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  • 1. Adrianto, Indra
    et al.
    Wen, Feng
    Templeton, Amanda
    Wiley, Graham
    King, Jarrod B.
    Lessard, Christopher J.
    Bates, Jared S.
    Hu, Yanqing
    Kelly, Jennifer A.
    Kaufman, Kenneth M.
    Guthridge, Joel M.
    Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.
    Anaya, Juan-Manuel
    Bae, Sang-Cheol
    Bang, So-Young
    Boackle, Susan A.
    Brown, Elizabeth E.
    Petri, Michelle A.
    Gallant, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind
    Reveille, John D.
    Vila, Luis M.
    Criswell, Lindsey A.
    Edberg, Jeffrey C.
    Freedman, Barry I.
    Gregersen, Peter K.
    Gilkeson, Gary S.
    Jacob, Chaim O.
    James, Judith A.
    Kamen, Diane L.
    Kimberly, Robert P.
    Martin, Javier
    Merrill, Joan T.
    Niewold, Timothy B.
    Park, So-Yeon
    Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.
    Scofield, R. Hal
    Stevens, Anne M.
    Tsao, Betty P.
    Vyse, Timothy J.
    Langefeld, Carl D.
    Harley, John B.
    Moser, Kathy L.
    Webb, Carol F.
    Humphrey, Mary Beth
    Montgomery, Courtney Gray
    Gaffney, Patrick M.
    Association of a functional variant downstream of TNFAIP3 with systemic lupus erythematosus2011In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 253-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, MIM152700) is an autoimmune disease characterized by self-reactive antibodies resulting in systemic inflammation and organ failure. TNFAIP3, encoding the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20, is an established susceptibility locus for SLE. By fine mapping and genomic re-sequencing in ethnically diverse populations, we fully characterized the TNFAIP3 risk haplotype and identified a TT>A polymorphic dinucleotide (deletion T followed by a T to A transversion) associated with SLE in subjects of European (P = 1.58 x 10(-8), odds ratio = 1.70) and Korean (P = 8.33 x 10(-10), odds ratio = 2.54) ancestry. This variant, located in a region of high conservation and regulatory potential, bound a nuclear protein complex composed of NF-kappa B subunits with reduced avidity. Further, compared with the non-risk haplotype, the haplotype carrying this variant resulted in reduced TNFAIP3 mRNA and A20 protein expression. These results establish this TT>A variant as the most likely functional polymorphism responsible for the association between TNFAIP3 and SLE.

  • 2.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Teichmann, Martin
    Institut Européen de Chimie et Biologie (IECB), Université de Bordeaux 2, rue , Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac, France..
    Jernberg Wiklund, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Smit, Arian
    Institute for Systems Biology, 401 Terry Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109-5234, USA.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs2016In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1558-1571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CGGBP1 (CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1) regulates cell proliferation, stress response,cytokinesis, telomeric integrity and transcription. It could affect these processes by modulatingtarget gene expression under different conditions. Identification of CGGBP1-target genes andtheir regulation could reveal how a transcription regulator affects such diverse cellular processes.Here we describe the mechanisms of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 inquiescent or growing cells. By studying global gene expression patterns and genome-wide DNAbindingpatterns of CGGBP1, we show that a possible mechanism through which it affects theexpression of RNA Pol II-transcribed genes in trans depends on Alu RNA. We also show that itregulates Alu transcription in cis by binding to Alu promoter. Our results also indicate thatpotential phosphorylation of CGGBP1 upon growth stimulation facilitates its nuclear retention,Alu-binding and dislodging of RNA Pol III therefrom. These findings provide insights into howAlu transcription is regulated in response to growth signals.

  • 3.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Österborg, Anders
    Department of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital Solna.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Jernberg Wiklund, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    The epigenomic map of multiple myeloma reveals the importance of Polycomb gene silencing for the malignancyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by accumulation of post-germinal center, isotype switched, long-living plasma cells with retained proliferation capacity within the bone marrow. MM is highly heterogeneous and remains fatal. This heterogeneity has hampered identification of a common underlying mechanism for disease establishment and the development of targeted therapy. We recently provided proof-of-principle that gene silencing associated with H3K27me3 contributes to the malignancy of MM. Here we present the first epigenomic map of MM for H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 derived by ChIP- and RNA sequencing from freshly-isolated bone marrow plasma cells from four patients. We compile lists of targets common among the patients as well as unique to MM when compared with PBMCs. Indicating the clinical relevance of our findings, we find increased silencing of H3K27me3 targets with disease progression and in patients presenting with a poor prognosis. Bivalent genes further significantly correlated to under-expressed genes in MM and were unique to MM when compared to PBMCs. Furthermore, bivalent genes, unlike H3K27me3 targets, significantly associated with transcriptional activation upon Polycomb inhibition indicating a potential for drug targeting. Thus, we suggest that gene silencing by Polycomb plays an important role in the development of the malignant phenotype of the MM cell during tumor progression.

  • 4.
    Ahlgren, Kerstin M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Euler, Henrik
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lobell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Andersson, Göran
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Lernmark, Åke
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lack of evidence for a role of islet autoimmunity in the aetiology of canine diabetes mellitus2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, p. e105473-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported.

    METHODS:

    Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide.

    RESULTS:

    None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS:

    Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus.

  • 5.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Understanding Cancer Mutations by Genome Editing2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutational analyses of cancer genomes have identified novel candidate cancer genes with hitherto unknown function in cancer. To enable phenotyping of mutations in such genes, we have developed a scalable technology for gene knock-in and knock-out in human somatic cells based on recombination-mediated construct generation and a computational tool to design gene targeting constructs. Using this technology, we have generated somatic cell knock-outs of the putative cancer genes ZBED6 and DIP2C in human colorectal cancer cells. In ZBED6-/- cells complete loss of functional ZBED6 was validated and loss of ZBED6 induced the expression of IGF2. Whole transcriptome and ChIP-seq analyses revealed relative enrichment of ZBED6 binding sites at upregulated genes as compared to downregulated genes. The functional annotation of differentially expressed genes revealed enrichment of genes related to cell cycle and cell proliferation and the transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affected the cell growth and cell cycle of human colorectal cancer cells. In DIP2C-/-cells, transcriptome sequencing revealed 780 differentially expressed genes as compared to their parental cells including the tumour suppressor gene CDKN2A. The DIP2C regulated genes belonged to several cancer related processes such as angiogenesis, cell structure and motility. The DIP2C-/-cells were enlarged and grew slower than their parental cells. To be able to directly compare the phenotypes of mutant KRAS and BRAF in colorectal cancers, we have introduced a KRASG13D allele in RKO BRAFV600E/-/-/ cells. The expression of the mutant KRAS allele was confirmed and anchorage independent growth was restored in KRASG13D cells. The differentially expressed genes both in BRAF and KRAS mutant cells included ERBB, TGFB and histone modification pathways. Together, the isogenic model systems presented here can provide insights to known and novel cancer pathways and can be used for drug discovery.

    List of papers
    1. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV mediated genome editing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV mediated genome editing
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting is particularly suited to knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ~72% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ~81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV mediated knock-out. A Gateway based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations.

    National Category
    Medical Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235563 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    2. The transcriptional modulator ZBED6 regulates cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The transcriptional modulator ZBED6 regulates cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor ZBED6 is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Transcriptome analyses revealed enrichment of cell cycle-related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes upregulated in ZBED6-/- knockout clones. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets and their downregulation by ZBED6 was experimentally validated. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-b, EGFR or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate of ZBED6-/- RKO cells. These observations support a role for transcriptional modulation by ZBED6 in cell cycle regulation and growth of colorectal cancers.

    National Category
    Medical Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235564 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    3. DIP2C regulates expression of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>DIP2C regulates expression of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The disco-interacting protein 2 homolog C (DIP2C) gene is an uncharacterized candidate

    breast and lung cancer gene. The gene contains a DMAP1 binding domain, pointing to

    potential involvement in DNMT1-dependent methylation. To study the role of DIP2C in

    tumor development, we engineered human DIP2C knockout cell systems by rAAV-mediated

    gene targeting. Homo- and heterozygous RKO DIP2C knockout cells displayed enlarged cells

    and growth retardation. This phenotype was most pronounced in DIP2C-/- knockouts, and

    these cells also displayed a significant decrease in DIP2C mRNA levels. RNA sequencing

    revealed 780 genes affected by the loss of DIP2C, including the cellular senescence marker

    P16INK4a. Functional annotation of the regulated genes shows enrichment of genes involved

    with cell death processes, cell structure and motility. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis

    shows association of 19 genes with pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the phenotypic data

    and expression changes induced by loss of DIP2C indicate that the gene function may be

    important for several biological processes implicated in cancer, and that loss of gene function

    may be a trigger of cellular senescence.

    National Category
    Medical Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235565 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    4. Core Ras Pathway Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancers Revealed by Isogenic Modeling of NF1, KRAS and BRAF Mutations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Core Ras Pathway Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancers Revealed by Isogenic Modeling of NF1, KRAS and BRAF Mutations
    2012 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no Suppl.5, p. S118-S118Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-194476 (URN)10.1016/S0959-8049(12)71162-0 (DOI)000313036501006 ()
    Conference
    22nd Biennial Congress of the European-Association-for-Cancer-Research, JUL 07-10, 2012, Barcelona, SPAIN
    Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Core Ras Pathway Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancers Revealed by Isogenic Modeling of NF1, KRAS and BRAF Mutations2012In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no Suppl.5, p. S118-S118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Younis, Shady
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Gupta, Rajesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Tobias Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    The transcriptional modulator ZBED6 regulates cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor ZBED6 is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Transcriptome analyses revealed enrichment of cell cycle-related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes upregulated in ZBED6-/- knockout clones. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets and their downregulation by ZBED6 was experimentally validated. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-b, EGFR or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate of ZBED6-/- RKO cells. These observations support a role for transcriptional modulation by ZBED6 in cell cycle regulation and growth of colorectal cancers.

