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  • 1.
    Abel, Pascal
    et al.
    Eberhani Karls Univ Tubingen, Senckenberg Ctr Human Evolut & Palaeoenvironm, Sigwartstr 28, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Hornung, Jahn
    Niedersachs Landesmuseum Hannover, Willy Brandt Allee 5, D-30169 Hannover, Germany..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Sachs, Sven
    Nat Kunde Museum Bielefeld, Abt Geowissensch, Adenauerpl 2, D-33602 Bielefeld, Germany..
    An anhanguerian pterodactyloid mandible from the lower Valanginian of Northern Germany, and the German record of Cretaceous pterosaurs2021In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, no 3, p. S5-S12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The record of Cretaceous pterosaur remains from Germany is sparse. The material recovered to date includes the fragmentary holotypes of Targaryendraco wiedenrothi and Ctenochasma roemeri, as well as a few isolated pterodactyloid teeth and some indeterminate skeletal elements, together with a plaster cast of a large Purbeckopus manus imprint. Here, we report the discovery of a pterodactyloid pterosaur mandible from lower Valanginian strata of the Stadthagen Formation in the Lower Saxony Basin of Northern Germany. Based on the size and spacing of its alveoli, this fossil is attributable to the cosmopolitan Early Cretaceous pteranodontoid clade Anhangueria. Moreover, it represents the first and only known pterosaur from the Valanginian of Germany and is one of only a handful Valanganian pterosaur occurrences presently recognized worldwide. In addition to the approximately coeval Coloborhynchus clavirostris from the Hastings Bed Group of southern England, the Stadthagen Formation pterosaur mandible is among the stratigraphically oldest identifiable anhanguerians.

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  • 2.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA..
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, Tromso, Norway..
    Jensen, Soren
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, Badajoz, Spain..
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Vickers-Rich, Patricia
    Monash Univ, Sch Earth Atmosphere & Environm, Clayton, Vic, Australia.;Swinburne Univ Technol, Sch Sci, Dept Chem & Biotechnol, Hawthorn, Vic, Australia..
    Hall, Michael
    Monash Univ, Sch Earth Atmosphere & Environm, Clayton, Vic, Australia..
    Matthews, Jack J.
    Oxford Univ Museum Nat Hist, Oxford, England..
    Meinhold, Guido
    TU Bergakad Freiberg, Inst Geol, Freiberg, Germany.;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Gottingen, Germany..
    Hoyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, Mandal, Norway..
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, Rondebosch, South Africa..
    Late Ediacaran occurrences of the organic-walled microfossils Granomarginata and flask-shaped Lagoenaforma collaris gen. et sp. nov.2022In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 159, no 7, p. 1071-1092, article id PII S0016756821001096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New occurrences of flask-shaped and envelope-bearing microfossils, including the predominantly Cambrian taxon Granomarginata, are reported from new localities, as well as from earlier in time (Ediacaran) than previously known. The stratigraphic range of Granomarginata extends into the Cambrian System, where it had a cosmopolitan distribution. This newly reported Ediacaran record includes areas from Norway (Baltica), Newfoundland (Avalonia) and Namibia (adjacent to the Kalahari Craton), and puts the oldest global occurrence of Granomarginata in the Indreelva Member (< 563 Ma) of the Stahpogieddi Formation on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway. Although Granomarginata is rare within the assemblage, these new occurrences together with previously reported occurrences from India and Poland, suggest a potentially widespread palaeogeographic distribution of Granomarginata through the middle-late Ediacaran interval. A new flask-shaped microfossil Lagoenaforma collaris gen. et sp. nov. is also reported in horizons containing Granomarginata from the Stahpogieddi Formation in Norway and the Dabis Formation in Namibia, and flask-shaped fossils are also found in the Gibbett Hill Formation in Newfoundland. The Granomarginata-Lagoenaforma association, in addition to a low-diversity organic-walled microfossil assemblage, occurs in the strata postdating the Shuram carbon isotope excursion, and may eventually be of use in terminal Ediacaran biostratigraphy. These older occurrences of Granomarginata add to a growing record of body fossil taxa spanning the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

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  • 3.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Life through the 'Varanger ice ages': microfossil record of late Neoproterozoic glacial-interglacial units from arctic Norway2018In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Geological Society of America, 2018, Vol. 50Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic strata in Finnmark (Arctic Norway) provide a good sedimentary record of Neoproterozoic glaciations on the Baltica paleocontinent. The lower Vestertana Group exposed on the Digermulen Peninsula contains two glaciogenic units, the Smalfjord and Mortensnes formations. Chemostratigraphic correlation dated the Smalfjord diamictite to the Marinoan glaciation (650-635 Ma), yet its age was also proposed to be older, per correlation to glacial units in central and southern Scandinavia. The diamictites are bracketing shales and siltstones of the interglacial Nyborg Formation. Stratigraphic, paleontological, and sedimentological data are presented from the interglacial-glacial succession, investigated by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group. Palynological analysis yielded well-preserved organic-walled microfossils (OWM) from the Nyborg Fm., and from fine-grained diamictite matrix in the Mortensnes Fm. via a modified extraction method.

    The interglacial Nyborg Fm. hosts a moderate diversity assemblage of prokaryotic and eukaryotic OWM, as well as acanthomorphic acritarchs such as Ceratosphaeridium, ?Cavaspina, and a novel process-bearing form. Organically preserved, enigmatic multicellular eukaryotic fossils occur in the upper Nyborg Fm. The Mortensens glacial assemblage is less diverse and contains bacterial filaments, leiosphaerids, toroidal forms, and Micrhystridium-type minute acanthomorphs.

    The presence of Doushantuo-Pertatataka type acritarchs in the Nyborg Fm., and small acanthomorphs in the Mortensnes diamictite corroborate an early Ediacaran age for the interglacial-glacial succession on Digermulen. In addition to the trace fossil and body-fossil record of Ediacara-biota in the overlying Stáhpogieddi Formation, the microfossil biostratigraphy suggests Marinoan and Gaskiers glaciation equivalent ages of the Varanger glaciations in Finnmark. Protistan diversity in the succession declined through and following the glaciation, until late Ediacaran.

