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  • 1.
    Ahren-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Holmgren, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Personality traits and self-injurious behaviour in patients with eating disorders2008In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 16, no 4, 268-275 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in different aspects of personality and the neuropsychological basis for behaviour in eating disorder patients has increased over the last decade. The present study aims at exploring personality traits, self-injurious behaviour (SIB) and suicide attempts in a group of severely ill eating disorder patients. Patients with eating disorders (N = 38) and age-matched controls (N = 67) were examined concerning self-reported personality traits by means of the Karolinska scales of personality (KSP). Psychosocial history and SIB was collected from medical records. Depression was rated by means of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results indicated significantly higher anxiety-related and detachment traits in both anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) patients and higher hostility in BN patients than controls. No specific personality traits could be defined as typical for self-injurious or suicidal behaviour. The AN group was lower than the BN group on scales measuring impulsivity, guilt and anxiety. Furthermore, presence of SIB and suicide attempts was more frequent among the BN patients.

  • 2.
    Alenius, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hartvig, Per
    Sundquist, Staffan
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Treatmentresponse in psychotic patients classified according to social and clinical needs, drug side effects, and previous treatment; a method to identify functional remission2009In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 50, no 5, 453-462 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Various approaches have been made over the years to classify psychotic patients according to inadequate treatment response, using terms such as treatment resistant or treatment refractory. Existing classifications have been criticized for overestimating positive symptoms; underestimating residual symptoms, negative symptoms, and side effects; or being to open for individual interpretation. The aim of this study was to present and evaluate a new method of classification according to treatment response and, thus, to identify patients in functional remission. METHOD: A naturalistic, cross-sectional study was performed using patient interviews and information from patient files. The new classification method CANSEPT, which combines the Camberwell Assessment of Need rating scale, the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser side effect rating scale (SE), and the patient's previous treatment history (PT), was used to group the patients according to treatment response. CANSEPT was evaluated by comparison of expected and observed results. RESULTS: In the patient population (n = 123), the patients in functional remission, as defined by CANSEPT, had higher quality of life, fewer hospitalizations, fewer psychotic symptoms, and higher rate of workers than those with the worst treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: In the evaluation, CANSEPT showed validity in discriminating the patients of interest and was well tolerated by the patients. CANSEPT could secure inclusion of correct patients in the clinic or in research.

  • 3.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Linnman, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Langström, Bengt
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Altered NK1-receptor availability in patients with post traumatic stress disorder2009In: [Biological Psychiatry 2009, 65(8), Suppl. 1, 118S, no. 394], 2009, 118S- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after one or more traumatic events causing extreme stress or grave physical harm. The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor is the primary receptor for substance P (SP); a neuropeptide suggested being involved in anxiety and depression. The present study investigated differences in NK1-receptor availability between PTSD patients and healthy controls, using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Eleven male refugee patients (age: 41±10) with DSM-IV defined PTSD and nine healthy male control subjects (age: 33±10) were investigated using the PET-tracer [11C]GR205171, supplied by Uppsala Imanet. GR205171 is a highly selective NK1-receptor antagonist. Scans were performed during 60 minutes in the resting state. Parametric images were generated using the graphical reference Patlak method assuming irreversible binding of [11C]GR205171 from 20-60 minutes and having cerebellum as reference region. Exploratory whole brain analyses were performed using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) software. Results: PTSD patients had lower [11C]GR205171 binding compared to controls, in frontal cortical clusters encompassing bilaterally insula and left Brodmann area 11, reflecting lower NK1-receptor availability. No areas were found in which PTSD patients had higher [11C]GR205171 binding. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting differences in NK1-receptor availability in PTSD patients relative to controls. A tentative conclusion is that PTSD patients have a down regulation of the NK1-receptor system, which could be either a risk factor or due to emotional trauma processing.

  • 4. Archer, Trevor
    et al.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Delayed Exercise-Induced Functional and Neurochemical Partial Restoration Following MPTP2012In: Neurotoxicity research, ISSN 1029-8428, E-ISSN 1476-3524, Vol. 21, no 2, 210-221 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In two experiments, MPTP was administered to C57/BL6 mice according to a single-dose weekly regime (MPTP: 1 x 30 mg/kg on the fifth day of the week, Friday, over 4 weeks) with vehicle group (Vehicle: 1 x 5 ml/kg) treated concurrently. Exercise schedules (delayed) were introduced either at the beginning of the week after the second MPTP injection (MPTP + Exercise(2) group), or at the beginning of the week after the fourth MPTP injection (MPTP + Exercise(4) group). Wheel-running was provided on the first 4 days of each week (Monday-Thursday) more than 30-min periods. In Experiment I, wheel-running exercise was introduced either after 2 or 4 weeks after MPTP/Vehicle. MPTP and Vehicle groups not provided access to the running wheels were placed in single cages within the wheel-running room over 30-min concomitantly with the wheel-running groups. In Experiment II, wheel-running exercise was introduced 2 weeks after MPTP/Vehicle but a no-exercise control group with non-revolving wheel included (MPTP-Wheel). In both experiments, spontaneous motor activity tests during 60-min intervals were performed at the end (Fridays) of weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10, where the week on which the first injection of MPTP was the first week; in the case of weeks 1-4, this was immediately before MPTP/Vehicle injections. It was observed that the introduction of the exercise schedule after the second MPTP injection, but not after the fourth injection, restored motor activity that had been markedly elevated by the end of the tenth week. Subthreshold administration of l-dopa tests was performed after the spontaneous motor activity tests 6, 8 and 10; these indicated significant effects of exercise, MPTP + Exercise(2) group, on Tests 6 and 8, but not Test 10. The physical exercise schedule in that group also showed markedly attenuated loss of dopamine (DA). Restoration of MPTP-induced motor activity deficits and DA loss was a function of the point at which exercise was introduced, in the present case after two administrations of the neurotoxin. In Experiment II, physical exercise markedly attenuated the hypokinesic effect of MPTP in the exercise condition, MPTP-exercise, but not in the non-exercise conditions, MPTP-Cage and MPTP-Wheel, for both spontaneous motor activity and l-dopa-induced activity. MPTP-induced loss of DA was also attenuated by exercise.

