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  • 1. Barregard, Lars
    et al.
    Sällsten, Gerd
    Gustafson, Pernilla
    Andersson, Lena
    Johansson, Linda
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Stigendal, Lennart
    Experimental exposure to wood-smoke particles in healthy humans: Effects on markers of inflammation, coagulation, and lipid peroxidation2006In: Inhalation Toxicology, ISSN 0895-8378, E-ISSN 1091-7691, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 845-853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particulate air pollution is known to increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Proposed mechanisms underlying this increase include effects on inflammation, coagulation factors, and oxidative stress, which could increase the risk of coronary events and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether short-term exposure to wood smoke affects markers of inflammation, blood hemostasis, and lipid peroxidation in healthy humans. Thirteen subjects were exposed to wood smoke and clean air in a chamber during two 4-h sessions, 1 wk apart. The mass concentrations of fine particles at wood smoke exposure were 240 - 280 mu g/m(3), and number concentrations were 95,000 - 180,000/cm(3). About half of the particles were ultrafine (< 100 nm). Blood and urine samples were taken before and after the experiment. Exposure to wood smoke increased the levels of serum amyloid A, a cardiovascular risk factor, as well as factor VIII in plasma and the factor VIII/vonWillebrand factor ratio, indicating a slight effect on the balance of coagulation factors. Moreover, there was an increased urinary excretion of free 8-iso-prostaglandin(2 alpha), a major F-2-isoprostane, though this was based on nine subjects only, indicating a temporary increase in free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation. Thus, wood-smoke particles at levels that can be found in smoky indoor environments seem to affect inflammation, coagulation, and possibly lipid peroxidation. These factors may be involved in the mechanisms whereby particulate air pollution affects cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The exposure setup could be used to establish which particle characteristics are critical for the effects.

  • 2. Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Smedman, Annika
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Conjugated linoleic acid induces lipid peroxidation in humans2000In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, Vol. 468, no 1, p. 33-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Florvall, Gösta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Basu, Samar
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences.
    Microalbuminuria, blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly males2005Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - To correlate blood pressure and inflammatory markers with urine albumin analysed with a point-of-care testing (POCT) instrument, nephelometric determination of albumin and creatinine related urine albumin in elderly males.

    Methods and Results - The study population consisted of 103 diabetic and 603 nondiabetic males (age 77 years) in a cross-sectional study in central Sweden. We analyzed urine albumin with a HemoCue® Urine Albumin POCT instrument and a ProSpec® nephelometer and creatinine related urine albumin. There were strong correlation between both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and all three urine albumin methods (p<0.0001). There were also significant correlations between the different urine albumin measurements and SAA, hsCRP and IL-6.

    Conclusions - Hypertension has a strong impact on hyperfiltration in diabetic and nondiabetic elderly males.

  • 4.
    Gulliksson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Burell, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Lundin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Toss, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt F
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy versus standard treatment on recurrent cardiovascular events in coronary heart diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Persson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Pre- andpostoperative nutritional status and predictors for surgical-wound infections in elective orthopaedic and thoracic patients2008In: e-SPEN, The European E-Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 3, no 3, p. e93-e101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe pre- and postoperative nutritional status for patients undergoing elective orthopaedic or thoracic surgery, compare different methods for screening and assessment of nutritional status and identify predictors for surgical-wound infection.

    Method

    Ninety-four patients were consecutively included and assessed preoperatively using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), nutritional screening indicators (NSI), nutrition risk index (NRI), and the biochemical indicators serum albumin (S-Albumin) and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (S-IGF-1). Thirty days postoperatively, a structured infection surveillance questionnaire, weight and blood sampling were conducted.

    Results

    The prevalence of malnutrition preoperatively ranged from 3.2% (PG-SGA) to 17.0–17.1% (S-IGF-1 and NSI). Thirty days postoperatively, the body weight, the body mass index and S-Albumin had decreased, while the S-IGF-1 had increased significantly. The only significant correlation between different methods preoperatively was found between S-Albumin and S-IGF-1. The agreement between NRI and S-Albumin was fair. Six patients (6.4%) developed surgical-wound infections. Preoperative S-Albumin was significantly lower for patients who developed surgical-wound infection compared to those who did not.