  • 4.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Univ Durham, Dept Earth Sci, Durham, England..
    Jensen, Soren
    Univ Extremadura, Fac Ciencias, Area Paleontol, Badajoz, Spain..
    Meinhold, Guido
    TU Bergakad Freiberg, Inst Geol, Freiberg, Germany.;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Gottingen, Germany..
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    Arctic Univ Museum Norway, UiT The Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso, Norway..
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hoyberget, Magne
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Fac Ciencias, Area Paleontol, Badajoz, Spain..
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, Rondebosch, South Africa..
    Life through an Ediacaran glaciation: Shale- and diamictite-hosted organic-walled microfossil assemblages from the late Neoproterozoic of the Tanafjorden area, northern Norway2024In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 635, article id 111956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New organic-walled microfossil (OWM) assemblages are reported from upper Neoproterozoic glacial and interglacial siliciclastic deposits in Finnmark, northern Norway. A nearly continuous sedimentary succession of the Vestertana Group contains two glaciogenic units, the Smalfjorden and Mortensnes formations, interpreted as end-Cryogenian Marinoan and Ediacaran glaciations, respectively. We investigated the OWM record in the Nyborg, Mortensnes, and St ' ahpogieddi formations to assess the impact of a glacial interval on the diversity of microscopic eukaryotes. A modified acid-extraction technique was applied to recover OWM from the diamictite matrix. The upper Nyborg Formation contains morphologically complex Doushantuo-Pertatataka acritarchs (DPA), restricting the age of the Nyborg Formation to early-mid Ediacaran. DPA occur below the dolostones that record a negative carbon isotope excursion correlated with the Shuram anomaly and below a glacial diamictite. A decline in species richness and compositional change is observed in the Mortensnes glacial assemblage. DPA are replaced by bacterial filaments and cell aggregates. The overlying Indreelva Member, St ' ahpogieddi Formation contains Ediacara-type biota and palaeopascichnids, but only a depauperate OWM assemblage of leiosphaerids and flask-shaped microfossils characteristic of the late Ediacaran.The succession of assemblages in the Vestertana Group demonstrates a turnover from large eukaryotic OWM to a microbial community in the glacial interval, to a low diversity post-glacial assemblage during the rise of macroscopic life. We compared the Vestertana record to global DPA occurrences. Although one DPA assemblage zone postdates the Shuram excursion, no DPA occur above Ediacaran glacial diamictites in successions where those deposits are present. Considering this, and the community changes in the Vestertana succession, we suggest that DPA were affected by the onset of an Ediacaran glaciation. Lastly, we combined the biostratigraphic markers in the Vestertana Group to constrain the age of the Mortensnes diamictite.

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  • 5.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Moczydłowska, Małgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Unusual organic-walled microfossil from the late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation, Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2017In: ISECT 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation is exposed in the Tanafjord area, Finnmark, Arctic Norway, on Digermulen and Varanger Peninsulas. The succession is composed of ~400 m of interbedded shales, siltstone and purple to grey sandstone, deposited between Neoproterozoic low latitude glacial deposits. The Nyborg Fm. lies on top of the Smalfjord diamictite, and is overlain by the Mortensnes diamictite (the latter was attributed to both Marinoan (650-635 Ma) and Gaskiers (579 Ma) glaciations) and the Ediacaran-Cambrian Stáhpogieddi Formation. Thus, the Nyborg Fm. represents late Neoproterozoic, probably the last Cryogenian interglacial interval. Presented material was collected in 2014 by members of Digermulen Early Life Research Group, from organic-rich, grey-green shales and siltstones of the Nyborg Mbr. D, uppermost Nyborg Fm. between Árasulluokta and Guvssájohka valleys. Organic-walled microfossils were extracted from shale via standard palynological acetolysis in hydrofluoric acid, and studied via light and scanning electron microscopy. Microfossils from the Nyborg Fm. include Synsphaeridium-type aggregated cells, unbranched bacterial filaments (Polythrichoides and Siphonophycus), sphaeromorph and envelope-bearing acritarchs (leiosphaerids, Stictosphaeridium, Simia), and previously unrecognized aggregated tubular microfossils. These taxa are long-ranging, but common in glacial-interglacial units worldwide, and thus broadly corroborate the Cryogenian age of the Nyborg sediments. The novel fossil, up to 300 μm in size, is a parenchymatous meshwork of interconnected organic-walled tubes that terminate in cup-shaped apices 4-11 µm in diameter. Irregular tube clusters are truncated both in macerates and in thin sections, suggesting post mortem transport. Elemental EDXS analysis indicates that extracted meshwork microfossils are predominantly composed of carbonaceous material and also associated with small amounts of titanium and vanadium. Considering the branching and adjoined body plan of carbonaceous fossil, it was likely multicellular and of eukaryotic affinity. As such, it may represent an important step in the evolution of complex multicellularity and morphological complexity several million years before the appearance of Ediacaran organisms.

  • 6.
    Agić, Heda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Moczydlowska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Jensen, Sören
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, ZA-7701 Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Höyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Organically-preserved multicellular eukaryote from the early Ediacaran Nyborg Formation, Arctic Norway2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 14659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eukaryotic multicellularity originated in the Mesoproterozoic Era and evolved multiple times since, yet early multicellular fossils are scarce until the terminal Neoproterozoic and often restricted to cases of exceptional preservation. Here we describe unusual organically-preserved fossils from mudrocks, that provide support for the presence of organisms with differentiated cells (potentially an epithelial layer) in the late Neoproterozoic. Cyathinema digermulense gen. et sp. nov. from the Nyborg Formation, Vestertana Group, Digermulen Peninsula in Arctic Norway, is a new carbonaceous organ-taxon which consists of stacked tubes with cup-shaped ends. It represents parts of a larger organism (multicellular eukaryote or a colony), likely with greater preservation potential than its other elements. Arrangement of open-ended tubes invites comparison with cells of an epithelial layer present in a variety of eukaryotic clades. This tissue may have benefitted the organism in: avoiding overgrowth, limiting fouling, reproduction, or water filtration. C. digermulense shares characteristics with extant and fossil groups including red algae and their fossils, demosponge larvae and putative sponge fossils, colonial protists, and nematophytes. Regardless of its precise affinity, C. digermulense was a complex and likely benthic marine eukaryote exhibiting cellular differentiation, and a rare occurrence of early multicellularity outside of Konservat-Lagerstatten.

