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  • 1.
    Abeywickrama, Ruby
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Transcending Memories Beyond Borders: Carrying Memorabilia from Home to Abroad.: Transferring Personal Memorabilia for a Meaningful Cross-Country Experience.2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Collecting memorabilia has been a longstanding practice as it evolved around cultures and societies. Despite existing research about preserving memorabilia, meaningful preservation methods remain unclear due to the individual and idiosyncratic nature of practices [18,22,40,43,47,59]. Migrants who collect memorabilia face challenges in preserving them due to unavoidable circumstances such as lack of transportation, physical measurements and weight of memorabilia. In 2020, 281 million people migrated globally, accounting for 3.6% of the world's population, and as this issue continues to grow, finding practical solu tions is crucial [36,38]. The aim of this study is to explore ways to digitally preserve memorabilia to maintain their material qualities and meaning across diverse geographical contexts (RQ1). The study also focused on understanding what objects migrants regard as worth preserving (RQ2) and how digital memorabilia can be designed to serve as memory tokens (RQ3). The research employed an exploratory case study approach, focusing on first-generation Sri Lankan migrants [11,30]. Qualitative data was collected through interviews and the use of 3D printing and augmented reality was evaluated through prototype testing using a research-through-design approach [29,58]. Results revealed that souvenirs encapsulates sentimental, economic and aesthetic values that provides a symbolic meaning to its’ owner and contributes to constructing their identity. Migrants were willing to try new technologies and augmented reality was recognised as a satisfying experience. To transfer memorabilia meaningfully among different geographical context, a holistic solution for memorabilia preservation was expected by migrants where physical protection of memorabilia is emphasized. Further research in this study involves utilizing photogrammetry scanning and 3D modeling to closely replicate real-life memorabilia and further evaluating mixed-reality user interactions such as augmented reality. 

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  • 2.
    Akkuzu, Beliz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Behavioural Observations as Objective Measures of Trust in Child-Robot Interaction: Mutual Gaze2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Given the subjective nature of trust as a phenomenon and its unified multifaceted contributions for every individual context,the development of a computational model of trust proves to be a difficult endeavour. In this study, we investigate mutual gaze as a behavioural measure of social trust and liking in child-robot interaction. Developing on a prior user study involving 52 children interacting with a robot with variable human-likeness and lexical alignment in two interaction contexts (task-based and dialogue-based), we investigate the effects of human-likeness and lexical alignment on mutual gaze, associations and correlations between metrics assessing social trust and liking, and the development of mutual gaze as an objective measure of social trust and liking. We achieve this through several statistical analyses between the percent of mutual gaze in each interaction, human-likeness, lexical alignment, scores from social trust and liking metrics, self-disclosure content, age, and time. The main findings of our study support the use of mutual gaze as an objective measure for liking, but there is still not sufficient evidence to supportthe use of mutual gaze as an objective measure to identify and capture social trust as a whole. Furthermore, we found that human-likeness and lexical alignment do not significantly affect mutual gaze in an interaction, but the interaction context does. Moreover, it seems that age plays a role in the amount of mutual gaze in an interaction, where older participants engage in less mutual gaze compared to the younger participants. Alongside this, the amount of mutual gaze the participant engages in is stable across periods when they are not interacting with the robot, changing more towards the first half of the first interaction and the second half of the second interaction. Based on the study, our findings suggest using different objective behavioural measures for social trust compared to its related concepts such as liking. Also, our results have found that there may be other constructs intertwined with liking, such as attention and interest, which may need to be addressed with separate metrics.

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  • 3.
    Ali, Saad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Multiplayer Functionality In HRTF (Head-Related Transfer Function) Audio Games To Increase Players' Interest2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream video games retain players' interest with dynamic updates of graphics such as game characters, levels, themes and other game inventory items. For visually impaired players, updates in graphics for player retention are not very efficient. Video games for people with serious visual impairment rely heavily on audio. The players are presented with either frequent audio instructions or 3D audio to be able to roughly judge the state of the game. In both cases, the players could either overwhelmed by frequent audio instructions or might lose interest in the game after some time. A possible reason could be that there are limited ways to evolve these games to keep the players interested as compared to games developed for sighted players. Multiplayer functionality can potentially bring a continuous stream of challenges and competitive situations in games. The research question investigated in this thesis focuses on whether the addition of multiplayer functionality in 3D audio game will increase the level of player interest. The hypothesis was evaluated by performing an experiment. The results of the study showed that multiplayer functionality can significantly increase the level of player interest and enjoyment in 3D audio based game for people with serious visual impairment.

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  • 4.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    et al.
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Duval, Jared
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Universidad Carlos III Madrid, Spain.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Chisik, Yoram
    Juanet Casulleras, Marina
    Garcia Pañella, Oscar
    Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Chasing Play Potentials in Food Culture: Learning from Traditions to Inspire Future Human-Food Interaction Design2020In: DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this pictorial, we turn to culture and traditions to present an annotated portfolio of play-food potentials, i.e. interesting design qualities and/or interaction mechanisms that could help promote playful and social engagement in food practices. Our portfolio emerged from a one-day workshop where we played with and analyzed a collection of 27 food traditions from diverse cultural backgrounds and historical periods. We highlight play forms and experiential textures that are underexplored in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research. Our contribution is intended to inspire designers to broaden the palette of play experiences and emotions embraced in HFI.