    Conclusion

    The prevalence of malnutrition and risk for malnutrition in patients undergoing elective surgery varied depending on which evaluation method was used. Low preoperative S-Albumin was identified as the only significant predictor for surgical-wound infection.

  • 6.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Prostaglandins and Isoprostanes in Relation to Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis: Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in atherogenesis. This thesis describes clinical studies of prostaglandin F (PGF), an inflammatory mediator, and the isoprostane 8-iso-PGF, a reliable indicator of oxidative stress, and cytokine-related inflammatory mediators and indicators in healthy subjects and in a population-based cohort of Swedish men.

    PGF and 8-iso-PGF formation in healthy subjects varied considerably between days with a mean intra-individual coefficient of variation of 41 % and 42 %, respectively. A morning urine sample reflected the basal level of 8-iso-PGF formation as accurately as a 24-hour urine collection, and represents a more practical alternative to the 24-hour urine collection in clinical studies. PGF formation (as measured by urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF) was increased in patients with type 2 diabetes and in smokers independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. These results indicated an on-going cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammatory reaction related to these conditions. Further, an increased formation of isoprostanes (as measured by urinary 8-iso-PGF) was found in patients with type 2 diabetes and in smokers, indicating a high level of oxidative stress in these men. The smokers had also increased levels of the cytokine interleukin-6, indicating an on-going cytokine-related inflammatory reaction. The inflammatory indicators C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were related to overweight but not independently associated to type 2 diabetes. High levels of serum selenium in middle-aged men predicted reduced formation of PGF and 8-iso-PGF 27 years later.

    In summary, low-grade, chronic COX-mediated and possibly cytokine-related inflammation, and oxidative stress, seem to be joint features of type 2 diabetes and smoking, two major risk factors of atherosclerosis, in elderly men. Inflammation and oxidative stress may represent a possible common pathogenetic link between established risk factors for atherosclerosis and atherogenesis.

    List of papers
    1. F2-isoprostane excretion rate and diurnal variation in human urine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>F2-isoprostane excretion rate and diurnal variation in human urine
    1999 In: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 203-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92653 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-10 Created: 2005-03-10Bibliographically approved
    2. F2-isoprostane and prostaglandin F2α metabolite excretion rate and day to day variation in healthy humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>F2-isoprostane and prostaglandin F2α metabolite excretion rate and day to day variation in healthy humans
    2001 In: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 99-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92654 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-10 Created: 2005-03-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Association of type 2 diabetes with cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation and oxidative stress in an elderly population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of type 2 diabetes with cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation and oxidative stress in an elderly population
    2004 In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, Vol. 109, p. 1729-1734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92655 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-10 Created: 2005-03-10Bibliographically approved
    4. Active smoking and a history of smoking are associated with enhanced prostaglandin F(2alpha), interleukin-6 and F(2)-isoprostane formation in elderly men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active smoking and a history of smoking are associated with enhanced prostaglandin F(2alpha), interleukin-6 and F(2)-isoprostane formation in elderly men
    2005 (English)In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 181, no 1, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanisms by which smoking induces cardiovascular diseases are largely unknown. The effect of smoking status on the cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammatory indicator prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) has never been studied. Associations of cytokines and antioxidants and smoking status, have shown conflicting results. Urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha) (a major metabolite of PGF(2alpha)), serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum amyloid protein A (SAA), urinary 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (an F(2)-isoprostane, indicator of oxidative stress), and serum alpha-tocopherol were quantified in a population-based sample (n = 642) of 77-year old men without diabetes. Fifty-five men were current smokers and 391 former smokers. Inflammatory indicators were increased in current smokers (15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha), P < 0.001; IL-6, P = 0.01) than non-smokers. 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was increased (P < 0.01) and alpha-tocopherol reduced (P < 0.001) in current smokers. Further, former smokers had increased formation of 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha), IL-6 and 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) compared non-smokers. This is the first study to show that smokers have increased PGF(2alpha) formation, thus enhanced COX-mediated inflammation, in addition to elevated levels of cytokines and isoprostanes. Subclinical COX- and cytokine-mediated inflammation and oxidative stress are ongoing processes not only in active smokers but also in former smokers which may contribute to the accelerated atherosclerosis associated with smoking.