  • 5. Archer, Trevor
    et al.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    The Yeast Product Milmed Enhances the Effect of Physical Exercise on Motor Performance and Dopamine Neurochemistry Recovery in MPTP-Lesioned Mice2013In: Neurotoxicity research, ISSN 1029-8428, E-ISSN 1476-3524, Vol. 24, no 3, 393-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both clinical and laboratory studies have demonstrated that different types of physical exercise may alleviate Parkinsonism yet evidence for complete restoration of motor function and biomarker integrity are difficult to identify. MPTP (1 x 30 mg/kg, s.c., 4 groups) or saline (vehicle 1 x 5 ml/kg, s.c., 1 group) were administered in a single dose regime over three consecutive weeks on Fridays. Three MPTP groups were given four 30-min periods/week (Mondays to Thursdays), of these two groups, MPTP + Exer + M(i) and MPTP + Exer + M(ii); the former were introduced to exercise and Milmed (oral injection) on the week following the 1st MPTP injection and the latter on the Monday prior to the 1st injection of MPTP onwards. One MPTP group, MPTP + Exer, was given access to exercise (running wheels) from the week following the 1st MPTP injection onwards. The fourth MPTP group, MPTP-NoEx, and the Vehicle group were only given access to exercise on a single day each week (Wednesdays, exercise test) from the week following the 1st MPTP injection onwards. The exercise/exercise + Milmed regime was maintained for a further 9 weeks. It was observed that exercise by itself ameliorated MPTP-induced deficits regarding motor function and dopamine loss only partially whereas in the groups combining exercise with twice weekly dosages of Milmed the MPTP-induced deficits were abolished by the 10th week of the intervention. The three main conclusions that were drawn from correlational analyses of individual mice were: (i) that DA integrity was observed to be a direct function of ability to express running exercise in a treadmill wheel-running arrangement, and (ii) that DA integrity was observed to be a direct function of the capacity for motor performance as measured by spontaneous motor activity and subthreshold l-Dopa (5 mg/kg) induced activity in the motor activity test chambers, and (iii) that the extent to which running exercise in a running wheel was predictive of later motor performance in the activity test chambers was highly convincing.

  • 6. Archer, Trevor
    et al.
    Garcia, Danilo
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Restoration of MPTP-induced deficits by exercise and Milmed (R) co-treatment2014In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 2, e531- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induces permanent neurochemical and functional deficits. Following the administration of either two or four injections of the dopamine neurotoxin, MPTP, at a dose of 40 mg/kg, C57/BL6 mice were given access to running-wheels (30-min sessions, four times/week, Monday-Thursday) and treatment with the treated yeast, Milmed (R) (four times/week, Monday-Thursday), or simply running-wheel exercise by itself, over ten weeks. It was observed that the combination of physical exercise and Milmed (R) treatment, the MPTP + Exercise + Yeast (MC) group [MPTP + Exercise + Milmed (R) (MC)], restored spontaneous motor activity markedly by test day 10, restored completely subthreshold L-Dopa-induced activity, and dopamine concentration to 76% of control values, in the condition wherein two administrations of MPTP (2 x 40 mg/kg) were given prior to initiation of exercise and/or Milmed (R) treatment. Physical exercise by itself, MPTP + Exercise (MC) group, attenuated these deficits only partially. Administration of MPTP four times (i.e., 40 mg/kg, s.c., once weekly over four weeks for a total of 160 mg/kg, MPTP + Exercise + Yeast (MC) group [MPTP + Exercise + Milmed (R) (SC)] and MPTP + Exercise (SC), induced a lesioning effect that was far too severe for either exercise alone or the exercise + Milmed (R) combination to ameliorate. Nevertheless, these findings indicate a powerful effect of physical exercise reinforced by Milmed (R) treatment in restoring MPTP-induced deficits of motor function and dopamine neurochemistry in mice.

  • 7.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long-Term Posttraumatic Stress in Survivors from Disasters and Major Accidents2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters and major accidents are a significant cause of distress worldwide. High levels of posttraumatic stress can become chronic after severe and prolonged psychological trauma, raising concerns about the extent of adverse long-term consequences after single events. The present thesis aimed to describe the course and burden of posttraumatic stress in survivors from a ferry disaster in the Baltic Sea, an airliner crash-landing in Gottröra, Sweden, and a bus accident involving Swedish 6th grade schoolchildren in Måbødalen, Norway.

    The participants were surveyed 1 month to 4 years after the events and again after 14 to 20 years. The follow-up surveys included 33 ferry disaster survivors, 70 airline survivors, and 7 surviving schoolchildren with a comparison group from the same school (n = 33). Short- and long-term changes in posttraumatic stress were estimated separately in generalised regression models refined by linear splines. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 ferry survivors 15 years after the disaster, including structured clinical interviews and thematic analysis of survivors’ descriptions of consequences of the event and social support.

    Approximately half of all survivors experienced significant posttraumatic stress at the initial assessments. Significant long-term distress was noted in one fourth of the ferry survivors and one sixth of the airline survivors. The bus crash was not associated with significant long-term posttraumatic stress. A poorer long-term outcome was noted in women and in bereaved survivors.

    The thematic analysis revealed that long-term consequences not only included negative aspects but also positive ones, including personal growth and existential awareness. There was ample availability of social support, although the need for support extended over a period of several years. Barriers to support from significant others were described in detail by the survivors.

    The results extend previous research by providing a comprehensive account of long-term consequences of disasters and major accidents in light of early reactions. The interviews provide some new insights into features of social support that warrant further study. Important future challenges include evaluating whether timely attention to survivors at risk for chronic distress and significant others can facilitate recovery.

    List of papers
    1. Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 24, no 2, 183-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine posttraumatic stress in survivors 14 years after a ferry disaster, and estimate short- and long-term changes in stress associated with traumatic bereavement and acute dissociation. There were 852 people who perished in the disaster, 137 survived. The 51 Swedish survivors were surveyed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) at 3 months, 1, 3, and 14 years (response rates 82%, 65%, 51%, and 69%). Symptoms decreased from 3 months to 1 year; no change was found thereafter. After 14 years, 27% reported significant symptoms. Traumatic bereavement, but not acute dissociation, was associated with long-term symptom elevation. Chronic posttraumatic stress can persist in a minority of survivors, and traumatic bereavement appears to hinder recovery.

    Keyword
    posttraumatic stress disorder, bereavement, dissociation, disasters, survivors, Estonia prospective studies, posttraumatisk stress, förlustdrabbade, dissociation, katastrof, överlevande, Estonia
    National Category
    Psychiatry Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-151374 (URN)10.1002/jts.20629 (DOI)000289528300006 ()21442665 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Long-term posttraumatic stress in survivors from disasters and major accidents
    Available from: 2011-04-11 Created: 2011-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience
    2013 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 4, 20650- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Disasters yield increased rates of psychological disorders decades later. Other consequences, however, have received little attention in the past.

    Objective:

    We aimed to examine diagnostic status and survivors’ views on disaster-related consequences and social support.

    Methods:

    A mixed-methods approach was used with 22 survivors (of 49 eligible) 15 years after a ferry disaster. Data collection included audiotaped interviews with open-ended questions and diagnostic assessment of Axis-I disorders.

    Results:

    The post-disaster incidence was 54% (12/22) for Axis-I disorders, and 45% (10/22) for full or subsyndromal posttraumatic stress disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that survivor perception of the longterm consequences included positive (character change) and negative aspects (being ascribed a survivor identity). Participants’ sought social support for several years, yet many felt hindered by experiential dissimilarity and distress of significant others.

    Conclusions:

    Axis-I disorders were prevalent, but not salient to survivors’ perceptions in the long-term. Postdisaster interventions need to attend to common barriers to support.

