uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 110
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Ananta, M
    et al.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Aibibu, Dilibaier
    Houis, Stéphanie
    Brown, Robert A.
    Mudera, Vivek
    A Poly(Lactic Acid-Co-Caprolactone)–Collagen Hybrid for Tissue Engineering Applications2009In: Tissue engineering Part A, ISSN 1937-3341, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1667-1675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A biodegradable hybrid scaffold consisting of a synthetic polymer,   poly(lactic acid-co-caprolactone) (PLACL), and a naturally derived   polymer, collagen, was constructed by plastic compressing hyperhydrated  collagen gels onto a flat warp-knitted PLACL mesh. The collagen   compaction process was characterized, and it was found that the duration, rather than the applied load under the test conditions in the  plastic compression, was the determining factor of the collagen and cell density in the cell-carrying component. Cells were spatially   distributed in three different setups and statically cultured for a   period of 7 days. Short-term biocompatibility of the hybrid construct   was quantitatively assessed with AlamarBlue and qualitatively with   fluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. No significant cell   death was observed after the plastic compression of the interstitial   equivalents, confirming previous reports of good cell viability   retention. The interstitial, epithelial, and composite tissue   equivalents showed no macroscopic signs of contraction and good cell   proliferation with a two- to threefold increase in cell number over 7   days. Quantitative analysis showed a homogenous cell distribution and   good biocompatibility. The results indicate that viable and proliferating multilayered tissue equivalents can be engineered using   the PLACL-collagen hybrid construct in the space of several hours.

  • 2. Ananta, M.
    et al.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Aibibu, D.
    Brown, R. A.
    Mudera, V.
    A Novel Poly(L-Lactide-co-e-Caprolactone)-Collagen Hybrid Construct for Application in Tissue Engineering2007In: Termis-EU Meeting Abstracts, London, UK September 4-7 2007: [Published in Tissue Engineering, vol. 13, nr. 7], Mary Ann Liebert Inc. , 2007, p. 1637-1637Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A biodegradable hybrid construct consisting of a slow degrading poly(L-lactide-co-e-caprolactone) (PLA-e-CL) knitted mesh, plastically compressed (1) between two collagen gels was fabricated and tested in vitro for tissue engineering applications. The polymer mesh was incorporated to give greater mechanical stability to the compressed collagen scaffolds.

    The hybrid construct was characterized for fluid (weight) loss and cell viability during compression and mechanical properties.

    Hybrid constructs embedded and surface layered with human dermal

    fibroblasts (2, Eþ5 per 5 ml) were cultured for up to one week

    in static culture. Quantitative and qualitative data on cell viability

    and proliferation were obtained.

    It was found that the fluid (weight) loss in plastic compression

    of the hybrid construct was time dependent and not weight dependent

    at an applied load of 240 grams. No significant cell death

    was observed during the plastic compression process and a homogenous

    cell distribution was achieved. One week of static culture

    showed that the cultivated hybrid construct retained its

    mechanical properties with no evidence of degradation, and cells

    inside the constructs as well as layered on top of the constructs

    proliferated.

    We found the PLA-e-CL-Collagen hybrid construct a useful

    three-dimensional scaffold for tissue engineering of stratified tissues

    and potential applications in bladder wall, blood vessels and

    skin are currently being explored.

  • 3. Arnander, Claes
    et al.
    Westermark, Anders
    Veltheim, Riikka
    Docherty-Skogh, Ann-Charlotte
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Three-Dimensional Technology and Bone Morphogenetic Protein in Frontal Bone Reconstruction2006In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 275-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) may be used in humans to facilitate healing of bony defects. The effect of different BMPs is, as with many other growth factors, highly dependent on the delivery vehicle. Bovine type I collagen is currently used in the clinical setting as a carrier and has been approved in several countries for human use. Here, we report the reconstruction of a frontal bone defect using heparin together with bovine type I collagen, hyaluronic acid, and fibrin as vehicles for BMP-2. A bony structure was created on the back of the patient by treating the latissimus dorsi muscle with the growth factor. A polyamide mold was used as a template to achieve the desired shape. The bone structure was transplanted into the defect site via microsurgical techniques. Although the prefabricated bone was not large enough tocover the entire frontal defect, the reconstruction was completed by using an additional cranial implant.

