disulfides, depending on the buffer systems used.

    Furthermore, to probe the internal factors contributing to inefficiency of oxidative folding, as well as undesired bioactivities of bracelet cyclotides (e.g., cytotoxic activity), polymer-hybridized cyclotides were designed by replacing non-conserved residues with small isosteric polymers. The designed hybrid analogs in which hybridization involved replacement of loop 3 with isosteric polymers showed improved synthetic and oxidative folding properties. The cytoxicity of a model hybrid designed with replacement of loop 3 and 5 exhibited no cytotoxic activity at concentration of 128-fold relative to that of native peptide. Furthermore, 1D and 2D 1H NMR analysis of this hybrid showed that it had well structured fold.

    List of papers
    1. Discovery, synthesis, and structural determination of a toxine-like disulfide-rich peptide from the cactus Trichoserus pachanoi
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovery, synthesis, and structural determination of a toxine-like disulfide-rich peptide from the cactus Trichoserus pachanoi
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145716 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-10 Created: 2011-02-10 Last updated: 2011-05-04
    2. Ultra-stable peptide scaffolds for protein engineering-synthesis and folding of the circular cystine knotted cyclotide cycloviolacin O2
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultra-stable peptide scaffolds for protein engineering-synthesis and folding of the circular cystine knotted cyclotide cycloviolacin O2
    2008 (English)In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The cyclic cystine knot motif, as defined by the cyclotide peptide family, is an attractive scaffold for protein engineering. To date, however, the utilisation of this scaffold has been limited by the inability to synthesise members of the most diverse and biologically active subfamily, the bracelet cyclotides. This study describes the synthesis and first direct oxidative folding of a bracelet cyclotide-cycloviolacin O2-and thus provides an efficient method for exploring the most potent cyclic cystine knot peptides. The linear chain of cycloviolacin O2 was assembled by solid-phase Fmoc peptide synthesis and cyclised by thioester-mediated native chemical ligation, and the inherent difficulties of folding bracelet cyclotides were successfully overcome in a single-step reaction. The folding pathway was characterised and was found to include predominating fully oxidised intermediates that slowly converted to the native peptide structure.

    Keywords
    cyclotides, native chemical ligation, peptides, protein folding, synthesis, thioesters
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-98767 (URN)10.1002/cbic.200700357 (DOI)000252292200017 ()18058973 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. An Efficient Approach for the Total Synthesis of Cyclotides by Microwave Assisted Fmoc-SPPS
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Efficient Approach for the Total Synthesis of Cyclotides by Microwave Assisted Fmoc-SPPS
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Peptide Research and Therapeutics, ISSN 1573-3149, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 167-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclotides are mini-proteins of approximately 30 amino acid residues that have a unique structure consisting of a head-to-tail cyclized backbone and a knotted arrangement of three disulfide bonds. This unique cyclotide structure provides exceptional stability to chemical, enzymatic and thermal treatments and has been implicated as an ideal drug scaffold for the development into agricultural and biotechnological agents. In the current work, we present the first method for microwave assisted Fmoc-SPPS of cyclotides. This protocol adopts a strategy that combines optimized microwave assisted chemical reactions for Fmoc-SPPS of the peptide backbone, the cleavage of the protected peptide and the introduction of a thioester at the C-terminal carboxylic acid to obtain the head-to-tail cyclized cyclotide backbone by native chemical ligation. To exemplify the utility of this protocol in the synthesis of a wide array of different cyclotide sequences we synthesized representative members from the three cyclotide subfamilies-the Mobius kalata B1, the bracelet cycloviolacin O2 and the trypsin inhibitory MCoTI-II. In addition, a "one pot" reaction promoting both cyclization and oxidative folding of crude peptide thioester was adapted for kalata B1 and MCoTI-II.

    Keywords
    Cyclotides, Microwave chemistry, Fmoc-SPPS, Circular proteins, Cystine knot, Native chemical ligation
    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-134899 (URN)10.1007/s10989-010-9221-0 (DOI)000281682600007 ()
    Available from: 2010-12-02 Created: 2010-12-02 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Interlocking disulfides in circular proteins: toward efficient oxidative folding of cyclotides.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interlocking disulfides in circular proteins: toward efficient oxidative folding of cyclotides.
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclotides are ultrastable plant proteins characterized by the presence of a cyclic amide backbone and three disulfide bonds that form a cystine knot. Because of their extreme stability, there has been significant interest in developing these molecules as a drug design scaffold. For this potential to be realized, efficient methods for the synthesis and oxidative folding of cyclotides need to be developed, yet we currently have only a basic understanding of the folding mechanism and the factors influencing this process. In this study, we determine the major factors influencing oxidative folding of the different subfamilies of cyclotides. The folding of all the cyclotides examined was heavily influenced by the concentration of redox reagents, with the folding rate and final yield of the native isomer greatly enhanced by high concentrations of oxidized glutathione. Addition of hydrophobic solvents to the buffer also enhanced the folding rates and appeared to alter the folding pathway. Significant deamidation and isoaspartate formation were seen when oxidation conditions were conducive to slow folding. The identification of factors that influence the folding and degradation pathways of cyclotides will facilitate the development of folding screens and optimized conditions for producing cyclotides and grafted analogs as stable peptide-based therapeutics.