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  • 7.
    Aldén, Björn
    et al.
    Göteborgs botaniska trädgård.
    Ryman, Svengunnar
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Våra kulturväxters namn: ursprung och användning2009Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Alhalabi, Wafa A.
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Biol, FFCLRP, Ave Bandeirantes 3900, BR-14040901 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil..
    Bardet, Nathalie
    CR2P Ctr Rech Paleontol Paris, Museum Natl Hist Nat, CP38,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Sachs, Sven
    Nat Kundemuseum Bielefeld, Abt Geowissensch, Adenauerpl 2, D-33602 Bielefeld, Germany..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Joude, Issam B.
    Morrison Hershfield, 2932 Baseline Rd, Ottawa, ON K2H 1B1, Canada..
    Yazbek, Muhammed K.
    Al Baath Univ, Fac Sci, Geol Dept, Damascus Aleppo Highway, Homs, Syria..
    Godoy, Pedro L.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biosci, Dept Zool, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.;SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Anat Sci, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Langer, Max C.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Biol, FFCLRP, Ave Bandeirantes 3900, BR-14040901 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil..
    Recovering lost time in Syria: New Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Santonian) elasmosaurid remains from the Palmyrides mountain chain2024In: Cretaceous research (Print), ISSN 0195-6671, E-ISSN 1095-998X, Vol. 159, article id 105871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its relatively limited vertebrate fossil record, Syria currently records the largest number of documented Mesozoic marine reptile occurrences among the Middle Eastern countries. In particular, the phosphatic deposits of the Palmyrides mountain chain have yielded fossils of aquatic squamates, bothremydid and chelonioid marine turtles, as well as elasmosaurid plesiosaurs. Nevertheless, new discoveries have not been reported for the last two decades. Here, we describe the partial skeleton of an elasmosaurid plesiosaur from Syria, which comprises the middle and posterior cervical series, together with articulated pectoral, dorsal and anterior caudal parts of the vertebral column, with associated rib fragments. The fossil was excavated from Coniacian-Santonian phosphatic deposits of the Al Sawaneh el Charquieh mines, in the central part of the southwestern Palmyrides, about 200 km northeast of Damascus. The specimen can be assigned to Elasmosauridae based on the cervical centra morphology and, although incomplete, is significant because it not only represents likely the oldest, but also the currently most complete plesiosaur skeleton recovered from the Middle East. (c) 2024 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9. Alstrup, Vagn
    et al.
    Grube, Martin
    Motiejunaite, Jurga
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Zhurbenko, Mikhail
    Lichenicolous fungi from the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway2008In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altogether 93 species of lichenicolous fungi are reported, the majority collected during the Nordic Lichen Society excursion in 2003 to the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway. Cornutispora ciliata, Intralichen cf. lichenum, Opegrapha stereocaulicola and Sphaerulina cf. dubiella are new to Scandinavia, 11 species are new to Norway, and further 42 are new to Troms. Stigmidium aggregata is also reported as new to Greenland. Host lichens, localities, collectors and collection numbers are given.

  • 10.
    Amcoff, Örjan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Nysten, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Bonanzamalm i mikroskala1998In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 18, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 11.
    Ament-Velásquez, Sandra Lorena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Giraud, Tatiana
    Univ Paris Saclay, AgroParisTech, CNRS, Ecol Systemat Evolut, F-91400 Orsay, France.
    Debuchy, Robert
    Univ Paris Saclas CEA, Inst Integrat Biol Cell I2BC, CNRS, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Saupe, Sven J.
    Univ Bordeaux, IBGC, UMR 5095, CNRS, 1 Rue Camille St Saens, F-33077 Bordeaux, France.
    Debets, Alfons J. M.
    Wageningen Univ, Lab Genet, Arboretumlaan 4, NL-6703 BD Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Bastiaans, Eric
    Wageningen Univ, Lab Genet, Arboretumlaan 4, NL-6703 BD Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Malagnac, Fabienne
    Univ Paris Saclas CEA, Inst Integrat Biol Cell I2BC, CNRS, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Grognet, Pierre
    Univ Paris Saclas CEA, Inst Integrat Biol Cell I2BC, CNRS, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Peraza-Reyes, Leonardo
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Inst Fisiol Celular, Dept Bioquim & Biol Estruct, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Gladieux, Pierre
    Univ Montpellier, Inst Agro, CIRAD, INRAE,UMR BGPI, F-34398 Montpellier, France.
    Kruys, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Silar, Philippe
    Univ Paris, Lab Interdisciplinaire Energies Demain LIED, F-75006 Paris, France.
    Huhndorf, Sabine M.
    Bot Dept, Field Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 USA.
    Miller, Andrew N.
    Univ Illinois, Illinois Nat Hist Survey, Champaign, IL 61820 USA.
    Vogan, Aaron A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    The taxonomy of the model filamentous fungus Podospora anserina2020In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 75, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The filamentous fungus Podospora anserina has been used as a model organism for more than 100 years and has proved to be an invaluable resource in numerous areas of research. Throughout this period, P. anserina has been embroiled in a number of taxonomic controversies regarding the proper name under which it should be called. The most recent taxonomic treatment proposed to change the name of this important species to Triangularia anserina. The results of past name changes of this species indicate that the broader research community is unlikely to accept this change, which will lead to nomenclatural instability and confusion in literature. Here, we review the phylogeny of the species closely related to P. anserina and provide evidence that currently available marker information is insufficient to resolve the relationships amongst many of the lineages. We argue that it is not only premature to propose a new name for P. anserina based on current data, but also that every effort should be made to retain P. anserina as the current name to ensure stability and to minimise confusion in scientific literature. Therefore, we synonymise Triangularia with Podospora and suggest that either the type species of Podospora be moved to P. anserina from P. fimiseda or that all species within the Podosporaceae be placed in the genus Podospora.

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  • 12.
    Armstrong, Ellie E.
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Prost, Stefan
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Integrat Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Ertz, Damien
    Bot Garden Meise, Dept Res, Meise, Belgium;Federat Wallonie Bruxelles, Direct Gen Enseignement Non Obligatoire & Rech Sc, Brussels, Belgium.
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frisch, Andreas
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU Univ Museum, Trondheim, Norway.
    Bendiksby, Mika
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU Univ Museum, Trondheim, Norway.
    Draft Genome Sequence and Annotation of the Lichen-Forming Fungus Arthonia radiata2018In: Microbiology Resource Announcements, E-ISSN 2576-098X, Vol. 6, no 14, article id e00281-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report here the draft de novo genome assembly, transcriptome assembly, and annotation of the lichen-forming fungus Arthonia radiata (Pers.) Ach., the type species for Arthoniomycetes, a class of lichen-forming, lichenicolous, and saprobic Ascomycota. The genome was assembled using overlapping paired-end and mate pair libraries and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 instrument.

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  • 13.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fröberg, Lars
    Lund University.
    Frödén, Patrik
    Lund University.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörns högskola.
    Thell, Arne
    Lund University.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Professor Ingvar Kärnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 453-456Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Grube, Martin
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Wedin, Mats
    The sister group relation of Parmeliaceae2007In: Mycologia, Vol. 99, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Atkins, Christian J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Yochelcionella (Mollusca, Helcionelloida) from the lower Cambrian of North America2008In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 23-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five named species of the helcionelloid mollusc genus Yochelcionella Runnegar & Pojeta, 1974 are recognized from the lower Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2) of North America: Yochelcionella erecta (Walcott, 1891), Y. americana Runnegar & Pojeta, 1980, Y. chinensis Pei, 1985, Y. greenlandica Atkins & Peel, 2004 and Y. gracilis Atkins & Peel, 2004, linking lower Cambrian outcrops along the present north-eastern seaboard. Yochelcionella erecta, an Avalonian species, is described for the first time, other species are derived from Laurentia. A revised concept of the Chinese species, Y. chinensis, is based mainly on a large sample from the Forteau Formation of western Newfoundland and the species may have stratigraphic utility between Cambrian palaeocontinents.