  • 4.
    Asplund, Basse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Mathisen, Torbjörn
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Variable Hard Segment Length in Poly(urethane urea) through Excess of Diisocyanate and Vapor Phase Addition of Water2006In: Macromolecules, Vol. 39, p. 4380-4385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(urethane urea)s with hard segments derived only from diisocyanate linked via urea linkages were synthesized using a new and simple one-pot method. The creation of urea linkages were done via creating the amine in situ by adding water in vapor phase slowly and continuously. This synthesis method eliminates the tedious control to approach stoichiometry, is less sensitive to impurities, involves no intermediate isolation steps, and does not involve any chain extender. A study using a two-armed poly(-caprolactone) as soft segment and methyl 2,6-diisocyantohexanoate (LDI) as the hard segment was performed. The length of the hard segment was varied from 4.8 to 11.6 LDI units. Stress-strain measurements showed an increase in elastic modulus, 146 to 235 MPa, when increasing the hard segment length, while the elongation at break decreased, 980 to 548%. IR spectroscopy showed an increase in hydrogen bonding when increasing the hard segment length. The synthesis was also shown to be applicable to common diisocyanates such as HDI, TDI, and MDI.

  • 5.
    Asplund, Basse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Sperens, Jenny
    Mathisen, Torbjorn
    Hilborn, Jons
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Effects of hydrolysis on a new biodegradable co-polymer2006In: Journal of Biomaterials Science. Polymer Edition, ISSN 0920-5063, E-ISSN 1568-5624, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 615-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of using a new low-modulus biodegradable thermoplastic elastomer for in vivo application as a stent cover. The new polymer, a thermoplastic elastomer, consists of a three-armed co-polymer of poly(lactide)acid (PLLA), poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL). A degradation study was performed in a buffer solution at 37 degrees C for 4 and 6 weeks. The effect of degradation on mechanical properties was studied by stress-strain measurements and explained by using modulated DSC, GPC and mass measurements. A tapered block of PLLA and trimethylene carbonate connecting the crystalline outer part and the inner elastic part was highly susceptible to hydrolysis and caused rapid degradation and subsequent loss of mechanical properties. Random chain scission and homogenous hydrolysis resulted in a loss in mass and molecular weight. After 6 weeks of in vitro hydrolysis the molecular weight had decreased 54% and the elongation-at-break dropped from more than 300% to 90%. A medium free cell seeding study showed that endothelial cells adhered well to the polymeric material. An indicative animal study with the polymer acting as a stent cover showed very low levels of inflammation however, pronounced neointima thickening was observed which was probably due to the premature failure of the material.

  • 6.
    Asplund, Basse
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Sperens, Jenny
    Mathisen, Torbjörn
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Effects of hydrolysis on a new biodegradable co-polymer2006In: Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 615-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of using a new low-modulus biodegradable thermoplastic elastomer for in vivo application as a stent cover. The new polymer, a thermoplastic elastomer, consists of a three-armed co-polymer of poly(lactide)acid (PLLA), poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL). A degradation study was performed in a buffer solution at 37°C for 4 and 6 weeks. The effect of degradation on mechanical properties was studied by stress-strain measurements and explained by using modulated DSC, GPC and mass measurements. A tapered block of PLLA and trimethylene carbonate connecting the crystalline outer part and the inner elastic part was highly susceptible to hydrolysis and caused rapid degradation and subsequent loss of mechanical properties. Random chain scission and homogenous hydrolysis resulted in a loss in mass and molecular weight. After 6 weeks of in vitro hydrolysis the molecular weight had decreased 54% and the elongation-at-break dropped from more than 300% to 90%. A medium free cell seeding study showed that endothelial cells adhered well to the polymeric material. An indicative animal study with the polymer acting as a stent cover showed very low levels of inflammation; however, pronounced neointima thickening was observed which was probably due to the premature failure of the material.

  • 7.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Danielsson, C
    Frey, P
    Gupta, B
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Scaffolds combining compliance and strength2002In: International Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 640-641Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Protein adsorption onto polyester surfaces: Is there a need for surface activation?2007In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface hydrolysis of polyester scaffolds is a convenient technique suggested to promote protein adsorption for improving cell attachment. We have, therefore, investigated the effect of hydrolysis of polyester surfaces for protein adsorption to clarify the conditions needed. Three polyesters, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly(lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), were selected. Adsorption was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Hydrolyzed PET adsorbed significantly more proteins than nonhydrolyzed. Degradable polymers adsorbed at higher rates when the polymers were hydrolyzed prior to adsorption, but the same amount as noehydrolyzed, suggesting spontaneous hydrolysis during the adsorption. XPS shows that hydrolysis prior to absorption for PET results in a surface nitrogen composition of ∼14%, similar to pure protein (16%). Nonhydrolyzed PET surfaces showed only ∼7% nitrogen, indicating protein layers thinner than ∼10 nm. Adsorption to PLA and PGA shows nitrogen contents of 14-15% in both cases. SEM revealed striking differences in morphology of the protein coating. Hydrolyzed or spontaneously hydrolyzable surfaces display a pronounced fibrous structure while nonhydrolyzed surfaces give smooth structures. In combination, the results show that surface hydrolysis increase adsorption rate, but not the amount of proteins on polyesters that degrades in vivo. Surface treatment of nondegradable polyester increases the total amount of proteins and induces the formation of fibrous protein structures. Post hydrolysis treatment by acetic acid, replacing the counter-ion to a proton, further enhances protein attachment. Finally, cell attachment experiments verifies that protein adsorption increase the cell attachment to polyester surfaces.