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  • 5.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    et al.
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Dagan, Ella
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Duval, Jared
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Universidad Carlos III Madrid, Spain.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Chasing Play with Instagram: How Can We Capture Mundane Play Potentials to Inspire Interaction Design?2020In: CHI EA '20: Extended Abstracts of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Hawai'i, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id LBW203Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Play and playfulness permeate our daily lives and are often the target of interaction designers. Yet, designing for play while embracing the idiosyncrasies of users and their contexts is challenging. Here we address recent calls for new situated and emergent play design methods by turning to social media, which is currently a source of inspiration for arts, crafts, fashion, and more. We present @chasing.play: an exploration of how Instagram may help designers capture and share instances of mundane playful engagement to inspire play design. We report on the findings of a pilot study where we experimented with the tool, and raise a challenges and open questions we plan to address in the future. Our work can trigger discussions among researchers about the potential of social media as a design tool and inspire action towards collectively defining strategies to leverage that potential.

  • 6.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing an Audience in the StreetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis sets out to explore why people engage in, and how to design for, play in a public setting. It does this by separating design for play from design of games, describing play as a socially and mentally understood activity, and a playful approach to engaging in that activity. It emphasises that while play is voluntary, design can help shape the players’ mode of engagement.

    The thesis uses a qualitative and inductive approach to research, with an understanding of knowledge as being constructed in the individual. The research is grounded in human computer interaction and interaction design, and closely related to game studies and design science.

    The research question concerns how design can influence the player activity in order to create a desired player experience in public, by harnessing playful engagement. It’s foundation is a theory of play which describes play as a framed, or hedged-off, activity with a fragile border; where knowledge and feelings can leak both in and out of the activity, and affect the play as well as what is around it. The theory of enjoyment of play is discussed, and the problem of treating this as ‘fun’ is addressed, concluding in a presentation of how playful engagement can be harnessed through design.

    The theory is applied in five design cases: I’m Your Body, a locative storytelling app; Codename Heroes, a pervasive game of personal empowerment; Passing On, a slow-paced game about communication; Busking Studies, which involves observing street performers and their shows; and DigiFys, an architectural design exploration of playgrounds and play paths.

    Finally, three concepts, or design tools, are presented, which address: 1) a structure for understanding a design through three layers, constructs designed by the designer, inspiring play activity with the player, leading to experience; 2) an approach to designing invitations to play; and finally 3), a four faceted structure for understanding play engagement when players engage in non intended ways.

    List of papers
    1. Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268059 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    2. Designing an Audience in the Streets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an Audience in the Streets
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268058 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

    Keywords
    outdoor play, playscape, interactive play technology, landscape architecture
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268057 (URN)10.1145/2901790.2901875 (DOI)000390478300006 ()
    Conference
    11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS), Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, JUN 04-08, 2016
    Note

    The manuscript version of this article is part of the thesis: "Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience" by Jon Back. http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:876519

    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2022-01-29
    4. ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Keywords
    Location-based, asymmetric gameplay, negotiating language, physical feedback, player behavior
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239070 (URN)978-0-9913982-2-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG), 2014, April 3-7, 2014, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. "We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    2013 (English)In: Defragging game studies: Proceedings of DIGRA 2013, DIGRA , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-aware design is important in computer games in general, and perhaps even more so in the design of pervasive games, as these are played in the ordinary world. As pervasive games blur the distinction between game and non-game situations, they influence the everyday lives of their players.

    We discuss the design process for the game ‘Codename Heroes’ from a gender-aware perspective. The focus is on how players reacted to the experience of playing the game during a sequence of design workshops. We found that playing the game made people less sensitive to ‘fear of the outside’. The participants were aware they ‘should’ feel unsafe in unknown neighbourhoods, but mostly did not. Furthermore, a combination of collaboration with internal competition fostered a sense of empowerment. Finally, we could confirm what previous researchers have seen, that women participants tended to blame themselves, rather than the technology or the situation, for errors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    DIGRA, 2013
    Keywords
    Game, Design, Gender, Pervasive game
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212715 (URN)
    Conference
    The sixth international conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA); 26-29 August 2013; Atlanta, GA, USA
    Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
    6. Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268055 (URN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    7. Experimental Game Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Game Design
    2015 (English)In: Game Research Methods: An Overview / [ed] Lankoski, Petri; Björk, Staffan, ETC press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ETC press, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268056 (URN)9781312884731 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
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  • 8.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Back, Svante
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bexell, Emma
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stanisic, Stefan
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rosqvist, Daniel
    National Museum of Science and Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    the Quest: An Escape Room Inspired Interactive Museum Exhibition2019In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 81-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this project, we report on designing an interactive museum exhibit in a technology museum, inspired by escape room game mechanics and technology. The project aims to create a deeper more immersed engagement with and interest in the exhibition, and thereby increase the interest in the exhibit's subject. In the game, the players take on the role of grandchildren to a known (fictitious) turn-of-the-century explorer and set out to find the treasures she hid around the world during her years of adventure. Clues to the treasures are hidden within the museum exhibition and by using knowledge found around the exhibition the players can solve the riddles and find the treasure, while also picking up some knowledge along the way.

  • 10.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Bedwell, Benjamin
    Benford, Steve
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Sundnes Løvlie, Anders
    Preston, William
    Rajkowska, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ryding, Karin
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Thorn, Emily-Clare
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Wray, Tim
    GIFT: Hybrid Museum Experiences through Gifting and Play2018In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Cultural Informatics / [ed] Angeliki Antoniou, Manolis Wallace, 2018, Vol. 2235, p. 31-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he GIFT project develops new approaches to creating hybrid physi-cal-digital visitor experiences in museums. Through design exploration of two concepts focusing on gifting and playful appropriation, the project charts how museums can create a deeper and more meaningful experience by giving visitors the tools to tell their own stories. The project is highly cross-disciplinary com-bining HCI research, artist-led exploration, technology explorations, and experi-ence design in collaboration with museums. Furthermore, the project gathers 10 prominent museums from Europe and the US in an action research project that both serves to ground the prototypes and framework in the needs of museums, while also facilitating the museum sector's need to become 'digital-ready', under-standing and capitalising on digital technology. As the project has progressed through half of its duration, we report on initial findings and how these have shaped our direction of progress.

