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  • 1.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Wolf, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Måns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Linnman, Clas
    Visualization of painful inflammation in patients with pain after traumatic ankle sprain using [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [(11)C]-D-deprenyl has shown increased signal at location of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic whiplash injury. The binding site of [(11)C]-D-deprenyl in peripheral tissues is suggested to be mitochondrial monoamine oxidase in cells engaged in post-traumatic inflammation and tissue repair processes. The association between [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake and the transition from acute to chronic pain remain unknown. Further imaging studies of musculoskeletal pain at the molecular level would benefit from establishing a clinical model in a common and well-defined injury in otherwise healthy and drug-naïve subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate if [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake would be acutely elevated in unilateral ankle sprain and if tracer uptake would be reduced as a function of healing, and correlated with pain localizations and pain experience.

    METHODS: Eight otherwise healthy patients with unilateral ankle sprain were recruited at the emergency department. All underwent [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase, at one month and 6-14 months after injury.

    RESULTS: Acute [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake at the injury site was a factor of 10.7 (range 2.9-37.3) higher than the intact ankle. During healing, [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake decreased, but did not normalize until after 11 months. Patients experiencing persistent pain had prolonged [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake in painful locations.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The data provide further support that [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET can visualize, quantify and follow processes in peripheral tissue that may relate to soft tissue injuries, inflammation and associated nociceptive signaling. Such an objective correlate would represent a progress in pain research, as well as in clinical pain diagnostics and management.

  • 2.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CTManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of etiological mechanisms of whiplash associated disorder is still inadequate. Objective visualization and quantification of peripheral musculoskeletal injury and possible painful inflammation in whiplash associated disorder would facilitate diagnosis, strengthen patients’ subjective pain reports and aid clinical decisions eventually leading to better treatments. In the current study, we further evaluated the potential to use [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT to visualize inflammation after whiplash injury. Sixteen patients with whiplash injury grade II were recruited at the emergency department and underwent [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase and at 6 months after injury. Subjective pain levels, self rated neck disability and active cervical range of motion were recorded at each imaging session. Results showed that the molecular aspects of inflammation and possible tissue injuries after acute whiplash injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. An altered [11C]D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self rated disability during both imaging occasions. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of affected peripheral structures in whiplash injury and strengthens the idea that PET/CT detectable organic lesions in peripheral tissue may be relevant for the development of persistent pain and disability in whiplash injury.

    Perspective: This article presents a novel way of objectively visualizing possible structural damage and inflammation that cause pain and disability in whiplash injury. This PET method can bring an advance in pain research and eventually would facilitate the clinical management of patients in pain.

  • 3.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 4.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome2016In: MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome, Springer, 2016, Vol. 7, Suppl. 1, article id B-0814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. Three MRI techniques were compared in demonstrating acute brain lesions.  Relationship of the anatomical distribution of the lesions in combination with clinical prognostic factors to outcome after 6 months was evaluated.  

    Methods and Materials: Thirty patients, aged 16-60 years (mean 31.2 years) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score = GMS < 6) were examined with MRI at 1.5T within one week after the injury. A diffusion-weighted (DW) sequence (SE-EPI, b value 1000 s/mm2), a T2*-weighted gradient echo (T2*GRE) sequence and a susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequence were evaluated by two independent reviewers with short and long neuroradiological experiences. Clinical outcome was assessed with Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE) after ≥ 6 months.

    Results: Interreviewer agreement for DAI classification was very good (ҡ 0.82 – 0.91) with all three sequences. SWI visualized more lesions than the T2*GRE or DW sequence.  In univariate analysis, number of DW lesions in the deep gray matter area including the internal capsules, number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon, age, and GMS at admission and discharge correlated significantly with poor outcome.  Multivariate analysis only revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.011) and lesions in the mesencephalic region including crura cerebri, substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p = 0.032).

    Conclusion: SWI is the most sensitive technique to visualize lesions in DAI. Age over 30 years and hemorrhagic mesencephalic lesions anterior to the tectum are indicators of poor long-term outcome in DAI.

  • 5.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structuresIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

  • 6.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Brekkan, Einar
    Häggman, Michael
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison.2018In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, article id 284185118780891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision. Purpose To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Material and Methods The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes. Results Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%). Conclusion Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