    National Category
    Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-139359 (URN)10.1089/ars.2010.3112 (DOI)000284572100009 ()20486762 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-12-23 Created: 2010-12-23 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
    5. Design, synthesis, structural and biological evaluation of backbone-engineered cyclotides
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design, synthesis, structural and biological evaluation of backbone-engineered cyclotides
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145719 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-10 Created: 2011-02-10 Last updated: 2011-05-04
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Design, synthesis, structural and biological evaluation of backbone-engineered cyclotidesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Clark, Richard J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis and Oxidative Folding of Cyclic Cystine Knot Peptides: Towards Backbone Engineering2010In: Peptides 2010: Tales of Peptides Proceedings of the Thirty-First European Peptide Symposium / [ed] Michal Lebl, Morten Meldal, Knud J. Jensen, Thomas Høeg-Jensen, European Peptide Society , 2010, p. 142-143Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Clark, Richard J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Roig, Marta Bajona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Interlocking disulfides in circular proteins: toward efficient oxidative folding of cyclotides.2011In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclotides are ultrastable plant proteins characterized by the presence of a cyclic amide backbone and three disulfide bonds that form a cystine knot. Because of their extreme stability, there has been significant interest in developing these molecules as a drug design scaffold. For this potential to be realized, efficient methods for the synthesis and oxidative folding of cyclotides need to be developed, yet we currently have only a basic understanding of the folding mechanism and the factors influencing this process. In this study, we determine the major factors influencing oxidative folding of the different subfamilies of cyclotides. The folding of all the cyclotides examined was heavily influenced by the concentration of redox reagents, with the folding rate and final yield of the native isomer greatly enhanced by high concentrations of oxidized glutathione. Addition of hydrophobic solvents to the buffer also enhanced the folding rates and appeared to alter the folding pathway. Significant deamidation and isoaspartate formation were seen when oxidation conditions were conducive to slow folding. The identification of factors that influence the folding and degradation pathways of cyclotides will facilitate the development of folding screens and optimized conditions for producing cyclotides and grafted analogs as stable peptide-based therapeutics.

  • 27.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Clark, Richard. J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Goransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Synthesis and folding of the circular cystine knotted cyclotide cycloviolacin O2.2008In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 74, no 9, p. 1158-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Clark, Richard J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis and folding of the circular cystine knotted cyclotide cycloviolacin O22008In: Peptides 2008: Chemistry of Peptides in Life Science Technology and MedicineProceedings of The Thirtieth European Peptide Symposium / [ed] Hilkka Lankinen, The Finnish Peptide Society and The European Peptide Society , 2008, p. 280-281Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Rosengren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Gunasekera, Sunithi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Bruhn, G. Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Discovery, synthesis, and structural determination of a toxine-like disulfide-rich peptide from the cactus Trichoserus pachanoiManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Abualreesh, Heba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Screening for antibacterial metabolites in marine sponges collected from the coastline of Sri Lanka.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Natural products and their derivatives have and are still used by humans for various health ailments due to their rich sources of drug discovery. New biologically active compounds from natural products play a key role in drug development. Marine sponges and their associated microbes contain a lot of bioactive compounds that are potential for drug development. These compounds produce chemical compounds with useful pharmaceutical properties such as antitumor, anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. The main focus of this project was on the antibacterial activity of six different sponge specimens. The aim was to screen the antibacterial activity of the sponge specimen’s extracts. In order to do so, a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration assay was performed to screen the sponge's antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus. Analytical HPLC was used for separation and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was used for determining the effect of salts towards the inhibition of anti-bacterial activity for two selected extracts. Ethanolic extract of Stylissa massa showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus. SPE would be a rapid purification step to remove the salts present in sponges at a high concentration but it has not shown a significant effect on the inhibition of antibacterial activity. However, further separation and purification need to be done to be able to completely screen for all the six different sponge specimens.

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  • 31.
    Abubakar Mohamed, Rania
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Tracing a compound with ecological importance for Ficus species and profiling the chemical constituents of Ficus obtusifolia2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 32.
    Acuna, UM
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Atha, DE
    Ma, J
    Nee, MH
    Kennelly, EJ
    Antioxidant capacities of ten edible North American plants.2002In: Phytother Res, Vol. 16, p. 63-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Adeyemi, Ahmed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Palladium(0)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Spirocycles and Supercritical Chemistry using a Resistively Heated Flow Reactor2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis focusses on an effective and selective approach to the synthesis of spirocycles using palladium(0)-catalyzed Mizoroki-Heck reactions. In addition, selective and efficient chemistry was highlighted by the design and evaluation of a novel resistively heated system for continuous flow (CF) synthesis for high-temperature and high-pressure applications.