    Keywords
    Aged, Aging/*metabolism, Antioxidants/metabolism, Biological Markers/blood/urine, C-Reactive Protein/metabolism, Cohort Studies, Cytokines/metabolism, Dinoprost/analogs & derivatives/*biosynthesis/urine, F2-Isoprostanes/*biosynthesis, Humans, Inflammation/etiology, Interleukin-6/*biosynthesis/blood, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Oxidative Stress, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases/metabolism, Smoking/*adverse effects, Smoking Cessation, Time Factors, Tocopherols/blood
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92656 (URN)10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2004.11.026 (DOI)15939073 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-03-10 Created: 2005-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Serum selenium predicts levels of F2-isoprostanes and prostaglandin F2alpha in a 27 year follow-up study of Swedish men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum selenium predicts levels of F2-isoprostanes and prostaglandin F2alpha in a 27 year follow-up study of Swedish men
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Free radical research, ISSN 1071-5762, E-ISSN 1029-2470, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 763-770Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Low concentrations of selenium (Se) predict mortality and cardiovascular diseases in some populations. The effect of Se on in vivo indicators of oxidative stress and inflammation, two important features of atherosclerosis, in human populations is largely unexplored. This study investigated the longitudinal association between serum selenium (s-Se) and a golden standard indicator of oxidative stress in vivo (8-iso-prostaglandin F2, a major F2-isoprostane), an indicator of cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammation (prostaglandin F2), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in a follow-up study of 27 years. The s-Se was measured in 615 Swedish men at 50 years of age in a health investigation. The status of oxidative stress and inflammation was evaluated in a re-investigation 27 years later by quantification of urinary 8-iso-PGF2 and 15-keto-dihydro- PGF2 (a major metabolite of PGF2) and serum hsCRP, SAA and IL-6. Men in the highest quartile of s-Se at age 50 had decreased levels of 8-iso-PGF2 compared to all lower quartiles   and decreased levels of PGF2 compared to all lower quartiles   at follow-up. These associations were independent of BMI, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, -tocopherol and β-carotene at baseline. The s-Se was not associated with hsCRP, SAA or IL-6 at follow-up. In conclusion, high concentrations of s-Se predict reduced levels of oxidative stress and subclinical COX-mediated (but not cytokine-mediated) inflammation in a male population. The associations between Se, oxidative stress and inflammation, respectively, might be related to the proposed cardiovascular protective property of Se.

    Keywords
    Aged, Biological Markers/blood/urine, C-Reactive Protein/metabolism, Cardiovascular Diseases/blood/epidemiology/urine, Cohort Studies, Diet, Dinoprost/*analogs & derivatives/urine, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Inflammation/blood, Inflammation Mediators/blood, Interleukin-6/blood, Isoprostanes/*pharmacology, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Radioimmunoassay, Selenium/administration & dosage/*blood, Serum Amyloid A Protein/metabolism, Sweden/epidemiology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92657 (URN)10.1080/10715760500108513 (DOI)16036356 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-03-10 Created: 2005-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Basu, Samar
    F2-isoprostane and prostaglandin F2α metabolite excretion rate and day to day variation in healthy humans2001In: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 99-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Basu, Samar
    F2-isoprostane excretion rate and diurnal variation in human urine1999In: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 203-205Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Active smoking and a history of smoking are associated with enhanced prostaglandin F(2alpha), interleukin-6 and F(2)-isoprostane formation in elderly men2005In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 181, no 1, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanisms by which smoking induces cardiovascular diseases are largely unknown. The effect of smoking status on the cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammatory indicator prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) has never been studied. Associations of cytokines and antioxidants and smoking status, have shown conflicting results. Urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha) (a major metabolite of PGF(2alpha)), serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum amyloid protein A (SAA), urinary 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (an F(2)-isoprostane, indicator of oxidative stress), and serum alpha-tocopherol were quantified in a population-based sample (n = 642) of 77-year old men without diabetes. Fifty-five men were current smokers and 391 former smokers. Inflammatory indicators were increased in current smokers (15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha), P < 0.001; IL-6, P = 0.01) than non-smokers. 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was increased (P < 0.01) and alpha-tocopherol reduced (P < 0.001) in current smokers. Further, former smokers had increased formation of 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha), IL-6 and 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) compared non-smokers. This is the first study to show that smokers have increased PGF(2alpha) formation, thus enhanced COX-mediated inflammation, in addition to elevated levels of cytokines and isoprostanes. Subclinical COX- and cytokine-mediated inflammation and oxidative stress are ongoing processes not only in active smokers but also in former smokers which may contribute to the accelerated atherosclerosis associated with smoking.