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  • 11.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Paget, Susan
    Rau, Andreas
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Children’s Digital-Physical Play in Natural Outdoors Settings2016In: CHI Extended Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to develop solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. Here we report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of the schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment. We highlight in particular how the interactive technology contributed to the versatility of play activities, but also how the nature setting and the availability of natural materials contributed to the play activities around the interactive artefacts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development.
    Rau, Andreas
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Children's Outdoor Play2016In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

  • 13.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Playing Cool - Winter Weather’s Influence on Location-Based Gaming2021In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 5, no 242, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location-based games are highly dependent on the physical environment. One important but often overlooked factor is weather. In this paper we focus on winter weather, as this is a common weather that is often not designed for specifically. By performing a qualitative observation, interview, and questionnaire study of families during and after playing a GPS-based mobile game in a winter setting, this paper studies how winter conditions affected the gaming experience. Three main factors were observed to have a big impact on the gaming experience: snow, ice and cold. We outline ways these weather conditions were found to be both obstacles, and adding value to the game. Finally, we suggest design implications for winter weather, mainly; the need for short games due to cold, adaption of gameplay for movement in snow, to avoid interactions based on handling the phone, and to adapt maps to the effects of snow and ice. By explaining how winter conditions affect the gaming experience, location-based games can be better adapted for these weather conditions, and thereby help in making better design decisions.

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  • 14.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Hangvar, Jonas
    Drakryggen, Sweden.
    Let’s Play Something New!: Designing for Digital Malleability in Outdoor Playgrounds2023In: Mindtrek '23: Proceedings of the 26th International Academic Mindtrek Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 233-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor playground design has traditionally involved building installations that after inauguration remain stationary and rigid. New technologies open possibilities to reinvent playground design, but also provide new challenges. This paper focuses on how an outdoor playground can be made malleable through digital technology, and how such a design can increase play values and provide more flexible possibilities for an iterative design process, also after inauguration. During a total period of 5 years, using a Research-through-Design, and more specifically Reflective Design, approach researchers participated in a co-design project where a hybrid Internet of Things-enhanced permanent outdoor playground was developed and studied. The installations have been up and running around the clock, and used daily, for 2.5 years. The study suggests ways to design digitally malleable playground installations in permanent playgrounds. Further it points to areas where malleability functions may be restricted, due to reasons such as municipality policy, security and resources. It shows that the malleability functions were mainly used to increase usability, for educational purposes, to enhance play values, and to allow for appropriation and co-creation. The malleability features enabled an interactive design after design approach, and those possibilities were utilised in several ways, adding values to the playground, compared to rigid playground designs.

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  • 15.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin
    Ecorado, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wireband, Joacim
    Drakryggen, Linköping, Sweden.
    Value Driven Design for Playful Technology Enhanced Installations in Public Settings2021In: C&C '21: Creativity and Cognition, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, article id 34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Art and installations in public settings are often created on commission from a municipality or similar public sector. Within the public sector there are many values that the community strives to enhance. Values related to democracy, inclusion, and aesthetics are but a few. When designing for public environments, the design process might be affected by the need to strive for those values in addition to, or even rather than, the more common considerations focused on user experience or commercial aspects. In this pictorial we present how identified core values influenced a design process aimed at designing innovative IoT-enhanced playground installations in a public setting. Inspired by annotated portfolios, we explicate how these core values influenced the final design.

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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Transformative Play2017In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 3, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have foregrounded how play is only partially shaped by the artifacts that their designers design. The play activity can change the structures framing it, turning players into co-designers through the mere act of playing. This article contributes to our understanding of how we can design for play taking into account that play has this transformative power. We describe four ways that players can engage with framing structures, which we classify in terms of whether players conform to explore, transgress, or (re)create them. Through the examples of three case studies, we illustrate how this model has been useful in design: as an analytical tool for deconstructing player behavior, to articulate design goals and support specific design choices, and for shaping the design process.

  • 17.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative PlayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing Close to Home:: Interaction and Emerging Play in Outdoor Play Installations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor play is becoming an increasingly marginalised activity in the urban landscape. Even in HCI, research on interactive solutions for outdoor play has largely been limited to special areas and in particular playgrounds. But children play everywhere, and especially play close to home is central in children's play activities. In this article we draw upon knowledge about designing for children's play in interaction design as well as in landscape architecture, to study how interactive play installations can be integrated in outdoor environments of a residential area. We present a field study in which digitally enhanced play installations were installed, in dialogue with the landscape, in between the buildings of a residential area. We focus on how emerging play activities made use of the installations as well as of the surrounding landscape in expected as well as unexpected ways. Based on the observations, we discuss how residential play is special, and how this affects how to design for it.

  • 19.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    University of Nottingham..
    Evaluation2022In: Hybrid Museum Experiences: Theory and Design / [ed] Annika Waern; Anders Sundnes Løvlie, Amsterdam University Press, 2022, p. 177-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter gives an overview of methods and tools for evaluating hybrid experiences in a museum context, and in general, what is gained by doing studies of visitor experiences. It of fers strategies for the why, what, who, where, when, and how of conducting evaluations. This includes goal-setting for multiple stakeholders, formative studies, analyses, and ethics. The strategies cover both quick-and-dirty methods as well as in-depth studies.