    Paper I described the design and evaluation of a novel resistively heated CF system. The design of a low-cost, simple, robust, and effective CF system involving a resistively heated steel reactor capable of delivering 400 °C and 200 bar was reported. The reactor was evaluated with esterification, transesterification and direct carboxylic acid to nitrile conversions using supercritical ethanol, methanol and acetonitrile respectively. Diels-Alder reactions under neat conditions were also carried out at high temperature and pressure.

    Paper II reported the synthesis of spirooxindoles by a selective application of the palladium(0)-catalyzed Mizoroki-Heck spirocyclization. The precursors for the reaction were synthesized by coupling 2-iodoanilines with esters derived from enantiomerically pure (+)-Vince lactam decorated with the bulky, directing 2,5-dimethylpyrrole protecting group. Ten different spirooxindoles were reported with good yields and high regio- and stereoselectivity. Functionalization of a synthesized spirooxindole was done by a palladium(0)-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation, followed by selective deprotections.

    In Paper III, ether precursors were synthesized from (+)-Vince lactam, via a Mitsunobu reaction with the corresponding iodophenols. The precursors were later subjected to conditions for intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck reaction. Overall, 12 spiroethers were synthesized in useable yields, regioselectivity up to 98% and with excellent diastereoselectivity (d.e.>98%). Further functionalization to mono-protected rigidified amino acids was also demonstrated.

    List of papers
    1. Continuous Flow Synthesis under High-Temperature/High-Pressure Conditions Using a Resistively Heated Flow Reactor
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous Flow Synthesis under High-Temperature/High-Pressure Conditions Using a Resistively Heated Flow Reactor
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Organic Process Research & Development, ISSN 1083-6160, E-ISSN 1520-586X, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 947-955Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A cheap, easy-to-build, and effective resistively heated reactor for continuous flow synthesis at high temperature and pressure is herein presented. The reactor is rapidly heated directly using, an electric current and is capable of rapidly delivering temperatures and pressures up to 400 degrees C and 200 bar, respectively. High-temperature and high-pressure applications of this reactor were safely performed and demonstrated by selected transformations such as esterifications, transesterifications, and direct carboxylic acid to nitrile reactions using supercritical ethanol, methanol, and acetonitrile. Reaction temperatures were between 300 and 400 degrees C with excellent conversions and good to excellent isolated product yields. Examples of Diels-Alder reactions were also carried out at temperatures up to 300 degrees C in high yield. No additives or catalysts were used in the reactions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333407 (URN)10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00063 (DOI)000406356200003 ()
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 607517
    Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Regio- and Stereoselective Synthesis of Spirooxindoles via Mizoroki-Heck Coupling of Aryl Iodides
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regio- and Stereoselective Synthesis of Spirooxindoles via Mizoroki-Heck Coupling of Aryl Iodides
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 82-88Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A method for highly regio- and stereoselective intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck 5- exo cyclization of aryl iodides to the corresponding spirooxindoles has been developed. Electron-rich and electron-deficient aryl iodide precursors were selectively ring-closed with high stereoselectivity and good yields. The double-bond position in the cyclopentene ring was controlled by careful choice of reaction conditions. These rare spiro compounds were further functionalized to rigidified unnatural amino acid derivatives by a subsequent gas-free Pd(0)-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation, followed by selective O - and N -deprotections.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    GEORG THIEME VERLAG KG, 2019
    Keywords
    spirooxindoles, Mizoroki-Heck, cyclization, carbonylation
    National Category
    Medicinal Chemistry Organic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372880 (URN)10.1055/s-0037-1611360 (DOI)000453250700013 ()
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 607517
    Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
    3. Regio- and Stereo-Selective Synthesis of Allylic Spiroethers (Spirobenzofuranes) via Intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck Reaction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regio- and Stereo-Selective Synthesis of Allylic Spiroethers (Spirobenzofuranes) via Intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck Reaction
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium(0)-catalyzed intramolecular annulation of twelve 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentenes, derived from (+)-vince lactam, resulted in 5-exo cyclizations, furnishing a series of 2,5-dimethyl-1-((3R,4'S)-2H-spiro[benzofuran-3,1'-cyclopentan]-2'-en-4'-yl)-1H-pyrroles in excellent diastereoselectivities and useful isolated yields. The double bond migration process, following the arylpalladium insertion, was controlled by fine-tuning of the reaction system, providing regioselectivities of up to 98:2. The selective Mizoroki-Heck reaction was used as the key transformation for preparing two new spirocyclic monoprotected amino acids as single diastereoisomers.