  • 16.
    Atkins, Christian J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    New species of Yochelcionella (Mollusca; Helcionelloida) from the Lower Cambrian of Greenland2004In: Bulletin, Geological Society of Denmark, ISSN 0011-6297, Vol. 51, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Babcock, Loren E.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Palaeobiology, taphonomy and stratigraphic significance of the trilobite BUENELLUS from the Sirius Passet Biota, Cambrian of North Greenland2007In: Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, ISSN 0810-8889, Vol. 34, p. 401-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet Biota, collected from the lower Buen Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3), North Greenland, contains one species of trilobite, the nevadiid Buenellus higginsi Blaker, 1988. The species shows considerable morphological variation, especially in exoskeletal width. Many specimens of B. higginsi show some form of exceptionally preserved, non-biomineralised tissue. Structures interpreted as alimentary tracts and probable digestive glands are commonly preserved by silica and limonite. Antennae are rarely preserved, apparently through replication in clay minerals. Tendinous bars in the axial region also seem to be preserved by replication in clay minerals. Mineral-filled gut tracts in B. higginsi suggest they were fluid-filled at the time of burial, and that the species was a non-durophagous predator. Healed injuries, some of which are the result of unsuccessful predaceous attacks, are uncommon in B. higginsi. Other exoskeletons show evidence of post-mortem disruption, perhaps scavenging. Buenellus higginsi, one of the earliest known trilobites from Laurentia, seems to have played an important role in the Sirius Passet ecosystem, serving both as predator on, and prey for, contemporary animals.

  • 18.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Univ New England, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Armidale, NSW, Australia..
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Tooth morphology elucidates shark evolution across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction2021In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 19, no 8, article id e3001108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sharks (Selachimorpha) are iconic marine predators that have survived multiple mass extinctions over geologic time. Their prolific fossil record is represented mainly by isolated shed teeth, which provide the basis for reconstructing deep time diversity changes affecting different selachimorph clades. By contrast, corresponding shifts in shark ecology, as measured through morphological disparity, have received comparatively limited analytical attention. Here, we use a geometric morphometric approach to comprehensively examine tooth morphologies in multiple shark lineages traversing the catastrophic end-Cretaceous mass extinction-this event terminated the Mesozoic Era 66 million years ago. Our results show that selachimorphs maintained virtually static levels of dental disparity in most of their constituent clades across the Cretaceous-Paleogene interval. Nevertheless, selective extinctions did impact apex predator species characterized by triangular blade-like teeth. This is particularly evident among lamniforms, which included the dominant Cretaceous anacoracids. Conversely, other groups, such as carcharhiniforms and orectolobiforms, experienced disparity modifications, while heterodontiforms, hexanchiforms, squaliforms, squatiniforms, and dagger synechodontiforms were not overtly affected. Finally, while some lamniform lineages disappeared, others underwent postextinction disparity increases, especially odontaspidids, which are typified by narrow-cusped teeth adapted for feeding on fishes. Notably, this increase coincides with the early Paleogene radiation of teleosts as a possible prey source, and the geographic relocation of disparity sampling "hotspots," perhaps indicating a regionally disjunct extinction recovery. Ultimately, our study reveals a complex morphological response to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction and highlights an event that influenced the evolution of modern sharks.

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  • 19.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. University of Zurich.
    Campione, Nicolás E.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Pimiento, Catalina
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Feeding ecology has shaped the evolution of modern sharks2021In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 31, no 23, p. 5138-5148.e4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sharks are iconic predators in today’s oceans, yet their modern diversity has ancient origins. In particular, present hypotheses suggest that a combination of mass extinction, global climate change, and competition has regulated the community structure of dominant mackerel (Lamniformes) and ground (Carcharhiniformes) sharks over the last 66 million years. However, while these scenarios advocate an interplay of major abiotic and biotic events, the precise drivers remain obscure. Here, we focus on the role of feeding ecology using a geometric morphometric analysis of 3,837 fossil and extant shark teeth. Our results reveal that morphological segregation rather than competition has characterized lamniform and carcharhiniform evolution. Moreover, although lamniforms suffered a long-term disparity decline potentially linked to dietary “specialization,” their recent disparity rivals that of “generalist” carcharhiniforms. We further confirm that low eustatic sea levels impacted lamniform disparity across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Adaptations to changing prey availability and the proliferation of coral reef habitats during the Paleogene also likely facilitated carcharhiniform dispersals and cladogenesis, underpinning their current taxonomic dominance. Ultimately, we posit that trophic partitioning and resource utilization shaped past shark ecology and represent critical determinants for their future species survivorship.

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  • 20.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Einarsson, Elisabeth
    Lund University.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Late Cretaceous (Campanian) actinopterygian fishes from the Kristianstad Basin of southern Sweden2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 277-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a diverse range of aquatic vertebrates are documented from the Upper Cretaceous (mid-Campanian) marine strata of the Kristianstad Basin in southern Sweden, only chondrichthyans and marine amniotes have been described in detail to date. In contrast, coeval actinopterygians are virtually unreported, yet their remains are extremely abundant at most sampled localities. A comprehensive assessment of these fossils has identified the first Late Cretaceous actinopterygian fauna from the Fennoscandian Shield, incorporating indeterminate lepisosteids, the durophagous pycnodontid Anomoeodus subclavatus, the predatory pachycormid Protosphyraena sp., a large ichthyodectid, pachyrhizodontids resembling Pachyrhizodus, the enchodontid Enchodus cf. gladiolus and indeterminate small teleosts. These taxa are diagnosed mainly from isolated teeth and scales, implying substantial taphonomic loss prior to burial. Moreover, the prolific recovery of actinopterygian skeletal remnants in recent excavations suggests that historical collecting biases, rather than ecological paucity, have contributed to their under-representation in the Swedish Cretaceous record. Palaeobiogeographically, the Kristianstad Basin actinopterygians show compositional resemblance to assemblages from the Northern European Platform and the Western Interior Seaway of North America, advocating distributional communication across the Boreal proto-Atlantic Ocean.