  • 8.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Andréasson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mitochondrial D-loop and coding sequence analysis using pyrosequencing2005In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 297, p. 179-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In forensic casework analysis, mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) often is used when the evidence material contains scarce amounts of DNA. Here, a mitochondrial DNA typing system for D-loop and coding region analysis based on pyrosequencing is described. Pyrosequencing is a real-time, single-tube sequencing-by-synthesis method, in which a cascade of enzymatic reactions yields detectable light. This pyrosequencing system has a higher resolution than the D-loop analysis performed routinely today as it also covers informative positions in the mitochondrial coding region. The system is composed of 16 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments and 24 pyrosequencing reactions with a turn around time for a 96-well plate of less than 3 h after PCR.

  • 9.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Engström, A-S.
    Meyers, S.
    Handt, O.
    Saldeen, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    von Haeseler, A.
    Pääbo, S.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mitochondrial DNA sequencing of shed hairs and saliva on robbery caps: sensitivity and matching probabilities1998In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, ISSN 0022-1198, E-ISSN 1556-4029, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 453-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been used for human identification based on teeth and skeletal remains. Here, we describe an amplification system for the mtDNA control region (D-loop) suited for the analysis of shed hair, which constitutes the most common biological evidence material in forensic investigations. The success rate was over 90% when applied to evidence materials such as shed hair, saliva stains and saliva on stamps. The analysis of evidence materials collected from three similar robberies revealed the presence of mtDNA sequences identical to those of the suspects in the three crimes. The use of mtDNA control region sequences for individual identification was evaluated. The probability of identity by chance for the mtDNA types of the suspects in the robberies was found to vary between Pr = 0.017 - < 0.0017, depending on the reference population used, emphasizing the need for large population databases to obtain the appropriate estimate.

  • 10.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Liu, Limin
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    High resolution genetic typing of the class II HLA-DRB1 locus using group-specific amplification and SSO-hybridisation in microplates1998In: Hereditas, ISSN 0018-0661, E-ISSN 1601-5223, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 161-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HLA-DRB1 locus is one of the most polymorphic HLA class II loci and rapid and accurate typing of this polymorphism is important both in bone-marrow transplantation, analysis of disease association and in forensic medicine. The allelic variation at DRB1 is characterized by combinations of a limited number of amino-acid motifs, reducing the resolution of a typing strategy based on a single PCR and subsequent analysis of polymorphic motifs. In the present paper we describe a strategy for typing of DRB1 based on eight allele-specific PCRs followed by sandwich hybridization to immobilized probes in a microplate format. The combined approach results in a rapid typing system with very high resolution. Using a rapid DNA extraction protocol, a complete HLA-DRB1 typing can be performed in less than a day.

  • 11.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Kalantari, M.
    Ylitalo, Natalie
    Pettersson, B.
    Hagmar, B.
    Scheibenflug, L.
    Johansson, B.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    HLA DQ-DR haplotype and susceptibility to cervical carcinoma: indications of increased risk for development of cervical carcinoma in individuals infected with HPV 181996In: Tissue Antigens, ISSN 0001-2815, E-ISSN 1399-0039, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association of HLA class II DQB1 and DRB1 alleles with the development of cervical carcinoma was studied in 150 Swedish patients using PCR-based HPV and HLA typing. The association of cervical carcinoma with alleles encoding the DQ3 antigen, previously found among German and Norwegian patients, was not observed in the Swedish patients. Five DQ-DR haplotypes were indicated to be positively associated with development of cervical carcinoma in the Swedish patients. Two of these HLA associations were specific for HPV 18 infected patients, suggesting that the ability of the oncogenic HPV 18 to cause more rapid-transit tumors than other high risk HPV types may be due to a deficiency in antigen presentation by the HLA molecules encoded by carried on these haplotypes.

  • 12.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Saldeen, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Allele-specific HLA-DRB1 amplification of forensic evidence samples with mixed genotypes1995In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 454-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major problem in analyzing forensic casework samples is the presence of genetic material from more than one individual in the material evidence. For instance, in sexual assault cases the evidence (vaginal swabs) usually contains a majority of vaginal epithelial cells and varying amounts of sperm cells from the perpetrator. Samples with mixed genotypes are also common among other biological evidence materials such as nail scrapes and mixed bloodstains. We have developed an allele-specific amplification system for the highly polymorphic HLA class II DRB1 locus that permits the detection of individual alleles in a sample with mixed genotypes, independent of the initial frequency of the alleles. Using a set of eight allele-specific amplification primers and typing the amplified fragments with sequence-specific probes, most of the 60 DRB1 alleles can be resolved. The method is highly specific and sensitive, with the potential for amplifying 15 copies of a particular allele in a background of 3 x 10(5) copies of other alleles. The method was successfully applied to three forensic cases, where the material evidence consisted of sperm stains on panties, nail scrapes and bloodstains on skin. Thus the DRB1 allele-specific amplification system can be employed for the unambiguous determination of the presence of individual alleles in materials suspected to contain mixed genotypes, even when the alleles of interest constitute only a small fraction of the total DNA

  • 13.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Saldeen, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    PCR-based DNA typing of saliva on stamps and envelopes1994In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 546-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In forensic cases involving mail bombs, extortion, kidnapping or threatening letters, biological evidence such as the saliva used to attach the stamp and seal the envelope could be used for genetic analysis. We have developed a highly sensitive semi-nested PCR method for the HLA-DRB1 locus; suitable for the analyses of very limited amounts of DNA. When applied to a set of stamps and envelopes with saliva from control individuals, typing results were consistent with those obtained using hairs drawn from the same individuals. No interference was found due to DNA from the fingerprints of people handling the letters. The system was applied to three forensic cases with threatening letters. The first case resulted in an exclusion of the suspect. In the second case, the suspect could not be excluded (probability of identical genotype by chance > 0.01). These results demonstrate that biological evidence in cases with threatening letters is amenable to genetic typing.

  • 14.
    Ameur, Adam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Bunikis, Ignas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    CanvasDB: a local database infrastructure for analysis of targeted- and whole genome re-sequencing projects2014In: Database: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation, ISSN 1758-0463, E-ISSN 1758-0463, p. bau098-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CanvasDB is an infrastructure for management and analysis of genetic variants from massively parallel sequencing (MPS) projects. The system stores SNP and indel calls in a local database, designed to handle very large datasets, to allow for rapid analysis using simple commands in R. Functional annotations are included in the system, making it suitable for direct identification of disease-causing mutations in human exome-(WES) or whole-genome sequencing (WGS) projects. The system has a built-in filtering function implemented to simultaneously take into account variant calls from all individual samples. This enables advanced comparative analysis of variant distribution between groups of samples, including detection of candidate causative mutations within family structures and genome-wide association by sequencing. In most cases, these analyses are executed within just a matter of seconds, even when there are several hundreds of samples and millions of variants in the database. We demonstrate the scalability of canvasDB by importing the individual variant calls from all 1092 individuals present in the 1000 Genomes Project into the system, over 4.4 billion SNPs and indels in total. Our results show that canvasDB makes it possible to perform advanced analyses of large-scale WGS projects on a local server.

  • 15.
    Ameur, Adam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaboli, Ghazal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Igl, Wilmar
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Anna C. V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rivas, Manuel A.
    Daly, Mark J.
    Schmitz, Gerd
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van Duijn, Cornelia
    Oostra, Ben
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Rudan, Igor
    Wright, Alan F.
    Wilson, James F.
    Campbell, Harry
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genetic Adaptation of Fatty-Acid Metabolism: A Human-Specific Haplotype Increasing the Biosynthesis of Long-Chain Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids2012In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 809-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Omega-3 and omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are essential for the development and function of the human brain. They can be obtained directly from food, e.g., fish, or synthesized from precursor molecules found in vegetable oils. To determine the importance of genetic variability to fatty-acid biosynthesis, we studied FADS1 and FADS2, which encode rate-limiting enzymes for fatty-acid conversion. We performed genome-wide genotyping (n = 5,652 individuals) and targeted resequencing (n = 960 individuals) of the FADS region in five European population cohorts. We also analyzed available genomic data from human populations, archaic hominins, and more distant primates. Our results show that present-day humans have two common FADS haplotypes-defined by 28 closely linked SNPs across 38.9 kb-that differ dramatically in their ability to generate LC-PUFAs. No independent effects on FADS activity were seen for rare SNPs detected by targeted resequencing. The more efficient, evolutionarily derived haplotype appeared after the lineage split leading to modern humans and Neanderthals and shows evidence of positive selection. This human-specific haplotype increases the efficiency of synthesizing essential long-chain fatty acids from precursors and thereby might have provided an advantage in environments with limited access to dietary LC-PUFAs. In the modern world, this haplotype has been associated with lifestyle-related diseases, such as coronary artery disease.

  • 16.
    Ameur, Adam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Total RNA sequencing reveals nascent transcription and widespread co-transcriptional splicing in the human brain2011In: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, ISSN 1545-9993, E-ISSN 1545-9985, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1435-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcriptome sequencing allows for analysis of mature RNAs at base pair resolution. Here we show that RNA-seq can also be used for studying nascent RNAs undergoing transcription. We sequenced total RNA from human brain and liver and found a large fraction of reads (up to 40%) within introns. Intronic RNAs were abundant in brain tissue, particularly for genes involved in axonal growth and synaptic transmission. Moreover, we detected significant differences in intronic RNA levels between fetal and adult brains. We show that the pattern of intronic sequence read coverage is explained by nascent transcription in combination with co-transcriptional splicing. Further analysis of co-transcriptional splicing indicates a correlation between slowly removed introns and alternative splicing. Our data show that sequencing of total RNA provides unique insight into the transcriptional processes in the cell, with particular importance for normal brain development.

  • 17. Andersson, Sonia
    et al.
    Mints, Miriam
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Lindell, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Gustavsson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Wilander, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Uneven distribution of human papillomavirus 16111 cervical carcinoma in situ and squamous cell carcinoma in older females: A retrospective database study2014In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 1528-1532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 is the dominant cofactor in cervical cancer development. The present report investigated the age-specific prevalence of HPV16 in cervical carcinoma in situ (CIS) in females attending organised cervical cancer screening. A retrospective observational study was performed based on individual data from two databases. A total of 162 females aged between 20 and 65 years from Uppsala County, Sweden with CIS and an HPV test conducted between 2010 and 2011, preceding or concomitant to CIS diagnosis, were included. Females with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n=35) were used for comparison. In total, 96% (n=156) of females with CIS were positive for high-risk HPV; HPV16 was the most prevalent (44.5%), followed by HPV33/52/58 (19.5%), HPV31 (13.1%) and HPV18145 (9.5%). HPV16 was most frequently detected in females with CIS aged between 20 and 29 years (73.6%) and least frequently detected in those aged between 50 and 65 years (33.3%), with a statistically significant age-specific difference (P=0.001). Among the HPV16-positive females, multiple infections were most frequent in the younger age groups. The prevalence of HPV16 in females with CIS decreased with age, whereas a high prevalence of HPV16 remained in females with SCC. These results may indicate that HPV16 has increased oncogenic potential in older females.

  • 18.
    Andréasson, H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Real-Time DNA Quantification of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA in Forensic Analysis2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 402-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of molecular genetic analysis tools has made it possible to analyze most biological materialfound at the scene of a crime. Evidence materials containing DNA quantities too low to be analyzed using nuclear markers can be analyzed using the highly abundant mtDNA. However, there is a shortage of sensitive nDNA and mtDNA quantification assays. In this study, an assay for the quantification of very small amounts of DNA, based on the real-time Taq-Man assay, has been developed. This analysis will provide an estimate of the total number of nDNA copies and the total number of mtDNA molecules in a particular evidence material. The quantification is easy to perform, fast, and requires a minimum of the valuable DNA extracted from the evidence materiaL The results will aid in the evaluation of whether the specific sample is suitable for nDNA or mtDNA analysis. Furthermore, the optimal amount of DNA to be used in further analysis can be estimated ensuring that the analysis is successful and that the DNA is retained for future independent analysis. This assay has significant advantages over existing techniques because of its high sensitivity, accuracy, and the combined analysis of nDNA and mtDNA. Moreover, it has the potential to provide additional information about the presence of inhibitors in forensic samples. Subsequent mitochondrial and nuclear analysis of quantified samples illustrated the potential to predict the number of DNA copies required for a successful analysis in a certain typing assay.

  • 19.
    Andréasson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Rapid quantification and sex determination of forensic evidence materials2003In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, ISSN 0022-1198, E-ISSN 1556-4029, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1280-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA quantification of forensic evidence is very valuable for an optimal use of the available biological material. Moreover, sex determination is of great importance as additional information in criminal investigations as well as in identification of missing persons, no suspect cases, and ancient DNA studies. While routine forensic DNA analysis based on short tandem repeat markers includes a marker for sex determination, analysis of samples containing scarce amounts of DNA is often based on mitochondrial DNA, and sex determination is not performed. In order to allow quantification and simultaneous sex determination on minute amounts of DNA, an assay based on real-time PCR analysis of a marker within the human amelogenin gene has been developed. The sex determination is based on melting curve analysis, while an externally standardized kinetic analysis allows quantification of the nuclear DNA copy number in the sample. This real-time DNA quantification assay has proven to be highly sensitive, enabling quantification of single DNA copies. Although certain limitations were apparent, the system is a rapid, cost-effective, and flexible assay for analysis of forensic casework samples.

  • 20.
    Andréasson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Asp, Allan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Alderborn, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mitochondrial sequence analysis for forensic identification using Pyrosequencing technology2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 124-6, 128, 130-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over recent years, requests for mtDNA analysis in the field of forensic medicine have notably increased, and the results of such analyses have proved to be very useful in forensic cases where nuclear DNA analysis cannot be performed. Traditionally, mtDNA has been analyzed by DNA sequencing of the two hypervariable regions, HVI and HVII, in the D-loop. DNA sequence analysis using the conventional Sanger sequencing is very robust but time consuming and labor intensive. By contrast, mtDNA analysis based on the pyrosequencing technology provides fast and accurate results from the human mtDNA present in many types of evidence materials in forensic casework. The assay has been developed to determine polymorphic sites in the mitochondrial D-loop as well as the coding region to further increase the discrimination power of mtDNA analysis. The pyrosequencing technology for analysis of mtDNA polymorphisms has been tested with regard to sensitivity, reproducibility, and success rate when applied to control samples and actual casework materials. The results show that the method is very accurate and sensitive; the results are easily interpreted and provide a high success rate on casework samples. The panel of pyrosequencing reactions for the mtDNA polymorphisms were chosen to result in an optimal discrimination power in relation to the number of bases determined.

  • 21.
    Andréasson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Martina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lundberg, Hans
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA quantification of various forensic materials2006In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 164, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the different types and quality of forensic evidence materials, their DNA content can vary substantially, and particularly low quantities can impact the results in an identification analysis. In this study, the quantity of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA was determined in a variety of materials using a previously described real-time PCR method. DNA quantification in the roots and distal sections of plucked and shed head hairs revealed large variations in DNA content particularly between the root and the shaft of plucked hairs. Also large intra- and inter-individual variations were found among hairs. In additions DNA content was estimated in samples collected from fingerprints and accessories. The quantification of DNA on various items also displayed large variations, with some materials containing large amounts of nuclear DNA while no detectable nuclear DNA and only limited amounts of mitochondrial DNA were seen in others. Using this sensitive real-time PCR quantification assay, a better understanding was obtained regarding DNA content and variation in commonly analysed forensic evidence materials and this may guide the forensic scientist as to the best molecular biology approach for analysing various forensic evidence materials.

  • 22.
    Arendt, Maja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Axelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes2014In: Animal Genetics, ISSN 0268-9146, E-ISSN 1365-2052, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 716-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus.

  • 23.
    Artemenko, Konstantin A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lind, Sara Bergström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mayrhofer, Corina
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Optimization of immunoaffinity enrichment and detection: toward a comprehensive characterization of the phosphotyrosine proteome of K562 cells by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry2011In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 136, no 9, p. 1971-1978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues regulates many cell functions and has also been proved to be involved in oncogenesis. Thus, the identification of the phosphotyrosine (pTyr) proteome of cells is a very important task. Since tyrosine phosphorylation represents only around 1% of the total human phosphoproteome, the study of pTyr proteins is rather challenging. Here we report the optimization study of the phosphotyrosine proteome using K562 cells as a model system. A substantial segment of the phosphotyrosine proteome of K562 cells was characterized by immunoaffinity enrichment with 4G10 and PYKD1 antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. 480 non-redundant pTyr peptides corresponding to 342 pTyr proteins were found. 141 pTyr peptides were not described elsewhere. The mass spectrometry approach involving high-resolving FTMS analysis of precursor ions and subsequent detection of CID fragments in a linear ion trap was considered as optimal. For detection of low abundant pTyr peptides pooling of individual immunoaffinity enrichments for one LC-MS/MS analysis was crucial. The enrichment properties of the monoclonal PYKD1 antibody were presented for the first time, also in comparison to the 4G10 antibody. PYKD1 was found to be more effective for protein enrichment (1.2 and 5% efficiency at peptide and protein level correspondingly), while 4G10 showed better results when peptide enrichment was performed (15% efficiency versus 3.6% at protein level). Substantially different subsets of the phosphoproteome were enriched by these antibodies. This finding together with previous studies demonstrates that comprehensive pTyr proteome characterization by immunoprecipitation requires multiple antibodies to be used for the affinity enrichment.

  • 24. Baranowska Korberg, Izabella
    et al.
    Sundström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Meadows, Jennifer R. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pielberg, Gerli Rosengren
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Gustafson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hedhammar, Ake
    Karlsson, Elinor K.
    Seddon, Jennifer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Soderberg, Arne
    Vila, Carles
    Zhang, Xiaolan
    Akesson, Mikael
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Goran
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    A Simple Repeat Polymorphism in the MITF-M Promoter Is a Key Regulator of White Spotting in Dogs2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, p. e104363-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The white spotting locus (S) in dogs is colocalized with the MITF (microphtalmia-associated transcription factor) gene. The phenotypic effects of the four S alleles range from solid colour (S) to extreme white spotting (s(w)). We have investigated four candidate mutations associated with the s(w) allele, a SINE insertion, a SNP at a conserved site and a simple repeat polymorphism all associated with the MITF-M promoter as well as a 12 base pair deletion in exon 1B. The variants associated with white spotting at all four loci were also found among wolves and we conclude that none of these could be a sole causal mutation, at least not for extreme white spotting. We propose that the three canine white spotting alleles are not caused by three independent mutations but represent haplotype effects due to different combinations of causal polymorphisms. The simple repeat polymorphism showed extensive diversity both in dogs and wolves, and allele-sharing was common between wolves and white spotted dogs but was non-existent between solid and spotted dogs as well as between wolves and solid dogs. This finding was unexpected as Solid is assumed to be the wild-type allele. The data indicate that the simple repeat polymorphism has been a target for selection during dog domestication and breed formation. We also evaluated the significance of the three MITF-M associated polymorphisms with a Luciferase assay, and found conclusive evidence that the simple repeat polymorphism affects promoter activity. Three alleles associated with white spotting gave consistently lower promoter activity compared with the allele associated with solid colour. We propose that the simple repeat polymorphism affects cooperativity between transcription factors binding on either flanking sides of the repeat. Thus, both genetic and functional evidence show that the simple repeat polymorphism is a key regulator of white spotting in dogs.

  • 25. Berger, Itai
    et al.
    Dor, Talya
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Edvardson, Simon
    Shaag, Avraham
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Elpeleg, Orly
    Intractable epilepsy of infancy due to homozygous mutation in the EFHC1 gene2012In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1436-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: 

    The molecular etiology of primary intractable epilepsy in infancy is largely unknown. We studied a nonconsanguineous Moroccan-Jewish family, where three of their seven children presented with intractable seizures and died at 18-36 months.

    Methods: 

    Homozygous regions were searched using 250 K DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The sequence of 50 Mb exome of a single patient was determined using SOLiD 5500XL deep sequencing analyzer.

    Key Findings:

    A single homozygous 11.3 Mb genomic region on chromosome 6 was linked to the disease in this family. This region contained 110 genes encoding a total of 1,000 exons. Whole exome sequencing revealed a single pathogenic homozygous variant within the critical region. The mutation, Phe229Leu in the EFHC1 gene was previously shown, in a carrier state, to be associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Significance: 

    Although heterozygosity for the Phe229Leu mutation is known to be associated with a relatively benign form of epilepsy in adolescence; homozygosity for the same mutation is associated with lethal epilepsy of infancy. Given the considerable carrier rate of this mutation worldwide, the sequence of the EFHC1 gene should be determined in all patients with primary intractable epilepsy in infancy.

  • 26.
    Bergström Lind, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Artemenko, Konstantin A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhao, Yanhong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The phosphoproteome of the adenovirus type 2 virion2012In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 433, no 1, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used a proteomics approach to identify sites of phosphorylation in the structural proteins of the Adenovirus type 2 particle. This protein modification might play an important role during infection. Peptides from highly purified virus were enriched for phosphorylations and analyzed by liquid chromatography-high-resolving mass spectrometry. Phosphorylations were identified in 11 structural peptides and 29 non-redundant phosphorylation sites were unambiguously assigned to specific amino acid. An unexpected result was the finding of phosphotyrosine in two of the viral polypeptides. The most highly phosphorylated protein was pIIIa with 12 identified phosphorylation sites. An identified preference for proline or leucine residue flanking the phosphorylation sites downstream suggests that cellular kinases are involved in many of the phosphorylations. Structural modeling showed that one site in the hexon is located on the outer side of the virus and could be of importance for the virus when attaching and entering cells.

  • 27.
    Bergström Lind, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Artemenko, Konstantin A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    A strategy for identification of protein tyrosine phosphorylation2012In: Methods, ISSN 1046-2023, E-ISSN 1095-9130, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 275-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To develop methods for studying phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is an important task since this protein modification regulates many cellular functions and often is involved in oncogenesis. An optimal protocol includes enrichment of tyrosine phosphorylated (pTyr) peptides or proteins, followed by a high resolving analytical method for identification of the enriched components. In this Methods paper, we describe a working strategy on how immunoaffinity enrichments, using anti-pTyr antibodies, combined with mass spectrometric (MS) analysis can be used to study the pTyr proteome. We describe in detail how our procedure was used to characterize the pTyr proteome of K562 leukemia cells. Important questions concerning the use of different anti-pTyr antibodies, enrichments performed at the peptide and/or the protein level, pooling of enrichments and requirements for the MS characterization are discussed.

  • 28. Berndt, Sonja I.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maegi, Reedik
    Ganna, Andrea
    Wheeler, Eleanor
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Justice, Anne E.
    Monda, Keri L.
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.
    Day, Felix R.
    Esko, Tonu
    Fall, Tove
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Gentilini, Davide
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Randall, Joshua C.
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Willer, Cristen J.
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Wood, Andrew R.
    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie
    Hu, Yi-Juan
    Lee, Sang Hong
    Liang, Liming
    Lin, Dan-Yu
    Min, Josine L.
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Yang, Jian
    Albrecht, Eva
    Amin, Najaf
    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.
    Cadby, Gemma
    den Heijer, Martin
    Eklund, Niina
    Fischer, Krista
    Goel, Anuj
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    Jarick, Ivonne
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnson, Toby
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Koenig, Inke R.
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Kutalik, Zoltn
    Lamina, Claudia
    Lecoeur, Cecile
    Li, Guo
    Mangino, Massimo
    McArdle, Wendy L.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Paternoster, Lavinia
    Pechlivanis, Sonali
    Perola, Markus
    Peters, Marjolein J.
    Preuss, Michael
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Shi, Jianxin
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Surakka, Ida
    Teumer, Alexander
    Trip, Mieke D.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Waite, Lindsay L.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Absher, Devin
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Atalay, Mustafa
    Attwood, Antony P.
    Balmforth, Anthony J.
    Basart, Hanneke
    Beilby, John
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Campbell, Harry
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Chines, Peter S.
    Collins, Francis S.
    Connell, John M.
    Cookson, William O.
    de Faire, Ulf
    de Vegt, Femmie
    Dei, Mariano
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Edkins, Sarah
    Estrada, Karol
    Evans, David M.
    Farrall, Martin
    Ferrario, Marco M.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Franke, Lude
    Frau, Francesca
    Gejman, Pablo V.
    Grallert, Harald
    Groenberg, Henrik
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hall, Alistair S.
    Hall, Per
    Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa
    Hayward, Caroline
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L.
    Heath, Andrew C.
    Hebebrand, Johannes
    Homuth, Georg
    Hu, Frank B.
    Hunt, Sarah E.
    Hyppoenen, Elina
    Iribarren, Carlos
    Jacobs, Kevin B.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Jula, Antti
    Kahonen, Mika
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Kee, Frank
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Laitinen, Jaana H.
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindstrom, Jaana
    Liu, Jianjun
    Liuzzi, Antonio
    Lokki, Marja-Liisa
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Madden, Pamela A.
    Magnusson, Patrik K.
    Manunta, Paolo
    Marek, Diana
    Maerz, Winfried
    Leach, Irene Mateo
    McKnight, Barbara
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Milani, Lili
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Mooser, Vincent
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Munroe, Patricia B.
    Musk, Arthur W.
    Narisu, Narisu
    Navis, Gerjan
    Nicholson, George
    Nohr, Ellen A.
    Ong, Ken K.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Peden, John F.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Peters, Annette
    Polasek, Ozren
    Pouta, Anneli
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Puetter, Carolin
    Radhakrishnan, Aparna
    Raitakari, Olli
    Rendon, Augusto
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Rudan, Igor
    Saaristo, Timo E.
    Sambrook, Jennifer G.
    Sanders, Alan R.
    Sanna, Serena
    Saramies, Jouko
    Schipf, Sabine
    Schreiber, Stefan
    Schunkert, Heribert
    Shin, So-Youn
    Signorini, Stefano
    Sinisalo, Juha
    Skrobek, Boris
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Stancakova, Alena
    Stark, Klaus
    Stephens, Jonathan C.
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Stolk, Ronald P.
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Swift, Amy J.
    Theodoraki, Eirini V.
    Thorand, Barbara
    Tregouet, David-Alexandre
    Tremoli, Elena
    Van der Klauw, Melanie M.
    van Meurs, Joyce B. J.
    Vermeulen, Sita H.
    Viikari, Jorma
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Vitart, Veronique
    Waeber, Gerard
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Wild, Sarah H.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Winkelmann, Bernhard R.
    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.
    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.
    Wong, Andrew
    Wright, Alan F.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Caulfield, Mark J.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Cusi, Daniele
    Dedoussis, George V.
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gieger, Christian
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Hengstenberg, Christian
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Hinney, Anke
    Hofman, Albert
    Hovingh, Kees G.
    Hveem, Kristian
    Illig, Thomas
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Joeckel, Karl-Heinz
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Kuh, Diana
    Laakso, Markku
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Levinson, Douglas F.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Metspalu, Andres
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Njolstad, Inger
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Ouwehand, Willem H.
    Palmer, Lyle J.
    Penninx, Brenda
    Power, Chris
    Province, Michael A.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Qi, Lu
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Snieder, Harold
    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Tonjes, Anke
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    van der Harst, Pim
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Watkins, Hugh
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Wilson, James F.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Assimes, Themistocles L.
    Barroso, Ines
    Boehnke, Michael
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fox, Caroline S.
    Frayling, Timothy
    Groop, Leif C.
    Haritunian, Talin
    Heid, Iris M.
    Hunter, David
    Kaplan, Robert C.
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Moffatt, Miriam F.
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R.
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Schadt, Eric E.
    Schlessinger, David
    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur
    Strachan, David P.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Visscher, Peter M.
    Di Blasio, Anna Maria
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Meyre, David
    Scherag, Andr
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
    North, Kari E.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture2013In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 501-U69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.

  • 29. Berndt, Sonja I.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maegi, Reedik
    Ganna, Andrea
    Wheeler, Eleanor
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Justice, Anne E.
    Monda, Keri L.
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.
    Day, Felix R.
    Esko, Tonu
    Fall, Tove
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Gentilini, Davide
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Randall, Joshua C.
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Willer, Cristen J.
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Wood, Andrew R.
    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie
    Hu, Yi-Juan
    Lee, Sang Hong
    Liang, Liming
    Lin, Dan-Yu
    Min, Josine L.
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Yang, Jian
    Albrecht, Eva
    Amin, Najaf
    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.
    Cadby, Gemma
    den Heijer, Martin
    Eklund, Niina
    Fischer, Krista
    Goel, Anuj
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    Jarick, Ivonne
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnson, Toby
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Koenig, Inke R.
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Kutalik, Zoltn
    Lamina, Claudia
    Lecoeur, Cecile
    Li, Guo
    Mangino, Massimo
    McArdle, Wendy L.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Paternoster, Lavinia
    Pechlivanis, Sonali
    Perola, Markus
    Peters, Marjolein J.
    Preuss, Michael
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Shi, Jianxin
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Surakka, Ida
    Teumer, Alexander
    Trip, Mieke D.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Waite, Lindsay L.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Absher, Devin
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Atalay, Mustafa
    Attwood, Antony P.
    Balmforth, Anthony J.
    Basart, Hanneke
    Beilby, John
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Campbell, Harry
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Chines, Peter S.
    Collins, Francis S.
    Connell, John M.
    Cookson, William O.
    de Faire, Ulf
    de Vegt, Femmie
    Dei, Mariano
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Edkins, Sarah
    Estrada, Karol
    Evans, David M.
    Farrall, Martin
    Ferrario, Marco M.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Franke, Lude
    Frau, Francesca
    Gejman, Pablo V.
    Grallert, Harald
    Groenberg, Henrik
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hall, Alistair S.
    Hall, Per
    Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa
    Hayward, Caroline
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L.
    Heath, Andrew C.
    Hebebrand, Johannes
    Homuth, Georg
    Hu, Frank B.
    Hunt, Sarah E.
    Hyppoenen, Elina
    Iribarren, Carlos
    Jacobs, Kevin B.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Jula, Antti
    Kahonen, Mika
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Kee, Frank
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Laitinen, Jaana H.
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindstrom, Jaana
    Liu, Jianjun
    Liuzzi, Antonio
    Lokki, Marja-Liisa
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Madden, Pamela A.
    Magnusson, Patrik K.
    Manunta, Paolo
    Marek, Diana
    Maerz, Winfried
    Leach, Irene Mateo
    McKnight, Barbara
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Milani, Lili
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Mooser, Vincent
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Munroe, Patricia B.
    Musk, Arthur W.
    Narisu, Narisu
    Navis, Gerjan
    Nicholson, George
    Nohr, Ellen A.
    Ong, Ken K.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Peden, John F.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Peters, Annette
    Polasek, Ozren
    Pouta, Anneli
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Puetter, Carolin
    Radhakrishnan, Aparna
    Raitakari, Olli
    Rendon, Augusto
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Rudan, Igor
    Saaristo, Timo E.
    Sambrook, Jennifer G.
    Sanders, Alan R.
    Sanna, Serena
    Saramies, Jouko
    Schipf, Sabine
    Schreiber, Stefan
    Schunkert, Heribert
    Shin, So-Youn
    Signorini, Stefano
    Sinisalo, Juha
    Skrobek, Boris
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Stancakova, Alena
    Stark, Klaus
    Stephens, Jonathan C.
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Stolk, Ronald P.
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Swift, Amy J.
    Theodoraki, Eirini V.
    Thorand, Barbara
    Tregouet, David-Alexandre
    Tremoli, Elena
    Van der Klauw, Melanie M.
    van Meurs, Joyce B. J.
    Vermeulen, Sita H.
    Viikari, Jorma
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Vitart, Veronique
    Waeber, Gerard
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Wild, Sarah H.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Winkelmann, Bernhard R.
    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.
    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.
    Wong, Andrew
    Wright, Alan F.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Caulfield, Mark J.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Cusi, Daniele
    Dedoussis, George V.
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gieger, Christian
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Hengstenberg, Christian
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Hinney, Anke
    Hofman, Albert
    Hovingh, Kees G.
    Hveem, Kristian
    Illig, Thomas
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Joeckel, Karl-Heinz
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Kuh, Diana
    Laakso, Markku
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Levinson, Douglas F.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Metspalu, Andres
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Njolstad, Inger
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Ouwehand, Willem H.
    Palmer, Lyle J.
    Penninx, Brenda
    Power, Chris
    Province, Michael A.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Qi, Lu
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Snieder, Harold
    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Tonjes, Anke
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    van der Harst, Pim
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Watkins, Hugh
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Wilson, James F.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Assimes, Themistocles L.
    Barroso, Ines
    Boehnke, Michael
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fox, Caroline S.
    Frayling, Timothy
    Groop, Leif C.
    Haritunian, Talin
    Heid, Iris M.
    Hunter, David
    Kaplan, Robert C.
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Moffatt, Miriam F.
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R.
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Schadt, Eric E.
    Schlessinger, David
    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur
    Strachan, David P.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Visscher, Peter M.
    Di Blasio, Anna Maria
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Meyre, David
    Scherag, Andr
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
    North, Kari E.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture2013In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 501-U69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.

  • 30.
    Besingi, Welisane
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Smoke-related DNA methylation changes in the etiology of human disease2014In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 2290-2297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors, such as cigarette smoking, affect the epigenome and might mediate risk for diseases and cancers. We have performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study to determine the effect of smoke and snuff (smokeless tobacco) on DNA methylation. A total of 95 sites were differentially methylated [false discovery rate (FDR) q-values < 0.05] in smokers and a subset of the differentially methylated loci were also differentially expressed in smokers. We found no sites, neither any biological functions nor molecular processes enriched for smoke-less tobacco-related differential DNA methylation. This suggests that methylation changes are not caused by the basic components of the tobacco but from its burnt products. Instead, we see a clear enrichment (FDR q-value < 0.05) for genes, including CPOX, CDKN1A and PTK2, involved in response to arsenic-containing substance, which agrees with smoke containing small amounts of arsenic. A large number of biological functions and molecular processes with links to disease conditions are also enriched (FDR q-value < 0.05) for smoke-related DNA methylation changes. These include 'insulin receptor binding', and 'negative regulation of glucose import' which are associated with diabetes, 'positive regulation of interleukin-6-mediated signaling pathway', 'regulation of T-helper 2 cell differentiation', 'positive regulation of interleukin-13 production' which are associated with the immune system and 'sertoli cell fate commitment' which is important for male fertility. Since type 2 diabetes, repressed immune system and infertility have previously been associated with smoking, our results suggest that this might be mediated by DNA methylation changes.

  • 31.
    Bornelöv, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Komorowski, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Visualization of Rules in Rule-Based Classifiers2012In: INTELLIGENT DECISION TECHNOLOGIES (IDT'2012), VOL 1, 2012, Vol. 15, p. 329-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpretation and visualization of the classification models are important parts of machine learning. Rule-based classifiers often contain too many rules to be easily interpreted by humans, and methods for post-classification analysis of the rules are needed. Here we present a strategy for circular visualization of sets of classification rules. The Circos software was used to generate graphs showing all pairs of conditions that were present in the rules as edges inside a circle. We showed using simulated data that all two-way interactions in the data were found by the classifier and displayed in the graph, although the single attributes were constructed to have no correlation to the decision class. For all examples we used rules trained using the rough set theory, but the visualization would by applicable to any sort of classification rules. This method for rule visualization may be useful for applications where interaction terms are expected, and the size of the model limits the interpretability.

  • 32. Bruzzese, Francesca
    et al.
    Hagglof, Christina
    Leone, Alessandra
    Sjoberg, Elin
    Roca, Maria Serena
    Kiflemariam, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Egevad, Lars
    Bergh, Anders
    Ostman, Arne
    Budillon, Alfredo
    Augsten, Martin
    Local and Systemic Protumorigenic Effects of Cancer-Associated Fibroblast-Derived GDF152014In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 74, no 13, p. 3408-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tumor stroma is vital to tumor development, progression, and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are among the abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, but the range of their contributions to cancer pathogenicity has yet to be fully understood. Here, we report a critical role for upregulation of the TGF beta/BMP family member GDF15 (MIC-1) in tumor stroma. GDF15 was found upregulated in situ and in primary cultures of CAF from prostate cancer. Ectopic expression of GDF15 in fibroblasts produced prominent paracrine effects on prostate cancer cell migration, invasion, and tumor growth. Notably, GDF15-expressing fibroblasts exerted systemic in vivo effects on the outgrowth of distant and otherwise indolent prostate cancer cells. Our findings identify tumor stromal cells as a novel source of GDF15 in human prostate cancer and illustrate a systemic mechanism of cancer progression driven by the tumor microenvironment. Further, they provide a functional basis to understand GDF15 as a biomarker of poor prognosis and a candidate therapeutic target in prostate cancer. 