    Keyword
    posttraumatic stress disorder, survivors, diagnosis, social support, posttraumatic growth, mixed methods, PTSD, överlevande, posttraumatisk stress, socialt stöd, Estonia
    National Category
    Psychiatry Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169280 (URN)10.3402/ejpt.v4i0.20650 (DOI)000332099200001 ()
    Projects
    Long-term posttraumatic stress in survivors from disasters and major accidents
    Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing
    2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, e0119732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Posttraumatic stress (PTS) is common in survivors from life-threatening events. Little is known, however, about the course of PTS after life threat in the absence of collateral stressors (e.g., bereavement, social stigma, property loss) and there is a scarcity of studies about PTS in the long term. This study assessed the short- and long-term course of PTS, and the influence of gender, education and age on the level and course of PTS, in survivors from a non-fatal airliner emergency landing caused by engine failure at an altitude of 1 km. There were 129 persons on board. A survey including the Impact of Event Scale was distributed to 106 subjects after 1 month, 4 months, 14 months, and 25 months, and to 95 subjects after 19 years (response rates 64–83%). There were initially high levels of PTS. The majority of changes in PTS occurred from 1 to 4 months after the event. There were small changes from 4 to 25 months but further decrease in PTS thereafter. Female gender was associated with higher levels of PTS whereas gender was unrelated to the slope of the short- and long-term trajectories. Higher education was related to a quicker recovery although not to initial or long-term PTS. Age was not associated with PTS. The present findings suggest that a life-threatening experience without collateral stressors may produce high levels of acute posttraumatic stress, yet with a benign prognosis. The findings further implicate that gender is unrelated to trajectories of recovery in the context of highly similar exposure and few collateral stressors.

    Keyword
    Aviation disasters, Posttraumatic stress, Longitudinal studies, Long-term studies
    National Category
    Psychiatry Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169279 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0119732 (DOI)000350314700063 ()25734536 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Long-term posttraumatic stress in survivors from disasters and major accidents
    Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. A longitudinal follow-up of posttraumatic stress: from 9 months to 20 years after a major road traffic accident
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal follow-up of posttraumatic stress: from 9 months to 20 years after a major road traffic accident
    2011 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 5, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although road traffic accidents (RTA) are a major cause of injury and a cause of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in the aftermath, little is known about the long-term psychological effects of RTA.

    Methods: This prospective longitudinal study assessed long-term PTS, grief, and general mental health after a bus carrying 23 sixth-grade schoolchildren crashed on a school outing and 12 children died. Directly affected (i.e., children in the crash) and indirectly affected children (i.e., all pupils in the sixth grade who were not in the crash) were surveyed at 9 months (N = 102), 4 years (N = 51), and 20 years (N = 40) after the event. Psychological distresswas assessed by single items, including sadness, avoidance, intrusions, and guilt. After 20 years, PTS was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale–Revised.

    Results: Stress reactions were prevalent 9 months after the event, with sadness (69%) and avoidance (59%) being highly represented in both directly and indirectly affected groups, whereas, nightmares (60%) and feelings of guilt (50%) were only frequent in those directly affected. The frequency of sadness and avoidance decreased after 4 years in the indirectly exposed (ps < .05). After 20 years, the directly affected had a higher prevalence of PTS (p = .003), but not decreased general mental health (p = .14), than those indirectly affected.

    Conclusions: The limitations preclude assertive conclusions. Nonetheless, the findings corroborate previous studies reporting traumatic events are associated with long-term PTS, but not with decreased general mental health.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: BioMed Central, 2011
    Keyword
    road traffic accidents, posttraumatic stress, children, adolescents, disasters
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology; Child and Youth Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-150258 (URN)10.1186/1753-2000-5-8 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-04-09 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2012-04-19Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Alaie, Iman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Karolinska institutet; Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering.
    Recent randomized controlled trials of psychological interventions in healthcare: A review of their quantity, scope, and characteristics2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 75, no 5, 401-408 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to describe the quantity, scope, and fundamental characteristics of recently published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions.

    Methods: We queried two major databases (PsycINFO and PubMeD) for primary reports published in 2010 of RCTs of psychological interventions for participants with a medical condition. We collected data on the characteristics of the trials, participants, interventions, outcomes, and reports.

    Results: Of 3,696 retrieved reports 295 primary publications were included. About half (53%) of trials included participants with a mental disorder and more than half evaluated interventions based on a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) framework. A majority of trials recruited participants in North America and Europe (79%). A minority of the trials focused on children and adolescents (17%) or the elderly (8%). The median sample size of the intervention arm was n = 41. Thirty-nine percent of trials reported solely patient-reported outcomes. Only 5% of reports indicated funding from for-profit organizations. The median 2010 impact factor of the journals in which reports were published was 2.96.

    Conclusion: This snapshot of the research on psychological interventions suggests that the evidence base for psychological interventions is expanding mainly for CBT interventions for adults in high-income countries. Although the restrictive inclusion criteria limit the generalizability of these results, researchers and funding agencies might be advised to strive for greater diversity regarding interventions, geographical/cultural settings and age groups. Regularly updated reviews of this research field, with gradually refined methodology and increased scope, may further inform funders and researchers.

  • 9.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Melin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Differences in social support between groups of tsunami survivors and the correlation between social support and posttraumatic stress after 14 months2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Melin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Is Social Support Equally Important for Both Directly and Indirectly Affected Disaster Victims?2011In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Volume 2 Supplement 1, 2011, 72-72 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been much research on social support and its association with both general mental and physical health, and social support is an important salutogenic factor after traumatic events. Still, the magnitude of the effect of social support on posttraumatic stress (PTS) is not fully understood. In particular, the importance of social support after disasters may be contingent on exposure severity. In a survey of Swedish tourists 14 months after the tsunami in Southeast Asia (N4910), in which the survivors were exposed to few post-disaster adversities, detailed information on exposure severity allowed for an examination of the effect of the interaction between social support and exposure severity on PTS. Social support was assessed by the Crisis Support Scale and PTS by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Preliminary analyses will be presented, and the size and significance of the effect will be discussed.

  • 11.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Panel discussion: early interventions after traumatic events2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, 28636Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf
    Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    A longitudinal study of posttraumatic stress: from 3 months to 14 years after the m/s Estonia disaster2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf
    Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster2011In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 24, no 2, 183-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine posttraumatic stress in survivors 14 years after a ferry disaster, and estimate short- and long-term changes in stress associated with traumatic bereavement and acute dissociation. There were 852 people who perished in the disaster, 137 survived. The 51 Swedish survivors were surveyed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) at 3 months, 1, 3, and 14 years (response rates 82%, 65%, 51%, and 69%). Symptoms decreased from 3 months to 1 year; no change was found thereafter. After 14 years, 27% reported significant symptoms. Traumatic bereavement, but not acute dissociation, was associated with long-term symptom elevation. Chronic posttraumatic stress can persist in a minority of survivors, and traumatic bereavement appears to hinder recovery.