    National Category
    Organic Chemistry Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Organic Chemistry; Medicinal Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402335 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-24
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    presentationsbild
  • 34.
    Adeyemi, Ahmed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Joakim
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med Chem Cardiovasc & Metab Dis, Innovat Med & Early Dev Biotech Unit, Pepparedsleden 1, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Branalt, Jonas
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med Chem Cardiovasc & Metab Dis, Innovat Med & Early Dev Biotech Unit, Pepparedsleden 1, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden..
    Sävmarker, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Continuous Flow Synthesis under High-Temperature/High-Pressure Conditions Using a Resistively Heated Flow Reactor2017In: Organic Process Research & Development, ISSN 1083-6160, E-ISSN 1520-586X, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 947-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cheap, easy-to-build, and effective resistively heated reactor for continuous flow synthesis at high temperature and pressure is herein presented. The reactor is rapidly heated directly using, an electric current and is capable of rapidly delivering temperatures and pressures up to 400 degrees C and 200 bar, respectively. High-temperature and high-pressure applications of this reactor were safely performed and demonstrated by selected transformations such as esterifications, transesterifications, and direct carboxylic acid to nitrile reactions using supercritical ethanol, methanol, and acetonitrile. Reaction temperatures were between 300 and 400 degrees C with excellent conversions and good to excellent isolated product yields. Examples of Diels-Alder reactions were also carried out at temperatures up to 300 degrees C in high yield. No additives or catalysts were used in the reactions.

  • 35.
    Adeyemi, Ahmed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Regio- and Stereoselective Synthesis of Allylic Spiroethers (Spirobenzofuranes) via an Intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck Reaction2020In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 85, no 12, p. 7648-7657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The palladium(0)-catalyzed intramolecular annulation of 12 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentenes, derived from (+)-vincelactam, resulted in 5-exo cyclizations which furnished a series of 2,5-dimethyl-14(3R,4'S)-2H-spiro[benzofuran-3,1'-cyclopentan]2'-en-4'-yl)-1H-pyrroles in excellent diastereoselectivities and useful isolated yields. The double bond migration process that followed the arylpalladium insertion was controlled by a fine-tuning of the reaction system, which provided regioselectivities of up to 98:2. The selective Mizoroki-Heck reaction was used as the key transformation for preparing two new spirocyclic monoprotected amino acids as single stereoisomers.

  • 36.
    Adeyemi, Ahmed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Wetzel, Alexander
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med Chem, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab IMED Biotech Unit, Pepparedsleden 1, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden.
    Bergman, Joakim
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med Chem, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab IMED Biotech Unit, Pepparedsleden 1, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden.
    Brånalt, Jonas
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med Chem, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab IMED Biotech Unit, Pepparedsleden 1, S-43183 Molndal, Sweden.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Regio- and Stereoselective Synthesis of Spirooxindoles via Mizoroki-Heck Coupling of Aryl Iodides2019In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for highly regio- and stereoselective intramolecular Mizoroki-Heck 5- exo cyclization of aryl iodides to the corresponding spirooxindoles has been developed. Electron-rich and electron-deficient aryl iodide precursors were selectively ring-closed with high stereoselectivity and good yields. The double-bond position in the cyclopentene ring was controlled by careful choice of reaction conditions. These rare spiro compounds were further functionalized to rigidified unnatural amino acid derivatives by a subsequent gas-free Pd(0)-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation, followed by selective O - and N -deprotections.

  • 37.
    Adil, Nurmeen
    et al.
    Univ Karachi, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Ali, Hamad
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Ali, Arslan
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Ahmed, Ayaz
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam
    Univ Karachi, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.;Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Evaluation of cytotoxicity of areca nut and its commercial products on normal human gingival fibroblast and oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 403, article id 123872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption of areca nut products is the most common cause of oral cancers, particularly in South Asian countries. This study evaluates the cytotoxic and necrotizing effects of areca nut and its formulations on normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, CAL-27) cell lines. Identification of various carcinogens and adulterants using LC-HR-ESI-MS/MS analysis was performed in the extracts of areca nut and its products. Apart from alkaloids and flavonoids, a major adulterant, saccharin was found in all the samples of chalia (one of the most common chewing products of areca nut) in the ranges between 1.697-7.170 mg/g of the sample. Cytotoxic studies showed that most of the areca nut products were found cytotoxic to HGF-1 cells while being relatively non-cytotoxic against CAL-27 cells, rather they promote the growth of cancer cells. Our findings revealed that the components of areca nut and its products were injurious to HGF-1 cells and caused necrosis, which may attenuate HGF-1 protection toward oral epithelial cells. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic effect of these products on cancer cell lines suggests further predisposal of the habitual chewers for developing oral carcinomas. This study will give a better understanding of the hazardous effects of areca nut products.