  • 21.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ New England, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
    Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 16, p. 2607-2615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction profoundly altered vertebrate ecosystems and prompted the radiation of many extant clades [1, 2]. Sharks (Selachimorpha) were one of the few larger-bodied marine predators that survived the K-Pg event and are represented by an almost-continuous dental fossil record. However, the precise dynamics of their transition through this interval remain uncertain [3]. Here, we apply 2D geometric morphometrics to reconstruct global and regional dental morphospace variation among Lamniformes (Mackerel sharks) and Carch-arhiniformes (Ground sharks). These clades are prevalent predators in today's oceans, and were geographically widespread during the late Cretaceous-early Palaeogene. Our results reveal a decoupling of morphological disparity and taxonomic richness. Indeed, shark disparity was nearly static across the K-Pg extinction, in contrast to abrupt declines among other higher-trophic-level marine predators [4, 5]. Nevertheless, specific patterns indicate that an asymmetric extinction occurred among lamniforms possessing lowcrowned/triangular teeth and that a subsequent proliferation of carcharhiniforms with similar tooth morphologies took place during the early Paleocene. This compositional shift in post-Mesozoic shark lineages hints at a profound and persistent K-Pg signature evident in the heterogeneity of modern shark communities. Moreover, such wholesale lineage turnover coincided with the loss of many cephalopod [6] and pelagic amniote [5] groups, as well as the explosive radiation of middle trophic-level teleost fishes [1]. We hypothesize that a combination of prey availability and post-extinction trophic cascades favored extant shark antecedents and laid the foundation for their extensive diversification later in the Cenozoic [7-10].

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  • 22.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Paleontological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Zurich CH‑8006, Switzerland.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Siversson, Mikael
    Western Australian Museum, Collections and Research, 49 Kew Street, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia.
    Southern higher-latitude lamniform sharks track mid-Cretaceous environmental change2022In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 103, p. 362-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mid-Cretaceous (Albian and Cenomanian, 113–93.9 Myr) marked a transformative interval of shark evolution during which lamniforms (mackerel sharks) diversified as dominant marine predators. Yet, their radiation dynamics relative to major biotic turnovers delimiting the Albian–Cenomanian and Cenomanian–Turonian boundaries are incompletely understood. Here, we use the high-resolution dental fossil record of lamniforms to track changing morphological disparity and tooth size through a succession of mid-Cretaceous shark assemblages from higher-palaeolatitude (up to ∼ 58°S) settings in Australia. Our geometric morphometric analyses and evolutionary model fitting reveal stable disparity throughout the late Albian–late Cenomanian. By contrast, lamniform disparity increased in the early Turonian, which might reflect local habitat differences and/or intraspecific variability through heterodonty. Nevertheless, clade-specific partial disparity increases are evident among small-bodied carchariids, and couple with a trend towards larger teeth as a proxy for body-size in coeval anacoracids. We correlate these signals with recovery after the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2, which severely disrupted latest Cenomanian marine ecosystems and apparently instigated disjunct responses in shark communities occupying epeiric versus outer neritic environments.

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  • 23.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lars Roberg och trilobiterna2015In: Geologiskt forum, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 18 juni 1715 försvarades uppsatsen De Fluviatili Astaco ejusque usu medico vid Uppsalauniversitet. Författaren var Lars Roberg ochämnet var kräftdjur av olika slag. Arbetet innehöllen figur och på denna avbildades tre fossil;en krabba och två svanssköldar från trilobiter. Fossil hade aldrig tidigare avbildats i trycktaarbeten i Sverige, och därmed blev Lars Robergför trehundra år sedan den första i Sverige attillustrera fossil, därtill även svenska sådana.

  • 24.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The Bromell fossil collection at Uppsala University, Sweden: its history and the people behind it2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of 17(th) century cabinets of curiosity collections are held at the Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden. Some of the oldest date back to the 1650s, and were included in the collection of Archiater, i.e. physician to the Crown, von Bromell (1679-1731). He is also known for publishing the first series of papers in Sweden to exclusively deal with palaeontology. Throughout his life he acquired specimens by collecting, buying or receiving in exchange to add to those he inherited from his father Olaus Bromelius, a famous botanist and physician. Information on the labels gives a glimpse of his network of friends, colleagues and fellow collectors, such as Kilian Stobaeus, Lars Roberg, Emanuel Swedenborg, Elias Brenner and Johan Dobelius. When Bromell died, his vast collections of books, coins, furniture, conchs, stuffed animals, minerals and fossils were sold off. The minerals and fossils were split up and owned by various persons during the following century. Parts owned by A. Lagerberg between the years 1746 and 1776 were bought in 1796 by Johan Afzelius and donated to Uppsala University at his death. Fossils and minerals earlier described by Bromell were in the care of The Royal Society of Science in Uppsala at least by 1791. Through the Institute of Geology, fossils accumulated over the centuries at Uppsala University eventually came together under the same roof in 1932, under professor Carl Wiman's care at the then newly erected Palaeontology museum building. Today, about 300 fossils from the Bromell collection are preserved at the museum.

  • 25.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Malinky, J.M.
    A revision of Holm's late Mid and Late Cambrian hyoliths of Sweden1999In: Palaeontology, Vol. 42, p. 841-885Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    BERG-MADSEN, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    PEEL, John S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A TERGOMYAN MOLLUSC FROM THE UPPER CAMBRIAN OF WALES1994In: PALAEONTOLOGY, ISSN 0031-0239, Vol. 37, p. 505-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bellerophon cambriensis from the Upper Cambrian of North Wales is redescribed as the type species of the new genus Telamocornu. Unlike most similarly coiled molluscs of this age, apertural sinuses are present which permit both a functional morphological i

  • 27.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Valent, Martin
    Natl Museum, Dept Palaeontol, Cirkusova, Horni Pocernice, Czech Republic.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    An orthothecid hyolith with a digestive tract from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hyolith assemblage from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark, shows a higher diversity than contemporary assemblages in Baltoscandia. The most common species in the Green Shales (Laesa Formation, Norretorp Member, Cambrian Stage 3), is Hyolithes [=Hyolithus] (Orthotheca) johnstrupi Holm, 1893. A specimen of this species shows a well-preserved and almost complete digestive tract, folded into an approximately 22mm long chevron-like structure comprised of at least 20 arcuate loops on the ventral side and a flattened, gently sinuous to straight anal tube on the dorsal side. The thin, phosphatic outer shell layer of the conch is crushed under the digestive tract due to compaction while the digestive tract is preserved in three dimensions and appears undisturbed. The shape of the digestive tract is similar to that of the middle Cambrian Guduguwan hardmani (Etheridge) from Australia and the lower Cambrian specimens from Russia described by Mekova & Sysoev. The Danish specimen is probably an adult, lending support to the idea that the orthothecid digestive tract becomes more complex during ontogeny. Hyolithus (Orthotheca) johnstrupi is revised and here referred to Circotheca Sysoev, 1958.