  • 20.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Codename Heroes – Designing for Experience in Public Places in a Long Term Pervasive Game2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Codename Heroes is a persistent, multiplayer, crowd-sourced pervasive game that uses Bluetooth, GPS and the phone camera. It plays in the world around you and is always active. Players take the roles of secret superheroes, fighting for their rights and their beliefs. The game also makes use of physical objects and places in the environment.

    The game targets teenagers with a specific focus on young women. The purpose of the game is to engage and empower players. The design is informed by ethnographic studies of young women as well as by gender studies. The goal is to create an incitement for young people to appropriate spaces they do not usually move in, and try things they would not otherwise do.

    Codename Heroes is part of a project investigating pervasive games, games that are played in the physical world with the aid of mobile technology. The current research is focused at exploring large scale, long term, non-location-specific pervasive games, while still keeping the physical aspect of game-specific objects, to understand how this physicality affects the experience of the game.

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  • 21.
    Bang, GiHoon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Human-Telepresence Robot Proxemics Interaction: An ethnographic approach to non-verbal communication2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to find distinct and crucial factors needed in order to design a better robot through exploring the meaning of movement. The researcher conducted six-weeks of iterative work to collect data via an ethnographic method. The researcher examined the interactions between a telepresence robot and human beings in an authentic environment through the collected data and analyzed it based on proxemics theory. The research observed that the robot was given social space when it approached the participants with pauses in between movements. Furthermore, the research introduces proxemics pivot and its notion. Proxemics pivot refers to the part of the robot that people perceive as a standard point when they adjust the proximity between the robot and themselves. The proxemics pivot was considered “a face” and was attributed social properties; the other parts of the robot did not receive the same consideration.

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    fulltext
  • 22.
    Bergman, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Exploration of a Uni-Mode Survey: Impact of Verbose Verbal CATI Elements on Survey Comprehension for CAWI Respondents2024Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores what type of verbal/text survey content translates effectively between survey modes within a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) and Computer Assisted Web Interview (CAWI) mixed-mode survey project within unified mixed-mode survey design. This phenomenon is researched through the implementation of online probes within an existing CAWI survey project for sections close to an original CATI design. This research provides insights into how respondents understand and conceptualize verbal content within a unified mixed-mode CAWI survey in today’s online survey environment. This research is timely as the penetration of mobile has increased drastically, which may have implications on CAWI/CATI mixed-mode research considering the conflicting best practices for mobile CAWI survey design and CATI survey design. The results show that respondents do not engage with introductory pages enough to reliably recall their information, even when significantly shortened and simplified. Additionally, respondents are sensitive to high amounts of text and topics within survey question spaces. This means that some aspects of CATI survey design do not translate to CAWI and may even be cause for data quality concerns. These findings highlight some key issues faced by researchers and practitioners, provide some guidance on how design choices may impact results, and presents rich opportunities for future research.

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    fulltext
  • 23.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Kim, Soomin
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Commun, Seoul, South Korea..
    Chang, Minsuk
    Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Sch Comp, Naver AI Lab, Seoul, South Korea..
    Dagan, Ella
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Duval, Jared
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as a Design and Research Site in HCI: Mapping Out Opportunities and Envisioning Future Uses2021In: Extended abstracts of the 2021 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems  (CHI'21), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop, we will explore the emergent methodological space of social media based HCI design and research. We will gather scholars and practitioners from different areas within HCI to discuss how social media platforms might support their practice. Through short presentations, open discussions, and design-led activities, we will examine the affordances of existing social media platforms and speculate future developments in this methodological space. The outcome of the workshop will be an interactive data visualization of existing social media platforms, their main characteristics, and their affordances for HCI design and research. Overall, we will begin to characterize the methodological space of social media based HCI design and research, setting the foundation for future developments in this space.

  • 24.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Duval, Jared
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Chasing Play Potentials: Towards an Increasingly Situated and Emergent Approach to Everyday Play Design2019In: DIS '19: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2019, p. 1265-1277Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User involvement is well established in game and play design. But in a time when play design is becoming relevant in domains beyond pure entertainment, and play blends into everyday activity in diverse ways, we need to revisit old, and develop new, user involvement methods. Using a situated perspective and Research through Design, we present Situated Play Design (SPD), a novel approach for the design of playful interventions aimed at open-ended, everyday activities that are non-entertainment based. Like user-centered game and play design methods, our contribution leverages user engagement; like Participatory Design methods, our method acknowledges the co-creating role of end users. SPD extends those approaches by focusing on uncovering existing manifestations of contextual playful engagement and using them as design material. Through two case studies, we illustrate our approach and the design value of using existing and emergent playful interactions of users in context as inspirations for future designs. This allows us to provide actionable strategies to design for in-context playful engagement.

  • 25.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Technology for Situated and Emergent Play: A Bridging Concept and Design Agenda2020In: Proceedings Of The 2020 Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems (CHI'20), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, article id 730Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the capacity of play to spontaneously emerge in our daily life, the scope of application of play design in HCI is generally narrower, specifically targeting areas of pure leisure, or wholly utilitarian and productive play. Here we focus on the value of play design to respond to and support our natural gravitation towards emergent play that helps to meet our social and emotional needs. We present a bridging concept: Technology for Situated and Emergent Play, i.e. technology design that supports playful engagement that emerges interwoven with our everyday activities outside leisure, and that enriches these activities with socio-emotional value. Our intermediate-level contribution has value as a synthesis piece: it weaves together theories of play and play design and bridges them with concrete design examples. As a bridging concept, it contributes: i) theoretical grounding; ii) inspiring design exemplars that illustrate the theory and foreground its value; and iii) design articulations in the form of valuable experiential qualities and design features. Our work can help to focus design agendas for playful technology and inspire future designs in this space.

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  • 26.
    Biehl, Marten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sketching Movement-based Interactions: Defining Guidelines for Tool Support in Interdisciplinary Teams2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Interaction Design there is an increased interest in designing for leisure and fun in contrast to an understanding of technology primarily as part of the workplace. Along with this, the relevance of experiential aspects of design is heightened compared to usability in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. At the same time, this created an interest in the relationship between the human body and technology use in research and industry.

    The starting point for this thesis is the perceived difficulty to combine exploration and technology in early stages of the design process without becoming technology-focused. Instead of picking a technology early in the process and therefore letting the design process be shaped by it, this thesis advocates introducing technology in a way that designers can explore different technologies similar to sketching with different materials.

    This thesis aims to identify the needs of designers in inter- disciplinary teams when designing with movement-based interactions. This is done by first summarizing important aspects of sketching from the literature. Secondly, the tools that are currently available are reviewed. Finally, an observational study of a design situation is conducted to complete this investigation.

    The main outcome of this thesis is a set of guidelines for designing a sketching tool for movement-based interactions in interdisciplinary teams. The most important are low transaction costs, overview over sketches, integration into the existing ecosystem, optimization for the team setting and clear articulation of material qualities. 

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    Biehl-SketchingMovementbasedIx.pdf
  • 27.
    Bishehsari, Taraneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Wearable Device for Physiotherapeutic Home Training2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Wearable for physiotherapy
  • 28.
    Bohné, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Emotions at play: gaining emotional knowledge using a video game2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of video games for teaching children different subjects is commonly believed to be a good  approach. In  general  has  learning  theme  for  these  games  focused  on  traditionally subject, such as math or biology. Important as they can be for education, other softer aspects can also be considered important for the children and education. One such aspect is emotions and the role it has on a social level. However, it is not much research showing how to use emotions  in  a  learning  game. In  this  thesis, I  examine  how  children  perceive  and  use emotions as they play a game specially designed for teaching emotions. The game utilises emotions  in  a  new  design  that  let  the  player  interact  with  cartoon  animals  in  different scenarios. I report findings based on a sample of thirty-three (33) preschool children, and six (6) parents who took part in the study. Data was collected using a qualitative method in a two step procedure with observation of play and follow up interviews in the first step, followed by video recordings of play and demonstrations using cuddly pets in the second step. Using an ecological framework for analysis and theory from the field of emotional intelligence, I show that children playing this game can perceive emotions expressed in the game. I also show that it is possible to play this particular game without the need to involve emotions. Children do not learn emotions from playing the game. These results carries important implication for the design of learning games as it illuminates that learning can come from possible sources other than the gameplay.

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  • 29.
    Bulygin, Denis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    How do people evaluate virtual goods in social media? The case of Dota 22019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual purchases are the main source of revenue for developers of F2P games being a market with expected 17.4 billions of dollars volume in 2019. Despite the broad scope of research of virtual purchases, it is still unclear how the player evaluate non-functional goods. Based on analysis of discussions of virtual decorative items this work what experiences nonfunctional items grants players with and how those experiences discussions reflect in the item’s price. 

    With the use of Structural Topic Modeling framework this work demonstrates the dimensions of players’ experience in their association with price change on the case of Reddit.com subreddit /r/Dota2. Analysis reveals three main categories of discussions: dimensions of hedonic value, dimensions of social value, expectations mismatch. This work contributes to studies of virtual purchases by decomposing each category into experience dimensions and by revealing the relationship between extracted experience dimensions and items price.

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  • 30.
    Cederved, Catarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    engvall, gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Involving children treated for cancer in developing a serious game about radiotherapy2022In: Congress of the International Society of Peadiatric Oncology (SIOP).: Supportive Care and Palliative Care, UPPSALA, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Cederved, Catarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ångström Brännström, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Behind the scenes of the development of a serious game for health for children: An interdisciplinary interview study exploring perspectives from game designers, researchers, and experts from the field of hospital careManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is considered advantageous to adopt an interdisciplinary approach when creating serious games in the sphere of health practice. However, different fields have reported that interdisciplinary work is challenging. Yet, the literature is scarce regarding how participants within health research have experienced collaborative research. In 2019 and 2020 three teams worked together to produce a serious game for children undergoing radiotherapy. The game was designed for children aged 5-14 years. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of the participants in the teams from the production phase of a serious game about radiotherapy. Thirteen in depth interviews were carried out with members from all three teams. The teams included game designers, a research team, and an expert team. The latter consisted of a play therapist, a pediatric nurse, and radiation oncology nurses. A reflective thematic analysis was performed where one main theme and four subthemes were formulated. The main theme was: A learning experience during the participatory process. The subthemes were: (1) New insights were established due to the collaboration, (2) Games give the impression of being easy, yet are complex to produce, (3) The amount of time spent meeting in the teams was beneficial to the experience, and (4) The impact of having confidence in the game that was designed. In conclusion, knowledge expansion arose on several levels during the production phase. Having time and building trust in team constellations are significant factors in achieving a productive and favorable/beneficial experience for participants. Further, confidence in the end product could be a contributory factor for participants continuing to work and the understanding of the complexity of the evolving process.