  • 38.
    Adl, Sina M.
    et al.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Soil Sci, Coll Agr & Bioresources, 51 Campus Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada.
    Bass, David
    Nat Hist Museum, Dept Life Sci, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England;CEFAS, Barrack Rd, Weymouth DT4 8UB, Dorset, England.
    Lane, Christopher E.
    Univ Rhode Isl, Dept Biol Sci, Kingston, RI 02881 USA.
    Lukes, Julius
    Czech Acad Sci, Biol Ctr, Inst Parasitol, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic;Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Schoch, Conrad L.
    Natl Inst Biotechnol Informat, Natl Lib Med, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Smirnov, Alexey
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Agatha, Sabine
    Univ Salzburg, Dept Biosci, Hellbrunnerstr 34, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria.
    Berney, Cedric
    CNRS, UMR 7144 AD2M, Grp Evolut Protistes & Ecosyst Pelag, Stn Biol Roscoff, Pl Georges Teissier, F-29680 Roscoff, France.
    Brown, Matthew W.
    Mississippi State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Starkville, MS 39762 USA;Mississippi State Univ, Inst Genom Biocomp & Biotechnol, Starkville, MS 39762 USA.
    Burki, Fabien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cárdenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Cepicka, Ivan
    Charles Univ Prague, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Vinicna 7, CR-12844 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Chistyakova, Lyudmila
    St Petersburg State Univ, Core Facil Ctr Culture Collect Microorganisms, St Petersburg 198504, Russia.
    del Campo, Javier
    CSIC, Inst Ciencies Mar, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Dunthorn, Micah
    Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Ecol, Erwin Schroedinger St, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany;Univ Duisburg Essen, Dept Eukaryot Microbiol, Univ Str 5, D-45141 Essen, Germany.
    Edvardsen, Bente
    Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, POB 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
    Eglit, Yana
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax B3H 4R2, NS, Canada.
    Guillou, Laure
    Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, Paris 6, CNRS,UMR 7144 AD2M,Stn Biol Roscoff, Pl Georges Teissier,,CS90074, F-29688 Roscoff, France.
    Hampl, Vladimir
    Charles Univ Prague, Dept Parasitol, Fac Sci, BIOCEV, Prumyslov 595, Vestec 25242, Czech Republic.
    Heiss, Aaron A.
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Dept Invertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA.
    Hoppenrath, Mona
    DZMB German Ctr Marine Biodivers Res, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany.
    James, Timothy Y.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Karnkowska, Anna
    Univ Warsaw, Dept Mol Phylogenet & Evolut, PL-02089 Warsaw, Poland.
    Karpov, Sergey
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia;RAS, Lab Parasit Worms & Protistol, Zool Inst, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Kim, Eunsoo
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Dept Invertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA.
    Kolisko, Martin
    Czech Acad Sci, Biol Ctr, Inst Parasitol, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Kudryavtsev, Alexander
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia;RAS, Lab Parasit Worms & Protistol, Zool Inst, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Lahr, Daniel J. G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Zool, Inst Biosci, Matao Travessa 14 Cidade Univ, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    Lara, Enrique
    Univ Neuchatel, Lab Soil Biodivers, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland;CSIC, Real Jardim Bot,Plaza Murillo 2, E-28014 Madrid, Spain.
    Le Gall, Line
    Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, Inst Systemat Evolut Biodiversit, 57 Rue Cuvier,CP 39, F-75005 Paris, France.
    Lynn, Denis H.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Summerlee Sci Complex, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada;Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, 4200-6270 Univ Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Mann, David G.
    Royal Bot Garden, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Midlothian, Scotland;Inst Agrifood Res & Technol, C Poble Nou Km 5-5, E-43540 San Carlos de la Rapita, Spain.
    Massana, Ramon
    CSIC, Inst Ciencies Mar, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Mitchell, Edward A. D.
    Univ Neuchatel, Lab Soil Biodivers, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland;Jardin Bot Neuchatel,Chemin Perthuis du Salut 58, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland.
    Morrow, Christine
    Natl Museums Northern Ireland, Dept Nat Sci, 153 Bangor Rd, Holywood BT18 0EU, England.
    Park, Jong Soo
    Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Earth Syst Sci, Dept Oceanog, Daegu, South Korea;Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Earth Syst Sci, Kyungpook Inst Oceanog, Daegu, South Korea.
    Pawlowski, Jan W.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet & Evolut, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.
    Powell, Martha J.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Biol Sci, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Richter, Daniel J.
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, CSIC, Inst Biol Evolut, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
    Rueckert, Sonja
    Edinburgh Napier Univ, Sch Appl Sci, Edinburgh EH11 4BN, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Shadwick, Lora
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA.
    Shimano, Satoshi
    Hosei Univ, Sci Res Ctr, Chiyoda Ku, 2-17-1 Fujimi, Tokyo, Japan.
    Spiegel, Frederick W.
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA.
    Torruella, Guifre
    Univ Paris XI, Lab Evolut & Systemat, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Youssef, Noha
    Oklahoma State Univ, Dept Microbiol & Mol Genet, Stillwater, OK 74074 USA.
    Zlatogursky, Vasily V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Zhang, Qianqian
    Chinese Acad Sci, Yantai Inst Coastal Zone Res, Yantai 264003, Peoples R China.
    Revisions to the Classification, Nomenclature, and Diversity of Eukaryotes2019In: Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, ISSN 1066-5234, E-ISSN 1550-7408, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 4-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes follows that of Adl et al., 2012 [J. Euk. Microbiol. 59(5)] and retains an emphasis on protists. Changes since have improved the resolution of many nodes in phylogenetic analyses. For some clades even families are being clearly resolved. As we had predicted, environmental sampling in the intervening years has massively increased the genetic information at hand. Consequently, we have discovered novel clades, exciting new genera and uncovered a massive species level diversity beyond the morphological species descriptions. Several clades known from environmental samples only have now found their home. Sampling soils, deeper marine waters and the deep sea will continue to fill us with surprises. The main changes in this revision are the confirmation that eukaryotes form at least two domains, the loss of monophyly in the Excavata, robust support for the Haptista and Cryptista. We provide suggested primer sets for DNA sequences from environmental samples that are effective for each clade. We have provided a guide to trophic functional guilds in an appendix, to facilitate the interpretation of environmental samples, and a standardized taxonomic guide for East Asian users.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Afewerki, Samson
    et al.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Engn Med, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;MIT, Harvard Mit Div Hlth Sci & Technol, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Bassous, Nicole
    Northeastern Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Nanomed Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Harb, Samarah
    Sao Paulo State Univ, Inst Chem, Araraquara, SP, Brazil..
    Palo-Nieto, Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Engn Med, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;MIT, Harvard Mit Div Hlth Sci & Technol, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Marciano, Fernanda R.
    UFPI Fed Univ Piaui, Dept Phys, Teresina, PI, Brazil..
    Webster, Thomas J.
    Northeastern Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Nanomed Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Aguiar Furtado, Andre Sales
    UFPI Fed Univ Piaui, Dept Mat Engn, LIMAV Interdisciplinary Lab Adv Mat, BR-64049550 Teresina, PI, Brazil..
    Lobo, Anderson O.
    UFPI Fed Univ Piaui, Dept Mat Engn, LIMAV Interdisciplinary Lab Adv Mat, BR-64049550 Teresina, PI, Brazil.;MIT, Dept Chem, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Advances in dual functional antimicrobial and osteoinductive biomaterials for orthopaedic applications2020In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 24, article id 102143Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A vast growing problem in orthopaedic medicine is the increase of clinical cases with antibiotic resistant pathogenic microbes, which is predicted to cause higher mortality than all cancers combined by 2050. Bone infectious diseases limit the healing ability of tissues and increase the risk of future injuries due to pathologic tissue remodelling. The traditional treatment for bone infections has several drawbacks and limitations, such as lengthy antibiotic treatment, extensive surgical interventions, and removal of orthopaedic implants and/or prosthesis, all of these resulting in long-term rehabilitation. This is a huge burden to the public health system resulting in increased healthcare costs. Current technologies e.g. co-delivery systems, where antibacterial and osteoinductive agents are delivered encounter challenges such as site-specific delivery, sustained and prolonged release, and biocompatibility. In this review, these aspects are highlighted to promote the invention of the next generation biomaterials to prevent and/or treat bone infections and promote tissue regeneration.