  • 7.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 8. Adam, A
    et al.
    Robison, J
    Lu, J
    Jose, R
    Badran, N
    Vivas-Buitrago, T
    Rigamonti, D
    Sattar, A
    Omoush, O
    Hammad, M
    Dawood, M
    Maghaslah, M
    Belcher, T
    Carson, K
    Hoffberger, J
    Jusué Torres, I
    Foley, S
    Yasar, S
    Thai, Q A
    Wemmer, J
    Klinge, P
    Al-Mutawa, L
    Al-Ghamdi, H
    Carson, K A
    Asgari, M
    de Zélicourt, D
    Kurtcuoglu, V
    Garnotel, S
    Salmon, S
    Balédent, O
    Lokossou, A
    Page, G
    Balardy, L
    Czosnyka, Z
    Payoux, P
    Schmidt, E A
    Zitoun, M
    Sevestre, M A
    Alperin, N
    Baudracco, I
    Craven, C
    Matloob, S
    Thompson, S
    Haylock Vize, P
    Thorne, L
    Watkins, L D
    Toma, A K
    Bechter, Karl
    Pong, A C
    Jugé, L
    Bilston, L E
    Cheng, S
    Bradley, W
    Hakim, F
    Ramón, J F
    Cárdenas, M F
    Davidson, J S
    García, C
    González, D
    Bermúdez, S
    Useche, N
    Mejía, J A
    Mayorga, P
    Cruz, F
    Martinez, C
    Matiz, M C
    Vallejo, M
    Ghotme, K
    Soto, H A
    Riveros, D
    Buitrago, A
    Mora, M
    Murcia, L
    Bermudez, S
    Cohen, D
    Dasgupta, D
    Curtis, C
    Domínguez, L
    Remolina, A J
    Grijalba, M A
    Whitehouse, K J
    Edwards, R J
    Eleftheriou, A
    Lundin, F
    Fountas, K N
    Kapsalaki, E Z
    Smisson, H F
    Robinson, J S
    Fritsch, M J
    Arouk, W
    Garzon, M
    Kang, M
    Sandhu, K
    Baghawatti, D
    Aquilina, K
    James, G
    Thompson, D
    Gehlen, M
    Schmid Daners, M
    Eklund, A
    Malm, J
    Gomez, D
    Guerra, M
    Jara, M
    Flores, M
    Vío, K
    Moreno, I
    Rodríguez, S
    Ortega, E
    Rodríguez, E M
    McAllister, J P
    Guerra, M M
    Morales, D M
    Sival, D
    Jimenez, A
    Limbrick, D D
    Ishikawa, M
    Yamada, S
    Yamamoto, K
    Junkkari, A
    Häyrinen, A
    Rauramaa, T
    Sintonen, H
    Nerg, O
    Koivisto, A M
    Roine, R P
    Viinamäki, H
    Soininen, H
    Luikku, A
    Jääskeläinen, J E
    Leinonen, V
    Kehler, U
    Lilja-Lund, O
    Kockum, K
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Riklund, K
    Söderström, L
    Hellström, P
    Laurell, K
    Kojoukhova, M
    Sutela, A
    Vanninen, R
    Vanha, K I
    Timonen, M
    Rummukainen, J
    Korhonen, V
    Helisalmi, S
    Solje, E
    Remes, A M
    Huovinen, J
    Paananen, J
    Hiltunen, M
    Kurki, M
    Martin, B
    Loth, F
    Luciano, M
    Luikku, A J
    Hall, A
    Herukka, S K
    Mattila, J
    Lötjönen, J
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Jurjević, I
    Miyajima, M
    Nakajima, M
    Murai, H
    Shin, T
    Kawaguchi, D
    Akiba, C
    Ogino, I
    Karagiozov, K
    Arai, H
    Reis, R C
    Teixeira, M J
    Valêncio, C G
    da Vigua, D
    Almeida-Lopes, L
    Mancini, M W
    Pinto, F C G
    Maykot, R H
    Calia, G
    Tornai, J
    Silvestre, S S S
    Mendes, G
    Sousa, V
    Bezerra, B
    Dutra, P
    Modesto, P
    Oliveira, M F
    Petitto, C E
    Pulhorn, H
    Chandran, A
    McMahon, C
    Rao, A S
    Jumaly, M
    Solomon, D
    Moghekar, A
    Relkin, N
    Hamilton, M
    Katzen, H
    Williams, M
    Bach, T
    Zuspan, S
    Holubkov, R
    Rigamonti, A
    Clemens, G
    Sharkey, P
    Sanyal, A
    Sankey, E
    Rigamonti, K
    Naqvi, S
    Hung, A
    Schmidt, E
    Ory-Magne, F
    Gantet, P
    Guenego, A
    Januel, A C
    Tall, P
    Fabre, N
    Mahieu, L
    Cognard, C
    Gray, L
    Buttner-Ennever, J A
    Takagi, K
    Onouchi, K
    Thompson, S D
    Thorne, L D
    Tully, H M
    Wenger, T L
    Kukull, W A
    Doherty, D
    Dobyns, W B
    Moran, D
    Vakili, S
    Patel, M A
    Elder, B
    Goodwin, C R
    Crawford, J A
    Pletnikov, M V
    Xu, J
    Blitz, A
    Herzka, D A
    Guerrero-Cazares, H
    Quiñones-Hinojosa, A
    Mori, S
    Saavedra, P
    Treviño, H
    Maitani, K
    Ziai, W C
    Eslami, V
    Nekoovaght-Tak, S
    Dlugash, R
    Yenokyan, G
    McBee, N
    Hanley, D F
    Abstracts from Hydrocephalus 2016.2017In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, ISSN 2045-8118, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 14, no Suppl 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Neyens, Veerle
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Old Age Psychiat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Goffin, Karolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75323 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Amyloid imaging in cognitively normal older adults: comparison between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Preclinical, or asymptomatic, Alzheimer's disease (AD) refers to the presence of positive AD biomarkers in the absence of cognitive deficits. This research concept is being applied to define target populations for clinical drug development. In a prospective community-recruited cohort of cognitively intact older adults, we compared two amyloid imaging markers within subjects: F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Methods In 32 community-recruited cognitively intact older adults aged between 65 and 80 years, we determined the concordance between binary classification based on F-18-flutemetamol versus C-11-PIB according to semiquantitative assessment (standardized uptake value ratio in composite cortical volume, SUVRcomp) and, alternatively, according to visual reads. We also determined the correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVR and evaluated how this was affected by the reference region chosen (cerebellar grey matter versus pons) and the use of partial volume correction (PVC) in this population. Results Binary classification based on semiquantitative assessment was concordant between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB in 94 % of cases. Concordance of blinded binary visual reads between tracers was 84 %. The Spearman correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVRcomp with cerebellar grey matter as reference region was 0.84, with a slope of 0.98. Correlations in neocortical regions were significantly lower with the pons as reference region. PVC improved the correlation in striatum and medial temporal cortex. Conclusion For the definition of preclinical AD based on F-18-flutemetamol, concordance with C-11-PIB was highest using semiquantitative assessment with cerebellar grey matter as reference region.

  • 10.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vanderstichele, Hugo M. J.
    ADx NeuroSci, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75125 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven Hosp, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Poesen, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Mol Neurobiomarker Res, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;UZ Leuven, Lab Med, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Diagnostic value of cerebrospinal fluid A beta ratios in preclinical Alzheimer's disease2015In: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, ISSN 0065-6755, E-ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 7, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In this study of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) we assessed the added diagnostic value of using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) A beta ratios rather than A beta 42 in isolation for detecting individuals who are positive on amyloid positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Thirty-eight community-recruited cognitively intact older adults (mean age 73, range 65-80 years) underwent F-18-flutemetamol PET and CSF measurement of A beta 1-42, A beta 1-40, A beta 1-38, and total tau (ttau). F-18-flutemetamol retention was quantified using standardized uptake value ratios in a composite cortical region (SUVRcomp) with reference to cerebellar grey matter. Based on a prior autopsy validation study, the SUVRcomp cut-off was 1.57. Sensitivities, specificities and cut-offs were defined based on receiver operating characteristic analysis with CSF analytes as variables of interest and F-18-flutemetamol positivity as the classifier. We also determined sensitivities and CSF cut-off values at fixed specificities of 90 % and 95 %. Results: Seven out of 38 subjects (18 %) were positive on amyloid PET. A beta 42/ttau, A beta 42/A beta 40, A beta 42/A beta 38, and A beta 42 had the highest accuracy to identify amyloid-positive subjects (area under the curve (AUC) >= 0.908). A beta 40 and A beta 38 had significantly lower discriminative power (AUC = 0.571). When specificity was fixed at 90 % and 95 %, A beta 42/ttau had the highest sensitivity among the different CSF markers (85.71 % and 71.43 %, respectively). Sensitivity of A beta 42 alone was significantly lower under these conditions (57.14 % and 42.86 %, respectively). Conclusion: For the CSF-based definition of preclinical AD, if a high specificity is required, our data support the use of A beta 42/ttau rather than using A beta 42 in isolation.