  • 9.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Novel metal free catalyst for bulk polymerization of lactides, using a cationic ring opening polymerization procedure2003In: PMSE Preprints (2003), 88, 2003, p. 369-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Nederberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Biodegradable Ionomers2006In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 3907-3913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several telechelic anionic or cationic ionomers were synthesized starting from poly(trimethylene carbonate) diols (PTMC) of different molecular weight, ranging from 1000 to 12 000 g/mol. In the synthesis of the anionomer, addition of sulfur trioxide trimethylene complex to the PTMC end-group hydroxyls and subsequent ion exchange afforded a disulfate monoester sodium salt. The cationomer was synthesized in two steps. Acylation of the PTMC diol using 4-chlorobuturyl chloride was followed by displacement of the alkyl chloride with trimethylamine to give a quaternary ammonium salt. These ionomers showed excellent swelling properties, up to around 500% in H2O, while the unfunctionlized PTMC did not swell at all. The lowest molecular weight ionomers were soluble in both water and chloroform. The physical properties of the ionomers were analyzed with oscillating rheological experiments. Interestingly, the ionomers displayed "rubbery plateau". The mechanical and swelling properties may be linked to phase separation resulting in ionic aggregates within the bulk, which may function as physical cross-links. At ambient temperatures, the PTMC starting material behaved like a highly viscous fluid, while the ionomers behaved as elastomers. In a hydrophilic environment, the ionomers displayed a surface rearrangement making the surface of the ionomer hydrophilic by allowing the ionic end groups to appear at the water ionomer interface. In air or vacuum all the ionic groups were found in the bulk of the material as analyzed by XPS or contact angle measurements. Finally, we showed that with the specific ionic groups it was possible to complex specific molecules to the ionomers.

  • 11.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Nederberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Sulfate end functionalized heparin mimetic biodegradable poly(trimethylenecarbonate)2005In: Polymer Preprints (American Chemical Society, Division of Polymer Chemistry) 46(1) 2005, 2005, p. 473-474Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Atthoff, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Nederberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Söderberg, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Synthetic Biodegradable Ionomers that Engulf, Store, and Deliver Intact Proteins2006In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 2401-2406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telechelic anionic and cationic biodegradable ionomers capable of loading, storing, and releasing proteins are presented. Two different ionomers have been synthesized with either anionic or cationic end groups. The reaction was done quantitatively as shown by 1H NMR. The swelling properties of the hydrophobic poly(trimethylene carbonate) polymer are contributed to the ionic end groups that display hydrophilic properties. Depending on the molecular weight of the ionomer, and also on the ionic charge, the materials swell differently in water, from ~50% for Mw = 12 000 g/mol to ~500% when dealing with 2000 g/mol. The high swelling led us to believe that it would be possible to load and release proteins preferably in a still active form. As models, two different proteins were chosen: hemoglobin and cytochrome c. The swelling and release study shows that both ionomers possess the capability to adsorb and later release the proteins with retained structure. Release measurements from both the swollen and dried states have been evaluated with similar results, showing that the dried state seems to release a little bit less than the swollen one. These kinds of materials should be interesting for a wide variety of applications where drug and protein release is wanted, as well as in applications such as protein separation media.

  • 13.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Atthoff, Björn
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Andersson, J
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    In vitro/ Produced Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds2005In: European Tissue Engineering Society International Conference, München 8 Aug – 3 sept 2005, oral presentation, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 14.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Jensen-Waern, Marianne
    Hedenqvist, Patricia
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    In situ cross-linkable hyaluronan hydrogel enhances chondrogenesis2011In: Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, ISSN 1932-6254, Vol. 5, no 8, p. E188-E196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work describes the feasibility of a cross-linkable injectable hyaluronan hydrogel for cartilage repair. The hydrogel used is a two-component system based on aldehyde-modified hyaluronan and hydrazide-modified polyvinyl alcohol, which are rapidly cross-linked in situ upon mixing. The in vitro study showed that chondrocytes and mesenchymal cells cultured in the gel form cartilage-like tissue, rich in glycosaminoglycans, collagen type II and aggrecan. In a rabbit animal model the injection of the hydrogel improved the healing of a full-thickness cartilage defect created in the knee as compared to non-treated controls. This rabbit study showed that the regenerated cartilage defects stained more intensely for type II collagen upon treatment with the hydrogel. The hyaluronan-based hydrogel may be used as a delivery vehicle for both growth factors and/or cells for cartilage repair. The in vivo study also indicated that the hydrogel alone has a beneficial effect on cartilage regeneration.