  • 40.
    Afroz, Mohasana
    et al.
    Khulna Univ, Life Sci Sch, Pharm Discipline, Khulna, Bangladesh..
    Akter, Sanzida
    Khulna Univ, Life Sci Sch, Pharm Discipline, Khulna, Bangladesh..
    Ahmed, Asif
    Khulna Univ, Life Sci Sch, Biotechnol & Genet Engn Discipline, Khulna, Bangladesh..
    Rouf, Razina
    Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujlbur Rahman Sci & Technol U, Fac Life Sci, Dept Pharm, Gopalgani, Bangladesh..
    Shilpi, Jamil A.
    Khulna Univ, Life Sci Sch, Pharm Discipline, Khulna, Bangladesh..
    Tiralongo, Evelin
    Griffith Univ, Sch Pharm & Pharmacol, Southport, Qld, Australia..
    Sarker, Satyajit D.
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, Ctr Nat Prod Discovery, Sch Pharm & Bimol Sci, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Uddin, Shaikh Jamal
    Khulna Univ, Life Sci Sch, Pharm Discipline, Khulna, Bangladesh..
    Ethnobotany and Antimicrobial Peptides From Plants of the Solanaceae Family: An Update and Future Prospects2020In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 11, article id 565Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Solanaceae is an important plant family that has been playing an essential role in traditional medicine and human nutrition. Members of the Solanaceae are rich in bioactive metabolites and have been used by different tribes around the world for ages. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from plants have drawn great interest in recent years and raised new hope for developing new antimicrobial agents for meeting the challenges of antibiotic resistance. This review aims to summarize the reported AMPs from plants of the Solanaceae with possible molecular mechanisms of action as well as to correlate their traditional uses with reported antimicrobial actions of the peptides. A systematic literature study was conducted using different databases until August 2019 based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. According to literature, a variety of AMPs including defensins, protease inhibitor, lectins, thionin-like peptides, vicilin-like peptides, and snaking were isolated from plants of the Solanaceae and were involved in their defense mechanism. These peptides exhibited significant antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity against organisms for both plant and human host. Brugmansia, Capsicum, Datura, Nicotiana, Salpichora, Solanum, Petunia, and Withania are the most commonly studied genera for AMPs. Among these genera, Capsicum and the Solanum ranked top according to the total number of studies (35%-38% studies) for different AMPs. The mechanisms of action of the reported AMPs from Solanaceae was not any new rather similar to other reported AMPs including alteration of membrane potential and permeability, membrane pore formation, and cell aggregation. Whereas, induction of cell membrane permiabilization, inhibition of germination and alteration of hyphal growth were reported as mechanisms of antifungal activity. Plants of the Solanaceae have been used traditionally as antimicrobial, insecticidal, and antiinfectious agents, and as poisons. The reported AMPs from the Solanaceae are the products of chemical shields to protect plants from microorganisms and pests which unfold an obvious link with their traditional medicinal use. In summary, it is evident that AMPs from this family possess considerable antimicrobial activity against a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens and can be regarded as a potential source for lead molecules to develop new antimicrobial agents.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 41.
    Aftab, Obaid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Engskog, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Elmsjö, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hammerling, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    NMR spectroscopy based metabolic profiling of drug induced changes in vitro can discriminate between pharmacological classes2014In: Journal of chemical information and modeling, ISSN 1549-9596, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 3251-3258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug induced changes in mammalian cell line models have already been extensively profiled at the systemic mRNA level and subsequently used to suggest mechanisms of action for new substances as well as to support drug repurposing, i.e. identifying new potential indications for drugs already licensed for other pharmacotherapy settings. The seminal work in this field, which includes a large database and computational algorithms for pattern matching, is known as the “Connectivity Map” (CMap). The potential of similar exercises at the metabolite level is, however, still largely unexplored. Only recently the first high throughput metabolomic assay pilot study was published, involving screening of metabolic response to a set of 56 kinase inhibitors in a 96-well format. Here we report results from a separately developed metabolic profiling assay, which leverages 1H NMR spectroscopy to the quantification of metabolic changes in the HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line, in response to each of 26 compounds. These agents are distributed across 12 different pharmacological classes covering a broad spectrum of bioactivity. Differential metabolic profiles, inferred from multivariate spectral analysis of 18 spectral bins, allowed clustering of most tested drugs according to their respective pharmacological class. A more advanced supervised analysis, involving one multivariate scattering matrix per pharmacological class and using only 3 spectral bins (three metabolites), showed even more distinct pharmacology-related cluster formations. In conclusion, this kind of relatively fast and inexpensive profiling seems to provide a promising alternative to that afforded by mRNA expression analysis, which is relatively slow and costly. As also indicated by the present pilot study, the resulting metabolic profiles do not seem to provide as information rich signatures as those obtained using systemic mRNA profiling, but the methodology holds strong promise for significant refinement.