  • 10.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Larsson, Anders
    Basu, Samar
    Association of type 2 diabetes with cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation and oxidative stress in an elderly population2004In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, Vol. 109, p. 1729-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Alfthan, Georg
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Serum selenium predicts levels of F2-isoprostanes and prostaglandin F2alpha in a 27 year follow-up study of Swedish men2005In: Free radical research, ISSN 1071-5762, E-ISSN 1029-2470, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 763-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low concentrations of selenium (Se) predict mortality and cardiovascular diseases in some populations. The effect of Se on in vivo indicators of oxidative stress and inflammation, two important features of atherosclerosis, in human populations is largely unexplored. This study investigated the longitudinal association between serum selenium (s-Se) and a golden standard indicator of oxidative stress in vivo (8-iso-prostaglandin F2, a major F2-isoprostane), an indicator of cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammation (prostaglandin F2), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in a follow-up study of 27 years. The s-Se was measured in 615 Swedish men at 50 years of age in a health investigation. The status of oxidative stress and inflammation was evaluated in a re-investigation 27 years later by quantification of urinary 8-iso-PGF2 and 15-keto-dihydro- PGF2 (a major metabolite of PGF2) and serum hsCRP, SAA and IL-6. Men in the highest quartile of s-Se at age 50 had decreased levels of 8-iso-PGF2 compared to all lower quartiles   and decreased levels of PGF2 compared to all lower quartiles   at follow-up. These associations were independent of BMI, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, -tocopherol and β-carotene at baseline. The s-Se was not associated with hsCRP, SAA or IL-6 at follow-up. In conclusion, high concentrations of s-Se predict reduced levels of oxidative stress and subclinical COX-mediated (but not cytokine-mediated) inflammation in a male population. The associations between Se, oxidative stress and inflammation, respectively, might be related to the proposed cardiovascular protective property of Se.

  • 12.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Novel metabolic risk factors for heart failure2005In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 2054-2060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to explore novel metabolic risk factors for development of heart failure (HF).

    BACKGROUND: In the past decade, considerable knowledge has been gained from limited samples regarding novel risk factors for HF, but the importance of these in the general population is largely unexplored.

    METHODS: In a community-based prospective study of 2,321 middle-aged men free from HF and valvular disease at baseline, variables reflecting glucose and lipid metabolism and variables involved in oxidative processes were compared with established risk factors for HF (prior myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, smoking, obesity, and serum cholesterol) using Cox proportional hazards analyses.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up time of 29 years, 259 subjects developed HF. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazards backward stepwise model, a 1-SD increase of fasting proinsulin (hazard ratio [HR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.66) and apolipoprotein B/A-I-ratio (HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.48) increased the risk, whereas a 1-SD increase in serum beta-carotene (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94) decreased the risk of HF. These variables also remained significant when adjusting for acute myocardial infarction during follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: Novel variables reflecting insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, together with a low beta-carotene level, were found to predict HF independently of established risk factors. If confirmed, our observations could have large clinical implications, as they may offer new approaches in the prevention of HF.