  • 15.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Forough, F
    Brown, R
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    USING cells as micro factories for ECM polymer hybrid material production2008In: TERMIS EU 2008 Porto Meeting June 22–26, 2008 Porto Congress Center–Alfândega Portugal: [Published in Tissue Engineering. Part A, vol. 14, nr. 5], Mary Ann Liebert Inc. , 2008, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 925-925Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Foroughi, F
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Brown, R
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Extracellular matrix based scaffold produced by mechanical stimulation of fibroblasts2007In: Second International Conference on Mechanics of Biomaterials & Tissues, Lihue, Kauai, USA, 9-13 December 2007, poster presentation, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 17.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Foroughi, F
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Cell produced ECM on engineered polymer structures2006In: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society Conference, Rotterdam, 08 – 11 oktober 2006, oral presentation, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 18.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Foroughi, F.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Designing Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds by Dynamic culture of fibroblasts2007In: TERMIS-EU Meeting Abstracts London, UK September 4–7, 2007: [published in Tissue Engineering, vol. 13, nr. 7], Mary Ann Liebert , 2007, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 1667-1667Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our bodies are constantly exposed to different sorts of mechanical forces, from muscle tension to wound healing. Connective tissue adapts its extracellular matrix (ECM) to changes in mechanical load and the influence of mechanical stimulation on fibroblasts has been studied for a long time [1, 2]. When exposed to forces, fibroblasts are known to respond with expression and remodeling of ECM proteins, in particular collagen type I [3]. In this study the effect of dynamic culture conditions on human dermal fibroblasts was evaluated in terms of deposition and remodeling of ECM, with the aim of producing an ECM based scaffold. The fibroblasts were grown on compliant polymer supports either in a bioreactor with a pulsating flow or under static conditions. By applying dynamic culture conditions, the collagen deposition on the polymer supports increased fivefold. Scanning electron microscopy showed that polymer fibers were well integrated with cells and ECM and alignment along the polymer fibers was observed. Scaffold design should aim at creating structures that can help guiding the cells to form new, functional tissue. The presented system may present a new way of producing designed extracellular matrix based scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  • 19.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Foroughi, Farhad
    Brown, Robert
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Extracellular matrix-polymer hybrid materials produced in a pulsed-flow bioreactor system2009In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1932-6254, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell adhesion, interaction with material, cell proliferation and the production of an extracellular matrix (ECM) are all important factors determining the successful performance of an engineered scaffold. Scaffold design should aim at creating structures which can guide cells into forming new, functional tissue. In this study, the concept of in situ deposition of ECM by human dermal fibroblasts onto a compliant, knitted poly (ethyleneterephtalate) support is demonstrated, creating in vitro produced ECM polymer hybrid materials for tissue engineering. Comparison of cells cultured under static and dynamic conditions were examined, and the structure and morphology of the materials so formed were evaluated, along with the amount collagen deposited by the seeded cells. In vitro produced ECM polymer hybrid scaffolds could be created in this way, with the dynamic culture conditions increasing ECM deposition. Histological analysis indicated a homogenous distribution of cells in the 1 mm thick scaffold, surrounded by a matrix-like structure. ECM deposition was observed throughout the materials wigh 81.6 µg/cm2 of collagen deposited after 6 weeks. Cell produced bundles of ECM fibres bridged the polymer filaments and anchored cells to the support. These findings open hereto unknown possibilities of producing materials with structure designed by engineering together with biochemical composition given by cells.

  • 20.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hyaluronic acid cross-linking chemistry2005In: 8th International Symposium of Polymers for Advanced Technologies, 13th-16th Sept. 2005, Budapest, Hungary, 2005Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 21.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Ossipov, Dmitri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Injectable cell-free template for bone-tissue formation2009In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research-Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, Vol. 91A, no 4, p. 1111-1118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a novel injectable hydrogel which forms a template for de novo formation of bone tissue. Hydrogel formation takes place in situ in less than 1 min by the cross-linking of multifunctional hyaluronic acid and polyvinyl alcohol derivatives. Endogenous cells are recruited in vivo by incorporating bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a powerful promoter for osteogenic differentiation. The hydrogel was evaluated in vitro by performing a cell viability test and a release study and in vivo by a rat ectopic model. Examination by X-ray, microcomputed tomography, and histology revealed a significant bone formation at the target site for gels containing BMP-2, and a complete degradation was observed for gels without BMP-2 four weeks after injection. There were no signs of inflammation or foreign body response in either group and we believe that this system has the potential as an off-the-shelf injectable to be used where bone tissue is needed.