  • 42.
    Afzelius, L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Masimirembwa, CM
    Karlen, A
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Andersson, TB
    Zamora, I
    Discriminant and quantitative PLS analysis of competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors versus non-inhibitors using alignment independent GRIND descriptors2002In: JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-AIDED MOLECULAR DESIGN, Vol. 16, p. 443-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Afzelius, L
    et al.
    Zamora, I
    Ridderstrom, M
    Andersson, TB
    Karlen, A
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Masimirembwa, CM
    Competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors: enzyme inhibition studies, protein homologymodeling, and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activityrelationship analysis.2001In: Mol Pharmacol, Vol. 59, p. 909-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Computational Modelling of Structures and Ligands of CYP2C92004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    CYP2C9 is one of our major drug metabolising enzymes and belongs to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) super family. The aim of this thesis was to gain an understanding of the quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) of CYP2C9 substrates and inhibitors. This information will be useful in predicting drug metabolism and the potential for drug–drug interactions. To achieve this, a well characterised data set of structurally diverse, competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors was identified in our laboratory. Several computational methodologies, many based on GRID molecular interaction fields, were applied or developed in order to handle issues such as compound alignment and bioactive conformer selection. First, a traditional 3D QSAR was carried out in GOLPE, generating a predictive model. In this model the selection of a bioactive conformer and alignment was based on docking in a homology model of CYP2C9. Secondly, we introduced the concept of alignment independent descriptors from ALMOND. These descriptors were used to generate quantitatively and qualitatively predictive models. We subsequently derived conformation independent descriptors from molecular interaction fields calculated in FlexGRID. This enabled the derivation of 3D QSAR models without taking into account the selection of an alignment or a bioactive conformer. A subsequent programming effort enabled the conversion of this model back to 3D aligned pharmacophores. Similar alignment independent descriptors were also used in the development of the software MetaSite® that predicts the site of metabolism for CYP2C9 ligands. Finally, as crystal information on this isoform emerged, the performance of molecular dynamics simulations and homology models and the flexibility of the protein were evaluated using statistical analyses.