  • 13.
    Nälsén, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Sjödin, A
    Kamal-Eldin, A
    Skrede, G
    Basu, S
    Borge, GI
    Öhrvall, M
    Nogradi, E
    Segerbäck, D
    Vessby, B
    Effects of bilberry juice and black tea on plasma antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in vivo: a dose response study in healthy humansArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nälsén, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Berglund, L
    Uusitupa, M
    Hermansen, K
    Riccardi, G
    Rivellese, A
    Storlien, L
    Erkkilä, A
    Ylä-Herttuala, S
    Tapsell, L
    Basur, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Dietary (n-3) fatty acids reduce plasma F2-isoprostanes but not prostaglandin F2alpha in healthy humans2006In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1222-1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (n-3) Fatty acids are unsaturated and are therefore easily subject to oxidization; however, they have several beneficial health effects, which include protection against cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether (n-3) fatty acids, with a controlled fat quality in the background diet, affect nonenzymatic and enzymatic lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in humans. A total of 162 men and women in a multicenter study (The KANWU study) were randomly assigned to a diet containing a high proportion of saturated fatty acids or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) for 3 mo. Within each diet group, there was a second random assignment to supplementation with fish-oil capsules [3.6 g (n-3) fatty acids/d] or placebo. Biomarkers of nonenzymatic and enzymatic lipid peroxidation in vivo were determined by measuring 8-iso-prostaglandin F (8-iso-PGF) and prostaglandin F (PGF) concentrations in plasma at baseline and after 3 mo. Antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma antioxidant capacity with an enhanced chemiluminescence assay. The plasma 8-iso-PGF concentration was significantly decreased after 3 mo of supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids (P = 0.015), whereas the PGF concentration was not affected. The antioxidant status was not affected by supplementation of (n-3) fatty acids, but was improved by the background diet with a high proportion of MUFA. We conclude that supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids decreases nonenzymatic free radical–catalyzed isoprostane formation, but does not affect cyclooxygenase-mediated prostaglandin formation.

  • 15.
    Nälsén, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Öhrvall, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Kamal-Eldin, A
    Vessby, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Plasma antioxidant capacity among middle-aged men: the contribution of uric acid2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Although assays of plasma antioxidant capacity encompass interactions between various antioxidants, uric acid concentration can exert a predominant effect on results. Therefore, individual differences in uric acid concentration may explain a many of the differences in antioxidant capacity. The objective of this study was to measure the antioxidant capacity of plasma samples with and without uric acid in order to provide more information about how the concept of antioxidant capacity could be applied. Material and methods. Antioxidant capacity was measured using an enhanced chemiluminescence assay, and uric acid was removed from the samples using uricase. Results. Antioxidant capacity was positively correlated with uric acid concentration, body mass index, waist circumference, abdominal sagittal diameter and the concentrations of insulin and triglycerides. These correlations were not evident when uric acid was eliminated from the sample, but antioxidant capacity was correlated with lipid concentration; this may partly reflect tocopherols that are transported by lipid molecules. Conclusions. The significance of the contribution of uric acid to the antioxidant capacity could differ according to the type of study. Antioxidant capacity measurements in cross‐sectional studies may be presented both with and without the contribution of uric acid, because the absence of such data complicates interpretation of results when different populations are compared.

  • 16.
    Nälsén, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Measurement and Evaluation of Antioxidant Status and Relation to Oxidative Stress in Humans2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous diseases are associated with reduced antioxidant defence and oxidative stress. The antioxidant defence includes dietary and endogenous antioxidants and involves complex interactions between them. The effects of dietary factors on antioxidant status and oxidative stress of healthy humans were investigated in the studies described in this thesis. Assays of plasma antioxidant capacity encompass interactions between various antioxidants. Although uric acid has an unclear function as an antioxidant, it is a major determinant of antioxidant capacity. We measured antioxidant capacity in the presence and absence of uric acid to provide more information on the application of measures of antioxidant capacity. Individuals with high dietary intakes of various antioxidants and antioxidant rich foods, especially when combined, had higher plasma antioxidant capacities than those with lower antioxidant intakes. However, there were no associations between dietary intake of antioxidants or antioxidant rich foods and the plasma concentration of F2-isoprostanes, which is considered a reliable biomarker for oxidative stress. Intakes of various doses of a mixture of bilberry juice and black tea, rich in flavonoids for four weeks, increased antioxidant capacity in some groups, but urine levels of F2-isoprostanes were not affected. There were substantial individual variations in responses to the drinks related to baseline antioxidant capacity. Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid decreased the plasma levels of F2-isoprostanes, but not prostaglandin F formation or antioxidant capacity.

    It was concluded that a high intake of foods rich in antioxidants is related to improved antioxidant status. After intake of foods rich in antioxidants, the antioxidant status may increase, but with considerable individual variation in the responses, which warrants further investigation. Lipid peroxidation in vivo is not easily affected by dietary antioxidants in healthy humans. Although n-3 fatty acids are highly unsaturated, they reduce nonenzymatic free radical-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, but not enzymatic lipid peroxidation.

    List of papers
    1. Plasma antioxidant capacity among middle-aged men: the contribution of uric acid
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma antioxidant capacity among middle-aged men: the contribution of uric acid
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Although assays of plasma antioxidant capacity encompass interactions between various antioxidants, uric acid concentration can exert a predominant effect on results. Therefore, individual differences in uric acid concentration may explain a many of the differences in antioxidant capacity. The objective of this study was to measure the antioxidant capacity of plasma samples with and without uric acid in order to provide more information about how the concept of antioxidant capacity could be applied. Material and methods. Antioxidant capacity was measured using an enhanced chemiluminescence assay, and uric acid was removed from the samples using uricase. Results. Antioxidant capacity was positively correlated with uric acid concentration, body mass index, waist circumference, abdominal sagittal diameter and the concentrations of insulin and triglycerides. These correlations were not evident when uric acid was eliminated from the sample, but antioxidant capacity was correlated with lipid concentration; this may partly reflect tocopherols that are transported by lipid molecules. Conclusions. The significance of the contribution of uric acid to the antioxidant capacity could differ according to the type of study. Antioxidant capacity measurements in cross‐sectional studies may be presented both with and without the contribution of uric acid, because the absence of such data complicates interpretation of results when different populations are compared.

    Keywords
    Adult, Aged, Antioxidants/*metabolism, Blood Chemical Analysis, Chemiluminescent Measurements, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Urate Oxidase, Uric Acid/*blood/isolation & purification
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94249 (URN)10.1080/00365510600590423 (DOI)16714252 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-04-05 Created: 2006-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. The importance of dietary antioxidants on plasma antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in vivo in middle-aged men
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of dietary antioxidants on plasma antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in vivo in middle-aged men
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition, ISSN 1748-2976, E-ISSN 1748-2984, Vol. 50, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High intake of foods rich in antioxidants is associated with a reduced risk of several diseases, including coronary heart disease and some cancers. Objective: To study associations between dietary antioxidants and antioxidant-rich food items and antioxidant capacity (AOC), as well as lipid peroxidation in vivo. Design: A total of 86 men, with a mean age of 60 years, who were part of a larger population-based study in Sweden, participated. Fourteen 24 h recalls were collected by telephone, evenly distributed during 1 year. AOC was measured in plasma using an enhanced chemiluminescence assay and biomarkers of non-enzymic in vivo lipid peroxidation were determined by measuring F2-isoprostanes (8-iso-prostaglandin F2a) in plasma. Results: Higher intakes of ascorbic acid, tocopherols and b-carotene, and of the combined intake of different antioxidant-rich foods, were related to a higher plasma AOC. The levels of F2-isoprostanes were related neither to dieta ry intake of antioxidants nor to antioxidant-rich foods. Conclusions: Individuals with a higher intake of several different antioxidant-rich foods and of dietary antioxidants had a higher plasma AOC than those with the lowest intake, supporting the importance of a balanced diet rich in various antioxidants. Moreover, the results indicate that non-enzymic lipid peroxidation in vivo, measured as F2-isoprostanes in plasma, is not easily affected by the diet.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94250 (URN)10.1080/11026480600717202 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-04-05 Created: 2006-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Effects of bilberry juice and black tea on plasma antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in vivo: a dose response study in healthy humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of bilberry juice and black tea on plasma antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in vivo: a dose response study in healthy humans
    Show others...
    Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94251 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-04-05 Created: 2006-04-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Dietary (n-3) fatty acids reduce plasma F2-isoprostanes but not prostaglandin F2alpha in healthy humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary (n-3) fatty acids reduce plasma F2-isoprostanes but not prostaglandin F2alpha in healthy humans
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1222-1228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    (n-3) Fatty acids are unsaturated and are therefore easily subject to oxidization; however, they have several beneficial health effects, which include protection against cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether (n-3) fatty acids, with a controlled fat quality in the background diet, affect nonenzymatic and enzymatic lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in humans. A total of 162 men and women in a multicenter study (The KANWU study) were randomly assigned to a diet containing a high proportion of saturated fatty acids or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) for 3 mo. Within each diet group, there was a second random assignment to supplementation with fish-oil capsules [3.6 g (n-3) fatty acids/d] or placebo. Biomarkers of nonenzymatic and enzymatic lipid peroxidation in vivo were determined by measuring 8-iso-prostaglandin F (8-iso-PGF) and prostaglandin F (PGF) concentrations in plasma at baseline and after 3 mo. Antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma antioxidant capacity with an enhanced chemiluminescence assay. The plasma 8-iso-PGF concentration was significantly decreased after 3 mo of supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids (P = 0.015), whereas the PGF concentration was not affected. The antioxidant status was not affected by supplementation of (n-3) fatty acids, but was improved by the background diet with a high proportion of MUFA. We conclude that supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids decreases nonenzymatic free radical–catalyzed isoprostane formation, but does not affect cyclooxygenase-mediated prostaglandin formation.

    Keywords
    Administration; Oral, Comparative Study, Diet, Dinoprost/*blood, Energy Intake, F2-Isoprostanes/*blood, Fatty Acids/administration & dosage/pharmacology, Fatty Acids; Omega-3/administration & dosage/*pharmacology, Female, Humans, Male, Reference Values, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94252 (URN)16614408 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-04-05 Created: 2006-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 17.
    Smedman, Annika
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Milk Fat Intake and Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Supplementation: Dietary Markers and Associations to Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present thesis dietary markers for intake of milk fat, associations between intake of milk fat and risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), and the effects of supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to healthy humans are investigated.

    The dietary fat quality is one of the main lifestyle factors affecting risk for CHD. When studying the associations between diet and health it is important to have accurate dietary information. Objective dietary markers increase the possibilities to interpret dietary surveys.

    In a study of 62 men we demonstrated that the milk fatty acid pentadecanoic acid (15:0) measured in serum lipids can be used as marker for intake of fat from milk products. In the same study we observed inverse correlations between intake of milk fat and certain risk factors for CHD, especially anthropometric variables.

    To further investigate these findings we supplemented humans with CLA, naturally present in milk. CLA has in animals and in vitro been ascribed positive effects on adiposity and glucose and lipid metabolism. When supplementing humans with CLA we observed a slight decrease in body fat, but no effects on other anthropometric variables or serum lipids. However, markers of lipid peroxidation and inflammation increased. From a second supplementation study we concluded that CLA trans 10, cis 12 induced lipid peroxidation more than did a mixture of isomers.

    We conclude that the inverse associations between milk fat intake and CHD risk factors, and the effects of CLA, are interesting and need further investigation. However, according to current knowledge, the general population is still advised to have a limited intake of total and saturated fat and to instead choose unsaturated fats. In addition, there is to date no medical reasons for humans to take CLA as supplements.