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  • 28. Bergström, Sven
    et al.
    Olsen, Björn
    Burman, Nils
    Gothefors, Leif
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Molecular characterization of Borrelia burgdorferi isolated from Ixodes ricinus in northern Sweden.1992In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ixodes ricinus ticks, harbouring Borrelia burgdorferi, were found in an area in northern Sweden, not thought to be endemic for Lyme borreliosis. This investigation took place at Norrbyskär, an island situated in the Bothnian Gulf, 63 degrees 33'N/19 degrees 52'E. One of 42 nymphal and 8/43 adult I. ricinus ticks collected carried spirochetes as seen by phase contrast microscopy. Pure bacterial cultures were obtained from 2 of the ticks. Western blot analysis using species-specific monoclonal antibodies showed that the isolated spirochetes were B. burgdorferi. The identity of the isolated spirochetes was confirmed by DNA amplification using B. burgdorferi OspA and flagellin gene specific oligonucleotides as well as partial DNA sequencing of the respective OspA and flagellin genes. The 2 isolated spirochaete populations were different as shown by their protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gels. Moreover, the demonstration of Lyme borreliosis in a patient from the island of Norrbyskär indicates the need for clinical consideration of this disease in northern Sweden.

  • 29.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Donovan, Stephen K.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Suyarkova, Anna A.
    Yakupov, Rustem
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    New records of brachiopods and crinoids from the Silurian (Wenlock) of the southern Urals, Russia2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crinoids and brachiopods are described from the Silurian Uzyan Formation of the Zilair Zone in the southern Urals. The occurrence of the graptolites Coronograptus praedeubeli suggests a late Homerian (Wenlock) age for the strata. A new disparid crinoid, Cicerocrinus gracilis Donovan sp. nov., is the oldest known member of this genus. It has a long, flexible and homeomorphic column, and a tall bryozoan palaeontology terminology (IBr2) (second primibrachial) axillary. All species of Cicerocrinus described previously have been limited to the Ludlow of the British Isles, Sweden and Estonia, and the Pridoli of Estonia. The poorly preserved brachiopod fauna is represented by small atrypid (Atrypa? sp.) and dalmanellid brachiopods (Levenea? sp.). The reported assemblage generally inhabited deep-water environments.

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    SouthernUrals
  • 30.
    Boluda, C. G.
    et al.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain;Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Rico, V. J.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Divakar, P. K.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Nadyeina, O.
    Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Myllys, L.
    Univ Helsinki, Bot Museum, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, POB 7, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    McMullin, R. T.
    Canadian Museum Nat, Res & Collect, Ottawa, ON K1P 6P4, Canada.
    Zamora, Juan Carlos
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Scheidegger, C.
    Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Hawksworth, D. L.
    Nat Hist Museum, Dept Life Sci, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England;Royal Bot Gardens, Comparat Plant & Fungal Biol, Richmond TW9 3DS, Surrey, England.
    Evaluating methodologies for species delimitation: the mismatch between phenotypes and genotypes in lichenized fungi (Bryoria sect. Implexae, Parmeliaceae)2019In: Persoonia, ISSN 0031-5850, E-ISSN 1878-9080, Vol. 42, p. 75-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many lichen-forming fungi, molecular phylogenetic analyses lead to the discovery of cryptic species within traditional morphospecies. However, in some cases, molecular sequence data also questions the separation of phenotypically characterised species. Here we apply an integrative taxonomy approach - including morphological, chemical, molecular, and distributional characters - to re-assess species boundaries in a traditionally speciose group of hair lichens, Bryoria sect. Implexae. We sampled multilocus sequence and microsatellite data from 142 specimens from a broad intercontinental distribution. Molecular data included DNA sequences of the standard fungal markers ITS, IGS, GAPDH, two newly tested loci (FRBi15 and FRBi16), and SSR frequencies from 18 microsatellite markers. Datasets were analysed with Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic reconstruction, phenogram reconstruction, STRUCTURE Bayesian clustering, principal coordinate analysis, haplotype network, and several different species delimitation analyses (ABGD, PTP, GMYC, and DISSECT). Additionally, past population demography and divergence times are estimated. The different approaches to species recognition do not support the monophyly of the 11 currently accepted morphospecies, and rather suggest the reduction of these to four phylogenetic species. Moreover, three of these are relatively recent in origin and cryptic, including phenotypically and chemically variable specimens. Issues regarding the integration of an evolutionary perspective into taxonomic conclusions in species complexes, which have undergone recent diversification, are discussed. The four accepted species, all epitypified by sequenced material, are Bryoria fuscescens, B. glabra, B. kockiana, and B. pseudofuscescens. Ten species rank names are reduced to synonymy. In the absence of molecular data, they can be recorded as the B. fuscescens complex. Intraspecific phenotype plasticity and factors affecting the speciation of different morphospecies in this group of Bryoria are outlined.

  • 31.
    Borinder, Niclas H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Geol Survey Sweden, Fangvallsgatan 4, SE-75237 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Fac Sci & Technol, John St, Hawthorn, Vic 3122, Australia.;Australian Age Dinosaurs Museum Nat Hist, Lot 1 Dinosaur Dr,POB 408, Winton, Qld 4735, Australia.;Museums Victoria, Melbourne Museum, 11 Nicholson St, Carlton, Vic 3053, Australia..
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Univ New England, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia..
    Wigren, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Postcranial osteology of the basally branching hadrosauroid dinosaur Tanius sinensis from the Upper Cretaceous Wangshi Group of Shandong, China2021In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 41, no 1, article id e1914642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tanius sinensis was one of the first dinosaur species to be named from China. It was established on a partial skeleton recovered by a joint Sino-Swedish expedition in 1923. The fossils were excavated from Upper Cretaceous strata of the Jiangjunding Formation (Wangshi Group) in Shandong Province, and although their discovery dates back almost 100 years, they have not been reassessed in detail since their initial description in 1929. This omission is critical because T. sinensis is now recognized as one of the stratigraphically youngest non-hadrosaurid hadrosauroid taxa. Here, we re-evaluate the postcranial osteology of T. sinensis as a prelude to an anatomical and phylogenetic revision of the species. We examined the holotype and all currently referred specimens of T. sinensis first-hand, and identified a unique postcranial character state combination incorporating tall dorsal neural spines, a reduced postacetabular ridge on the ilium, a fully enclosed flexor tunnel formed by the distal condyles of the femur, and a lunate proximal end on metatarsal III. Comparisons with other species of Tanius confirm that: (1) T. chingkankouensis is a nomen dubium erected on non-diagnostic composite material; (2) T. laiyangensis was established on indeterminate hadrosaurid remains that are not attributable to Tanius; and (3) the anecdotal assignments of Bactrosaurus prynadai and Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus to Tanius cannot be substantiated. Close inspection of the holotype caudal vertebra further reveals a possible healed bite trace consistent with a prey-predator interaction. Lastly, our calculated average body mass estimate for T. sinensis of between 2091-3533 kg suggests that it was one of the largest non-hadrosaurid hadrosauroids.

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  • 32.
    Borinder, Niclas H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    Australian Age Dinosaurs Nat Hist Museum, Winton, Qld 4735, Australia.;Monash Univ, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Reassessment of the earliest documented stegosaurian fossils from Asia2016In: Cretaceous research (Print), ISSN 0195-6671, E-ISSN 1095-998X, Vol. 68, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1929, the famous Swedish palaeontologist Carl Wiman documented the first unequivocal stegosaurian dinosaur fossils from Asia. His material comprised an isolated dermal spine, together with a dorsal vertebra that was briefly described but never figured. Since then these remains have languished in obscurity, being noted in some stegosaur review articles but often ignored altogether. However, recent auditing of the Museum of Evolution palaeontological collection at Uppsala University in Sweden has led to the rediscovery of Wiman's original specimens, as well as two additional previously unrecognised stegosaurian dorsal vertebrae. All of these bones derive from the Lower Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) Mengyin Formation of Shandong Province in eastern China, and are morphologically compatible with the stratigraphically proximal stegosaurian taxon Wuerhosaurus from the Valanginian-Albian Tugulu Group in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of Western China. Wirnan's seminal stegosaurian fossils thus expand current palaeobiogeographical distributions, and contribute to the otherwise enigmatic record of Early Cretaceous stegosaurian occurrences.

  • 33. Broberg, Gunnar
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Anders Sparrman: Linnean, världsresenär, fattigläkare2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 34. Bungartz, Frank
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Grube, Ulrike
    Buellia2008In: Lichen Flora of the Greater Sonoran Desert Region, vol. 3., Arizona State University, Tempe: Lichens Unlimited , 2008, p. 113-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Byrne, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    During, Melanie A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Coprolite inclusions offer detailed insight into a post-Hangenberg crisis ecosystemManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Byrne, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Coprolite diversity reveals a cryptic ecosystem in an early Tournaisian lake in East Greenland: Implications for ecosystem recovery after the end-Devonian extinctio2022In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 605, article id 111215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early Tournaisian (Carboniferous) stage represents a key episode in the evolution of vertebrates. It follows the end-Devonian Hangenberg extinction event, which led to a major perturbation to both terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate ecosystems, and resulted in a significant restructuring of assemblages. However, few faunal associ-ations of this age have been described, and our understanding of faunal turnover across the Devonian -Carboniferous boundary remains poor. In this paper, we present an analysis of coprolite material from early Tournaisian lacustrine facies at Celsius Bjerg on Ymer o in East Greenland, which overlies the world-famous latest Devonian tetrapod-bearing localities. Fifty-five coprolite specimens (defined as a single coprolite or a piece of shale containing coprolites) were analysed using propagation phase-contrast synchrotron micro -tomography (PPC-SR mu CT). Through a study of external morphology, shape and size combined with information about internal structures, we categorise coprolite morphotypes, and interpret their origin. Notably, we identify a greater number of coprolite morphotypes compared to vertebrate taxa known from skeletal material, indicating the existence of a cryptic ecosystem that has not yet been recovered as body fossils. Vertebrate diversity in the immediate aftermath of the end-Devonian extinction is inferred to have been higher than expected, and might have included transient faunal elements within an open system, perhaps involving marine basin connections. Our results show that coprolites offer an alternative fossil data source, revealing diversity that is otherwise not always captured by the skeletal record.

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  • 37.
    Byrne, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    New tetrapod material from the terminal Famennian of East GreenlandManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Cao, Bin
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Microbiol, State Key Lab Mycol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Haelewaters, Danny
    Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.;Univ Ghent, Dept Biol, Res Grp Mycol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;Purdue Univ, Dept Bot & Plant Pathol, Coll Agr, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA..
    Schoutteten, Nathan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Biol, Res Grp Mycol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Begerow, Dominik
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Dept Geobotany, D-44801 Bochum, Germany..
    Boekhout, Teun
    Westerdijk Fungal Biodivers Inst, NL-3508 AD Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Amsterdam, Inst Biodivers & Ecosyst Dynam, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Giachini, Admir J.
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Microbiol, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Gorjón, Sergio P.
    Univ Salamanca, Dept Bot & Plant Physiol, Salamanca 37007, Spain..
    Gunde-Cimerman, Nina
    Univ Ljubljana, Biotechn Fac, Dept Biol, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Hyde, Kevin D.
    Mae Fah Luang Univ, Ctr Excellence Fungal Res, Chiang Rai 57100, Thailand.;Zhongkai Univ Agr & Engn, Innovat Inst Plant Hlth, Guangzhou 510225, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Bot, CAS Key Lab Plant Div & Biogeog East Asia, Kunming 650201, Yunnan, Peoples R China..
    Kemler, Martin
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Dept Geobotany, D-44801 Bochum, Germany..
    Li, Guo-Jie
    Hebei Agr Univ, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Vegetable, Coll Hort, Key Lab Vegetable Germplasm Innovat & Utilizat He, Baoding 071001, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Dong-Mei
    Chinese Res Inst Environm Sci, Inst Ecol, Beijing 100012, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Xin-Zhan
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Microbiol, State Key Lab Mycol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Nuytinck, Jorinde
    Univ Ghent, Dept Biol, Res Grp Mycol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;Naturalis Biodivers Ctr, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Papp, Viktor
    Hungarian Univ Agr & Life Sci, Inst Agron, Dept Bot, H-1518 Budapest, Hungary..
    Savchenko, Anton
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol Earth Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia..
    Savchenko, Kyryll
    Butler Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Indianapolis, IN 46219 USA..
    Tedersoo, Leho
    Univ Tartu, Ctr Mycol & Microbiol, 14a Ravila, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Theelen, Bart
    Westerdijk Fungal Biodivers Inst, NL-3508 AD Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Thines, Marco
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Goethe Univ, Inst Ecol & Div, Dept Biol Sci, D-60486 Frankfurt, Germany.;LOEWE Ctr Translat Biodivers Genom, D-60323 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Tomsovský, Michal
    Mendel Univ Brno, Fac Forestry & Wood Technol, Dept Forest Protect & Wildlife Management, Brno 61300, Czech Republic..
    Toome-Heller, Merje
    Plant Hlth & Environm Lab, Minist Primary Ind, Auckland 1140, New Zealand..
    Urón, Judith P.
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Microbiol, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Verbeken, Annemieke
    Univ Ghent, Dept Biol, Res Grp Mycol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Vizzini, Alfredo
    Univ Torino, Dept Sci Vita Biol Sistemi, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Yurkov, Andrey M.
    Leibniz Inst, German Collect Microorganisms & Cell Cultures, D-38124 Braunschweig, ME, Germany..
    Zamora, Juan Carlos
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Zhao, Rui-Lin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Microbiol, State Key Lab Mycol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing 101408, Peoples R China..
    Delimiting species in Basidiomycota: a review2021In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 181-237Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species delimitation is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. Biodiversity undertakings, for instance, require explicit species concepts and criteria for species delimitation in order to be relevant and translatable. However, a perfect species concept does not exist for Fungi. Here, we review the species concepts commonly used in Basidiomycota, the second largest phylum of Fungi that contains some of the best known species of mushrooms, rusts, smuts, and jelly fungi. In general, best practice is to delimitate species, publish new taxa, and conduct taxonomic revisions based on as many independent lines of evidence as possible, that is, by applying a so-called unifying (or integrative) conceptual framework. However, the types of data used vary considerably from group to group. For this reason we discuss the different classes of Basidiomycota, and for each provide: (i) a general introduction with difficulties faced in species recognition, (ii) species concepts and methods for species delimitation, and (iii) community recommendations and conclusions.

  • 39.
    Cederström, Peter
    et al.
    Axelvoldsvägen 27, SE-241 35 Eslöv, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Helcionelloid molluscs from Cambrian Series 2 strata in Sweden: Composition and stratigraphic implications2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40. Comstedt, Pär
    et al.
    Bergström, Sven
    Olsen, Björn
    Garpmo, Ulf
    Marjavaara, Lisette
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Barbour, Alan G.
    Bunikis, Jonas
    Migratory passerine birds as reservoirs of Lyme borreliosis in Europe2006In: Emerging Infect. Dis., Vol. 12, p. 1087-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Paraperonospora apiculata sp. nov.1996In: Sydowia, Vol. 48, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paraperonospora apiculata sp. nov., parasitic on Galatella (Asteraceae) collected from Kazakhstan, is described and illustrated. A key for the identification of Paraperonospora species is provided.

  • 42.
    Constantinescu, O
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Peronospora on Acaena (Rosaceae)1996In: MYCOTAXON, ISSN 0093-4666, Vol. 58, p. 313-318Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the examination of additional specimens, the rare Peronospora parasitic on Acaena is described, illustrated, and ascribed to Peronospora sparsa.

  • 43.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Plasmopara orientalis sp. nov. (Chromista, Peronosporales)2002In: Sydowia, Vol. 54, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmopara orientalis n. sp. parasitic on Schizopepon spp., and occasionally on Echinocystis lobata, is described and illustrated from specimens originating from Far East Russia, China and Japan. This fungus was previously confused with Plasmopara austral

  • 44.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Proposal to conserve the name Peronospora lunariae against Peronospora senecionis (Chromista, Peronosporales)2002In: Taxon, Vol. 51, p. 803-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The fine structure of the sporangium in Pseudoperonospora humuli (Chromista, Oomycota, Peronosporales)2000In: Cryptogamie, Mycologie, ISSN S0181158400001147/FLA, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultrastructure of the sporangium, particularly the dehiscence apparatus in Pseudoperonospora humuli is similar to the one described in P. cubensis. This similarity is considered an indication of the homogeneity of the genus Pseudoperonospora. The dehiscence apparatus in P humuli is also similar to those occurring in other closely related, and even more

    distant genera of Oomycota. The importance of the poroid condition in distinguishing Pseudoperonospora

    from Peronospora is emphasised. The dehiscence apparatus is considered as the most appropriate term for the structures present in genera of Oomycota having poroid dissemination

    organs.

  • 46.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The genus Chlorospora Spegazzini, an anamorphic fungus2002In: Sydowia, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The type specimen of the unispecific genus Chlorospora was examined. This fungus, considered either a member of the Chromista, Peronosporaceae, or of a doubtful systematic position, is shown to be based on the anamorphic fungus Harzia acremonioides.

  • 47.
    Constantinescu, O. & Fatehi, J.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. BOTANY SECTION, MUSEUM OF EVOLUTION.
    Peronospora-like fungi (Chromista, Peronosporales) parasitic on Brassicaceae and related hosts2002In: Nova Hedwigia, Vol. 74, no 3-4, p. 291-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Peronospora is emended and its type species, P. rumicis, is redescribed and illustrated. A new genus, Hyaloperonospora Constant., with 6 new combinations (H. floerkeae, H. lepidii-perfoliati, H. lunariae, H. niessleana, H. parasitica, and H. tri

  • 48.
    Constantinescu, O. & Negrean, G.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Peronospora on Fragaria1997In: Mycotaxon, Vol. 63, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of Peronospora on Fragaria, a previously disputed fungus-host association, is confirmed from collections in Romania. The fungus is described, illustrated, and ascribed to Peronospora sparsa

  • 49.
    Constantinescu, O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Mel'nik, V.A.
    Verkley, G.J.M.
    Two parasitic fungi on a new host, Syringa (Oleaceae)2006In: Mycotaxon, Vol. 94, p. 175-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thedgonia ligustrina, the agent of Ligustrum leaf-spot, and Gloeosporidiella turgida, known as a parasite of Fraxinus, are reported for the first time on Syringa spp. Both fungi were found in Sweden, the first in a tree nursery in the south, and the second on plants cultivated in Uppsala. Brief descriptions and illustration are provided and the distribution of T. ligustrina is reviewed.

  • 50.
    Constantinescu, O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Voglmayr, H.
    Fatehi, J.
    Thines, M.
    Plasmoverna gen nov., and the taxonomy and nomenclature of Plasmopara (Chromista, Peronosporales)2005In: Taxon, Vol. 54, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a review of the taxonomy and nomenclature of Plasmopara, it is concluded that this genus contains at least two groups of fungi that can be differentiated on both morphological and molecular grounds. In order to avoid numerous nomenclatural changes, the genus Plasmoverna with seven new combinations (Pv. pygmaea, Pv. alpina, Pv. anemones-dichotomae, Pv. anemones-ranunculoides, Pv. fusca, Pv. hellebori, and Pv. isopyrithalictroides) is introduced to accommodate the species parasitic on Ranunculaceae, which have so far often been referred to as Plasmopara pygmaea s.l. The lectotypification of Plasmopara with Pl. pygmaea, which has been accepted by most authors in recent times, is shown to have been superseded by typification with Pl. nivea. To ensure nomenclatural stability, the ambiguous Pl. nivea is neotypified, and Plasmopara is retained in its current use for the bulk of the species.

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