  • 33.
    Bus, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Collecting and Preserving Biological Samples from Challenging Environments for DNA Analysis2014In: Biopreservation and Biobanking, ISSN 1947-5535, E-ISSN 1947-5543, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bus, Magdalena M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Zmihorski, Michal
    Romanowski, Jerzy
    Balciauskiene, Laima
    Cichocki, Jan
    Balciauskas, Linas
    High efficiency protocol of DNA extraction from Micromys minutus mandibles from owl pellets: a tool for molecular research of cryptic mammal species2014In: Acta Theriologica, ISSN 0001-7051, E-ISSN 2190-3743, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owl pellets have high potential as a source of DNA. However, this noninvasive method of collecting DNA is rarely used, and its methodological aspects are poorly understood. We investigated the methodology for DNA extraction and amplification from owl pellets containing the smallest European rodent-the Harvest mouse Micromys minutus-as an example. We used mandibles identified in owl pellets for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA amplification. For DNA extraction, we tested two commercial protocols and utilized a protocol being a combination of two commercial kits which ensured high efficiency of DNA extraction. Additionally, we recorded that the amount of DNA was five times higher in extracts from teeth as compared to DNA extracts from jawbones derived from the same mandible. The quantity of DNA was significantly positively correlated with biological sample weight; however, the age of the pellet remains had an impact on the level of inhibition. We recorded inhibition in 40 % of mtDNA extracts derived from pellets older than 150 months, whereas in DNA extracts from pellets younger than 80 months, we did not observe a negative impact of inhibition on PCR efficiency. The amplification success rate was 89.9 % for the mitochondrial fragment and 39.4 % in the case of the nuclear fragment. We observed partial degradation of DNA evidenced by the fact that the longest fragments that we were able to amplify in the case of mtDNA were 450 and 200 bp for nuDNA. The study shows that pellets can be considered as a source of DNA and have high potential for molecular research in the case of threatened species and species that are difficult to study using standard field techniques.

  • 35.
    Bysani, Madhu Sudhan Reddy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bornelöv, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zatloukal, Kurt
    Komorowski, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wadelius, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    ChIP-seq in steatohepatitis and normal liver tissue identifies candidate disease mechanisms related to progression to cancer2013In: BMC Medical Genomics, ISSN 1755-8794, E-ISSN 1755-8794, Vol. 6, p. 50-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Steatohepatitis occurs in alcoholic liver disease and may progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Its molecular pathogenesis is to a large degree unknown. Histone modifications play a key role in transcriptional regulations as marks for silencing and activation of gene expression and as marks for functional elements. Many transcription factors (TFs) are crucial for the control of the genes involved in metabolism, and abnormality in their function may lead to disease. Methods: We performed ChIP-seq of the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3 and H3K27ac and a candidate transcription factor (USF1) in liver tissue from patients with steatohepatitis and normal livers and correlated results to mRNA-expression and genotypes. Results: We found several regions that are differentially enriched for histone modifications between disease and normal tissue, and qRT-PCR results indicated that the expression of the tested genes strongly correlated with differential enrichment of histone modifications but is independent of USF1 enrichment. By gene ontology analysis of differentially modified genes we found many disease associated genes, some of which had previously been implicated in the etiology of steatohepatitis. Importantly, the genes associated to the strongest histone peaks in the patient were over-represented in cancer specific pathways suggesting that the tissue was on a path to develop to cancer, a common complication to the disease. We also found several novel SNPs and GWAS catalogue SNPs that are candidates to be functional and therefore needs further study. Conclusion: In summary we find that analysis of chromatin features in tissue samples provides insight into disease mechanisms.

  • 36.
    Cahill, Nicola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Knutson, Carina
    Orebrand, Ulrika
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Bengtsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    HLA Typing By SMRT Sequencing: Advantages Of Full Length HLA Genotyping In Clinical Routine2014In: Tissue Antigens, ISSN 0001-2815, E-ISSN 1399-0039, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 113-113Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Cahill, Nicola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Murray, Fiona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Gunnarsson, Rebeqa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Ryan, Fergus
    Ekström-Smedby, Karin
    Geisler, Christian
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    IGHV3-21 Gene Frequency in a Swedish Cohort of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2012In: Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma & Leukemia, ISSN 2152-2650, E-ISSN 2152-2669, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IGHV3-21 gene has been shown to be overrepresented in Scandinavian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). By investigating a population-based cohort of 337 Swedish patients with CLL, a lower (6.5%) IGHV3-21 frequency was determined relative to our previous hospital-based studies (10.1%-12.7%), yet this frequency remained higher compared to other Western CLL cohorts (2.6%-4.1%). Furthermore, we confirmed the poor outcome for patients with IGHV3-21 to be independent of mutational and stereotypy status. Background: Scandinavian patients with CLL have shown an overrepresentation of the poor-prognostic IGHV3-21 gene. Furthermore, approximately 50% of patients with IGHV3-21 carry stereotyped B-cell receptors, which implicate antigen selection in leukemogenesis. These patients have also been reported to have shorter time to progression than patients with nonstereotyped IGHV3-21. Materials and Methods: To investigate the IGHV3-21 frequency and the clinical impact of IGHV3-21 stereotypy, 337 newly diagnosed Swedish CLL patients from a population-based cohort were analyzed. Results: Interestingly, the IGHV3-21 frequency was indeed lower (6.5%) in this indolent patient cohort than in our previous hospital-based cohort studies (10.1%-12.7%). Hence, a selection bias of more-aggressive cases rendered a higher proportion of IGHV3-21 cases in our original studies. Nevertheless, the Swedish IGHV3-21 frequency still remained higher when compared with other larger European or American studies (2.6%-4.1%). Finally, we confirmed the poor outcome for IGHV3-21 patients to be independent of mutational status and found stereotypy to have no impact on survival or time to treatment. Conclusion: The Swedish geographic bias in IGHV3-21 gene frequency was validated albeit at a lower frequency than previously reported. Moreover, no prognostic value could be attributed to IGHV3-21 stereotype status.

  • 38. Castillejo-Lopez, Casimiro
    et al.
    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Wojcik, Jerome
    Kozyrev, Sergey V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Thavathiru, Elangovan
    Wu, Ying-Yu
    Sanchez, Elena
    Pöllmann, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lopez-Egido, Juan R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fineschi, Serena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Dominguez, Nicolas
    Lu, Rufei
    James, Judith A.
    Merrill, Joan T.
    Kelly, Jennifer A.
    Kaufman, Kenneth M.
    Moser, Kathy L.
    Gilkeson, Gary
    Frostegård, Johan
    Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.
    D'Alfonso, Sandra
    Witte, Torsten
    Luis Callejas, Jose
    Harley, John B.
    Gaffney, Patrick M.
    Martin, Javier
    Guthridge, Joel M.
    Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.
    Genetic and physical interaction of the B-cell systemic lupus erythematosus-associated genes BANK1 and BLK2012In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Altered signalling in B cells is a predominant feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The genes BANK1 and BLK were recently described as associated with SLE. BANK1 codes for a B-cell-specific cytoplasmic protein involved in B-cell receptor signalling and BLK codes for an Src tyrosine kinase with important roles in B-cell development. To characterise the role of BANK1 and BLK in SLE, a genetic interaction analysis was performed hypothesising that genetic interactions could reveal functional pathways relevant to disease pathogenesis.

    Methods

    The GPAT16 method was used to analyse the gene-gene interactions of BANK1 and BLK. Confocal microscopy was used to investigate co-localisation, and immunoprecipitation was used to verify the physical interaction of BANK1 and BLK.

    Results

    Epistatic interactions between BANK1 and BLK polymorphisms associated with SLE were observed in a discovery set of 279 patients and 515 controls from northern Europe. A meta-analysis with 4399 European individuals confirmed the genetic interactions between BANK1 and BLK. As BANK1 was identified as a binding partner of the Src tyrosine kinase LYN, the possibility that BANK1 and BLK could also show a protein-protein interaction was tested. The co-immunoprecipitation and co-localisation of BLK and BANK1 were demonstrated. In a Daudi cell line and primary naive B cells endogenous binding was enhanced upon B-cell receptor stimulation using anti-IgM antibodies.

    Conclusions

    This study shows a genetic interaction between BANK1 and BLK, and demonstrates that these molecules interact physically. The results have important consequences for the understanding of SLE and other autoimmune diseases and identify a potential new signalling pathway.

  • 39. Castro, Felipe A
    et al.
    Ivansson, Emma L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Schmitt, Markus
    Juko-Pecirep, Ivana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Kjellberg, Lennart
    Hildesheim, Allan
    Gyllensten, Ulf B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Pawlita, Michael
    Contribution of TMC6 and TMC8 (EVER1 and EVER2) variants to cervical cancer susceptibility2012In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 349-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cervical cancer (CxCa) is caused by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection; genetic predisposition is also suspected to play a role. Our study is a targeted candidate gene follow-up based on: (i) strong clinical evidence demonstrating that mutations in the TMC6 and TMC8 (EVER1 and EVER2) genes associate with the HPV-associated disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) and (ii) recent epidemiological data suggesting a genetic susceptibility conferred by polymorphisms in such genes for skin and CxCa. Clarifying the association of the TMC6/8 genes with risk of CxCa will help in understanding why some HPV-infected women develop persistent infection, cervical lesions and eventually cancer while others do not. Twenty-two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) harboring the TMC6/8 genes were genotyped in 2,989 cases with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III or invasive CxCa and 2,281 controls from the Swedish population. Association was evaluated in logistic regression models. Two SNPs displayed association with cervical disease: rs2290907 [odds ratio (OR)(GGvsAA) = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.3-0.9, p = 0.02)] and rs16970849 (OR(AGvsGG) = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.66-0.98, p = 0.03). The present data support the involvement of the TMC6/8 region in CxCa susceptibility but further analyses are needed to replicate our findings, fully characterize the region and understand the function of the genetic variants involved.