    These modelling efforts have resulted in detailed knowledge of the structural characteristics in ligand interactions with the cytochrome P450 2C9 isoform.

    List of papers
    1. Competitive CYP2C9 Inhibitors: Enzyme inhibition Studies, Protein Homology Modelling, and Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competitive CYP2C9 Inhibitors: Enzyme inhibition Studies, Protein Homology Modelling, and Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Analysis
    Show others...
    2001 In: Molecular Pharmacology, ISSN 0026-895, Vol. 59, p. 909 - 919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91425 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Discriminant and quantitative PLS analysis of competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors versus non-inhibitors using alignment independent GRIND descriptors.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discriminant and quantitative PLS analysis of competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors versus non-inhibitors using alignment independent GRIND descriptors.
    Show others...
    2002 In: Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, ISSN 0920-654, Vol. 16, p. 443 - 458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91426 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Predicting Drug Metabolism: A Site of Metabolism Tool Applied to the Cytochrome P450 CYP2C9.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Drug Metabolism: A Site of Metabolism Tool Applied to the Cytochrome P450 CYP2C9.
    2003 In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 2313-2324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91427 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27Bibliographically approved
    4. A Conformer and Alignment independent model to predict structurally diverse competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Conformer and Alignment independent model to predict structurally diverse competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors.
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    2004 In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, Vol. Web Release Date: 13-JanArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91428 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27Bibliographically approved
    5. Structural analysis of CYP2C9 and CYP2C5 and critical assessment of molecular modelling techniques.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural analysis of CYP2C9 and CYP2C5 and critical assessment of molecular modelling techniques.
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91429 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    6. Virtual receptor site (VRS) derivation for competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors: - a novel approach for structurally diverse compounds.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual receptor site (VRS) derivation for competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors: - a novel approach for structurally diverse compounds.
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91430 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-27 Created: 2004-02-27 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 45.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Fontaine, Fabien
    Karlén, Anders
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    Masimirembwa, Collen
    Pastor, Manuel
    Zamora, Ismael
    Virtual receptor site (VRS) derivation for competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors: - a novel approach for structurally diverse compounds.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Masimirembwa, Collen
    Karlén, Anders
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    Zamora, Ismael
    Discriminant and quantitative PLS analysis of competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors versus non-inhibitors using alignment independent GRIND descriptors.2002In: Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, ISSN 0920-654, Vol. 16, p. 443 - 458Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. OrgFarmKemi.
    Raubacher, Florian
    Karlen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Department of Pharmacy. OrgFarmKemi.
    Jørgensen, Flemming Steen
    Andersson, Tommy B
    Masimirembwa, Collen M
    Zamora, Ismael
    Structural analysis of CYP2C9 and CYP2C5 and an evaluation of commonly used molecular modeling techniques.2004In: Drug Metab Dispos, ISSN 0090-9556, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1218-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Raubacher, Florian
    Karlén, Anders
    Jørgensen, Flemming S.
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    Masimirembwa, Collen
    Zamora, Ismael
    Structural analysis of CYP2C9 and CYP2C5 and critical assessment of molecular modelling techniques.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Zamora, Ismael
    Masimirembwa, Collen
    Karlén, Anders
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    Mecucci, Silvio
    Baroni, Massimo
    Cruciani, Gabriele
    A Conformer and Alignment independent model to predict structurally diverse competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors.2004In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, Vol. Web Release Date: 13-JanArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Afzelius, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. OrgFarmKemi.
    Zamora, Ismael
    Masimirembwa, Collen M
    Karlen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Andersson, Tommy B
    Mecucci, Silvio
    Baroni, Massimo
    Cruciani, Gabriele
    Conformer- and alignment-independent model for predicting structurally diverse competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors.2004In: J Med Chem, ISSN 0022-2623, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 907-14Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 2740
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