  • 22.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Mild modifications of hyaluronan for fine-tuning of mechanical and chemical properties2003In: Europolymer Congress, 2003, Stockholm, Sweden, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Modification of Hyaluronan by Triazine-Promoted Amidation in Aqueous Media2006In: 232nd ACS National Meeting, 10th-14th Sept. 2006, San Francisco, California, USA, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Preparation and evaluation of an injectable hyaluronan hydrogel for therapeutic applications2007In: 7th International conference on Hyaluronan, 22nd-27th April 2007, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Selective Michael-type addition of a D-glucuronic acid derivative in the synthesis of model substances for uronic acid containing polysaccharides2008In: Express Polymer Letters, ISSN 1788-618X, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 553-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A flexible protocol for the preparation of model substances for uronic acid containing polysaccharides is presented.We have synthesized a D-glucuronic acid derivative which is designed so that it easily can be conjugated with differentstructures and architectures by selective Michael-type addition. By successful coupling of the glucuronic acidderivative to polyethylene glycol with high degree of conversion, products were obtained that were easily characterized andwhich resembled polysaccharides in terms of solubility and purification methods that could be employed. The model substancecan potentially be used to facilitate optimization of low-degree modification reactions of high molecular weightD-glucuronic acid containing polysaccharides.

  • 26. Bisson, I
    et al.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Wurm, F
    Meyrat, B
    Frey, P
    Human urothelial cells grown on collagen adsorbed to surface-modified polymers2002In: Urology, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 176-180Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Bisson, I
    et al.
    Kosinski, M
    Ruault, S
    Gupta, B
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Wurm, F
    Frey, P
    Acrylic acid grafting and collagen immoblization on poly (ethylene terephthalate) surfaces for adherence and growth of human bladder smooth muscle cells2002In: Biomaterials, Vol. 23, no 15, p. 3149-3158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Bjursten, LM
    et al.
    Rosengren, A
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Marcolongo, M
    Johansson, JA
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Foreign body reaction is elicited by mechanical properties of implanted materials2003In: Faseb Journal, Vol. 17, no 5, p. A1197-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bowden, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    A metal-free catalyst for the catalytic cationic ring opening polymerization of lactones2003In: PMSE Preprints (2003), 88, 2003, p. 535-536Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Carrot, G
    et al.
    Rutot-Houze, D
    Pottier, A
    Degee, P
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Dubois, P
    Surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization: A versatile method for nanoparticle ordering.2002In: Macromolecules, Vol. 33, no 22, p. 8400-8404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Della Martina, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Garamszegi, L
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Pore size modification of macroporous crosslinked poly (dicyclopentadiene)2003In: Journal of Polymer Science Part A-Polymer Chemistry, Vol. 41, p. 2036-2046Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Della Martina, A
    et al.
    Garamszegi, L
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Surface functionalization of cross-linked poly(dicyclopentadiene)2003In: Reactive & Functional Polymers, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Della Martina, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Gradient porosity poly (dicyclopentadiene)2001In: Journal of Materials Research, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 2045-2052Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Docherty-Skogh, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Waern, Marianne Jensen
    Ekman, Stina
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Ossipov, Dimitri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivered by hyaluronan-based hydrogel induces massive bone formation and healing of cranial defects in minipigs2010In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 1383-1392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects is a challenge using bone transplants or alloplastic materials. The use of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 together with a suitable carrier is an attractive option that may facilitate new bone formation. The authors have developed a hydrogel that is formed in situ by the cross-linking of multifunctional hyaluronic acid and polyvinyl alcohol derivatives mixed with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, in the presence of BMP-2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the hydrogel as a carrier for BMP-2 in repairing critical size cranial defects in a minipig model. Methods: Cranial defects (2 × 4 cm) were created in 14 minipigs. The experimental groups were as follows: group 1, craniotomy and application of 5 ml of hydrogel with 1.25 mg of BMP-2 (n = 6); group 2, craniotomy and application of 5 ml of hydrogel without BMP-2 (n = 6); and group 3, craniotomy with no further treatment (n = 2). Results: After 3 months, computed tomographic and histologic examinations were performed. There was spontaneous ossification in the untreated group, but the healing was incomplete. The hydrogel alone demonstrated no further effects. The addition of 1.25 mg of BMP-2 to the hydrogel induced a greater than 100 percent increase in bone volume (p = 0.003) and complete healing of the defects. Histologic examination revealed compact lamellar bone in the BMP group without intertrabecular fibrous tissue, as was seen in the other groups. The hydrogel was resorbed completely within 3 months and, importantly, caused no inflammatory reaction. Conclusion: The injectable hydrogel may be favorable as a BMP-2 carrier for bone reconstruction.