    List of papers
    1. Pentadecanoic acid in serum as a marker for intake of milk fat: relations between intake of milk fat and metabolic risk factors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pentadecanoic acid in serum as a marker for intake of milk fat: relations between intake of milk fat and metabolic risk factors
    1999 In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92704 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-23 Created: 2005-03-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in humans - metabolic effects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in humans - metabolic effects
    2001 In: Lipids, ISSN 0024-4201, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 773-781Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92705 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-23 Created: 2005-03-23Bibliographically approved
    3. Conjugated linoleic acid induces lipid peroxidation in humans
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated linoleic acid induces lipid peroxidation in humans
    2000 In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, Vol. 468, no 1, p. 33-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92706 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-23 Created: 2005-03-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Conjugated linoleic acid increased C-reactive protein in human subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated linoleic acid increased C-reactive protein in human subjects
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 791-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We previously showed that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) increases 15-keto-dihydro-prostaglandin F2alpha, a marker for cyclooxygenase-mediated lipid peroxidation and thus an indicator of cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of CLA on other indicators of inflammation in human subjects, including C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors 1 and 2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, fifty-three human subjects were supplemented with a mixture (4.2 g/d) of the isomers cis-9,trans-11 CLA and trans-10,cis-12 CLA or control oil for 3 months. CLA supplementation increased levels of C-reactive protein (P=0.003) compared with the control group. However, no changes in TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors 1 and 2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were detected.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92707 (URN)10.1079/BJN20041419 (DOI)16277783 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-03-23 Created: 2005-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid on lipid peroxidation in humans: regulation by α-tocopherol and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid on lipid peroxidation in humans: regulation by α-tocopherol and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor
    2004 In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92708 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-03-23 Created: 2005-03-23Bibliographically approved
  • 18.
    Smedman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Jovinge, S
    Fredrikson, G Nordin
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Conjugated linoleic acid increased C-reactive protein in human subjects2005In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 791-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously showed that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) increases 15-keto-dihydro-prostaglandin F2alpha, a marker for cyclooxygenase-mediated lipid peroxidation and thus an indicator of cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of CLA on other indicators of inflammation in human subjects, including C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors 1 and 2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, fifty-three human subjects were supplemented with a mixture (4.2 g/d) of the isomers cis-9,trans-11 CLA and trans-10,cis-12 CLA or control oil for 3 months. CLA supplementation increased levels of C-reactive protein (P=0.003) compared with the control group. However, no changes in TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors 1 and 2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were detected.

  • 19.
    Smedman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Berglund, Lars
    Vessby, Bengt
    Pentadecanoic acid in serum as a marker for intake of milk fat: relations between intake of milk fat and metabolic risk factors1999In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Smedman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in humans - metabolic effects2001In: Lipids, ISSN 0024-4201, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 773-781Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Smedman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Basu, Samar
    Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid on lipid peroxidation in humans: regulation by α-tocopherol and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor2004In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Warensjö, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Jansson, JH
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Boman, K
    Ahren, B
    Weinehall, L
    Lindahl, B
    Hallmans, G
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Research.
    Estimated intake of milk fat is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk factors and does not increase the risk of a first acute myocardial infarction. A prospective case-control study2004In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 635-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Milk fat is high in saturated fatty acids (SFA) and high intakes of SFA are associated with cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the potential risk of a first-ever acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in relation to the estimated milk-fat intake, reflected as the proportions of pentadecanoic acid (15 : 0) and heptadecanoic acid (17 : 0) in serum lipid esters. This was evaluated in a study population selected within the Västerbotten Intervention Program and the northern Sweden 'Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular disease' survey populations. A prospective case-control design was used. The proportions of the biomarkers were lower in the cases (n 78) than in the controls (n 156), who were matched for age, sex, sampling time and geographical region. The standardised odds ratios of becoming an AMI case were between 0.7 and 0.8 for the biomarkers. The proportions of 15 : 0 and 17 : 0 in serum phospholipids were significantly and negatively correlated to serum concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tissue-type plasminogen activator, triacylglycerols, insulin, specific insulin, pro-insulin and leptin (all P<0.0001), suggesting a negative relationship to the insulin-resistance syndrome and the risk of CHD. Adjustment for BMI did not materially change the relationships. Although there seems to be a negative association between milk-fat intake as mirrored by the proportions of 15 : 0 and 17 : 0 in serum lipid esters and a first-ever AMI, adjustment for clinical risk factors removed this relationship.

1 - 22 of 22
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