  • 14.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fang, Fang
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A
    University of Iceland.
    Can a Natural Disaster Lead to Suicide Attempts and Psychiatric Disorders in Adults? A 5-Year Matched Cohort Study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gudmundsdottír, Ragnhildur
    University of Iceland.
    Valdimarsdottír, Unnur
    University of Iceland; Harvard School of Public Health.
    Can a Natural Disaster Increase the Risks of Suicide Attempts and Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents? A 5-Year Matched Cohort Study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Gudmundsdóttir, Ragnhildur
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    Fang, Fang
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Hultman, Christina M
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
    Psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: a 5 year matched cohort study2015In: The Lancet Psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 9, 817-824 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Survivors of natural disasters are thought to be at an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, however the extent of this risk, and whether it is linked to pre-existing psychopathology, is not known. We aimed to establish whether Swedish survivors of tsunamis from the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake had increased risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts 5 years after repatriation.

    Methods

    We identified Swedish survivors repatriated from southeast Asia (8762 adults and 3742 children) and 864 088 unexposed adults and 320 828 unexposed children matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. We retrieved psychiatric diagnoses and suicide attempts from the Swedish patient register for the 5 years after the tsunami (from Dec 26, 2004, to Jan 31, 2010) and estimated hazard ratios (HRs), then adjusted for pre-tsunami psychiatric disorders, and, for children, for parental pre-tsunami disorders.

    Findings

    Exposed adults were more likely than unexposed adults to receive any psychiatric diagnosis (547 [6.2%] vs 47 734 [5.5%]; adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11–1.32), particularly stress-related disorders (187 [2.1%] vs 8831 [1.0%]; 2.27, 1.96–2.62) and suicide attempts (38 [0.43%] vs 2752 [0.32%]; 1.54, 1.11–2.13), but not mood or anxiety disorders. Risk of psychiatric diagnoses did not differ between exposed and unexposed children and adolescents (248 [6.6] vs 22 081 [6.9%]; 0.98, 0.86–1.11), although exposed children and adolescents had a higher risk for suicide attempts with uncertain intent (1.43; 1.01–2.02) and stress-related disorders (1.79; 1.30–2.46), mainly during the first 3 months after the tsunami.

    Interpretation

    The 2004 tsunami was, independently of previous psychiatric morbidity, associated with an increased risk of severe psychopathology, mainly stress-related disorders and suicide attempts, in children and adults. Survivors of natural disasters should be targeted with early interventions and active long-term follow-up to prevent, detect, and alleviate psychiatric disorders that might follow.

  • 17.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience2013In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 4, 20650- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Disasters yield increased rates of psychological disorders decades later. Other consequences, however, have received little attention in the past.

    Objective:

    We aimed to examine diagnostic status and survivors’ views on disaster-related consequences and social support.

    Methods:

    A mixed-methods approach was used with 22 survivors (of 49 eligible) 15 years after a ferry disaster. Data collection included audiotaped interviews with open-ended questions and diagnostic assessment of Axis-I disorders.

    Results:

    The post-disaster incidence was 54% (12/22) for Axis-I disorders, and 45% (10/22) for full or subsyndromal posttraumatic stress disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that survivor perception of the longterm consequences included positive (character change) and negative aspects (being ascribed a survivor identity). Participants’ sought social support for several years, yet many felt hindered by experiential dissimilarity and distress of significant others.

    Conclusions:

    Axis-I disorders were prevalent, but not salient to survivors’ perceptions in the long-term. Postdisaster interventions need to attend to common barriers to support.

  • 18.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Social support moderates posttraumatic stress and general distress after disaster2012In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 25, no 6, 721-727 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social support buffers the negative impact of stressful events. Less, however, is known about the characteristics of this association in the context of disaster and findings have been discrepant regarding direct and buffering effects. This study tested whether the protective effects of social support differed across levels of exposure severity (i.e., buffered distress) and assessed whether the buffering effect differed between event-specific and general distress. Participants were 4,600 adult Swedish tourists (44% of invited; 55% women) repatriated within 3 weeks after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A survey 14 months after the disaster included the Crisis Support Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Social support buffered the negative impact of exposure on both outcomes. The support and distress association ranged from very small in participants with low exposure to moderate in those with high exposure (ηp2 = .004 to .053). The buffering effect was not found to differ between the IES-R and GHQ-12, F(2, 4589) = 0.87, p = .42. The findings suggest that social support moderates the stressor-distress relationship after disasters. This study might help explain discrepant findings and point to refinements of postdisaster interventions.

  • 19.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Karolinska institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Prospective longitudinal long-term studies 14-20 years after three disasters2011In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Volume 2 Supplement 1, 2011, 72-72 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although clinical experience and past research have shown that posttraumatic stress (PTS) can last for decades after a disaster, long-term follow-ups are scarce and little is known about predictors of chronic PTS. In this presentation, long-term consequences of disasters will be described by a summary of the findings from three surveys of man-made/technological disasters with 2-4 assessments during the first 34-4 years and with a long-term assessment of PTSD and general mental health after 14-20 years (Ns = 33-57). Similarities and dissimilarities in the course of PTS between the disasters will be presented. The influence of traumatic bereavement, psychological or pharmacological treatment, and additional negative life events on long-term PTS will be discussed, and experiences form conducting long-term studies will be communicated.

  • 20.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Sstressforskningsinstitutet, Stockholms universitet.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A
    Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Registration and definitions of mental disorders in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: – Authors' response2015In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 11, 962-963 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Johannesson, Kerstin Bergh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Posttraumatisk stress: Vad vi bör göra efter allvarliga händelser2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 3, 95-98 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters and other adverse life events may cause severe and chronic posttraumatic stress (PTS) in survivors. Knowledge varies within and across countries in Europe regarding psychosocial interventions after such events. Between 2007 and 2011, The European Network for Traumatic Stress (TENTS) established a network of expertise with the aim to examine the effectiveness of interventions on PTS after trauma, and develop and disseminate a teaching package throughout Europe. The systematic review by TENTS found a scarcity of research on acute interventions, and a lack of efficacy for preventive interventions, whereas trauma-focused psychotherapy is effective for severe acute and chronic PTS. Pharmacotherapy can alleviate chronic PTS although its effects are small. Sweden has a developed network for early psychosocial interventions after major events. As in most of Europe, however, there is a need for greater access to evidence-based psychotherapy.

  • 22.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Osher Ctr Integrat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Morey, Jennifer N.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Psychol, 125 Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 USA..
    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Psychol, 125 Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 USA..
    Self-rated health and interleukin-6: Longitudinal relationships in older adults2016In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 54, 226-232 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both self-rated health (SRH) and inflammation are implicated in chronic diseases and premature mortality. Better SRH is associated with lower proinflammatory cytokines, but there is little evidence about whether this relationship is more stable or dynamic. Objective: To study the between- and within-person associations between SRH and IL-6. Methods: Older adults (N = 131; M-age = 75 years) rated their health and provided blood samples for analysis of IL-6 at separate occasions every 6 months over a period up to 5 years. Age, sex, BMI, neuroticism, and statin use were examined as covariates in multilevel models. Results: In bivariate models, better SRH, lower BMI, younger age, and female sex correlated with lower IL-6. In multilevel models, stable SRH (between-person differences; p < .001) but not dynamic SRH (within-person changes; p = .93) correlated with IL-6. The stable relationship persisted with demographic and health covariates in the model. Conclusions: Better stable SRH but not dynamic SRH was robustly associated with lower IL-6 among older adults, lending support to previous cross-sectional findings on the relation between inflammatory markers and SRH. The findings suggest that trait-like mechanisms, rather than changes over a time scale of 6-month waves, govern this association. To further investigate the mechanisms behind the SRH-IL-6 association, studies with different measurement frequencies, higher within-person variability, and experimental approaches are warranted.