  • 40. Chasman, Daniel I.
    et al.
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    Pattaro, Cristian
    Teumer, Alexander
    Boeger, Carsten A.
    Endlich, Karlhans
    Olden, Matthias
    Chen, Ming-Huei
    Tin, Adrienne
    Taliun, Daniel
    Li, Man
    Gao, Xiaoyi
    Gorski, Mathias
    Yang, Qiong
    Hundertmark, Claudia
    Foster, Meredith C.
    O'Seaghdha, Conall M.
    Glazer, Nicole
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Liu, Ching-Ti
    Smith, Albert V.
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R.
    Struchalin, Maksim
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Li, Guo
    Johnson, Andrew D.
    Gierman, Hinco J.
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Hwang, Shih-Jen
    Atkinson, Elizabeth J.
    Lohman, Kurt
    Cornelis, Marilyn C.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Toenjes, Anke
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Lambert, Jean-Charles
    Holliday, Elizabeth G.
    Sorice, Rossella
    Kutalik, Zoltan
    Lehtimaeki, Terho
    Esko, Tonu
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Ulivi, Sheila
    Chu, Audrey Y.
    Murgia, Federico
    Trompet, Stella
    Imboden, Medea
    Coassin, Stefan
    Pistis, Giorgio
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Aspelund, Thor
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Mitchell, Braxton D.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Schmidt, Helena
    Cavalieri, Margherita
    Rao, Madhumathi
    Hu, Frank
    Demirkan, Ayse
    Oostra, Ben A.
    de Andrade, Mariza
    Turner, Stephen T.
    Ding, Jingzhong
    Andrews, Jeanette S.
    Freedman, Barry I.
    Giulianini, Franco
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Illig, Thomas
    Meisinger, Christa
    Gieger, Christian
    Zgaga, Lina
    Zemunik, Tatijana
    Boban, Mladen
    Minelli, Cosetta
    Wheeler, Heather E.
    Igl, Wilmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Zaboli, Ghazal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wild, Sarah H.
    Wright, Alan F.
    Campbell, Harry
    Ellinghaus, David
    Noethlings, Ute
    Jacobs, Gunnar
    Biffar, Reiner
    Ernst, Florian
    Homuth, Georg
    Kroemer, Heyo K.
    Nauck, Matthias
    Stracke, Sylvia
    Voelker, Uwe
    Voelzke, Henry
    Kovacs, Peter
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Maegi, Reedik
    Hofman, Albert
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Aulchenko, Yurii S.
    Polasek, Ozren
    Hastie, Nick
    Vitart, Veronique
    Helmer, Catherine
    Wang, Jie Jin
    Stengel, Benedicte
    Ruggiero, Daniela
    Bergmann, Sven
    Kahonen, Mika
    Viikari, Jorma
    Nikopensius, Tiit
    Province, Michael
    Ketkar, Shamika
    Colhoun, Helen
    Doney, Alex
    Robino, Antonietta
    Kraemer, Bernhard K.
    Portas, Laura
    Ford, Ian
    Buckley, Brendan M.
    Adam, Martin
    Thun, Gian-Andri
    Paulweber, Bernhard
    Haun, Margot
    Sala, Cinzia
    Mitchell, Paul
    Ciullo, Marina
    Kim, Stuart K.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Raitakari, Olli
    Metspalu, Andres
    Palmer, Colin
    Gasparini, Paolo
    Pirastu, Mario
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.
    Kronenberg, Florian
    Toniolo, Daniela
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Shuldiner, Alan R.
    Coresh, Josef
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Siscovick, David S.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Kardia, Sharon L. R.
    Liu, Yongmei
    Curhan, Gary C.
    Rudan, Igor
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Wilson, James F.
    Franke, Andre
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Rettig, Rainer
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Witteman, Jacqueline
    Hayward, Caroline
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Parsa, Afshin
    Bochud, Murielle
    Heid, Iris M.
    Kao, W. H. Linda
    Fox, Caroline S.
    Koettgen, Anna
    Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function2012In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 21, no 24, p. 5329-5343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P 5.6 10(9)) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 10(4)2.2 10(7). Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general.

  • 41. Chatzakos, Vicky
    et al.
    Slatis, Katharina
    Djureinovic, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Helleday, Thomas
    Hunt, Mary C.
    N-Acyl Taurines are Anti-Proliferative in Prostate Cancer Cells2012In: Lipids, ISSN 0024-4201, E-ISSN 1558-9307, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endocannabinoids have been implicated in cancer development and cause heterogenous effects in tumor cells, by inducing apoptosis, reducing migration, causing anti-angiogenic activity and alterations in the cell cycle resulting in growth arrest. Recently, several novel amides of fatty acids that are structurally related to endocannabinoids have been isolated from mammalian sources, although the functions of these fatty amides are not well studied. One group of these novel fatty acid amides are the N-acyl taurines (fatty acids conjugated to the amino acid taurine). This study examined if N-acyl taurines, specifically N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine could function in a similar way to endocannabinoids and result in cell cycle alterations or growth arrest in the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line PC-3. PC-3 cells were treated with various concentrations of N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine and cell proliferation and viability was measured using resazurin and colony formation assays. Effects of N-acyl taurines on the cell cycle was measured using FACS analysis. Treatment with N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation of PC-3 cells, even at concentrations as low as 1 mu M. Treatment with N-oleoyl taurine resulted in an increased number of cells in the subG1 population, suggesting apoptosis, and a lower number of cells in S-phase of the cell cycle. In summary, our results show that novel biologically active lipids, the N-acyl taurines, result in reduced proliferation in PC-3 cells.

  • 42.
    Chen, Dan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Ivansson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Pathway analysis of cervical cancer genome-wide association study highlights the MHC region and pathways involved in response to infection2014In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 23, no 22, p. 6047-6060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). A genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified several susceptibility loci for cervical cancer, but they explain only a small fraction of cervical cancer heritability. Other variants with weaker effect may be missed due to the stringent significance threshold. To identify important pathways in cervical carcinogenesis, we performed a two-stage pathway analysis in two independent GWASs in the Swedish population, using the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ratio test. The 565 predefined pathways from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and BioCarta databases were systematically evaluated in the discovery stage (1034 cases and 3948 controls with 632 668 SNPs) and the suggestive pathways were further validated in the replication stage (616 cases and 506 controls with 341 358 SNPs). We found 12 pathways that were significant in both stages, and these were further validated using set-based analysis. For 10 of these pathways, the effect was mainly due to genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. In addition, we identified a set of novel candidate genes outside the MHC region in the pathways denoted ‘Staphylococcus aureus infection’ and ‘herpes simplex infection’ that influenced susceptibility to cervical cancer (empirical P = 4.99 × 10−5 and 4.99 × 10−5 in the discovery study; empirical P = 8.98 × 10−5 and 0.009 in the replication study, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus infection may evoke an inflammatory response that inadvertently enhances malignant progression caused by HPV infection, and Herpes simplex virus-2 infection may act in conjunction with HPV infection to increase the risk of cervical carcinoma development. These findings provide new insights into the etiology of cervical cancer.

  • 43.
    Chen, Dan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Systematic investigation of contribution of genetic variation in the HLA-DP region to cervical cancer susceptibility2014In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1765-1769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared with the other human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, few studies have evaluated the role of HLA-DP genes in cervical cancer pathogenesis. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Swedish population has identified a susceptibility locus for cervical cancer within the HLA-DP region. To further study this locus, we imputed classic HLA alleles using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data and analysed 449 genotyped and 3066 imputed SNPs in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls. We confirmed that the strongest signal came from a SNP located at HLA-DPB2 [rs3117027, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-1.43, P = 1.9 x 10(-6) for A allele] and that this effect is not driven by associations with classic HLA alleles. In silico analysis further revealed that this SNP is highly correlated with rs3129294 (D' = 1, r(2) = 0.95 in controls), which may have a putative regulatory function. We also identified an independent association at DPB1*0402, which conferred decreased risk of cervical cancer (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.63-0.89, P = 7.0 x 10(-4)) and is independent of previously described associations with HLA-B*0702, DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602, and DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603. No association was found with the two SNPs (rs4282438 or rs9277952) that were recently identified within the HLA-DP region in a cervical cancer GWAS in the Chinese population. Our study provides the first systematic investigation of the association of genetic variants in the HLA-DP region with cervical cancer susceptibility and provides further insight into the contribution of polymorphisms in the HLA-DP region to risk of cervical cancer.

  • 44.
    Chen, Dan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Juko-Pecirep, Ivana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hammer, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Ivansson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Gustavsson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    McKay, James D.
    Wilander, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Genome-wide Association Study of Susceptibility Loci for Cervical Cancer2013In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 624-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cervical carcinoma has a heritable genetic component, but the genetic basis of cervical cancer is still not well understood. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study of 731 422 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1075 cervical cancer case subjects and 4014 control subjects and replicated it in 1140 case subjects and 1058 control subjects. The association between top SNPs and cervical cancer was estimated by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Three independent loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region at 6p21.3 were associated with cervical cancer: the first is adjacent to the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA) (rs2516448; OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.31 to 1.54; P = 1.6 x 10(-18)); the second is between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 (rs9272143; OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.72; P = 9.3 x 10(-24)); and the third is at HLA-DPB2 (rs3117027; OR=1.25, 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.35; P = 4.9 x 10(-8)). We also confirmed previously reported associations of B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with susceptibility to and DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 with protection against cervical cancer. The three new loci are statistically independent of these specific human leukocyte antigen alleles/haplotypes. MICA encodes a membrane-bound protein that acts as a ligand for NKG2D to activate antitumor effects. The risk allele of rs2516448 is in perfect linkage disequilibrium with a frameshift mutation (A5.1) of MICA, which results in a truncated protein. Functional analysis shows that women carrying this mutation have lower levels of membrane-bound MICA. Conclusions Three novel loci in the MHC may affect susceptibility to cervical cancer in situ, including the MICA-A5.1 allele that may cause impaired immune activation and increased risk of tumor development.