  • 35. Dudeck, O.
    et al.
    Jordan, O.
    Hoffmann, K. T.
    Okuducu, A. F.
    Husmann, I.
    Kreuzer-Nagy, T.
    Tesmer, K.
    Podrabsky, P.
    Bruhn, H.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Rüfenacht, D. A.
    Doelker, E.
    Felix, R.
    Embolization of experimental wide-necked aneurysms with iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol solubilized in a low-angiotoxicity solvent2006In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1849-1855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the ready-to-use iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol (I-PVA) dissolved in the low angiotoxic solvent N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) for embolization of porcine wide-necked aneurysms.

    METHODS: Fourteen broad-based carotid sidewall aneurysms were surgically constructed in 7 swine. I-PVA (40%) in NMP was injected under temporary balloon occlusion bridging the aneurysm neck. After 4 weeks, follow-up angiography, multisection CT angiography (MSCTA), and 3T MR imaging including MR angiography (MRA) sequences were performed. Afterward, harvested aneurysms were investigated histopathologically.

    RESULTS: The liquid embolic was well visible under fluoroscopy and displayed a favorable precipitation pattern, allowing for controlled polymer delivery. Ten aneurysms (71%) were initially completely occluded, whereas in 1 aneurysm, a minimal polymer leakage was observed. The other 4 aneurysms (29%) were almost completely occluded. One animal suffered a lethal rebleeding from the anastomosis after uneventful embolization. Aneurysms embolized with I-PVA could be discriminated well from the parent artery without beam-hardening artifacts on MSCTA, and no susceptibility artifacts were encountered on MR imaging. Histologic examination revealed all aneurysms covered with a membrane of fibroblasts and an endothelial cell layer while a moderate intraaneurysmal inflammatory response to the polymer was observed.

    CONCLUSION: I-PVA dissolved in NMP has proved its effectiveness for the embolization of experimental wide-necked aneurysms. This precipitating liquid embolic offers several interesting features in that it needs no preparation before use and no radiopaque admixtures, the latter allowing for artifact-free evaluation of treated aneurysms with MSCTA and MRA. Moreover, it uses NMP as a solvent, which has only a low angiotoxicity.

  • 36. Dudeck, Oliver
    et al.
    Jordan, Oliver
    Hoffmann, Karl-Titus
    Tesmer, Kai
    Kreuzer-Nagy, Tibor
    Podrabsky, Petr
    Heise, Michael
    Meyer, Rudolf
    Okuducu, Ali Fuat
    Bruhn, Harald
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Rüfenacht, Daniel
    Doelker, Eric
    Felix, Roland
    Intrinsically radiopaque iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol as a liquid embolic agent: evaluation in experimental wide-necked aneurysms2006In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 290-297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Engelhardt, E.
    et al.
    Aibibu, D.
    Gries, T.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Adam, M.
    Wurm, F.
    GFP expressing cell line as screening tool for biomaterials2007In: TERMIS-EU Meeting Abstracts London, UK September 4–7, 2007: [published in Tissue Engineering, vol. 13, nr. 7], Mary Ann Liebert Inc. , 2007, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 1702-1702Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38. Engelhardt, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Micol, Lionel A.
    Houis, Stephanie
    Wurm, Florian M.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hubbell, Jeffrey A.
    Frey, Peter
    A collagen-poly(lactic acid-co-epsilon-caprolactone) hybrid scaffold for bladder tissue regeneration2011In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 32, no 16, p. 3969-3976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scaffold materials should favor cell attachment and proliferation, and provide designable 3D structures with appropriate mechanical strength. Collagen matrices have proven to be beneficial scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, apart from small intestinal submucosa, they offer a limited mechanical strength even if crosslinking can enhance their mechanical properties. A more cell-friendly way to increase material strength is to combine synthetic polymer meshes with plastic compressed collagen gels. This work describes the potential of plastic compressed collagen poly(lactic acid-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLAC) hybrids as scaffolds for bladder tissue regeneration. Human bladder smooth muscle and urothelial cells were cultured on and inside collagen PLAC hybrids in vitro. Scaffolds were analyzed by electron microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and AlamarBlue assay. Both cell types proliferated in and on the hybrid, forming dense cell layers on top after two weeks. Furthermore, hybrids were implanted subcutaneously in the backs of nude mice. Host cell infiltration, scaffold degradation, and the presence of the seeded bladder cells were analyzed. Hybrids showed a lower inflammatory reaction in vivo than PLAC meshes alone, and first signs of polymer degradation were visible at six months. Collagen PLAC hybrids have potential for bladder tissue regeneration, as they show efficient cell seeding, proliferation, and good mechanical properties.