  • 23.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Linton, Steven J
    Hultcrantz, Monica
    Heintz, Emelie
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Internet-delivered psychological treatments for mood and anxiety disorders: a systematic review of their efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, e98118- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Greater access to evidence-based psychological treatments is needed. This review aimed to evaluate whether internet-delivered psychological treatments for mood and anxiety disorders are efficacious, noninferior to established treatments, safe, and cost-effective for children, adolescents and adults.

    METHODS: We searched the literature for studies published until March 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for the assessment of short-term efficacy and safety and were pooled in meta-analyses. Other designs were also considered for long-term effect and cost-effectiveness. Comparisons against established treatments were evaluated for noninferiority. Two reviewers independently assessed the relevant studies for risk of bias. The quality of the evidence was graded using an international grading system.

    RESULTS: A total of 52 relevant RCTs were identified whereof 12 were excluded due to high risk of bias. Five cost-effectiveness studies were identified and three were excluded due to high risk of bias. The included trials mainly evaluated internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (I-CBT) against a waiting list in adult volunteers and 88% were conducted in Sweden or Australia. One trial involved children. For adults, the quality of evidence was graded as moderate for the short-term efficacy of I-CBT vs. waiting list for mild/moderate depression (d = 0.83; 95% CI 0.59, 1.07) and social phobia (d = 0.85; 95% CI 0.66, 1.05), and moderate for no efficacy of internet-delivered attention bias modification vs. sham treatment for social phobia (d = -0.04; 95% CI -0.24, 0.35). The quality of evidence was graded as low/very low for other disorders, interventions, children/adolescents, noninferiority, adverse events, and cost-effectiveness.

    CONCLUSIONS: I-CBT is a viable treatment option for adults with depression and some anxiety disorders who request this treatment modality. Important questions remain before broad implementation can be supported. Future research would benefit from prioritizing adapting treatments to children/adolescents and using noninferiority designs with established forms of treatment.

  • 24.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    A Longitudinal Study of Survivors from an Airliner Crash: Gender Differences and Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Properties of Swedish Posttraumatic Stress Measures after a Disaster2014In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 28, no 4, 402-409 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the properties of Swedish versions of self-report measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with emphasis on the Impact of Event Scale–Revised (IES-R). Survey data from adult survivors 1, 3, and 6 years after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n = 1506) included the IES-R (from which the IES-6 was derived) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). The PTSD Checklist (PCL) was included in one survey. A structured clinical interview was performed after 6 years (n = 142). Factor analyses of the IES-R and PCL indicated that a dysphoric-arousal model provided good fit invariant across assessments. Both measures were accurate in excluding PTSD while all measures provided poorer positive predictive values. The IES-R, but not the IES-6 and GHQ-12, evidenced stability across assessments. In conclusion, the Swedish IES-R and PCL are sound measures of chronic PTSD, and the findings illustrate important temporal aspects of PTSD assessment.

  • 26.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Twenty years later: a follow-up study after the Måbødalen school-bus accident, August 15th, 19882009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Asherson, P.
    et al.
    Stes, S.
    Nilsson, Maria Markhed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Berggren, L.
    Svanborg, P.
    Kutzelnigg, A.
    Deberdt, W.
    The effects of atomoxetine on emotional control in adults with ADHD: An integrated analysis of multicenter studies2015In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no 4, 511-520 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of atomoxetine on emotional control in adults with ADHD. Methods: We performed an integrated analysis using individual patient data pooled from three Eli Lilly-sponsored studies. An integrated analysis can be viewed as a meta-analysis of individual patient-level data, rather than study-level summary data. Results: Two populations were identified: a large sample of patients with pre-treatment baseline data (the "overall population''; n = 2846); and a subset of these patients with placebo-controlled efficacy data from baseline to 10 or 12 weeks after initiating treatment (the "placebo-controlled population''; n = 829). At baseline, in the overall population, similar to 50% of ADHD patients had BRIEF-AS (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version Self-Report) Emotional control subscores between 21 and 30, compared with similar to 10% of normative subjects in the BRIEF-A manual. At endpoint, in the placebo-controlled population, atomoxetine led to a small (effect size 0.19) but significant (P = 0.013) treatment effect for emotional control. The effect size was 0.32 in patients with BRIEF-AS Emotional control scores > 20 at baseline. Improvements in emotional control correlated with improvements in the core ADHD symptoms and quality-of-life. Discussion: As deficient emotional control is associated with impaired social, educational and occupational functioning over and above that explained by core ADHD symptoms alone, improvements in emotional control may be clinically relevant. Conclusion: At baseline, adults with ADHD were more likely to have impaired emotional control than normative subjects. In the adult ADHD patients, atomoxetine treatment was associated with improvements in emotional control, as well as in core ADHD symptoms and quality-of-life.

  • 28.
    Axfors, Cathrine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sylvén, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetric research.
    Adult attachment's unique contribution in the prediction of postpartum depressive symptoms, beyond personality traits2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 222, 177-184 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Personality traits such as neuroticism can help identify pregnant women at risk of postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDS). However, it is unclear whether attachment style could have an additional contribution to this risk elevation. This study aimed to examine the overlap of adult attachment insecurity and neuroticism/trait anxiety as PPDS predictors, taking into account baseline depressive symptoms.

    Methods:

    A Swedish population-based sample of pregnant women reported on adult attachment and either neuroticism (n = 1063) or trait anxiety (n = 555). Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline, and at six weeks and six months postpartum. Correlations between attachment and neuroticism/trait anxiety were calculated. Generalized linear models of PPDS tested the effect of attachment anxiety and avoidance, adjusting for neuroticism/trait anxiety and baseline depression. Logistic regression models with combined high attachment anxiety and-neuroticism/trait anxiety visualized their value as risk factors beyond antenatal depression.

    Results:

    Attachment and neuroticism/trait anxiety were highly correlated (r = .55.77). Attachment anxiety exerted a partially independent effect on PPDS at six weeks (p < .05) and at six months (p < .05) adjusting for neuroticism. Among antenatally non-depressed, combined high attachment anxiety and high neuroticism or trait anxiety was predictive of PPDS at both assessment points. Limitations: Low acceptance rate, exclusive use of self-reports.

    Conclusions:

    Beyond personality, attachment anxiety had a small independent effect on the risk of PPDS. Combining items of adult attachment and neuroticism/trait anxiety could prove useful in antenatal screening for high risk of PPDS.

  • 29.
    Baghdassarian, Eva Juselius
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lewander, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Brainstem Audiometry Evoked Response (BAER) Profiling. New Potential Biomarkers in Schizoaffective Disorder and Early Psychosis2016In: Early Intervention in Psychiatry, ISSN 1751-7885, E-ISSN 1751-7893, Vol. 10, 160-160 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Edgar, Johan
    Humble, Mats B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Poor performance in physical education - a risk factor for bully victimization A case-control study2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 3, 413-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Poor social skills are a risk factor for becoming bullied, which could explain why this frequently occurs to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Poor social skills tend to coexist with clumsiness. According to a pilot study, poor performance in physical education (PE) was correlated with bully victimization. Methods: Sixty-nine healthy university students reported performance in PE and bully victimization in childhood. In addition, the participants responded to questionnaires for ADHD and ASDs to assess personality traits related to increased risk for bully victimization. Results: Below average performance in PE was a risk factor of being bullied in school with an odds ratio of 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.23-10.5; p = 0.017]. Strong correlations between poor performance in PE and long duration of victimization (p = 0.007) and poor performance in PE and high frequency of victimization (p = 0.008) were found. Autistic traits were related to performance below average in PE. Conclusion: Poor motor skills are a strong risk factor for becoming bullied. Prevention programmes that identify, protect and empower the clumsy children could be an important step to avoid bullying of the most vulnerable children.

  • 31. Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Humble, Mats B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gardner, Ann
    Endocrine disruptors, the increase of autism spectrum disorder and its comorbidity with gender identity disorder: a hypothetical association2011In: International Journal of Andrology, ISSN 0105-6263, E-ISSN 1365-2605, Vol. 34, no 5, E350- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Benedict, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Brytting, Maria
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep deprivation has no lasting effects on the human antibody titer response following a novel influenza A H1N1 virus vaccination2012In: BMC Immunology, ISSN 1471-2172, E-ISSN 1471-2172, Vol. 13, 1- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Experimental studies in humans have yielded evidence that adaptive immune function, including the production of antigen-specific antibodies, is distinctly impaired when sleep is deprived at the time of first antigen exposure. Here we examined the effects of a regular 24- hour sleep-wake cycle (including 8 hours of nocturnal sleep) and a 24-hour period of continuous wakefulness on the 7 week antibody production in 11 males and 13 females in response to the H1N1 (swine flu) virus vaccination. The specific antibody titer in serum was assayed by the hemagglutination inhibition test on the days 5, 10, 17, and 52 following vaccination.

    Results: In comparison to the sleep group, sleep-deprived males but not females had reduced serum concentration of H1N1-specific antibodies five days after vaccination, whereas antibody titers at later time points did not differ between the conditions.

    Conclusions: These findings concur with the notion that sleep is a supportive influence in the very early stage of an adaptive immune response to a viral antigen. However, our results do not support the view that acute sleep deprivation has lasting effects on the human antibody titer response to influenza vaccination.

  • 33.
    Benedict, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Nilsson, Emil K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hogenkamp, Pleunie S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men2014In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 37, no 1, 195-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES:

    To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid β (Aβ) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of Aβ 1-42 peptide in the brain.

    DESIGN:

    Subjects participated in two conditions (including either 8-h of nocturnal sleep [22:30-06:30] or TSD). Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after sleep interventions (19:30 and 07:30, respectively).

    SETTING:

    Sleep laboratory.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    15 healthy young men.

    RESULTS:

    TSD increased morning serum levels of NSE (P = 0.002) and S-100B (P = 0.02) by approximately 20%, compared with values obtained after a night of sleep. In contrast, the ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 did not differ between the sleep interventions.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Future studies in which both serum and cerebrospinal fluid are sampled after sleep loss should elucidate whether the increase in serum neuron-specific enolase and S100 calcium binding protein B is primarily caused by neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or is just a consequence of increased gene expression in non-neuronal cells, such as leukocytes.

  • 34.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    St Gorans Univ Hosp, Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Björn Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Boden, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Postinjection Delirium Syndrome Associated With Olanzapine Long-Acting Injectable2016In: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 36, no 4, 388-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Wass, Caroline
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and depression2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative symptoms in schizophrenia and core depressive symptoms share phenomenology and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a treatment modality for both conditions. The most common treatment site has been the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) but there might be more optimal targets. Furthermore, the implementation of the currently approved protocols is hampered by the long duration. More intense stimulation protocols such as the theta burst stimulation (TBS) are significantly shorter and may be as effective and safe.

    The overall aim of this project is to evaluate the treatment effect of TBS on poor motivation and anhedonia in schizophrenia and depression and to explore the neurobiological correlates of these deficits.

    The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) is a key cortical area in networks associated with motivation and anhedonia and it is affected in both schizophrenia and depression. The dmPFC has recently been identified as a possible site of stimulation and is now within reach by new angled coils that have deeper tissue penetration.

    Our study will enroll 38 patients with schizophrenia, 38 patients with depression and 38 healthy volunteers. Patients will be given daily TBS (totally 2400 pulses, 1200 on each hemisphere) over the dmPFC during 10 days. Target symptoms will be assessed with the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). We will also assess cortical excitability with paired-pulse stimulation and the pre-attentive memory function with mismatch negativity (MMN), spontaneous motor activity (assessed with 24 hours accelerometer) as well as autonomic nervous system tone (assessed by skin conductance, heart rate variability and breathing pattern). In addition, we will evaluate cognitive function (speed of processing, verbal fluency, auditory and working memory, visuospatial ability) during rest and stress.

  • 36.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Auricular acupuncture for insomnia2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) is the most effective treatment for insomnia. Studies show that auricular acupuncture (AA) may alleviate insomnia symptoms.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to compare treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) on symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, depression, hypnotic drugs consumption and quality of life from short- and long-term perspectives.

    Paper I had a qualitative approach with a descriptive design. 16 participants received group-treatment with AA during their protracted withdrawal phase and were interviewed about their experiences. They participants experienced a reduction in protracted withdrawal symptoms, improved subjective sleep quality, a strong sensation of peacefulness and increased wellbeing.

    Paper II, III and IV present results from a randomised controlled trial in where the effects of group-treatment with AA and CBT-i were compared in short- and long-term using subjective (questionnaires and sleep diary) and objective (actigraphy) measurements.

    The results showed that CBT-i was superior to AA in reducing insomnia symptoms in both the short and long run. Both groups experienced significant long-term reduction of depressive symptoms. Further, both groups managed to maintain a decreased intake of hypnotic drugs at the end of the treatment when compared to baseline measurement. Short-term reduction of symptoms of anxiety and depression improved only in the AA group. The results from the objective actigraph recordings showed that the AA group slept more and the CBT-i group less after the treatment and that sleep patterns in both groups reverted to pre-treatment levels after 6 months.

    Conclusively: AA, as administered in this study, was not as good as CBT-i in treating insomnia symptoms, and should not be used as a stand-alone treatment for insomnia. Our results also demonstrate that prolonged sleep time does not necessarily yield better sleep, and that the perception of insomnia symptoms is not inevitably affected by sleep duration. AA was as effective as CBT-i in ending hypnotic drugs consumption. Moreover, AA was more successful than CBT-i in reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression in the short run. Further studies investigating AA for anxiety and depression are motivated.

    List of papers
    1. Patients’ experience of auricular acupuncture during protracted withdrawal
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ experience of auricular acupuncture during protracted withdrawal
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 2, 163-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades interest in using auricular acupuncture for substance dependence care has increased. The specific auricular acupuncture protocol used follows the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) definition. This paper describes patients’ experiences of receiving auricular acupuncture during protracted withdrawal. Interviews were conducted with fifteen patients treated at an outpatient clinic for substance dependence. Content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. The analysis resulted in eight categories of positive experiences and five categories of negative experiences. The positive experiences were: Relaxation and wellbeing, Peacefulness and harmony, New behaviours, Positive physical impact, Importance of context, Anxiety reduction and Reduced drug- and alcohol consumption. The negative experiences were: Nothing negative, Disturbing context, Short term effect, Depending on someone else, Time consuming, Physical distrations and Remaining cravings. The conclusion of this study is that all respondents appreciated NADA treatment. This study supports further research on using NADA in addiction treatment to reduce suffering during protracted withdrawal and in other contexts.

    Keyword
    Auricular acupuncture, Substance dependence, Auricular acupuncture, Substance dependence
    National Category
    Nursing Neurology
    Research subject
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188482 (URN)10.1111/jpm.12028 (DOI)000330798000009 ()23230968 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-12-17 Created: 2012-12-17 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, 220-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

    Keyword
    Actigraphy, Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Insomnia disorder, Non-pharmacological, Treatment
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320044 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.06.006 (DOI)000407722900030 ()28779933 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
    Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, 15-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia. Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups. Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment. Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

    Keyword
    Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Hypnotic consumption, Anxiety Insomnia Depression
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
    Research subject
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319923 (URN)10.1016/j.eujim.2017.10.002 (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 214-214 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309495 (URN)000383445201011 ()
    Conference
    23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
    Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
  • 37.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Patients’ experience of auricular acupuncture during protracted withdrawal2014In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 2, 163-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades interest in using auricular acupuncture for substance dependence care has increased. The specific auricular acupuncture protocol used follows the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) definition. This paper describes patients’ experiences of receiving auricular acupuncture during protracted withdrawal. Interviews were conducted with fifteen patients treated at an outpatient clinic for substance dependence. Content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. The analysis resulted in eight categories of positive experiences and five categories of negative experiences. The positive experiences were: Relaxation and wellbeing, Peacefulness and harmony, New behaviours, Positive physical impact, Importance of context, Anxiety reduction and Reduced drug- and alcohol consumption. The negative experiences were: Nothing negative, Disturbing context, Short term effect, Depending on someone else, Time consuming, Physical distrations and Remaining cravings. The conclusion of this study is that all respondents appreciated NADA treatment. This study supports further research on using NADA in addiction treatment to reduce suffering during protracted withdrawal and in other contexts.

  • 38.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, A. H.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 213-213 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, A. H.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 214-214 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, Anne H
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study2016In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, Vol. 2016, 7057282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i). However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4), with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder.

  • 41.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms2017In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, 15-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia. Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups. Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment. Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

  • 42.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia2017In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, 220-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-01 14:20
  • 43.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Psykologiskt omhändertagande av skadade2007In: Traumatologi / [ed] Sten Lennquist, Liber, 2007, 1, 473-482 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Traumatic exposure, bereavement and recovery after the 2004 tsunami2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Traumatic Exposure, Bereavement and Recovery among Survivors and Close Relatives after Disasters2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    International studies of disasters indicate the risk for developing posttraumatic stress reactions among survivors is high. Modern life implicates increased traveling. During the last decades a large number of Swedish citizens were confronted with disasters taking place outside of their country.

    The prevalence of trauma reactions in a population that does not  normally  experience natural disasters, but are able to return to a community unaffected by the catastrophe, is not well studied. In addition, the effects of bereavement after traumatic circumstances have not been satisfactorily explored. Longitudinal studies on the effects of natural disasters are underrepresented and there are few studies investigating the course of recovery after traumatic exposure.

    The aim for this thesis was to examine long-term post-traumatic stress reactions, mental health, and complicated grief after disaster exposure and traumatic bereavement.  Data from returned questionnaires were analysed from bereaved Italian and Swedish relatives 18 months after the Linate airplane disaster 2001, and at 14 months and three years from Swedish travelers returning from Southeast Asia after the 2004 tsunami disaster, and from home staying bereaved relatives within the second year after the tsunami disaster. The main outcome measures were GHQ-12, IES-R and Inventory of Complicated Grief.

    The findings indicated many survivors were resilient and had ability to recover, but severe exposure to a disaster had considerable impact on psychological distress. Life threat was associated with higher levels of post-traumatic stress reactions, and increased the risk for affected mental health and suicidal ideation. Loss in combination with severe life threat exposure indicated a further increased risk of posttraumatic stress reactions and for complicated grief; this should be considered a substantial risk factor for general mental health. Loss of close relatives, especially loss of children, was associated with higher levels of posttraumatic stress and created a greater risk for complicated grief. Many survivors recovered over time; however, severe exposure and traumatic loss appeared to slow the recovery process. The findings have implications for government and health agencies, regarding the importance of knowledge and awareness of these risks for health, and for organizational structure, training, and accessibility of support and adequate treatment.

    List of papers
    1. Impact of bereavement among relatives in Italy and Sweden after the Linate airplane disaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of bereavement among relatives in Italy and Sweden after the Linate airplane disaster
    2006 (English)In: International Journal of Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1503-1438, Vol. 4, no 3, 110-117 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Victims of major disasters are at risk for development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to compare two groups of bereaved relatives from Italy and Sweden, and to examine the role of psychosocial support and psychological reactions 18 months after traumatic bereavement.

    Method

    153 bereaved relatives of deceased victims in the Milano/Linate air plane crash were assessed through a questionnaire. Reactions of psychological distress were measured by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R).

    Results

    In the total group 53, 2 % showed symptoms indicating that they might meet the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD. The frequency was higher among the Italian relatives (58.7%) compared to the Swedish (42, 6 %). Females compared to males showed more signs of posttraumatic reactions in the total population as did spouses and parents within the Italian group. The general health status, measured by subjective evaluation, was significantly affected in both groups as a result of the disaster. A significant recovery after 18 months was reported, although not to the pre-accident level. The Swedish relatives had a pattern of using more psychotherapy compared to the Italians among whom it was more common to use medication both for anxiety and sleeping problems. The need for psychotherapy and medication was related to higher scores on IES-R.

    Conclusions: (1) Traumatic losses deeply affect bereaved relatives. Health is affected and a large group of these relatives develop strong symptoms of post-traumatic stress. (2) Swedish bereaved relatives seem to be more apt to ask for professional help, e.g. psychotherapy, while in Italy it is more common to rely on family, friends and medication. (3) Acute organized psychosocial support in the aftermath can possibly facilitate for victims to handle a traumatic loss but it does not prevent the development of strong post-traumatic reactions. Future investigations may show how it is possible to optimize the help with more specific interventions of support and treatment.

    Keyword
    Airplane disaster, bereavement, posttraumatic stress reactions, traumatic grief, general health, psychosocial support, Linate
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119787 (URN)10.1080/15031430600969034 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-03-03 Created: 2010-03-02 Last updated: 2010-03-10Bibliographically approved
    2. Impact of Exposure to Trauma on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomatology in Swedish Tourist Tsunami Survivors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Exposure to Trauma on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomatology in Swedish Tourist Tsunami Survivors
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 197, no 5, 316-323 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to examine long-term mental health and posttraumatic stress symptomatology in a Swedish tourist population after exposure to the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami. Data from 4822 returned questionnaires 14 months after the disaster were analyzed. Respondents were categorized into 3 subgroups: (1) danger-to-life exposure group (having been caught or chased by the waves), (2) nondanger-to-life exposure group (exposed to other disaster-related stressors), and (3) low exposure group. Main outcome measures were General Health Questionnaire-12 and Impact of Event Scale-22-Revised. Danger-to-life exposure was an important factor in causing more severe posttraumatic stress symptoms and in affecting mental health. Female gender, single status, and former trauma experiences were associated with greater distress. Other factors related to more severe symptoms were loss of relatives, physical injuries, viewing many dead bodies, experiencing life threat, and showing signs of cognitive confusion. Disaster exposure has a substantial impact on survivors, which stresses the need for long-lasting support.

    Keyword
    Natural disaster, tsunami, exposure, life threatening danger, bereavement, posttraumatic stress, IES-R, GHQ-12
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119833 (URN)10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181a206f7 (DOI)000266047900005 ()19440104 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-03-05 Created: 2010-03-02 Last updated: 2014-03-05Bibliographically approved
    3. The effect of Traumatic Bereavement on Tsunami-Exposed Survivors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of Traumatic Bereavement on Tsunami-Exposed Survivors
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 22, no 6, 497-504 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen months after the 2004 tsunami, mental health outcome was assessed in 187 bereaved relatives, 308 bereaved friends, and in 3,020 nonbereaved Swedish survivors. Of the bereaved relatives, 41% reported posttraumatic stress reactions and 62% reported impaired general mental health. Having been caught or chased by the tsunami in combination with bereavement was associated with increased posttraumatic stress reactions. Complicated grief reactions among relatives were almost as frequent as posttraumatic stress reactions. The highest levels of psychological distress were found among those who had lost children. Traumatic bereavement, in combination with exposure to life danger, is probably a risk factor for mental health sequelae after a natural disaster.

    National Category
    Psychiatry Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychiatry; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119797 (URN)10.1002/jts.20467 (DOI)000273187100003 ()
    Available from: 2010-03-03 Created: 2010-03-02 Last updated: 2011-11-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Traumatic bereavement and complicated grief among tsunami-exposed and home-staying relatives
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traumatic bereavement and complicated grief among tsunami-exposed and home-staying relatives
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keyword
    disaster, bereavement, complicated grief, posttraumatic stress disorder, tsunami
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119837 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-09 Created: 2010-03-02 Last updated: 2010-03-10
    5. Tsunami-exposed survivors - signs of recovery in a three-year perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tsunami-exposed survivors - signs of recovery in a three-year perspective
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-119840 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-09 Created: 2010-03-02 Last updated: 2010-03-10
  • 46.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Arinell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Six years after the wave: Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster2015In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 36, 15-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The characteristics of long-term trajectories of distress after disasters are unclear, since few studies include a comparison group. This study examines trajectories of recovery among survivors in comparison to individuals with indirect exposure.

    Methods

    Postal surveys were sent to Swedish tourists, repatriated from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (= 2268), at 1, 3, and 6 years after the tsunami to assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) and poor mental health. Items were used to ascertain high and moderate disaster exposure groups and an indirect exposure comparison group.

    Results

    Long-term PTS trajectories were best characterized by a resilient (72.3%), a severe chronic (4.6%), a moderate chronic (11.2%) and a recovering (11.9%) trajectory. Trajectories reported higher levels of PTS than the comparison group. Exposure severity and bereavement were highly influential risk factors.

    Conclusions

    These findings have implications regarding anticipation of long-term psychological adjustment after natural disasters and need for interventions after a single traumatic event with few secondary stressors.

  • 47.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Fröjd, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Tsunami-exposed tourist survivors: Signs of recovery in an 3-year perspective2011In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 199, no 3, 162-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term follow-up after disaster exposure indicates increased rates of psychological distress. However, trajectories and rates of recovery in large samples of disaster-exposed survivors are largely lacking. A group of 3457 Swedish survivors temporarily on vacation in Southeast Asia during the 2004 tsunami were assessed by postal questionnaire at 14 months and 3 years after the tsunami regarding post-traumatic stress reactions (IES-R) and general mental health (GHQ-12). There was a general pattern of resilience and recovery 3 years postdisaster. Severe exposure and traumatic bereavement were associated with increased post-traumatic stress reactions and heightened risk for impaired mental health. The rate of recovery was lower among respondents exposed to life threat and among bereaved. Severe trauma exposure and bereavement seem to have considerable long-term impact on psychological distress and appear to slow down the recovery process. Readiness among health agencies for identification of symptoms and provision of interventions might facilitate optimal recovery.

  • 48.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fröjd, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Trajectoriesand rates of recovery in Swedish survivors of the 2004 tsunami2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M.
    Fröjd, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Prolonged Grief Among Traumatically Bereaved Relatives Exposed and Not Exposed to a Tsunami2011In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 24, no 4, 456-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies on the mental health consequences of traumatic exposure to a disaster compare those exposed to those not exposed. Relatively few focus on the effect of the death of a close relative caused by the disaster-suffering a traumatic bereavement. This study compared the impact on 345 participants who lost a close relative in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but who were themselves not present, to 141 who not only lost a relative, but also were themselves exposed to the tsunami. The focus was on psychological distress assessed during the second year after the sudden bereavement. Findings were that exposure to the tsunami was associated with prolonged grief (B = 3.81) and posttraumatic stress reactions (B 665), and doubled the risk for impaired mental health. Loss of children increased the risk for psychological distress (prolonged grief B = 692; The Impact of Event Scale-Revised: B = 610; General Health Questionnaire-12: OR = 2.34). Women had a higher frequency of prolonged grief For men, loss of children presented a higher risk for prolonged grief in relation to other types of bereavement (B = 636 vs. loss of partner). Further long-term follow-up could deepen the understanding of how recovery after traumatic loss is facilitated.

  • 50.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M.
    Department of Medical Epimediology and Biostatistics, Karolonska Institutet.
    Lindam, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    The effect of Traumatic Bereavement on Tsunami-Exposed Survivors2009In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 22, no 6, 497-504 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen months after the 2004 tsunami, mental health outcome was assessed in 187 bereaved relatives, 308 bereaved friends, and in 3,020 nonbereaved Swedish survivors. Of the bereaved relatives, 41% reported posttraumatic stress reactions and 62% reported impaired general mental health. Having been caught or chased by the tsunami in combination with bereavement was associated with increased posttraumatic stress reactions. Complicated grief reactions among relatives were almost as frequent as posttraumatic stress reactions. The highest levels of psychological distress were found among those who had lost children. Traumatic bereavement, in combination with exposure to life danger, is probably a risk factor for mental health sequelae after a natural disaster.

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