  • 11. Aguilar, Carlos
    et al.
    Edholm, Kaijsa
    Simmons, Andrew
    Cavallin, Lena
    Muller, Susanne
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Axelsson, Rimma
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Westman, Eric
    Automated CT-based segmentation and quantification of total intracranial volume2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 3151-3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an algorithm to segment and obtain an estimate of total intracranial volume (tICV) from computed tomography (CT) images.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six CT examinations from 18 patients were included. Ten patients were examined twice the same day and eight patients twice six months apart (these patients also underwent MRI). The algorithm combines morphological operations, intensity thresholding and mixture modelling. The method was validated against manual delineation and its robustness assessed from repeated imaging examinations. Using automated MRI software, the comparability with MRI was investigated. Volumes were compared based on average relative volume differences and their magnitudes; agreement was shown by a Bland-Altman analysis graph.

    RESULTS: We observed good agreement between our algorithm and manual delineation of a trained radiologist: the Pearson's correlation coefficient was r = 0.94, tICVml[manual] = 1.05 × tICVml[automated] - 33.78 (R(2) = 0.88). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 31 mL and a standard deviation of 30 mL over a range of 1265 to 1526 mL.

    CONCLUSIONS: tICV measurements derived from CT using our proposed algorithm have shown to be reliable and consistent compared to manual delineation. However, it appears difficult to directly compare tICV measures between CT and MRI.

    KEY POINTS: • Automated estimation of tICV is in good agreement with manual tracing. • Consistent tICV estimations from repeated measurements demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm. • Automatically segmented volumes seem less variable than those from manual tracing. • Unbiased and automated tlCV estimation is possible from CT.

  • 12.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekström, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sjöholm, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, E.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Hagmar, P.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Registration-based automated lesion detection and therapy evaluation of tumors in whole body PET-MR images2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28, no S5, article id 78PArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Ahmed, Adan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bemötande av barn på röntgen2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnen är oftast rädda och oroliga då de kommer till en röntgenundersökning på grund av att det är en främmande miljö utrustad med högteknologisk apparatur som är skrämmande för barnet. För att bemöta dessa barn behöver röntgensjuksköterskan ha kunskap och färdigheter om bemötande av barn. Ett bra samspel mellan röntgensjuksköterskan och barnen som bygger på ömsesidig tillit och respekt ger trygghet hos barnet och det kan samarbeta bättre under röntgenundersökningen. På en kort tid, ofta mindre än 5 minuter, måste en röntgensjuksköterska överföra viktig information om undersökningen till barnet. Därför är det viktigt för röntgensjuksköterskan att ha kunskap om gott bemötande av barn.

  • 14.
    Ali, Zafar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Jameel, Mohammad
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Kamal
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Fatima, Ambrin
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Baig, Shahid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Novel SACS mutations associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy and widespread supratentorial abnormalities2016In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 371, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe eight subjects from two consanguineous families segregating with autosomal recessive childhood onset spastic ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and intellectual disability. The degree of intellectual disability varied from mild to severe and all four affected individuals in one family developed aggressive behavior and epilepsy. Using exome sequencing, we identified two novel truncating mutations (c.2656C>T (p.Gln886*)) and (c.4756_4760delAATCA (p.Asn1586Tyrfs*3)) in the SACS gene responsible for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). MRI revealed typical cerebellar and pontine changes associated with ARSACS as well as multiple supratentorial changes in both families as likely contributing factors to the cognitive symptoms. Intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities have been reported in some cases of ARSACS but are not a part of the characteristic triad of symptoms that includes cerebellar ataxia, spasticity and peripheral neuropathy. Our combined findings bring further knowledge to the phenotypic spectrum, neurodegenerative changes and genetic variability associated with the SACS gene of clinical and diagnostic importance.

  • 15.
    Ali, Zafar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Zulfiqar, Shumaila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ullah, Farid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Ayaz
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Abdullah, Uzma
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Baig, Shahid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Homozygous GRID2 missense mutation predicts a shift in the D-serine binding domain of GluD2 in a case with generalized brain atrophy and unusual clinical features2017In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spinocerebellar ataxias comprise a large and heterogeneous group of disorders that may present with isolated ataxia, or ataxia in combination with other neurologic or non-neurologic symptoms. Monoallelic or biallelic GRID2 mutations were recently reported in rare cases with cerebellar syndrome and variable degree of ataxia, ocular symptoms, hypotonia and developmental delay.

    CASE PRESENTATION: We report on a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and delayed psychomotor development in three siblings. MRI of an adult and affected family member revealed slightly widened cerebral and cerebellar sulci, suggesting generalized brain atrophy, and mild cerebellar atrophy. Using whole exome sequencing we identified a novel homozygous missense variant [c.2128C > T, p.(Arg710Trp)] in GRID2 that segregates with the disease. The missense variant is located in a conserved region encoding the extracellular serine-binding domain of the GluD2 protein and predicts a change in conformation of the protein.

    CONCLUSION: The widespread supratentorial brain abnormalities, absence of oculomotor symptoms, increased peripheral muscle tone and the novel missense mutation add to the clinical and genetic variability in GRID2 associated cerebellar syndrome. The neuroradiological findings in our family indicate a generalized neurodegenerative process to be taken into account in other families segregating complex clinical features and GRID2 mutations.

  • 16.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Perols, Anna
    Tsourma, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Robillard, Marc
    Rossin, Raffaella
    Ten Hoeve, Wolter
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting2016In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules constitute a new class of probes for radionuclide tumor targeting. The small size of affibody molecules is favorable for rapid localization in tumors and clearance from circulation. However, high renal re-absorption of affibody molecules prevents the use of residualizing radiometals, including a number of promising low energy beta- and alpha-emitters, for radionuclide therapy. We tested a hypothesis that affibody-based pretargeting mediated by a bioorthogonal interaction between trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine would provide higher accumulation of radiometals in tumor xenografts than in the kidneys.

    Methods:

    TCO was conjugated to the anti-HER2 affibody molecule Z2395. DOTA-tetrazine was labeled with indium-111 and lutetium-177. In vitro pretargeting was studied in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 and BT474 cell lines. In vivo studies were performed on BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts.

    Results:

    125I-Z2395-TCO bound specifically to HER2-expressing cells in vitro with an affinity of 45±16 pM. 111In-tetrazine bound specifically and selectively to Z2395-TCO pre-treated cells. In vivo studies demonstrated HER2-specific 125I-Z2395-TCO accumulation in xenografts. TCO-mediated 111In-tetrazine localization was shown in tumors, when the radiolabeled tracer was injected 4 h after an injection of Z2395-TCO. At 1 h post injection, the tumor uptake of 111In-tetrazine and 177Lu-tetrazine was ca. 2-fold higher than the renal uptake. Pretargeting provided more than a 56-fold reduction of renal uptake of 111In in comparison with direct targeting.

    Conclusion:

    The feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated pretargeting was demonstrated. The use of pretargeting provides a substantial reduction of radiometal accumulation in kidneys, creating preconditions for palliative radionuclide therapy.

  • 17.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Tsourma, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Preclin PET Platform, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Perols, A.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robillard, M.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Rossin, R.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    ten Hoeve, W.
    Syncom BV, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Karlstrom, A. Eriksson
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting: proof-of-principle2015In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 42, no S1, p. S246-S246Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Oncol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Patient experience of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a mask fixation2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, p. S666-S666Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Silvia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Patient Experience of an 18F-FDG-PET/CT Examination:: Need for Improvements in Patient Care2015In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 100-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate the patients' knowledge about and experience of an 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) examination and to investigate the self-reported feelings of stress, level of physical activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to find out if this was related to how they experienced the examination. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect information on 198 patients with known or suspected malignancy. As many as 32% to 63% were satisfied with the nursing staff, the communication, and the professional skills. Most patients did not know beforehand what an FDG-PET/CT examination was. The HRQoL, level of perceived stress, and physical activity were relatively low. A better HRQoL, lower level of perceived stress, and a higher level of physical activity were correlated to a more positive experience and higher education to more knowledge about the examination (p < .01–.05). The information before the examination needs to be improved. The results may be used to improve patient care and optimize imaging procedures.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Silvia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Häkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Assessment of Whether Patients' Knowledge, Satisfaction, and Experience Regarding Their 18F-Fluoride PET/CT Examination Affects Image Quality.2016In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology, ISSN 0091-4916, E-ISSN 1535-5675, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 21-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ previous knowledge, satisfaction and experience regarding a (18F)-fluoride positron emission tomography / computed tomography examination ((18F)-fluoride PET/CT) and to explore whether experienced discomfort during the examination or pain was associated with reduced image quality. A further aim was to explore whether patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was associated with their satisfaction and experiences of the examination. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with a histopathological diagnosis of prostate cancer who were scheduled for (18F)-fluoride PET/CT were asked to participate in the study, which was performed between November 2011 and April 2013. A questionnaire was used to collect information regarding the patients’ previous knowledge and experience of the examination. Image quality assessment was performed according to an arbitrary scale. The EORTC-QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25 were used to assess HRQoL. Results: Forty-six patients (96%) completed the questionnaires. Twenty-six per cent of participants did not know at all what a (18F)-fluoride PET/CT examination was. The majority (52-70%) were to a very high degree satisfied with the care provided by the nursing staff but less satisfied with the information given prior to the examination. The image quality was similar in patients who were exhausted or claustrophobic during the examination and those who were not. No correlations between HRQoL and the participants’ experience of (18F)-fluoride PET/CT were found. Conclusion: The majority of participants were satisfied with the care provided by the nursing staff, but there is still room for improvement especially regarding the information prior to the examination. Long examination time may be strenuous, for the patient but there was no difference in image quality between patients who felt discomfort during the examination or pain and those who did not.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Röing, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Ehrsson, Ylva Tiblom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    It's a question of endurance: patients with head and neck cancer experiences of 18F-FDG PET/CT in a fixation mask2017In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 29, p. 85-90, article id S1462-3889(17)30082-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore how patients with head and neck cancer experienced undergoing an (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positrons emissions tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) examination in a fixation mask.

    METHOD: Interviews were conducted with nine patients with known or suspected head and neck cancer who were scheduled for the examination for the first time. The phenomenological method according to van Manen and his four lifeworld existentials; lived space, lived body, lived time, and lived relation was used to analyse the interviews.

    RESULTS: The thoughts and feelings of the patients during the PET/CT examination varied, some found it very difficult, while others did not. However, for all the patients, it was an experience that required some form of coping to maintain composure for example distraction.

    CONCLUSIONS: PET/CT examnation in a fixation mask may be strenuous for some patients. Patients need more detailed information, including suggestions for coping behaviours, prior to the examination, as well as higher level of support during and after the examination. The results of this study may be used to improve patient care and optimize the procedure of PET/CT examination in a fixation mask.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Trampal Pulido, Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Effects of web-based information on patient satisfaction and image quality in patients undergoing an 18F-FDG PET/CT examination: a randomized controlled trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Andersson, Jonathan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Water-fat separation incorporating spatial smoothing is robust to noise.2018In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 50, p. 78-83, article id S0730-725X(18)30040-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To develop and evaluate a noise-robust method for reconstruction of water and fat images for spoiled gradient multi-echo sequences.

    METHODS: The proposed method performs water-fat separation by using a graph cut to minimize an energy function consisting of unary and binary terms. Spatial smoothing is incorporated to increase robustness to noise. The graph cut can fail to find a solution covering the entire image, in which case the relative weighting of the unary term is iteratively increased until a complete solution is found. The proposed method was compared to two previously published methods. Reconstructions were performed on 16 cases taken from the 2012 ISMRM water-fat reconstruction challenge dataset, for which reference reconstructions were provided. Robustness towards noise was evaluated by reconstructing images with different levels of noise added. The percentage of water-fat swaps were calculated to measure performance.

    RESULTS: At low noise levels the proposed method produced similar results to one of the previously published methods, while outperforming the other. The proposed method significantly outperformed both of the previously published methods at moderate and high noise levels.

    CONCLUSION: By incorporating spatial smoothing, an increased robustness towards noise is achieved when performing water-fat reconstruction of spoiled gradient multi-echo sequences.

  • 24.
    Ange Marie, Ingabire
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Mina, Narmashiri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    För och nackdelar med CT lågdos protokoll: En kvalitativ litteraturstudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Antal röntgenundersökningar som utförs med Computer Tomografi (CT) ökar ständigt i sjukvården, vilket har lett till en ökad mängd farlig strålning som patienter och vårdpersonal utsätts för och därmed följer en rad risker. Därför är det eftersträvansvärt att minimera denna stråldos men även bibehålla bildkvalité och diagnostisk säkerhet. Detta kommer dock med en mängd utmaningar som kräver nya tekniker och protokoll. För att dessa ska appliceras korrekt krävs även att den ansvariga vårdpersonalen besitter god kunskap inom området. 

    Syfte: Syfte med denna studie är att beskriva fördelar och nackdelar med lågdos CT (LDCT) vid buk undersökningar.

    Metod: Den systematiska litteraturstudien sammanställer vetenskapliga artiklar från bland annat PubMed vars kvantitativa eller kvalitativa svar anses kunna besvara den kvalitativa frågeställningen. 

    Resultat: Lågdosprotokoll för CT ger i många fall en liknande diagnostisk säkerhet som konventionell CT samtidigt som dosen sänks kraftigt. Dock begränsas effektiviteten av lågdosprotokollen för bukundersökningar i fall där patienten är överviktig och kan ibland inte appliceras alls om de patologiska fenomenen är för små. Överlag överväger fördelarna med lågdos CT dess nackdelar i de flesta fall.

    Slutsats: Resultatet har visat att lågdos CT kan uppnå samma diagnostiska säkerhet som CT undersökningar med standarddos. Vårdpersonal bör dock vara medveten om begränsningarna med lågdosprotokollen för att undvika risken för upprepning av undersökningar. Mer forskning kring ämnet kan potentiellt driva ner stråldosen ytterligare och med bättre kunskap bland personalen kan diagnoser ställas korrekt och risken för strålskador med CT kan minimeras.  

  • 25.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis Clewemar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Olofsson, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Neuroendocrine tumors with syndromic vasoactive intestinal polypeptide hypersecretion: a retrospective study2017In: International Journal of Endocrine Oncology, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide producing neuroendocrine tumors are rare and cause severe hormonal symptoms. Patients/methods: Eighteen patients with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide producing neuroendocrine tumors were analyzed with reviews of medical records, radiology and tumor tissue specimens. Results: Twelve patients (67%) had liver metastases at diagnosis. Chemotherapy, somatostatin analogs and interferon were given as medical therapies. Streptozocin/5-fluorouracil produced an objective response in 40% of the evaluable patients. Somatostatin analogs gave a clinical/biochemical response in eight out of nine patients. Transarterial embolization of the liver and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy was given to refractory cases. Sixteen patients died during the observation period. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 102 months. Conclusion: Systemic chemotherapy and somatostatin analogs should be given in cases of advanced disease or for hormonal symptoms.

  • 26.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Streptozocin and 5-FU for the treatment of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Efficacy, Prognostic Factors and Toxicity2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 103, no 3-4, p. 345-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In our center, the combination of streptozocin (STZ) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been used as the first-line treatment in the majority of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) over the past few decades. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy, prognostic factors and safety of the combination of STZ and 5-FU.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical records and radiological reports of 133 patients with pNETs who received the combination of STZ and 5-FU during the period 1981-2014 were retrospectively evaluated.

    RESULTS: Median survival from start of treatment was 51.9 months in the whole group. In the radiologically evaluable patients (n = 100) progression-free survival was 23 months. Complete response was reached in 3 patients (3%), partial response in 25 patients (25%), 64 patients (64%) had stable disease and 8 patients (8%) had progressive disease. In a multivariate analysis, surgery of the primary tumor and having a G3 tumor were significant positive and negative prognostic factors of survival from start of treatment, respectively. Having either a G3 tumor or stage IV tumor were significant prognostic factors for shorter progression-free survival. Chemotherapy had to be discontinued in 29 patients due to side-effects, of which kidney toxicity (mainly grade 1-2) was the most frequent.

    CONCLUSION: As shown in recent reports, the combination of STZ and 5-FU is effective in the treatment of pNETs in terms of survival and radiological response, and has an acceptable toxicity profile.

  • 27.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jonasson, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Danfors, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Askmark, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Use of C-11-PE2I PET in Differential Diagnosis of Parkinsonian Disorders2015In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In idiopathic Parkinson disease and atypical parkinsonian disorders, central dopaminergic and overall brain functional activity are altered to different degrees, causing difficulties in achieving an unambiguous clinical diagnosis. A dual examination using I-123-FP-CIT (I-123-N-omega-fluoropropyl- 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane, or I-123-ioflupane) SPECT and F-18-FDG PET provides complementary information on dopamine transporter (DAT) availability and overall brain functional activity, respectively. Parametric images based on a single, dynamic C-11-PE2I (N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-methyl-phenyl) nortropane) scan potentially supply both DAT availability (nondisplaceable binding potential [BPND]) and relative cerebral blood flow (relative delivery [R-1]) at voxel level. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of C-11-PE2I PET against the dual-modality approach using I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET.

    Methods: Sixteen patients with parkinsonian disorders had a dual examination with F-18-FDG PET and I-123-FP-CIT SPECT following clinical routines and additionally an experimental C-11-PE2I PET scan. Parametric BPND and R-1 images were generated using receptor parametric mapping with the cerebellum as a reference. T1-weighted MR imaging was used for automated definition of volumes of interest (VOI). The DAT VOIs included the basal ganglia, whereas the overall brain functional activity was examined using VOIs across the brain. BPND and R-1 values were compared with normalized I-123-FP-CIT and F-18-FDG uptake values, respectively, using Pearson correlations and regression analyses. In addition, 2 masked interpreters evaluated the images visually, in both the routine and the experimental datasets, for comparison of patient diagnoses.

    Results: Parametric C-11-PE2I BPND and R-1 images showed high consistency with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET images. Correlations between C-11-PE2I BPND and I-123-FP-CIT uptake ratios were 0.97 and 0.76 in the putamen and caudate nucleus, respectively. Regional C-11-PE2I R-1 values were moderately to highly correlated with normalized F-18-FDG values (range, 0.61-0.94). Visual assessment of DAT availability showed a high consistency between C-11-PE2I BPND and I-123-FP-CIT images, whereas the consistency was somewhat lower for appraisal of overall brain functional activity using I-123-FP-CIT and F-18-FDG images. Substantial differences were found between clinical diagnosis and both neuro-imaging diagnoses.

    Conclusion: A single, dynamic C-11-PE2I PET investigation is a powerful alternative to a dual examination with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT and F-18-FDG PET for differential diagnosis of parkinsonian disorders. A large-scale patient study is, however, needed to further investigate distinct pathologic patterns in overall brain functional activity for various parkinsonian disorders.

  • 28.
    Axbåge, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Werner, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Mobil Radiologi: Radiologins Roll i Samhället2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 29.
    Badoud, Simon
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Fribourg CH, Neurophysiol Unit, Dept Med, Fribourg, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Nicastro, Nicolas
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Garibotto, Valentina
    Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.;Geneva Univ Hosp, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Unit, Dept Med Imaging, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Burkhard, Pierre R.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Neurol Unit, Dept Clin Neurosci, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.;Ctr Diagnost Radiolog Carouge, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Hosp Freiburg, Dept Neuroradiol, Freiburg, Germany..
    Distinct spatiotemporal patterns for disease duration and stage in Parkinson's disease2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 509-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To assess correlations between the degree of dopaminergic depletion measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and different clinical parameters of disease progression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods This retrospective study included 970 consecutive patients undergoing I-123-ioflupane SPECT scans in our institution between 2003 and 2013, from which we selected a study population of 411 patients according to their clinical diagnosis: 301 patients with PD (69.4 +/- 11.0 years, of age, 163 men) and 110 patients with nondegenerative conditions included as controls (72.7 +/- 8.0 years of age, 55 men). Comprehensive and operator-independent data analysis included spatial normalization into standard space, estimation of the mean uptake values in the striatum (caudate nucleus + putamen) and voxel-wise correlation between SPECT signal intensity and disease stage as well as disease duration in order to investigate the spatiotemporal pattern of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration. To compensate for potential interactions between disease stage and disease duration, one parameter was used as nonexplanatory coregressor for the other. Results Increasing disease stage was associated with an exponential decrease in I-123-ioflupane uptake (R (2) = 0.1501) particularly in the head of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001), whereas increasing disease duration was associated with a linear decrease in I-123-ioflupane uptake (p < 0.0001; R (2) = 0.1532) particularly in the contralateral anterior putamen (p < 0.0001). Conclusion We observed two distinct spatiotemporal patterns of posterior to anterior dopaminergic depletion associated with disease stage and disease duration in patients with PD. The developed operator-independent reference database of 411 I-123-ioflupane SPECT scans can be used for clinical and research applications.

  • 30. Badoud, Simon
    et al.
    Van De Ville, Dimitri
    Nicastro, Nicolas
    Garibotto, Valentina
    Burkhard, Pierre R
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Discriminating among degenerative parkinsonisms using advanced (123)I-ioflupane SPECT analyses2016In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 12, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (123)I-ioflupane single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive and well established imaging tool in Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS), yet a discrimination between PD and APS has been considered inconsistent at least based on visual inspection or simple region of interest analyses. We here reappraise this issue by applying advanced image analysis techniques to separate PD from the various APS. This study included 392 consecutive patients with degenerative parkinsonism undergoing (123)I-ioflupane SPECT at our institution over the last decade: 306 PD, 24 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 32 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 30 corticobasal degeneration (CBD) patients. Data analysis included voxel-wise univariate statistical parametric mapping and multivariate pattern recognition using linear discriminant classifiers. MSA and PSP showed less ioflupane uptake in the head of caudate nucleus relative to PD and CBD, yet there was no difference between MSA and PSP. CBD had higher uptake in both putamen relative to PD, MSA and PSP. Classification was significant for PD versus APS (AUC 0.69, p < 0.05) and between APS subtypes (MSA vs CBD AUC 0.80, p < 0.05; MSA vs PSP AUC 0.69 p < 0.05; CBD vs PSP AUC 0.69 p < 0.05). Both striatal and extra-striatal regions contain classification information, yet the combination of both regions does not significantly improve classification accuracy. PD, MSA, PSP and CBD have distinct patterns of dopaminergic depletion on (123)I-ioflupane SPECT. The high specificity of 84-90% for PD versus APS indicates that the classifier is particularly useful for confirming APS cases.

  • 31.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Incomplete hippocampal inversion does not affect hippocampal volume in neurologically healthy subjects.2017In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. Suppl1, p. S31-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Incomplete hippocampal inversion in patients with focal epilepsy without known etiology and focal MRI abnormalities.2016In: Neuroradiology Vol 58: Suppl.1, Springer, 2016, Vol. 58, p. S21-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion in patients with focal epilepsy without known etiology and focal MRI abnormalities

    PURPOSE: Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) is more common in patients with epilepsy than in subjects without epilepsy but is probably not an etiological factor. IHI frequency varies in different types of epilepsy. Our purpose was to evaluate the hippocampi of patients having focal epilepsy with unknown etiology and without focal abnormalities on MRI (EPue).

    METHODS: MRIs of 58 patients with EPue and 147 neurologically healthy controls were evaluated. Hippocampal volumetry could be performed in 54 of the patients. 47 controls, preferably those having IHI, were chosen for volumetry. The findings were compared with seizure semiology and EEG findings.

    RESULTS: 30/58 patients (52%) had IHI (18 left, 12 bilateral). 28/147 controls (19%) had IHI (20 left, 8 bilateral) (p<0.001). In subjects studied with volumetry, 27/54 patients (50%) and 23/47 selected controls (49%) had IHI. In patients, IHI was found on the left in 15 and bilaterally in 12. In controls, the numbers were 16 and 5, respectively. The left hippocampus was smaller in 48 patients and in 46 controls.  Asymmetry index (AI) was >0.10 in 16 patients (30%) and in 3 controls (6.5%) (p<0.01).  Among 10 patients having IHI and AI >0.10, six had temporal lobe semiology. One of them had bilateral IHI, 5 had IHI on the left. EEG foci were ipsilateral to IHI in 3, contralateral in 2.

    CONCLUSIONS: IHI was significantly more common in EPue patients than in controls. Hippocampal volume asymmetry was more prominent in the patients. Temporal semiology and EEG focus were not obviously related to IHI.

  • 33.
    Bannbers, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Morell, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sylvén, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kask, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Prefrontal activity during response inhibition decreases over time in postpartum womenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Barnaure, I.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Div Neuroradiol, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Montandon, M-L.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Rodriguez, C.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Herrmann, F.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Internal Med, Geneva, Switzerland; Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Rehabil, Geneva, Switzerland; Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Geriatr, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lövblad, K. O.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Div Neuroradiol, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Giannakopoulos, P.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Mental Hlth & Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Hosp Freiburg, Dept Neuroradiol, Freiburg, Germany; Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Clinicoradiologic Correlations of Cerebral Microbleeds in Advanced Age2017In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 38, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The presence of cerebral microbleeds has been associated with dementia and cognitive decline, although studies report conflicting results. Our aim was to determine the potential role of the presence and location of cerebral microbleeds in early stages of cognitive decline.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline 3T MR imaging examinations including SWI sequences of 328 cognitively intact community-dwelling controls and 72 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were analyzed with respect to the presence and distribution of cerebral microbleeds. A neuropsychological follow-up of controls was performed at 18 months post inclusion and identified cases with subtle cognitive deficits were referred to as controls with a deteriorating condition. Group differences in radiologic parameters were studied by using nonparametric tests, 1-way analysis of variance, and Spearman correlation coefficients.

    RESULTS: Cerebral microbleed prevalence was similar in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and controls with stable and cognitively deteriorating conditions (25%-31.9%). In all diagnostic groups, lobar cerebral microbleeds were more common. They occurred in 20.1% of all cases compared with 6.5% of cases with deep cerebral microbleeds. None of the investigated variables (age, sex, microbleed number, location and depth, baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score, and the Fazekas score) were significantly associated with cognitive deterioration with the exception of education of >12 years showing a slight but significant protective effect (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92; P = .028). The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Buschke total score were correlated with neither the total number nor lobar-versus-deep location of cerebral microbleeds.

    CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral microbleed presence, location, and severity are not related to the early stages of cognitive decline in advanced age.

  • 35.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Örndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Comparison of left ventricular volumes and regurgitant volumes by echocardiography and magnetic resonance in patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, p. 1239-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Batista Borges, João
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory. Univ Sao Paulo, Hosp Clin, Pulm Div Heart Inst InCor, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    The "normal" ventilated airspaces suffer the most damaging effects of mechanical ventilation2017In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1057-1058Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37. Bense, László
    et al.
    Eklund, Gunnar
    Jorulf, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Farkas, Árpád
    Eden-Strindberg, Jerker
    Gennser, Mikael
    Jókay, Ágnes
    Krebsz, Ádám
    Pulmonary gas conducting interstitial pathway.2015In: Acta radiologica open, ISSN 2058-4601, Vol. 4, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of the growing efforts oriented towards revealing different aspects of emphysema, the persistence of the emphysematous or emphysema-like changes (ELCs) is not explored yet in the open literature. In this study we demonstrate the persistence of an ELC for 22 years in a spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) patient which indicates a hitherto unknown gas supply to the ELC. For this purpose we used high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images processed into three-dimensional (3D) geometry. By the same token, not only a long persistence but also the volume increase of this ELC between 2002 and 2010 was demonstrated. The 3D geometry visualized an aerated interstitial structure between the sites of supposed gas leakage at the wall of the third generation airways and the ELC. This potential gas conducting interstitial pathway is not a continuation and has neither the form nor the structure of a bronchus. The finding suggests that in this patient the intrabronchial gas passes through the bronchial wall and via a gas conducting interstitial pathway reaches the ELC. Despite the availability of the presently employed techniques for at least 15 years, such case and phenomenon have not been described previously. The retrieval of the patient suggests that the findings could be relevant for a considerable proportion of the population.

  • 38. Bergström, G
    et al.
    Berglund, G
    Blomberg, A
    Brandberg, J
    Engström, G
    Engvall, J
    Eriksson, M
    de Faire, U
    Flinck, A
    Hansson, Mats G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hedblad, B
    Hjelmgren, O
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jernberg, T
    Johnsson, Å
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Melander, O
    Östgren, C J
    Persson, A
    Persson, M
    Sandström, A
    Schmidt, C
    Söderberg, S
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Toren, K
    Waldenström, A
    Wedel, H
    Vikgren, J
    Fagerberg, B
    Rosengren, A
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 39. Bertella, E
    et al.
    Baggiano, A
    Petulla', M
    Mushtaq, S
    Beltrama, V
    Gripari, P
    Conte, E
    Russo, E
    Andreini, D
    Pontone, G
    Soukka, I
    Maaniitty, T
    Saraste, A
    Uusitalo, V
    Ukkonen, H
    Kajander, S
    Maki, M
    Bax, J
    Knuuti, J
    De Graaf, M A
    Caselli, C
    Lorenzoni, V
    Rovai, D
    Marinelli, M
    Del Ry, S
    Giannessi, D
    Bax, J J
    Scholte, A J
    Neglia, D
    Thackeray, J T
    Korf-Klingebiel, M
    Wang, Y
    Kustikova, O
    Bankstahl, J P
    Wollert, K C
    Bengel, F M
    Harms, H J
    Tolbod, L P
    Hansson, N H
    Kim, W Y
    Bouchelouche, K
    Wiggers, H
    Frokiaer, J
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Maaniitty, T
    Stenstrom, I
    Saraste, A
    Uusitalo, V
    Ukkonen, H
    Kajander, S
    Maki, M
    Bax, J
    Knuuti, J
    Young Investigator Award Competition: Sunday 3 May 2015, 082015In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16 Suppl 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Björk, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Zachariah, Dave
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Stoica, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    A multicomponent T2 relaxometry algorithm for myelin water imaging of the brain2016In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 390-402Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Björkstam, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wärre, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    DT-colon: -En enkätundersökning om hur patienterna upplever informationen inför och under en DT-colonundersökning2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many patients who participate in CT-colonography find the preparations and the examination itself to be hard. A plain and well written information letter, as well as good communication and patient-centered care from the hospital staff could make the patient experience better.

    Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate how patients from two different hospitals perceive both the information letter and the oral information from the staff and compare to each other.

    Method: The study is a qualitative study. Patients have been asked to fill out a survey at the end of their examination. The patients have been strategically selected, inclusion- and exclusion criterias have been adapted. The result of the survey has been analyzed in SPSS.

    Results: In general the patients were pleased with the information letter. The patients at hospital B were to some extent more satisfied than the patients at hospital A. The majority of the patients from both hospitals were satisfied with the information from the hospital staff. Although the result showed some percentage difference between the hospitals, no significant difference was shown.  

    Conclusion: Overall the participants of the study were satisfied with both the information letter and the information from the hospital staff. Although there were no significant differences, the result showed that the patients from hospital B were more satisfied than the patients from hospital A in all senses.

  • 42.
    Björkstrand, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ågren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, p. e0129393-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear. We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

  • 43.
    Björkstrand, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ågren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hjorth, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Disrupting Reconsolidation Attenuates Long-Term Fear Memory in the Human Amygdala and Facilitates Approach Behavior2016In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 26, no 19, p. 2690-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memories become labile and malleable to modification when recalled [1]. Fear-conditioning experiments in both rodents and humans indicate that amygdala-localized short-term fear memories can be attenuated by disruption of their reconsolidation with extinction training soon after memory activation [2-7]. However, this may not be true for natural long-term fears. Studies in rodents indicate that although it is possible to disrupt the reconsolidation of older memories [8-11], they appear to be more resistant [1, 3, 9, 12, 13]. In humans, 1-week-old conditioned fear memories have been attenuated by behaviorally induced disruption of reconsolidation [14], but it remains to be seen whether this is possible for naturally occurring long-term fears and whether the underlying neural mechanisms are similar to those found in experimental fear-conditioning paradigms. Using functional brain imaging in individuals with a lifelong fear of spiders, we show that fear memory activation followed by repeated exposure to feared cues after 10 min, which disrupts reconsolidation, attenuates activity in the basolateral amygdala at re-exposure 24 hr later. In contrast, repeated exposure 6 hr after fear memory activation, which allows for reconsolidation, did not attenuate amygdala activity. Disrupted, but not undisrupted, reconsolidation facilitated approach behavior to feared cues, and approach behavior was inversely related to amygdala activity during re-exposure. We conclude that memory activation immediately preceding exposure attenuates the neural and behavioral expression of decades-old fear memories and that, similar to experimentally induced fear memories, the basolateral amygdala is crucially involved in this process.

  • 44.
    Björkstrand, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ågren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hjorth, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Think twice, it's all right: Long lasting effects of disrupted reconsolidation on brain and behavior in human long-term fear2017In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 324, p. 125-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memories can be modified when recalled. Experimental fear conditioning studies support that amygdala-localized fear memories are attenuated when reconsolidation is disrupted through extinction training immediately following memory activation. Recently, using functional brain imaging in individuals with lifelong spider fears, we demonstrated that fear memory activation followed by repeated exposure to feared cues after 10 min, thereby disrupting reconsolidation, attenuated activity in the amygdala during later re-exposure, and also facilitated approach behavior to feared cues. In contrast, repeated exposure 6 h after fear memory activation, allowing for reconsolidation, did not attenuate amygdala activity and resulted in less approach behavior as compared to the group that received disrupted reconsolidation. We here evaluated if these effects are stable after 6 months and found that amygdala activity was further reduced in both groups, with a tendency towards greater reductions in the 10 min than the 6 h group. Hence, disrupted reconsolidation results in long lasting attenuation of amygdala activity. The behavioral effect, with more approach towards previously feared cues, in the 10 min than the 6 h group also persisted. Thus, the brain effect of disrupted reconsolidation is stable over 6 months and the behavioral effect also remained. We therefore conclude that disrupted reconsolidation result in a long-lasting diminished fear memory representation in the amygdala which may have clinical importance.

  • 45. Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Håkansson, I
    Tisell, A
    Ernerudh, J
    Smedby, Örjan
    Lundberg, P
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Quantitative MRI for Analysis of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions without Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent2016In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions are important markers of active inflammation in the diagnostic work-up of MS and in disease monitoring with MR imaging. Because intravenous contrast agents involve an expense and a potential risk of adverse events, it would be desirable to identify active lesions without using a contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-contrast injection tissue-relaxation rates and proton density of MS lesions, by using a new quantitative MR imaging sequence, can identify active lesions.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of MS were studied. MR imaging with a standard clinical MS protocol and a quantitative MR imaging sequence was performed at inclusion (baseline) and after 1 year. ROIs were placed in MS lesions, classified as nonenhancing or enhancing. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, as well as proton density were obtained from the quantitative MR imaging sequence. Statistical analyses of ROI values were performed by using a mixed linear model, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic analysis.

    RESULTS: Enhancing lesions had a significantly (P < .001) higher mean longitudinal relaxation rate (1.22 ± 0.36 versus 0.89 ± 0.24), a higher mean transverse relaxation rate (9.8 ± 2.6 versus 7.4 ± 1.9), and a lower mean proton density (77 ± 11.2 versus 90 ± 8.4) than nonenhancing lesions. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.832 was obtained.

    CONCLUSIONS: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions often have proton density and relaxation times that differ from those in nonenhancing lesions, with lower proton density and shorter relaxation times in enhancing lesions compared with nonenhancing lesions.

  • 46.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Department of Radiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Warntjes, J B Marcel
    Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Smedby, Örjan
    Department of Radiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, School of Technology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tisell, Anders
    Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Quantitative MRI for analysis of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0177135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Damage to the blood-brain barrier with subsequent contrast enhancement is a hallmark of glioblastoma. Non-enhancing tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema is, however, not usually visible on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. New quantitative techniques using relaxometry offer additional information about tissue properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal relaxation R1, transverse relaxation R2, and proton density in the peritumoral edema in a group of patients with malignant glioma before surgery to assess whether relaxometry can detect changes not visible on conventional images.

    METHODS: In a prospective study, 24 patients with suspected malignant glioma were examined before surgery. A standard MRI protocol was used with the addition of a quantitative MR method (MAGIC), which measured R1, R2, and proton density. The diagnosis of malignant glioma was confirmed after biopsy/surgery. In 19 patients synthetic MR images were then created from the MAGIC scan, and ROIs were placed in the peritumoral edema to obtain the quantitative values. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion was used to obtain cerebral blood volume (rCBV) data of the peritumoral edema. Voxel-based statistical analysis was performed using a mixed linear model.

    RESULTS: R1, R2, and rCBV decrease with increasing distance from the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. There is a significant increase in R1 gradient after contrast agent injection (P < .0001). There is a heterogeneous pattern of relaxation values in the peritumoral edema adjacent to the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor.

    CONCLUSION: Quantitative analysis with relaxometry of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas detects tissue changes not visualized on conventional MR images. The finding of decreasing R1 and R2 means shorter relaxation times closer to the tumor, which could reflect tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema. However, these findings need to be validated in the future.

  • 47.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Striatal Phosphodiesterase 10A and Medial Prefrontal Cortical Thickness in Patients with Schizophrenia: A PET and MRI Study2017In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, p. S386-S387Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Striatal phosphodiesterase 10A and medial prefrontal cortical thickness in patients with schizophrenia: a PET and MRI study2017In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enzyme phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in animal models and is investigated as a possible new pharmacological treatment target. A reduction of prefrontal cortical thickness is common in schizophrenia, but how this relates to PDE10A expression is unknown. Our study aim was to compare, we believe for the first time, the striatal non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) of the new validated PDE10A ligand [(11)C]Lu AE92686 between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Furthermore, we aimed to assess the correlation of PDE10A BPND to cortical thickness. Sixteen healthy male controls and 10 male patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, olanzapine or quetiapine were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Striatal binding potential (BPND) of [(11)C]Lu AE92686 was acquired through dynamic PET scans and cortical thickness by structural MRI. Clinical assessments of symptoms and cognitive function were performed and the antipsychotic dosage was recorded. Patients with schizophrenia had a significantly lower BPND of [(11)C]Lu AE92686 in striatum (P=0.003) than healthy controls. The striatal BPND significantly correlated to cortical thickness in the medial prefrontal cortex and superior frontal gyrus across patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. No significant correlation was observed between the BPND for [(11)C]Lu AE92686 in striatum and age, schizophrenia symptoms, antipsychotic dosage, coffee consumption, smoking, duration of illness or cognitive function in the patients. In conclusion, PDE10A may be important for functioning in the striato-cortical interaction and in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  • 49.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Larsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Striatal Phosphodiesterase 10A and Thinning of the medial Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia - a PET and MRI study2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, p. S48-S49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Boersma, Greta J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Heurling, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Pereira, Maria J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Johansson, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lau Börjesson, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Katsogiannos, Petros
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Skrtic, S.
    AstraZeneca, R&D, Gothenburg, Sweden.;AstraZeneca, Dept Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, brain and visceral adipose tissue assessed with PET/MR strongly predicts whole body glucose uptake during hyperinsulinaemia2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S80-S80Article in journal (Other academic)
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