  • 39.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Aulin, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    The diverge effects of noggin on BMP-2 induced osteogenesis2007In: American society for bone and mineral research, Washington, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 40. Foroughi, Farhad
    et al.
    Aibibu, Dilbar
    Aulin, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Brown, Robert A.
    Bulk collagen incorporation rates into knitted stiff fibre polymer in tissue-engineered scaffolds: the rate-limiting step2008In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1932-6254, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs in vitro relies on sufficient synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) by cells to form a material suitable for normal function in vivo. Collagen synthesis by human dermal fibroblasts grown in vitro on two polymers, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyglycolic acid (PGA), was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cells were either cultured in a dynamic environment, where meshes were loaded onto a pulsing tube in a bioreactor, or in a static environment without pulsing. Collagen synthesis by cells cultured on a static mesh increased by six-fold compared to monolayer culture, and increased by up to a further 5.4-fold in a pulsed bioreactor. However, little of the collagen synthesized was deposited onto the meshes, almost all being lost to the medium. The amount of collagen deposited onto meshes was highest when cells were cultured dynamically on PET meshes (17.6 µg), but deposition still represented only 1.4% of the total synthesized. Although total collagen synthesis was increased by the use of 3D culture and the introduction of pulsing, the results suggest that the limiting factor for fabrication of a tissue-engineered construct within practical timescales is not the amount of collagen synthesized but the quantity retained (i.e. deposited) within the construct during culture. This may be enhanced by systems which promote or assemble true 3D multi-layers of cells.

  • 41.
    Forsgren, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Brohede, Ulrika
    Sandvik AB, Stockholm.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Maria, Strømme
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    In Vivo Evaluation of Functionalized Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite for Local Delivery of Active Agents2011In: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 2158-7027, 2158-7043, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was carried out to investigate the biological response in vivo to biomimetic hydroxyapatite implant coatings functionalized with bisphosphonates and bone morphogenetic proteins. The functionalization was carried out by a simple soaking procedure in the operating room immediately prior to surgery. Cylindrical titanium samples with and without coatings were implanted in the distal femoral epiphysis of sheep and retrieved after 6 weeks. The histological analysis proved that all samples were integrated well in the tissue with no signs of intolerance. Fewer osteoclasts were observed in the vicinity of bisphosphonate-functionalized samples and the bone was denser around these samples compared to the other samples. Samples functionalized with bone morphogenetic protein induced more bone/implant contact but showed a more inconsistent outcome with reduced bone density around the samples. This study demonstrates a simple method to functionalize implant coatings, which provides surgeons with an option of patient-specific functionalization of implants. The observed biological impact due to the delivery of active molecules from the coatings suggests that this strategy may also be employed to deliver antibiotics from similar coatings.

  • 42.
    Garamszegi, L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Donzel, C
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Carrot, G
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Nguyen, T. Q
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Synthesis of thiol end-functional polystyrene via atom transfer radical polymerization2003In: Reactive and Functional Polymers, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Gupta, B
    et al.
    Plummer, C
    Bisson, I
    Frey, P
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Plasma-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) films: characterization and human smooth muscle cell growth on grafted films2002In: Biomaterials, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 863-871Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Gupta, B
    et al.
    Saxena, S
    Geeta, -
    Ray, A.R
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Development of PLA and PCL Based Textile Structures as Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering2008In: TERMIS EU 2008 Porto Meeting June 22–26, 2008 Porto Congress Center–Alfândega Portugal: [Published in Tissue Engineering. Part A, vol. 14, nr. 5], 2008, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 838-838Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45. Gupta, Bhuvanesh
    et al.
    Revagade, Nilesh
    Anjum, Nishat
    Atthoff, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Preparation of poly(lactic acid) fiber by dry-jet-wet spinning. II. Effect of process parameters on fiber properties2006In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 101, no 6, p. 3774-3780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dry-jet-wet spinning process was employed to spin poly(lactic acid)(PLA) fiber by the phase inversion technique using chloroform and methanol as solvent and nonsolvent, respectively, for PLA. The as spun fiber was subjected to two-stage hot drawing to study the effect of various process parameters, such as take-up speed, drawing temperature, and heat-setting temperature on the fiber structural properties. The take-up speed had a pronounced influence on the maximum draw ratio of the fiber. The optimum drawing temperature was observed to be 90°C to get a fiber with the tenacity of 0.6 GPa for the draw ratio of 8. The heat-setting temperature had a pronounced effect on fiber properties.