  • 45. Chiesa, Nicoletta
    et al.
    De Crescenzo, Agostina
    Mishra, Kankadeb
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Perone, Lucia
    Carella, Massimo
    Palumbo, Orazio
    Mussa, Alessandro
    Sparago, Angela
    Cerrato, Flavia
    Russo, Silvia
    Lapi, Elisabetta
    Cubellis, Maria Vittoria
    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Silengo, Margherita Cirillo
    Riccio, Andrea
    Ferrero, Giovanni Battista
    The KCNQ1OT1 imprinting control region and non-coding RNA: new properties derived from the study of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome cases2012In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 10-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cluster of imprinted genes at chromosome 11p15.5 is associated with the growth disorders, Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The cluster is divided into two domains with independent imprinting control regions (ICRs). We describe two maternal 11p15.5 microduplications with contrasting phenotypes. The first is an inverted and in cis duplication of the entire 11p15.5 cluster associated with the maintenance of genomic imprinting and with the SRS phenotype. The second is a 160 kb duplication also inverted and in cis, but resulting in the imprinting alteration of the centromeric domain. It includes the centromeric ICR (ICR2) and the most 5' 20 kb of the non-coding KCNQ1OT1 gene. Its maternal transmission is associated with ICR2 hypomethylation and the BWS phenotype. By excluding epigenetic mosaicism, cell clones analysis indicated that the two closely located ICR2 sequences resulting from the 160 kb duplication carried discordant DNA methylation on the maternal chromosome and supported the hypothesis that the ICR2 sequence is not sufficient for establishing imprinted methylation and some other property, possibly orientation-dependent, is needed. Furthermore, the 1.2 Mb duplication demonstrated that all features are present for correct imprinting at ICR2 when this is duplicated and inverted within the entire cluster. In the individuals maternally inheriting the 160 kb duplication, ICR2 hypomethylation led to the expression of a truncated KCNQ1OT1 transcript and to down-regulation of CDKN1C. We demonstrated by chromatin RNA immunopurification that the KCNQ1OT1 RNA interacts with chromatin through its most 5' 20 kb sequence, providing a mechanism likely mediating the silencing activity of this long non-coding RNA.

  • 46. Ciusani, E.
    et al.
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Sandberg-Wollheim, M.
    Eoli, M.
    Salmaggi, A.
    Milanese, C.
    Nespolo, A.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Analysis of HLA-Class II DQA1, DQB1, DRB1 and DPB1 in Italian Multiple Sclerosis Patients1995In: European journal of immunogenetics, ISSN 0960-7420, E-ISSN 1365-2370, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the allelic constitution at the HLA class II DQA1, DQB1, DRB1 and DPB1 in 94 Italian multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 98 controls. No significant increase in the frequency of DR2 alleles was detected among MS patients, as previously observed both in European and some Italian studies. A slight increase was found for the DQA1*0301 and DQB1*0602 alleles in the MS patients. No significant association was found with the glutamine residue at position 34 of the DQ alpha chain, which was noted previously in MS patients from northern Europe.

  • 47. de Leeuw, Nicole
    et al.
    Dijkhuizen, Trijnie
    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.
    Carter, Nigel P.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Firth, Helen V.
    Kuhn, Robert M.
    Ledbetter, David H.
    Martin, Christa Lese
    van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.
    Scherer, Steven W.
    Shams, Soheil
    Van Vooren, Steven
    Sijmons, Rolf
    Swertz, Morris
    Hastings, Ros
    Diagnostic Interpretation of Array Data Using Public Databases and Internet Sources2012In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 930-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The range of commercially available array platforms and analysis software packages is expanding and their utility is improving, making reliable detection of copy-number variants (CNVs) relatively straightforward. Reliable interpretation of CNV data, however, is often difficult and requires expertise. With our knowledge of the human genome growing rapidly, applications for array testing continuously broadening, and the resolution of CNV detection increasing, this leads to great complexity in interpreting what can be daunting data. Correct CNV interpretation and optimal use of the genotype information provided by single-nucleotide polymorphism probes on an array depends largely on knowledge present in various resources. In addition to the availability of host laboratories' own datasets and national registries, there are several public databases and Internet resources with genotype and phenotype information that can be used for array data interpretation. With so many resources now available, it is important to know which are fit-for-purpose in a diagnostic setting. We summarize the characteristics of the most commonly used Internet databases and resources, and propose a general data interpretation strategy that can be used for comparative hybridization, comparative intensity, and genotype-based array data.

  • 48. De Silva, Wasanthi
    et al.
    Karunanayake, Eric H
    Tennekoon, Kamani H
    Allen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Amarasinghe, Indrani
    Angunawala, Preethika
    Ziard, Mohamed H
    Novel sequence variants and a high frequency of recurrent polymorphisms in BRCA1 gene in Sri Lankan breast cancer patients and at risk individuals2008In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 8, p. 214-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Breast Cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Sri Lankan women. Germline mutations in the susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, though low in prevalence, are highly penetrant and show geographical variations. There have been only a few reports from Asia on mutations in BRCA1/2 genes and none from Sri Lanka.

    METHODS: A total of 130 patients with (N = 66) and without (N = 64) a family history of breast cancer, 70 unaffected individuals with a family history of breast cancer and 40 control subjects were analysed for BRCA1 mutations. All but exon 11 were screened by single strand conformation analysis (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis. PCR products which showed abnormal patterns in SSCP were sequenced. Exon 11 was directly sequenced.

    RESULTS: Nineteen sequence variants were found in BRCA1 gene. Two novel deleterious frame-shift mutations; c.3086delT/exon11 (in one patient) and c.5404delG/exon21 (in one patient and two of her family members) were identified. A possibly pathogenic novel missense mutation (c.856T>G/exon 11) and three novel intronic variants (IVS7+36C>T, IVS7+41C>T, IVS7+49del15) were characterised. Ten previously reported common polymorphisms and three previously reported intronic variants were also observed.

    CONCLUSION: After screening of 66 patients with family history and 64 sporadic breast cancer patients, 2 deleterious mutations (c.3086delT and c.5404delG) in two families were identified and two more possibly pathogenic mutations (c.856T>G and IVS17-2A>T) in two families were identified. DATA BASE: BRCA1--Gene Bank: Accession # U14680 Version # 14680.1.

  • 49.
    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Dozmorov, Mikhail G.
    Bernal Quiros, Manuel
    Wu, Ying-Yu
    Martinez-Garcia, Belen
    Kozyrev, Sergey V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Frostegård, Johan
    Truedsson, Lennart
    de Ramon, Enrique
    Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.
    Ortego-Centeno, Norberto
    Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.
    D'Alfonso, Sandra
    Sebastiani, Gian Domenico
    Witte, Torsten
    Lauwerys, Bernard R.
    Endreffy, Emoke
    Kovacs, Laszlo
    Vasconcelos, Carlos
    da Silva, Berta Martins
    Wren, Jonathan D.
    Martin, Javier
    Castillejo-Lopez, Casimiro
    Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.
    Fine mapping and conditional analysis identify a new mutation in the autoimmunity susceptibility gene BLK that leads to reduced half-life of the BLK protein2012In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 1219-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To perform fine mapping of the autoimmunity susceptibility gene BLK and identify functional variants involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Methods

    Genotyping of 1163 European SLE patients and 1482 controls and imputation were performed covering the BLK gene with 158 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Logistic regression analysis was done using PLINK and conditional analyses using GENABEL's test score. Transfections of BLK constructs on HEK293 cells containing the novel mutation or the wild type form were analysed for their effect on protein half-life using a protein stability assay, cycloheximide and western blot. CHiP-qPCR for detection of nuclear factor. B (NFkB) binding.

    Results

    Fine mapping of BLK identified two independent genetic effects with functional consequences: one represented by two tightly linked associated haplotype blocks significantly enriched for NF kappa B-binding sites and numerous putative regulatory variants whose risk alleles correlated with low BLK mRNA levels. Binding of NFkBp50 and p65 to an associated 1.2 Kb haplotype segment was confirmed. A second independent genetic effect was represented by an Ala71Thr, low-frequency missense substitution with an OR = 2.31 (95% CI 1.38 to 3.86). The 71Thr decreased BLK protein half-life.

    Conclusions

    These results show that rare and common regulatory variants in BLK are involved in disease susceptibility and both, albeit independently, lead to reduced levels of BLK protein.

  • 50. Demirkan, Ayse
    et al.
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Ugocsai, Peter
    Liebisch, Gerhard
    Struchalin, Maksim
    Rudan, Igor
    Wilson, James F.
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Campbell, Harry
    Schmitz, Gerd
    Oostra, Ben A.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Plasma phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin concentrations are associated with depression and anxiety symptoms in a Dutch family-based lipidomics study2013In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central nervous system has the second highest concentration of lipids after adipose tissue. Alterations in neural membrane phospho- and sphingolipid composition can influence crucial intra- and intercellular signalling and alter the membrane's properties. Recently, the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) hypothesis for depression suggests that phospho- and sphingolipid metabolism includes potential pathways for the disease. In 742 people from a Dutch family-based study, we assessed the relationships between 148 different plasma phospho- and sphingolipid species and depression/anxiety symptoms as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS-A and HADS-D) and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). We observed significant differences in plasma sphingomyelins (SPM), particularly the SPM 23:1/SPM 16:0 ratio, which was inversely correlated with depressive symptom scores. We observed a similar trend for plasma phosphatidylcholines (PC), particularly the molar proportion of PC O 36:4 and its ratio to ceramide CER 20:0. Absolute levels of PC O 36:4 were also associated with depression symptoms in an independent replication. To our knowledge this is the first study on depressive symptoms that focuses on specific phospho- and sphingolipid molecules in plasma rather than total PUFA concentrations. The findings of this lipidomic study suggests that plasma sphingomyelins and ether phospholipids should be further studied for their potential as biomarkers and for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of this systemic disease.

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