  • 32.
    Cederved, Catarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ångström Brännström, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric oncology research with a special focus on side effects.
    Acceptability and potential impact on perceived anxiety of a serious game about radiotherapy in children aged 5 to 14 years: A feasibility and randomized controlled pilot trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A web-based serious game was developed as psychological preparation for children who are going to undergo radiotherapy. The game was developed together with children with experience of radiotherapy. The study aimed to investigate the feasibility in terms of reach, usability, and acceptability, of a serious game about radiotherapy, and to evaluate whether it can decrease anxiety levels in children aged 5 to14 years undergoing radiotherapy. The study was designed as a randomized controlled pilot trial with predefined feasibility criteria. Twenty-eight children were assessed for eligibility and 23 were found to meet the inclusion criteria. They were consecutively randomized into one of two study arms. One child was excluded after randomization due to language difficulties. If randomized into Group 1, the children received the intervention (serious game) before treatment started. Children in Group 2 received the intervention after three days of treatment. Questionnaires with fixed answers were used to assess anxiety levels (an adapted version of STAIC) and experiences of gameplay (an adapted version of PENS). The predefined feasibility criterion that the children should play the game for 20 minutes or more was not met. The second criterion, that 70% or more of the participants should return all of the questionnaires was not met either, however, more than 80% returned the PENS questionnaires. All feasibility criteria set for the study were not meet, suggesting that adaptions need to be made if a future study is going to be undertaken. There was no indication that playing the serious game decreased the children’s stated anxiety. When combining the two groups, a pattern emerged that anxiety levels decreased over time. The PENS questionnaire adapted for children showed promising results regarding player satisfaction when using the serious game within healthcare. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT04728555

  • 33.
    Chen, Qilun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Draw, Find, Answer and Decrypt: A Participatory Design approach to gift-giving experiences for couples visiting museums2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Museums are popular among people to relax and obtain knowledge. Prior studies showed great efforts on increasing meaningfulness of the museum tour with the support of technology. This research introduces a design created through participatory design practice. The interaction presents its potential of enhancing the museum visiting experience for visitors in intimate relationships through digital gift- giving behavior. Participants visit the museum as couples, with one party acting as the gift giver and the other as the gift receiver. During the visit, participants draw sketches, find objects, answer questions related to the objects and collect the clues to decrypt the given gift. This research explains how gift- giving behavior enhances the social experience between the intimate couple and how social interaction between intimate couple enhances the museum visiting experience. This research suggests the opportunity for research on the effect of the close relationship on meaningful experiences.

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  • 34.
    Chen, Yingjie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exploring Consumers’ Payment Behaviours atCompleting Micro-Transactions withVending Machines in Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis empirically investigated factors that affect consumers’ choice of paymentoptions including cash, credit card and mobile payment, in completingmicro-transactions with vending machines. For the purpose, a theory-informedqualitative study was conducted through semi-structured interviews in combinationwith observations. As a result, we found that consumers choose cash/coins as apriority payment with vending machines because they are traditionally perceived ascash-operated machines. However, since Sweden is moving toward a cashless society,credit card is suggested to be the most compatible with the purchase habit of Swedishpeople. Despite the compatibility, credit card payment with vending machines isperceived as insecure because of vagueness of transaction, pay without pin code andpotential risk of financial fraud. For mobile payment, the findings suggest thatperceived advantage of using mobile payment with vending machines are efficiency,security and privacy. Several barriers to consumers’ acceptance of mobile payment are also identified, which includes complexity and the lack of social influences.

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    chen
  • 35. Chisik, Yoram
    et al.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    Schaper, Marie Monique
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Wilde, Danielle
    Chasing play potentials in food culture: embracing children's perspectives2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this one-day workshop, we will explore how food related culture and traditions can guide the design of playful technologies and experiences. Using food as an accessible starting point, we aim to bring together a diverse set of participants in order to share and make creative use of playful traditions and food stuffs through hands-on prototyping, play and discussion. At the end of the day we expect to further advance our methodological inquiry with insights on how children's natural affinity to play can be leveraged in co-design explorations aimed at chasing play potentials in foods and food related practices as well as expand the repository of play-food potentials we have been curating for the past months. Overall the workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday use, in and beyond the food domain.

  • 36.
    Clark, Valjean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exploring design and product development data in high-tech companies using data visualization2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In high-tech companies, user experience has become an important part of data-driven product development, but unfortunately the artifacts created by user experience work are often stored in disparate documents and databases, and it is difficult to get a big picture of all the artifacts that have been created and how they relate to each other and to other product development data. Data visualization is one way to approach solving these issues, but how can this data be presented to users in a meaningful way such that both the artifacts and the relationships between them are understood? Three hierarchical data visualizations - partition, sunburst, and zoomable treemap - were built around some early product development data. These visualizations were tested in a comparative exploratory usability test with six users to find how well users understood the data and the relationships between the data. The most significant results were that most users did not know how to interact with the partition and sunburst visualizations until prompted to do so, users had a difference in understanding the data between the sunburst and partition visualization, and some techniques worked very well to keep users oriented while others did not. Future work should first focus on adding a creative element to the tool, where data can be added and relationships can be built in the visualization itself, and then focus on testing the tool again with a more specific audience of strategic planners, UX designers, and requirements engineers. 

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    Thesis_ValjeanClark_final
  • 37.
    Cockton, Gilbert
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Sch Design, Commun Design, Squires Bldg, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Höök, Kristina
    Royal Inst Technol, Lindstedsvagen 3, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kaye, Jofish
    Mozilla, 331 E Evelyn Ave, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Wynn, Eleanor
    6311 Palomino Way, West Linn, OR 97068 USA.
    Williamson, Julie
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Comp Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks2019In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, article id panel no. 6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a scholarly field, the ACM SIGCHI community maintains a strong focus on conferences as its main outlet for scholarly publication. Historically, this originates in how the field of computer science adopted a conference-centric publication model as well as in the organizational focus of ACM. Lately, this model has become increasingly challenged for a number of reasons, and multiple alternatives are emerging within the SIGCHI community as well as in adjacent communities. Through revisiting examples from other conferences and neighboring communities, this panel explores alternative publication paths and their opportunities and risks.

  • 38.
    Dagan, Ella
    et al.
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Computat Media Dept, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Computat Media Dept, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Flores, Miguel
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Computat Media Dept, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Mitchell, Robb
    Univ Southern Denmark, Design & Commun, Odense, Denmark..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Computat Media Dept, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Design Framework For Social Wearables2019In: DIS '19: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2019, p. 1001-1015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wearables are integrated into many aspects of our lives, yet, we still need further guidance to develop devices that truly enhance in-person interactions, rather than detract from them by taking people's attention away from the moment and one another. The value of this paper is twofold: first, we present an annotated portfolio of 'social wearables', namely technology designs worn on the body that augment co-located interaction. The design work described can serve as inspiration for others. Then we propose a design framework for social wearables grounded in prior work, as well as our own design research, that can help designers to ideate by raising valuable questions to begin their inquiry with and use to evaluate their designs. We illustrate the evaluative value of this framework through two social wearable designs, each tested in the appropriate social setting.

  • 39.
    Duval, Jared
    et al.
    Northern Arizona University.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid.
    Li, Yinchu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Reimagining Machine Learning's Role in Assistive Technology by Co-Designing Exergames with Children Using a Participatory Machine Learning Design Probe2023In: The 25th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility / [ed] Erin Brady; Maria Wolters, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paramount measure of success for a machine learning model has historically been predictive power and accuracy, but even a gold-standard accuracy benchmark fails when it inappropriately misrepresents a disabled or minority body. In this work, we reframe the role of machine learning as a provocation through a case study of participatory work co-creating exergames by employing machine learning and its training as a source of play and motivation rather than an accurate diagnostic tool for children with and without Sensory Based Motor Disorder. We created a design probe, Cirkus, that supports nearly any aminal locomotion exergame while collecting movement data for training a bespoke machine learning model. During 5 participatory workshops with a total of 30 children using Cirkus, we co-created a catalog of 17 exergames and a resulting machine-learning model. We discuss the potential implications of reframing machine learning’s role in Assistive Technology for values other than accuracy, share the challenges of using “messy” movement data from children with disabilities in an everchanging co-creation context for training machine learning, and present broader implications of using machine learning in therapy games.

  • 40.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Shoe Is a Shoe Is a Shoe: Interpersonalization and Meaning-making in Museums - Research Findings and Design Implications2020In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 36, no 16, p. 1503-1513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technology is increasingly used to enhance museum experiences for visitors. Concurrently, research shows that people seldom visit museums alone, yet design often focusses on creating individual experiences. This article addresses this conundrum by examining visitor's social interaction and meaning-making in museums in order to provide empirical results actionable for design. It does so through an ethnographic approach combining observations and extended focus group interviews in an analogue museum. Results highlight how museums are social spaces, made so by active participant visitors. Processes of social meaning-making occur as visitors draw on objects in social identity-making and recontextualization - linking the past to the present -, play, share knowledge, and engage in embodied practices. The study suggests shifting from designing personalized towardinterpersonalexperiences. Four design sensitivities are presented: Interpersonalized meaning-making, playful sociality, social information sharing, and social movement.

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  • 41.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    From Trash to Treasure: Exploring how video games are moving from popular culture to cultural heritage2022In: Proceedings of DIGRA 2022, The Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) , 2022, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video games are now recognized as an important part of our culture and history. However, this redefinition of the cultural value of video games has received scant academic attention.

    In this paper I explore the transformation video games have, and are undergoing by: 1) drawing on the event of the first excavation searching for video game history in the Alamogordo Landfill in New Mexico and 2) interviews with collection and exhibition experts in charge of video games in two U.S. museums: MoMA, New York and MADE, Oakland.

    Results explore how video games have gone from trash to treasure as exemplified by the excavation of the 1982 Atari game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. As video games enter museums they become valued using traditional western ideals on how cultural heritage is defined, based on ideals of age, materiality, monumentality, and aesthetics. Yet, the interactivity imperative of video games makes new evaluation structures relevant.

  • 42.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kinwork revisited: The gendered work of keeping up with family through communication technology2023In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1592-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kinwork is the maintenance of cross-household kin and family ties through both physical and mediated means and is a type of unpaid labour historically performed by women. However, changing gender norms, new communicative practices such as networked individualism, and internet and communication technologies are changing how kinwork is done. This study explores how these changes affect the gendered nature of kinwork. Swedes from multigenerational, cross-household families residing in Sweden and the United States took part in primarily home-based interviews (n=40). This empirical study explores current practices of kinwork, focusing on three empirical cases, Christmas cards for seasonal greetings, phone calls for birthday well-wishes, and digital communication for everyday contact. Results highlight how kinwork in the sample is performed by both men and women through a wide range of communication technologies. The study shows that due to new gendered norms, women in the younger generations are less willing to do kinwork for men than older generations in the same kinship networks, indicating generational differences rather than family differences. In the study, men use new internet and communication technology to both do and sometimes take responsibility for kinwork while older communication technologies retain a feminine coding, sometimes resulting in abandonment. Contemporary digital communication technology supports a shift to individual communication rather than group-based which further supports men’s increased engagement in kinwork. The study concludes that kinwork in the studied sample is performed by both men and women and that contemporary kinwork can only be understood by looking at the complex entanglements of evolving gender equality norms, trends towards more individual communication patterns, and affordances of communication technology. Together these result in new ways and opportunities for doing kinwork, which becomes less the work of women and more the work of networked individuals, whatever gender.

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  • 43.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sadowski, Helga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Doing intimate family work through ICTs in the time of networked individualism2023In: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 758-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, family intimacy has been seen as depending on spatial proximity and physical closeness. However, due to individualization and globalization, many families live apart and/or spend their days away from each other. Moreover, a shift in family communication from household-to-household to person-to-person has occurred in the context of so-called networked individualism. These changes make it imperative to investigate how contemporary families communicate to create and maintain intimacy in and across households. Drawing on the concept of doing intimate family work, this study investigates the small acts performed in everyday life to do family intimacy through ICT in the context of networked individualism. We conducted interviews with 6 multigenerational families – spread across 18 households in Sweden and the US. Results show how responsibilities and practices of family communication become part of doing intimate family work, through personalized technology, with consequences for each individual family member. We explore the various affordances family members realize through actions in order to support family intimacy and how these practices reinforce the importance of the family home as a physical base for cross-household family communication.

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  • 44.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Child & Youth Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prax, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Lost in Translation: Video Games Becoming Cultural Heritage?2019In: Cultural Sociology, ISSN 1749-9755, E-ISSN 1749-9763, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 444-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent attention to the question of preservation and exhibition of video games in cultural institutions such as museums indicates that this media form is moving from being seen as contentious consumer object to cultural heritage. This empirical study examines two recent museum exhibitions of digital games: GameOn 2.0 at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Stockholm (TM), and Women in Game Development at the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment, Oakland (MADE). The aim is to explore how games are appropriated within such institutions, and thereby how they are configured as cultural heritage and exhibitable culture. The study uses actor-network theory in order to analyse heterogeneous actors working in conjunction in such processes, specifically focusing on translation of games and game culture as they are repositioned within museums.

    The study explores how games are selectively recruited at both institutions and thereby translated in order to fit exhibition networks, in both cases leading to a glossing over of contentious issues in games and game culture. In turn, this has led to a more palatable but less nuanced transformation of video games into cultural heritage. While translating video games into cultural heritage, the process of making games exhibitable lost track of games as culture by focusing on physical artefacts and interactive, playable fun. It also lost track of them as situated in our culture by skimming over or ignoring the current contentious nature of digital games, and finally, it lost track of games as being produced and experienced in a particular context, or games of culture.

  • 45.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stamm, Isabell
    Technical University in Berlin.
    Liebermann, Wanda Katja
    Florida Atlantic University.
    The crowd in crowdsourcing: Crowdsourcing as a pragmatic research method2019In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 4, no 10, article id 9206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crowdsourcing, as a digital process employed to obtain information, ideas, and solicit contributions of work, creativity, etc., from large online crowds stems from business, yet is increasingly used in research. Engaging with previous literature and a symposium on academic crowdsourcing this study explores the underlying assumptions about crowdsourcing as a potential academic research method and how these affect the knowledge produced. Results identify crowdsourcing research as research about and with the crowd, explore how tasks can be productive, reconfiguring, and evaluating, and how these are linked to intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, we also identify three types of platforms: commercial platforms, research-specific platforms, and project specific platforms. Finally, the study suggests that crowdsourcing is a digital method that could be considered a pragmatic method; the challenge of a sound crowdsourcing project is to think about the researcher’s relationship to the crowd, the tasks, and the platform used.

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  • 46.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    von Essen, Emma
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Beyond a dichotomous understanding of online anonymity: bridging the macro and micro level2022In: Sociological Research Online, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 486-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anonymity on the Internet is a contentious issue; by some seen as an important freedom to be protected, while others argue for increased identification to protect groups at risk of exploitation. The debate reflects a dichotomous view of online anonymity; you are, or you are not anonymous. However, anonymity is a complex process played out on different levels and defined by various actors. While empirical studies show this, theoretical synthesis is lacking. This essay provides perspective on anonymity online by comparing two critical cases, online auctions and online gaming, we corroborate results from a 4-year interdisciplinary project with researchers from sociology, economics, and computer and system sciences. We argue that one should talk about anonymities in plural form, as online anonymity is not a state but a relational process. We put forth a conceptual model, which unpacks online anonymity as interdependent macro structures – legal, commercial, and technological – and micro/meso facets – factual, social group, and physical – to be used in future research.

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  • 47.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rajkowska, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    University of Nottingham.
    Ioannidis, Petros
    ITU Copenhagen.
    Løvlie, Anders Sundnes
    ITU Copenhagen .
    Life-cycle Analysis2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Englund, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Improving User Experiences to Help Students Know Their Equal Rights and Opportunities2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 49.
    Feng, Shuang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Friends or Strangers? Modeling Types of In-game Relationship, Social Capital and Psychological Well-being2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Online games are becoming more and more popular nowadays. Interacting with others in games has also become a channel for establishing or developing social relationships. In this article, the author conducted an online survey (N=165) to study the relationship between types of in-game relationships, social capital, and psychological well-being. In-game relationships mainly include two types: playing games with friends and playing games with strangers. The author used the framework of social capital, which includes bonding and bridging. Regarding psychological well-being, the author selected two indicators related to social aspects, namely loneliness and relatedness. The author constructs a structural equation model. The results show that playing with friends will enable bonding and bridging while playing with strangers will enable bridging. Second, two different social capitals can both increase players’ feelings of relatedness and reduce players’ feelings of loneliness. This shows that social relationships in online games have a certain impact on people's psychological well-being. This research also provides some information for game design and understanding of social relationships in games.

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  • 50. Foka, Anna
    et al.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala university.
    Lowe, Anna
    Skinner, Molly
    Sundnes Løvlie, Anders
    AI for Digitalisation of Cultural Heritage: potentials and ethical challenges2020In: : , Siegen, Germany, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
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