  • 46. Gupta, Bhuvanesh
    et al.
    Revagade, Nilesh
    Atthoff, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Radiation-induced graft modification of knitted poly(ethylene terephthalate) fabric for collagen immobilization2007In: Polymers for Advanced Technologies, ISSN 1042-7147, E-ISSN 1099-1581, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 281-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiation-induced graft co-polymerization of methacrylic acid and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone mixture from poly(ethylene terephthalate) knitted fabrics were conducted using a preirradiation method. The influence of the graft conditions, such as irradiation dose, reaction time, monomer concentration and temperature on the degree of grafting was determined. It was found that there is a limiting irradiation dose of 40 kGy above which the degree of grafting does not increase. An increase in the monomer concentration from 20 to 40% and an increase in temperature from 60 to 80°C gave a higher initial rate of grafting as well as higher equilibrium graft levels. The characterization of the fabric was carried out by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grafted fabric surface, carrying negatively charged carboxylate ions, was shown to attract collagen, being positively charged to provide bioreceptive surfaces.

  • 47. Gupta, Bhuvanesh
    et al.
    Revagade, Nilesh
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    In vitro degradation of dry-jet-wet spun poly(lactic acid) monofilament and knitted scaffold2007In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 2006-2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro degradation behavior of dry-jet-wet spun poly(lactic acid) (PLA) monofilament and knitted scaffold were studied at three different pH i.e., at 4.6, 7.4, and 8.0 at 37°C for 20 weeks. Characterization of PLA by intrinsic viscosity, thermal properties, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out. It is observed that the pH of the medium has significant role on degradation behavior of PLA. The degradation at pH 4.6 is observed to be maximum, which is confirmed by the drop of 52% in intrinsic viscosity. The degradation process has effect on the hydrophobicity of the PLA. The decrease in contact angle from 73° to 48° indicates that the PLA surface tends to become more hydrophilic as the degradation proceeds. The SEM analysis showed that with the degradation, surface deterioration takes place.

  • 48. Gupta, Bhuvanesh
    et al.
    Revagade, Nilesh
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Poly(lactic acid) fiber: An overview2007In: Progress in polymer science, ISSN 0079-6700, E-ISSN 1873-1619, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 455-482Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) has generated great interest as one of the most innovative materials being developed for a wide range of applications. The polymer is thermoplastic and biodegradable, which makes it highly attractive for biological and medical applications. It can be transformed by spinning into filaments for subsequent fabrication of desirable textile structures. Spinning may be accomplished by various routes, each with its merits and demerits. The medical applications of this polymer arise from its biocompatibility: the degradation product, lactic acid, is metabolically innocuous. The fibers may be fabricated into various forms and may be used for implants and other surgical applications such as sutures. Tissue engineering is the most recent domain where poly(lactic acid) is being used and is found to be one of the most favorable matrix materials. The present article presents a critical review on the production of poly(lactic acid) fiber by various methods, along with correlations between structure and properties of the fibers. The applications of these fibers in various domains are also discussed.

  • 49. Gupta, G
    et al.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry. polymerkemi.
    Plummer, C
    Bisson, I
    Frey, P
    Thermal crosslinking of collagen immbilized on poly (acrylic acid) grafted poly (ethylene terephthalate) films.2002In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Vol. 85, no 9, p. 1874-1880Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    In vivo injectable gels for tissue repair2011In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 1939-5116, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 589-606Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The desire to reduce healthcare costs while improving outcomes drives minimally invasive methods to replacing traditional surgical procedures. Various treatments that would previously have needed open-type surgeries can be carried out using endoscopes, catheters, and needles. These advantages have become especially obvious for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine with in vivo gel injectable nanomaterials. In this review, the state of the art in this rapidly developing field is given. This is done by contrasting functional evaluation in vitro with in vivo followed by describing (1) synthetic materials, (2) the body's own polymers, (3) polymers in nature, (4) self-assembled peptides, and (5) new innovations and combinations. With increased understanding of the relationship between material characteristics and the outcome in vivo more rational design criteria are emerging.

123 1 - 50 of 110
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf