uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 373
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Agnarsdóttir, Margrét
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Patil, Tushar
    Lab Surgpath, Mumbai, India.
    Johansson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Jirström, Karin
    Center for Molecular Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Department of Proteomics, School of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Gallagher, William
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland. .
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Protein Biomarkers in Malignant Melanoma: An Image Analysis-Based Study on Melanoma Markers of Potential Clinical RelevanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thickness of a primary malignant melanoma tumor is the most important prognostic indicator for a patient with primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. To optimize the management and treatment of melanoma patients there is an unmet need to identify characteristics that can further stratify melanoma patients into high or low risk for progressive disease. Despite numerous studies no single marker has yet been shown to add significant prognostic information. An algorithmic approach, combining data from several markers provides an attractive model to identify patients of increased risk of dying from malignant melanoma. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between clinical outcome and protein expression patterns of multiple proteins in malignant melanoma tumors using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. Candidate proteins were identified based on a selective and differential expression pattern in melanoma tumors and tested in a cohort of 143 melanoma patients. Protein expression was analyzed using both manual scoring and automated image analysis-based algorithms. We found no single marker of prognosis that was independent of tumor thickness. When combining potential prognostic markers we could define a prognostic index, based on RBM3, MITF, SOX10 and Ki-67, that was independent of tumor thickness in multivariate analysis. Our findings suggest that a good prognosis signature can be identified in melanoma patients with tumors showing a low fraction of Ki-67 positive tumor cells and a high fraction of RBM3 positive tumor cells combined with low intensity levels of SOX10 and MITF.

     

  • 2. Agren, Rasmus
    et al.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Nielsen, Jens
    Identification of anticancer drugs for hepatocellular carcinoma through personalized genome-scale metabolic modeling2014In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, E-ISSN 1744-4292, Vol. 10, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synopsis image Personalized GEMs for six hepatocellular carcinoma patients are reconstructed using proteomics data and a task-driven model reconstruction algorithm. These GEMs are used to predict antimetabolites preventing tumor growth in all patients or in individual patients. The presence of proteins encoded by 15,841 genes in tumors from 27 HCC patients is evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Personalized GEMs for six HCC patients and GEMs for 83 healthy cell types are reconstructed based on HMR 2.0 and the tINIT algorithm for task-driven model reconstruction. 101 antimetabolites are predicted to inhibit tumor growth in all patients. Antimetabolite toxicity is tested using the 83 cell type-specific GEMs. An l-carnitine analog inhibits the proliferation of HepG2 cells. Abstract Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) have proven useful as scaffolds for the integration of omics data for understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship in a mechanistic manner. Here, we evaluated the presence/absence of proteins encoded by 15,841 genes in 27 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients using immunohistochemistry. We used this information to reconstruct personalized GEMs for six HCC patients based on the proteomics data, HMR 2.0, and a task-driven model reconstruction algorithm (tINIT). The personalized GEMs were employed to identify anticancer drugs using the concept of antimetabolites; i.e., drugs that are structural analogs to metabolites. The toxicity of each antimetabolite was predicted by assessing the in silico functionality of 83 healthy cell type-specific GEMs, which were also reconstructed with the tINIT algorithm. We predicted 101 antimetabolites that could be effective in preventing tumor growth in all HCC patients, and 46 antimetabolites which were specific to individual patients. Twenty-two of the 101 predicted antimetabolites have already been used in different cancer treatment strategies, while the remaining antimetabolites represent new potential drugs. Finally, one of the identified targets was validated experimentally, and it was confirmed to attenuate growth of the HepG2 cell line.

  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Kerstin M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Euler, Henrik
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lobell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Andersson, Göran
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Lernmark, Åke
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lack of evidence for a role of islet autoimmunity in the aetiology of canine diabetes mellitus2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, p. e105473-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported.

    METHODS:

    Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide.

    RESULTS:

    None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS:

    Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus.

  • 4. Alaerts, Maaike
    et al.
    Ceulemans, Shana
    Forero, Diego
    Moens, Lotte N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    De Zutter, Sonia
    Heyrman, Lien
    Lenaerts, An-Sofie
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    De Rijk, Peter
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Goossens, Dirk
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Del-Favero, Jurgen
    Support for NRG1 as a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia in a northern Swedish isolated population.2009In: Archives of General Psychiatry, ISSN 0003-990X, E-ISSN 1538-3636, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 828-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a growth factor involved in neurodevelopment, myelination, neurotransmitter receptor expression, and synaptic plasticity, first joined the list of candidate genes for schizophrenia when a 7-marker haplotype at the 5' end of the gene (Hap(ICE)) was shown to be associated with the disorder in the Icelandic population. Since then, more genetic and functional evidence has emerged, which supports a role for NRG1 in the development of schizophrenia.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of NRG1 to susceptibility for schizophrenia in a northern Swedish isolated population.

    DESIGN: Detailed linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based patient-control association study. This is the first study to type and analyze the 7 Hap(ICE) markers and a set of 32 HapMap tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represents variants with a minor allele frequency of at least 1% and fully characterizes the LD structure of the 5' part of NRG1.

    SETTING: Outpatient and inpatient hospitals.

    PARTICIPANTS: A total of 486 unrelated patients with schizophrenia and 514 unrelated control individuals recruited from a northern Swedish isolated population.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between markers and disease.

    RESULTS: Analysis of the Hap(ICE) markers showed the association of a 7-marker and 2-microsatellite haplotype, different from the haplotypes associated in the Icelandic population and overrepresented in northern Swedish control individuals. Subsequently, a more detailed analysis that included all 37 genotyped SNPs was performed by investigating haplotypic association, dependent and independent of LD block structure. We found significant association with 5 SNPs located in the second intron of NRG1 (.007 </= P </= .04). Also, 2-, 3-, and 4-SNP windows that comprise these SNPs were associated (P < 3 x 10(-4)). One protective haplotype (0% vs 1.8%; P <5 x 10(-5)) and 1 disease risk-causing haplotype (40.4% vs 34.9%, P = .02) were defined.

    CONCLUSION: The NRG1 gene contributes to the susceptibility for schizophrenia in the northern Swedish population.

  • 5.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Alzheimerin tauti: (Alzheimer’s sjukdom)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1029-1031Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Alzheimer's disease-related lesions2013In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 33, no Suppl 1, p. S173-S179Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The invitation to contribute to "Alzheimer's Disease: Advances for a New Century" gave me an opportunity to briefly summarize my personal opinions about how the field of neuropathology has evolved. The goal is to briefly exemplify the changes that have influenced the way we conduct our diagnostic work as well as the way we interpret our results. From an era of histological stains, we have moved to visualization of altered proteins in predicted brain regions; we have also realized that in many aged subjects, not one but a plethora of co-pathologies are seen, and finally, we have become aware that the degenerative process is initiated much earlier than we ever suspected.

  • 7.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Frontotemporaaliset lobaariset degeneraatiot: (Frontoremporal degeneration)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1032-1033Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Neuropatologinen tutkimus: Neuropatologisk undersökning2010In: Muistisairaudet: (Minnestörningar) / [ed] Erkinjuntti T, Rinne J, Soininen H, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2010, 1, p. 438-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Neuropatologinen tutkimus: Neuropatologisk undersökning2015In: Muistisairaudet: (Minnestörningar) / [ed] Erkinjuntti T, Rinne J, Soininen H, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2015, 2, p. 426-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Parkinsonin tauti ja lewynkappaledementia: (Parkinsons sjukdom)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1031-1032Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Rapeuttavat aivosairaudet: (Degenerativa hjärnsjukdomar)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1023-1028Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Tau pathology in aging and AD: beyond neurofibrillary tangles (grains, astrocytes, etc.)2014In: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 24, no S1, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Gelpi, E.
    Al-Sarraj, S.
    Arzberger, T.
    Attems, J.
    Bodi, I.
    Bogdanovic, N.
    Budka, H.
    Bugiani, O.
    Englund, E.
    Ferrer, I.
    Gentleman, S.
    Giaccone, G.
    Graeber, M. B.
    Hortobagyi, T.
    Höftberger, R.
    Ironside, J. W.
    Jellinger, K.
    Kavantzas, N.
    King, A.
    Korkolopoulou, P.
    Kovács, G. G.
    Meyronet, D.
    Monoranu, C.
    Parchi, P.
    Patsouris, E.
    Roggendorf, W.
    Rozemuller, A.
    Seilhean, D.
    Streichenberger, N.
    Thal, D. R.
    Wharton, S. B.
    Kretzschmar, H.
    The need to unify neuropathological assessments of vascular alterations in the ageing brain: Multicentre survey by the BrainNet Europe consortium2012In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we summarise the results after carrying out a large survey regarding the assessment of vascular alterations, both vessel changes and vascular lesions in an inter-laboratory setting. In total, 32 neuropathologists from 22 centres, most being members of BrainNet Europe (BNE), participated by filling out a questionnaire with emphasis on assessment of common vascular alterations seen in the brains of aged subjects. A certain level of harmonisation has been reached among BNE members regarding sectioning of the brain, harvesting of brain tissue for histology and staining used when compared to the survey carried out in 2006 by Pantoni and colleagues. The most significant variability was seen regarding the assessment of severity and of clinical significance of vascular alterations. Two strategies have recently been recommended regarding the assessment of vascular alterations in aged and demented subjects. The National Institute on Aging - Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) recommends the assessment of hippocampal sclerosis, vascular brain injury and microvascular lesions in 12 regions. Although this strategy will be easy to follow, the recommendations do not inform how the load of observed alterations should be assessed and when the observed lesions are of significance. Deramecourt and his colleagues recommend an assessment and semiquantitative grading of various pathologies in 4 brain regions. This strategy yielded a total score of 0 to 20 as an estimate of pathology load. It is, however, not clear which score is considered to be of clinical significance. Furthermore, in several BNE trials the semiquantitative assessment has yielded poor agreement rates; an observation that might negatively influence the strategy proposed by Deramecourt and his colleagues. In line with NIA-AA, a dichotomised approach of easily recognisable lesions in a standardised set of brain regions harvested for neuropathological assessment and applying reproducible sampling and staining strategies is recommended by BNE. However, a simple strategy regarding assessment of load of alteration is urgently needed to yield reproducible, and at the same time, comparable results between centres.

  • 14.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Parkkinen, Laura
    Staged pathology in Parkinson's disease2014In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. S57-S61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a tremendous development since a regional progression of pathology in subjects with Lewy bodies (LB) was initially proposed 30 years ago. The entity of dementia with Lewy bodies has been acknowledged, the main protein constituent of LBs--aggregated α-synuclein (αS)--has been identified and a stepwise progression of the pathology has been reported. Implementation of the staging strategies published provides a common ground for handling a case with a suspected α-synucleinopathy. It is always important to state the staging strategy implemented while assessing a case, as the strategy applied might influence both the reported stage of LB pathology and, ultimately, the final diagnosis of the patient.

  • 15.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Pikkarainen, M
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Parkkinen, L
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Synucleinopathies2015In: Neuropathology of neurodegenerative diseases: A practical guide / [ed] Gabor G Kovacs, Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 149-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Definition, structure and biochemical background Similar to other “proteinopathies,” the process that links α-synuclein (αS) protein to disease pathogenesis originated from the discovery that a single point mutation in the αS gene (i.e. SNCA) can cause autosomal-dominant Parkinson’s disease (PD) [1]. This was followed by the breakthrough finding that the actual transcribed protein was a major fibrillar component of pathological hallmarks known as Lewy bodies (LBs), Lewy neurites (LNs) and glial cytoplasmic inclusions characterizing a heterogeneous group of diseases, now collectively referred to as “synucleinopathies,” i.e. PD, PD with dementia (PDD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) [2, 3]. Currently, there are five missense mutations (pA53T, p.A30P, p.E46K, p.H50Q and p.G51D) [1, 4–8] and multiplication mutations (SNCA duplication and triplication) [9–11] that are genetically linked to clinical parkinsonism (Table 9.1). This genetic and pathological linkage establishes αS as an important player in the development of these disorders.

  • 16. Alfstad, K Å
    et al.
    Lossius, M I
    Røste, G K
    Mowinckel, P
    Scheie, D
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Dept. of Laboratory medicine/Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå Sweden.
    Larsson, P G
    Nakken, K O
    Acute postoperative seizures after epilepsy surgery: a long-term outcome predictor?2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APS) after epilepsy surgery is much debated. This study evaluated APS, defined as seizures in the first week post-surgery, as a predictor of long-term seizure outcome, and investigated the utility of other potential outcome predictors.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 48 patients with temporal and extra-temporal epilepsy surgery were studied. Forty patients had lesional surgery. All had at least 2 year postoperative follow-up.

    RESULTS: At 2 year follow-up, 25 patients (53%) were seizure free. Univariate analysis showed that APS (P = 0.048), using ≥ six AEDs prior to surgery (P = 0.03), pathological postoperative EEG (P = 0.043) and female gender (P = 0.012) were associated with seizure recurrence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Univariate analysis indicate that APS, a high number of AEDs used prior to surgery, and pathological postoperative EEG are possible predictors of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery. Only gender retained significance in the multivariate analysis.

  • 17. Algenas, Cajsa
    et al.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    Fagerberg, Linn
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Bjorling, Lisa
    Bjorling, Erik
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Lundberg, Emma
    Nilsson, Peter
    Persson, Anja
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Wernerus, Henrik
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Takanen, Jenny Ottosson
    Hober, Sophia
    Antibody performance in western blot applications is context-dependent2014In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, E-ISSN 1860-7314, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 435-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important concern for the use of antibodies in various applications, such as western blot (WB) or immunohistochemistry (IHC), is specificity. This calls for systematic validations using well-designed conditions. Here, we have analyzed 13000 antibodies using western blot with lysates from human cell lines, tissues, and plasma. Standardized stratification showed that 45% of the antibodies yielded supportive staining, and the rest either no staining (12%) or protein bands of wrong size (43%). A comparative study of WB and IHC showed that the performance of antibodies is application-specific, although a correlation between no WB staining and weak IHC staining could be seen. To investigate the influence of protein abundance on the apparent specificity of the antibody, new WB analyses were performed for 1369 genes that gave unsupportive WBs in the initial screening using cell lysates with overexpressed full-length proteins. Then, more than 82% of the antibodies yielded a specific band corresponding to the full-length protein. Hence, the vast majority of the antibodies (90%) used in this study specifically recognize the target protein when present at sufficiently high levels. This demonstrates the context- and application-dependence of antibody validation and emphasizes that caution is needed when annotating binding reagents as specific or cross-reactive. WB is one of the most commonly used methods for validation of antibodies. Our data implicate that solely using one platform for antibody validation might give misleading information and therefore at least one additional method should be used to verify the achieved data.

  • 18. Amirian, E Susan
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina N
    Zhou, Renke
    Lau, Ching C
    Claus, Elizabeth B
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard S
    Jenkins, Robert B
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H
    Bernstein, Jonine L
    Merrell, Ryan T
    Wrensch, Margaret R
    Davis, Faith G
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I
    Scheurer, Michael E
    Aldape, Kenneth
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Broholm, Helle
    Collins, Peter
    Giannini, Caterina
    Rosenblum, Marc
    Tihan, Tarik
    Melin, Beatrice S
    Bondy, Melissa L
    The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium2016In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 183, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions.

  • 19. Andersson, Marlene
    et al.
    Chen, Gefei
    Otikovs, Martins
    Landreh, Michael
    Nordling, Kerstin
    Kronqvist, Nina
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Jornvall, Hans
    Knight, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Ridderstrale, Yvonne
    Holm, Lena
    Meng, Qing
    Jaudzems, Kristaps
    Chesler, Mitchell
    Johansson, Jan
    Rising, Anna
    Carbonic Anhydrase Generates CO2 and H+ That Drive Spider Silk Formation Via Opposite Effects on the Terminal Domains2014In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 12, no 8, p. e1001921-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins) under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT) that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive beta-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO(2)) in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Konrad, Anna
    Ashok, Nikhil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hober, Sophia
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Antibodies Biotinylated Using a Synthetic Z-domain from Protein A Provide Stringent In Situ Protein Detection2013In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 773-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based protein profiling on a global scale using immunohistochemistry constitutes an emerging strategy for mapping of the human proteome, which is crucial for an increased understanding of biological processes in the cell. Immunohistochemistry is often performed indirectly using secondary antibodies for detection, with the benefit of signal amplification. Direct immunohistochemistry instead brings the advantage of multiplexing; however, it requires labeling of the primary antibody. Many antibody-labeling kits do not specifically target IgG and may therefore cause labeling of stabilizing proteins present in the antibody solution. A new conjugation method has been developed that utilizes a modified Z-domain of protein A (ZBPA) to specifically target the Fc part of antibodies. The aim of the present study was to compare the ZBPA conjugation method and a commercially available labeling kit, Lightning-Link, for in situ protein detection. Fourteen antibodies were biotinylated with each method and stained using immunohistochemistry. For all antibodies tested, ZBPA biotinylation resulted in distinct immunoreactivity without off-target staining, regardless of the presence of stabilizing proteins in the buffer, whereas the majority of the Lightning-Link biotinylated antibodies displayed a characteristic pattern of nonspecific staining. We conclude that biotinylated ZBPA domain provides a stringent method for antibody biotinylation, advantageous for in situ protein detection in tissues.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    Hallstrom, Bjorn M.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    The Transcriptomic and Proteomic Landscapes of Bone Marrow and Secondary Lymphoid Tissues2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. e115911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The sequencing of the human genome has opened doors for global gene expression profiling, and the immense amount of data will lay an important ground for future studies of normal and diseased tissues. The Human Protein Atlas project aims to systematically map the human gene and protein expression landscape in a multitude of normal healthy tissues as well as cancers, enabling the characterization of both housekeeping genes and genes that display a tissue-specific expression pattern. This article focuses on identifying and describing genes with an elevated expression in four lymphohematopoietic tissue types (bone marrow, lymph node, spleen and appendix), based on the Human Protein Atlas-strategy that combines high throughput transcriptomics with affinity-based proteomics. Results: An enriched or enhanced expression in one or more of the lymphohematopoietic tissues, compared to other tissue-types, was seen for 693 out of 20,050 genes, and the highest levels of expression were found in bone marrow for neutrophilic and erythrocytic genes. A majority of these genes were found to constitute well-characterized genes with known functions in lymphatic or hematopoietic cells, while others are not previously studied, as exemplified by C19ORF59. Conclusions: In this paper we present a strategy of combining next generation RNA-sequencing with in situ affinity-based proteomics in order to identify and describe new gene targets for further research on lymphatic or hematopoietic cells and tissues. The results constitute lists of genes with enriched or enhanced expression in the four lymphohematopoietic tissues, exemplified also on protein level with immunohistochemical images.

  • 22. Andersson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Lindgren, PG
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Wilander, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Effects of Interferon on Tumor Tissue Content in Liver Metastases of Human Carcinoid Tumors1990In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, no 50, p. 3413-3415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 21 patients ultrasound-guided cutting biopsies, from carcinoid metastases of the liver, were taken before and after therapy with α-interferon. Each biopsy was examined under light microscopy and the amount of tumor tissue and connective tissue was quantified and then correlated to objective response to interferon therapy. A significant reduction of the amount of tumor tissue, in spite of unaltered metastatic size and a corresponding increase in connective tissue, was seen after interferon therapy. A more pronounced reduction of tumor tissue occurred after long-term interferon therapy. A positive correlation between objective therapy response and tumor tissue reduction was also present. Patients responding poorly, or not at all, to therapy did not show any significant decrease in tumor tissue.

    Since treatment with immune response modifiers is expected to increase in the near future, it is important to choose the right investigations for therapy monitoring, and since all patients in this investigation had unchanged tumor size on repeated radiological examinations, it is obvious that microscopic examination of core biopsies is a better method for evaluating effects of long-term therapy than tumor size measurement with radiological techniques. Further, the results may indicate that interferon exerts a cytotoxic effect on carcinoid tumor cells in vivo.

  • 23.
    Andreasson, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Willén, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Graf, Wilhelm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Zhang, Zhi-Yong
    Mahteme, Haile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Histopathological Classification of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei and the Prognostic Importance of PINCH Protein2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1443-1448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    The aims of this study were i) to assess a new and more detailed histopathological classification and to analyze concordance between pathologists in the histopathological classification of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP); ii) to analyze the expression in the stroma of the particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine (PINCH) protein and its prognostic importance in PMP.

    Materials and Methods:

    Surgical specimens from 81 patients, classified according to the Ronnett et al histopathological classification were compared to a new system with four groups ranging from indolent to aggressive growth patterns. PINCH protein expression was analyzed and was related to clinical variables.

    Results:

    The new four-group classification provided better prognostic information than the classification according to Ronnett et al. (p=0.04). Expression of the PINCH protein in the stroma was found in 83% of the cases and was associated with high tumor burden (p=0.002) and a poor prognosis (p=0.04).

    Conclusion:

    The proposed new PMP classification system may provide additional prognostic information. PINCH protein is expressed in PMP and has prognostic information.

  • 24.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Estrada, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Carlson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lindsjö, Lars
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Granstam, Sven-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Rosengren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Vedin, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    In Vivo Visualization of Amyloid Deposits in the Heart with 11C-PIB and PET2013In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a differential diagnosis in heart failure and is associated with high mortality. There is currently no noninvasive imaging test available for specific diagnosis. N-[methyl-11C]2-(4′-methylamino-phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (11C-PIB) PET is used in the evaluation of brain amyloidosis. We evaluated the potential use of 11C-PIB PET in systemic amyloidosis affecting the heart.

    Methods:

    Patients (n = 10) diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis—including heart involvement of either monoclonal immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) or transthyretin (ATTR) type—and healthy volunteers (n = 5) were investigated with PET/CT using 11C-PIB to study cardiac amyloid deposits and with 11C-acetate to measure myocardial blood flow to study the impact of global and regional perfusion on PIB retention.

    Results:

    Myocardial 11C-PIB uptake was visually evident in all patients 15–25 min after injection and was not seen in any volunteer. A significant difference in 11C-PIB retention in the heart between patients and healthy controls was found. The data indicate that myocardial amyloid deposits in patients diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis could be visualized with 11C-PIB. No correlation between 11C-PIB retention index and myocardial blood flow as measured with 11C-acetate was found on the global level, whereas a positive correlation on the segmental level was seen in a single patient.

    Conclusion:

    11C-PIB and PET could be a method to study systemic amyloidosis of type AL and ATTR affecting the heart and should be investigated further both as a diagnostic tool and as a noninvasive method for treatment follow-up.

  • 25. Arne, Kolstad
    et al.
    Laurell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Elonen, Erkki
    Raty, Riikka
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Loft, Annika
    Bogsrud, Trond Velde
    Nordstrom, Marie
    Hansen, Per Boye
    Fagerli, Unn-Merete
    Nilsson-Ehle, Herman
    Lauritzsen, Grete Fossum
    Lehmann, Anne Kristine
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa
    Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth
    Ehinger, Mats
    Delabie, Jan
    Bentzen, Hans
    Schildt, Jukka
    Kostova-Aherdan, Kamelia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Frederiksen, Henrik
    Brown, Peter de Nully
    Geisler, Christian H.
    Nordic MCL3 Study: Zevalin Combined with High-Dose Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Support As Late Intensification for Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) Patients < 66 Years Not in CR After Induction Chemoimmunotherapy: No Benefit of Zevalin2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 120, no 21, p. 747-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Asif, Sana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Sedigh, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Nordström, Johan
    Brandhorst, Heide
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Jorns, Carl
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nowak, Greg
    Theisinger, Sonja
    Hoeger, Simone
    Wennberg, Lars
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Brandhorst, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Oxygen-charged HTK-F6H8 emulsion reduces ischemia: reperfusion injury in kidneys from brain-dead pigs2012In: Journal of Surgical Research, ISSN 0022-4804, E-ISSN 1095-8673, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 959-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Prolonged cold ischemia is frequently associated with a greater risk of delayed graft function and enhanced graft failure. We hypothesized that media, combining a high oxygen-dissolving capacity with specific qualities of organ preservation solutions, would be more efficient in reducing immediate ischemia-reperfusion injury from organs stored long term compared with standard preservation media.

    Methods:

    Kidneys retrieved from brain-dead pigs were flushed using either cold histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) or oxygen-precharged emulsion composed of 75% HTK and 25% perfluorohexyloctane. After 18 h of cold ischemia the kidneys were transplanted into allogeneic recipients and assessed for adenosine triphosphate content, morphology, and expression of genes related to hypoxia, environmental stress, inflammation, and apoptosis.

    Results:

    Compared with HTK-flushed kidneys, organs preserved using oxygen-precharged HTK-perfluorohexyloctane emulsion had increased elevated adenosine triphosphate content and a significantly lower gene expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-alpha, JNK-1, p38, cytochrome-c, Bax, caspase-8, and caspase-3 at all time points assessed. In contrast, the mRNA expression of Bcl-2 was significantly increased.

    Conclusions:

    The present study has demonstrated that in brain-dead pigs the perfusion of kidneys with oxygen-precharged HTK-perfluorohexyloctane emulsion results in significantly reduced inflammation, hypoxic injury, and apoptosis and cellular integrity and energy content are well maintained. Histologic examination revealed less tubular, vascular, and glomerular changes in the emulsion-perfused tissue compared with the HTK-perfused counterparts. The concept of perfusing organs with oxygen-precharged emulsion based on organ preservation media represents an efficient alternative for improved organ preservation.

  • 27.
    Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Antibodies for profiling the human proteome: The Human Protein Atlas as a resource for cancer research2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 13, p. 2067-2077Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, we present an update on the progress of the Human Protein Atlas, with an emphasis on strategies for validating immunohistochemistry-based protein expression patterns and on the possibilities to extend the map of protein expression patterns for cancer research projects. The objectives underlying the Human Protein Atlas include (i) the generation of validated antibodies toward a major isoform of all proteins encoded by the human genome, (ii) creating an information database of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, in cells, and in cancer, and (iii) utilizing generated antibodies and protein expression data as tools to identify clinically useful biomarkers. The success of such an effort is dependent on the validity of antibodies as specific binders of intended targets in applications used to map protein expression patterns. The development of strategies to support specific target binding is crucial and remains a challenge as a large fraction of proteins encoded by the human genome is poorly characterized, including the approximately one-third of all proteins lacking evidence of existence. Conceivable methods for validation include the use of paired antibodies, i.e. two independent antibodies targeting different and nonoverlapping epitopes on the same protein as well as comparative analysis of mRNA expression patterns with corresponding proteins.

  • 28. Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 918-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 29.
    Azar, Jimmy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Carlbom, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Histological Stain Evaluation for Machine Learning Applications2012In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Bachmann, Julie
    et al.
    Burte, Florence
    Pramana, Setia
    Conte, Ianina
    Brown, Biobele J.
    Orimadegun, Adebola E.
    Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A.
    Afolabi, Nathaniel K.
    Akinkunmi, Francis
    Omokhodion, Samuel
    Akinbami, Felix O.
    Shokunbi, Wuraola A.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Sodeinde, Olugbemiro
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro
    Nilsson, Peter
    Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria2014In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 10, no 4, p. e1004038-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria.

  • 31.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Iliadou, Anastasia
    Granath, Fredrik
    Ekbom, Anders
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Askling, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphomas in rheumatoid arthritis2006In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 3774-3781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of malignant lymphomas, with a correlation between RA disease severity and lymphoma risk, most pronounced for diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs), which also constitute the majority of RA-associated lymphomas. DLBCLs can be further subdivided into germinal center (GC)-like and non-GC-like subtypes, with different cellular origins and prognoses. This study was undertaken to investigate whether RA displays a specific association with any of the DLBCL subtypes.

    METHODS:

    We identified 139 patients with DLBCLs within a population-based case-control study of 378 RA patients with lymphoma. The DLBCLs were examined for CD10, Bcl-6, and interferon regulatory factor 4 expression patterns, subclassified into GC and non-GC subtypes, and then correlated with clinical parameters.

    RESULTS:

    We found a statistically significant predominance of the non-GC subtype (97 patients; 70% of all DLBCLs). These patients more often had an advanced stage of lymphoma at diagnosis and had a worse 5-year overall survival rate (16% versus 33%) compared with patients with the GC subtype. There was a strong association with RA disease activity in both subtypes, with >70% of the GC and non-GC cases occurring in RA patients with the highest overall disease activity scores.

    CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that severe RA is particularly associated with the non-GC subtype of DLBCL, and indicate a critical role of activated peripheral B cells as the cells of origin in these lymphomas.

  • 32.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Mansouri, Mahmoud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Askling, Johan
    Iliadou, Anastasia Nyman
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Lossos, Izidore S.
    Natkunam, Yasodha
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    LMO2 protein expression predicts survival in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2011In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1146-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Hellgren, K.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Askling, J.
    Does Biological Therapy Alter the Lymphoma Risk or Distribution of Lymphoma Subtypes in Patients with ra?2013In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 72, no Suppl. 3, p. 427-427Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34. Barbany, Gisela
    et al.
    Gauffin, Fredrika
    Ofverholm, Ingegerd
    Karlsson, Hakan
    Thörn, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Arvidson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Heyman, Mats
    Gustafsson, Britt
    Nordgren, Ann
    The ETV6/RUNX1 fusion transcript is not detected in RNA isolated from neonatal dried blood spots from children later diagnosed with the corresponding leukemia2013In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 2742-2744Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bergfelt, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Kozlowski, P.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Hulegardh, E.
    Hägglund, H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Karlsson, K.
    Markuszewska-Kuczymska, A.
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Smedmyr, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Astrom, M.
    Amini, Rose Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Hallböök, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Minimal Residual Disease in Adults with Philadelphia Negative B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia a Swedish Population-Based Study2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no S1, p. 279-280Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Berglund, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Kinch, Amelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Edman, Elin
    Halmstad Hospital.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Pauksens, Karlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Expression of Intratumoral Forkhead Box Protein 3 in Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Clinical Features and Survival Outcomes2015In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 1036-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The infiltration of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in lymphomas is associated with better prognosis for some types of lymphomas, but knowledge of their role in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) is limited. We therefore investigated the association between the expression of the Treg marker forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) in biopsies of PTLDs and survival, PTLD subtype, and clinical characteristics.

    Methods. Seventy-four cases of PTLD after solid organ transplantation with sufficient material for further analysis were included from a population-based study of PTLDs in Sweden. The PTLD biopsies were reevaluated and stained with the 236A/E7 antibody to detect FoxP3 in lymphoma tissue. Detailed clinical data were collected retrospectively from medical records.

    Results. Based on a cutoff level of 29 FoxP3+ cells per mm2, most (80%) of the PTLDs were FoxP3-. Forty-seven of 74 PTLDs displayed no FoxP3+ cells at all. The frequency of FoxP3+ cells did not influence median overall survival. The FoxP3- PTLDs were more frequently of T-cell phenotype (P=0.04), located at the graft (P=0.03), occurred earlier after transplantation (P=0.04), were more likely to develop in lung recipients (P=0.04), and in patients that had received anti T-cell globulin as induction therapy (P=0.02). The FoxP3+ PTLDs were associated with hepatitis C seropositivity (P=0.03). In multivariate analysis, B-cell PTLD and hepatitis C infection were independent predictors of FoxP3 positivity.

    Conclusion. Our findings suggest that intratumoral FoxP3+ Tregs do not influence survival in patients with PTLD. FoxP3+ Tregs are rare in PTLD, possibly because of heavy immunosuppression.

  • 37.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Is the rs10484561 SNP responsible for differences in age at diagnosis, transformation and death of patients with follicular lymphoma?2013In: International Journal of Hematologic Oncology, ISSN 2045-1407, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 391-396Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To analyze follicular lymphoma (FL) patients by determining the genotype at SNP rs10484561 (T or G) and comparing the polymorphism with overall survival, time to transformation, time from transformation to death, and age both dependently and independently of gender.

    Materials & methods:A total of 94 patients with FL diagnosed between 1970 and 2000 from a Swedish population were analyzed by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism to determine genotypes for rs10484561.

    Results:

    We found that women with FL and the TT genotype of SNP rs10484561 were older at diagnosis, transformation and when they died (p = 0.03, 0.01 and 0.02, respectively) and had a significantly shorter overall survival (p = 0.04) compared with women with the TG or GG genotypes.

    Conclusion:

    It is possible that the SNP rs10484561 polymorphism is responsible for differences in age at diagnosis, transformation and death for patients with follicular lymphoma, particularly in women.

  • 38.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    High expression of microRNA-200c predicts poor clinical outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2013In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 720-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous group of B-cell lymphomas. A new and important tool for understanding the biology and clinical course of DLBCL is microRNA expression. This study presents microRNA-200c expression data from 61 DLBCL patients treated with CHOP or R-CHOP. Patients with high microRNA-200c expression had a median survival of 20.3 months and a significantly shorter overall survival (P=0.019) compared to patients with low microRNA-200c expression, who had a median survival of 35.8 months. We also found that patients treated with R-CHOP only and displaying high microRNA-200c expression had a significantly shorter overall survival compared to patients with low microRNA-200c expression, where all patients were still alive at the time of the last follow-up (P=0.0036). Lastly, we found that patients with high microRNA-200c expression had a significantly shorter time from initial diagnosis to the first relapse compared to patients with low microRNA-200c expression (P=0.0001). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that the expression of microRNA-200c affects the clinical outcome of DLBCL patients, and that microRNA-200c is involved in the biology of DLBCL development, although larger studies are necessary to confirm this. Further investigations may also help to elucidate the biological role of microRNA-200c in DLBCL.

  • 39.
    Bergman, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Aspects of Gene Expression Profiling in Disease and Health2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to in various ways explore protein expression in human normal tissue and in cancer and to apply that knowledge in biomarker discovery.

    In Paper I the prognostic significance of RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) is explored in malignant melanoma. To further evaluate the prognostic significance of RBM3 expression was assessed in 226 incident cases of malignant melanoma from the prospective populationbased cohort study Malmö Diet and Cancer Study using tissue microarray technique (TMA). RBM3 was shown to be down regulated in metastatic melanoma and high nuclear expression in the primary tumor was an independent marker of prolonged over all survival. As a tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies the Human Protein Atlas has created a tissue dictionary as an introduction to human histology and histopathology. In Paper II this work is introduced.

    A cancer diagnosis can be a complex process with difficulties of establishing tumor type in localized disease or organ of origin in generalized disease. Immunohistochemically assisted diagnosis of cancer is common practice among pathologists where its application combined with known protein expression profiles of different cancer types, can strengthen or help dismiss a suspected diagnosis. In Paper III the diagnostic performance of 27 commonly used antibodies are tested in a predominantly metastatic, multicancer cohort using TMA technique. Overall these 27 diagnostic markers showed a low sensitivity and specificity for its intended use, highlighting the need for novel, more specific markers.

    Breast, ovarian, endometrial and ovarian cancers affect predominantly women. Differential diagnostics between these cancer types can be challenging. In Paper IV an algorithm, based on six different IHC markers, to differentiate between these cancer types is presented. A new diagnostic marker for breast cancer, namely ZAG is also introduced.

    In Paper V the transcriptomic landscape of the adrenal gland is explored by combining a transcriptomic approach with a immunohistochemistry based proteomic approach. In the adrenal gland we were able to detect 253 genes with an elevated pattern of expression in the adrenal gland, as compared to 31 other normal human tissue types analyzed. This combination of a transcriptomic and immunohistochemical approach provides a foundation for a deeper understanding of the adrenal glands function and physiology.

    List of papers
    1. Low RBM3 protein expression correlates with tumour progression and poor prognosis in malignant melanoma: An analysis of 215 cases from the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low RBM3 protein expression correlates with tumour progression and poor prognosis in malignant melanoma: An analysis of 215 cases from the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 9, p. 114-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have previously reported that expression of the RNA-and DNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with a good prognosis in breast cancer and ovarian cancer. In this study, the prognostic value of immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was assessed in incident cases of malignant melanoma from a prospective population-based cohort study. Methods: Until Dec 31(st) 2008, 264 incident cases of primary invasive melanoma had been registered in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study. Histopathological and clinical information was obtained for available cases and tissue microarrays (TMAs) constructed from 226 (85.6%) suitable paraffin-embedded tumours and 31 metastases. RBM3 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry on the TMAs and a subset of full-face sections. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for comparison of RBM3 expression and relevant clinicopathological characteristics. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between RBM3 and recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: RBM3 could be assessed in 215/226 (95.1%) of primary tumours and all metastases. Longitudinal analysis revealed that 16/31 (51.6%) of metastases lacked RBM3 expression, in contrast to the primary tumours in which RBM3 was absent in 3/215 (1.4%) cases and strongly expressed in 120/215 (55.8%) cases. Strong nuclear RBM3 expression in the primary tumour was significantly associated with favourable clinicopathological parameters; i. e. non-ulcerated tumours, lower depth of invasion, lower Clark level, less advanced clinical stage, low mitotic activity and non-nodular histological type, and a prolonged RFS (RR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.27-0.91) and OS (RR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.20-0.64). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the beneficial prognostic value of RBM3 remained significant for OS (RR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.18-0.61). Conclusions: In line with previous in vitro data, we here show that RBM3 is down-regulated in metastatic melanoma and high nuclear RBM3 expression in the primary tumour is an independent marker of a prolonged OS. The potential utility of RBM3 in treatment stratification of patients with melanoma should be pursued in future studies.

    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-158331 (URN)10.1186/1479-5876-9-114 (DOI)000293917900001 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 10, p. 103-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies.

    Keyword
    Antibody-based proteomics, cancer biomarkers, tissue and cell dictionary, immunohistochemistry, protein expression, histology, pathology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-192083 (URN)10.1186/1741-7015-10-103 (DOI)000312389800001 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. A systematic analysis of commonly used antibodies in cancer diagnostics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic analysis of commonly used antibodies in cancer diagnostics
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AimsImmunohistochemistry plays a pivotal role in cancer differential diagnostics. To identify the primary tumour from a metastasis specimen remains a significant challenge, despite the availability of an increasing number of antibodies. The aim of the present study was to provide evidence-based data on the diagnostic power of antibodies used frequently for clinical differential diagnostics. Methods and resultsA tissue microarray cohort comprising 940 tumour samples, of which 502 were metastatic lesions, representing tumours from 18 different organs and four non-localized cancer types, was analysed using immunohistochemistry with 27 well-established antibodies used in clinical differential diagnostics. Few antibodies, e.g. prostate-specific antigen and thyroglobulin, showed a cancer type-related sensitivity and specificity of more than 95%. A majority of the antibodies showed a low degree of sensitivity and specificity for defined cancer types. Combinations of antibodies provided limited added value for differential diagnostics of cancer types. ConclusionsThe results from analysing 27 diagnostic antibodies on consecutive sections of 940 defined tumours provide a unique repository of data that can empower a more optimal use of clinical immunohistochemistry. Our results highlight the benefit of immunohistochemistry and the unmet need for novel markers to improve differential diagnostics of cancer.

    Keyword
    biological tumour markers, differential diagnosis, immunohistochemistry, surgical pathology, tissue microarray analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-216054 (URN)10.1111/his.12255 (DOI)000328347800012 ()
    Note

    De två (2) första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2014-01-20 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2018-02-01Bibliographically approved
    4. A six marker panel for differential diagnostics of female cancers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A six marker panel for differential diagnostics of female cancers
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To present a new immunohistochemistry-based panel for clinical differential diagnostics of breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer.

     

    Background: Diagnostics of metastatic ER-positive tumors can present a clinical challenge. Breast and gynecological cancers are to a varying degree ER+, and can have similar growth patterns. The close proximity of the ovaries, endometrium and cervix also renders difficulties to distinguish between primary gynecological cancer in advanced stages.

     

    Material and Methods: As a discovery set for the selection of antibodies, tissue microarray (TMA) blocks containing 60 breast, 60 ovarian, 60 endometrial and 60 cervical tumor samples of predominantly metastatic sources were sectioned and immunohistochemically stained using 43 different primary antibodies, including both well accepted diagnostic markers and novel candidate markers. The results were analyzed for best possible differential diagnostic power to discriminate between these forms of female cancer.

     

    Results: By the implementation of a decision tree we were able to define a six-marker panel including antibodies detecting the WT1, ZAG, VIM, CK5, GATA3 and PAX8 proteins. This antibody panel enabled differentiation between breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer with an accuracy of 80%. The selected markers were then examined in a second cohort of 452 cancer samples comprising 60 breast, 48 ovary, 233 endometrium and 111 cervix patients. A decision tree classifier was used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of these markers in differential diagnosis of the female cancers.  The results suggest that this panel could be used in a clinical setting to achieve a more accurate diagnosis and thus provide a basis for further prospective clinical studies.

    Keyword
    Differential diagnostics, immunohistochemistry
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Research subject
    Pathology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312936 (URN)
    Projects
    Human Protein Atlas
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
    Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2017-01-16
    5. The human adrenal gland proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The human adrenal gland proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.
    2016 (English)In: Endocrinology, ISSN 0013-7227, E-ISSN 1945-7170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The adrenal gland is a composite endocrine organ with vital functions that include the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. To define the molecular landscape that underlies the specific functions of the adrenal gland, we combined a genome-wide transcriptomics approach based on mRNA sequencing of human tissues with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling on tissue microarrays. Approximately two-thirds of all putative protein coding genes were expressed in the adrenal gland and the analysis identified 253 genes with an elevated pattern of expression in the adrenal gland, with only 37 genes showing a markedly higher expression level (>5-fold) in the adrenal gland compared to 31 other normal human tissue types analyzed. The analyses allowed for an assessment of the relative expression levels for well-known proteins involved in adrenal gland function, but also identified previously poorly characterized proteins in the adrenal cortex, such as FERM domain containing 5 (FRMD5) and protein NOV homolog (NOV). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the adrenal gland transcriptome and proteome, with a comprehensive list of genes with elevated expression in the adrenal gland and spatial information with examples of protein expression patterns for corresponding proteins. These genes and proteins constitute important starting points for an improved understanding of the normal function and pathophysiology of the adrenal glands.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312934 (URN)10.1210/en.2016-1758 (DOI)27901589 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29
  • 40.
    Bergman, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Anna, Tolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    A six marker panel for differential diagnostics of female cancersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To present a new immunohistochemistry-based panel for clinical differential diagnostics of breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer.

     

    Background: Diagnostics of metastatic ER-positive tumors can present a clinical challenge. Breast and gynecological cancers are to a varying degree ER+, and can have similar growth patterns. The close proximity of the ovaries, endometrium and cervix also renders difficulties to distinguish between primary gynecological cancer in advanced stages.

     

    Material and Methods: As a discovery set for the selection of antibodies, tissue microarray (TMA) blocks containing 60 breast, 60 ovarian, 60 endometrial and 60 cervical tumor samples of predominantly metastatic sources were sectioned and immunohistochemically stained using 43 different primary antibodies, including both well accepted diagnostic markers and novel candidate markers. The results were analyzed for best possible differential diagnostic power to discriminate between these forms of female cancer.

     

    Results: By the implementation of a decision tree we were able to define a six-marker panel including antibodies detecting the WT1, ZAG, VIM, CK5, GATA3 and PAX8 proteins. This antibody panel enabled differentiation between breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer with an accuracy of 80%. The selected markers were then examined in a second cohort of 452 cancer samples comprising 60 breast, 48 ovary, 233 endometrium and 111 cervix patients. A decision tree classifier was used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of these markers in differential diagnosis of the female cancers.  The results suggest that this panel could be used in a clinical setting to achieve a more accurate diagnosis and thus provide a basis for further prospective clinical studies.

  • 41.
    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Falk, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Savitcheva, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Godau, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Zetterling, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Perfusion and diffusion MRI combined with (11)C-methionine PET in the preoperative evaluation of suspected adult low-grade gliomas2013In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI, dMRI) are valuable diagnostic tools for assessing brain tumors in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation of pMRI and dMRI with (11)C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET PET) in suspected low-grade gliomas (LGG) prior to surgery. Twenty-four adults with suspected LGG were enrolled in an observational study and examined by MET PET, pMRI and dMRI. Histological tumor diagnosis was confirmed in 23/24 patients (18 gliomas grade II, 5 gliomas grade III). The maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBVmax) and the minimum mean diffusivity (MDmin) were measured in tumor areas with highest MET uptake (hotspot) on PET by using automated co-registration of MRI and PET scans. A clearly defined hotspot on PET was present in all 23 tumors. Regions with rCBVmax corresponded with hotspot regions in all tumors, regions with MDmin corresponded with hotspot regions in 20/23 tumors. The correlation between rCBVmax (r = 0.19, P = 0.38) and MDmin (r = -0.41, P = 0.053) with MET uptake in the hotspot was not statistically significant. Taken into account the difficulties of measuring perfusion abnormalities in non-enhancing gliomas, this study demonstrates that co-registered MET PET and pMRI facilitates the identification of regions with rCBVmax. Furthermore, the lack of a clear positive correlation between tumor metabolism in terms of MET uptake and tumor vascularity measured as rCBVmax suggests that combined pMRI/PET provides complementary baseline imaging data in these tumors.

  • 42.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Bennet, William
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Yamamoto, Shinji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Sedigh, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    von Zur-Mühlen, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Utilization of Small Pediatric Donors Including Infants for Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation: Exemplification of the Surgical Technique and the Surveillance2014In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 260, no 2, p. e5-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Biglarnia, Alireza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Emanuelsson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Schneider, Mårten K. J.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Lorant, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    The free radical scavenger S-PBN significantly prolongs DSG-mediated graft survival in experimental xenotransplantation2012In: Xenotransplantation, ISSN 0908-665X, E-ISSN 1399-3089, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 166-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nitrones such as 2-sulfo-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (S-PBN) are known to trap and stabilize free radicals and to reduce inflammation. Recently, S-PBN was shown to reduce infiltration of T lymphocytes and the expression of adhesion molecules on the endothelium in experimental traumatic brain injury. We hypothesized that S-PBN could reduce infiltration of T lymphocytes during cell-mediated xenograft rejection and thereby increase graft survival. The concordant mouse-to-rat heart transplantation model was used to test the hypothesis. In this model, grafts undergo acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR) almost invariably on day 3 and succumb to cell-mediated rejection on approximately day 8 if AHXR is inhibited by treatment with 15-deoxyspergualin (DSG). Material and methods: Hearts from Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice were transplanted to the neck vessels of Lewis rats. Recipients were treated with S-PBN (n = 9), DSG (n = 9), S-PBN and DSG in combination (n = 10) or left untreated (n = 9) for survival studies. S-PBN was given daily intraperitoneally at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight (BW) on day -1 to 30, and DSG was given daily intraperitoneally at a dose of 10 mg/kg BW on day -1 to 4 and 5 mg/kg BW on day 5 to 21. Nine additional recipients were given S-PBN only on days -1 and 0 in combination with continuous DSG treatment. Grafts were monitored until they stopped beating. Additional recipients were treated with S-PBN (n = 5), DSG (n = 5), S-PBN and DSG in combination (n = 6) or left untreated (n = 5) for morphological, immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses on days 2 and 6 after transplantation. Results: S-PBN treatment in combination with DSG resulted in increased median graft survival compared to DSG treatment alone (14 vs. 7 days; P = 0.019). Lower number of T lymphocytes on day 6 (P = 0.019) was observed by ex vivo propagation and flow cytometry when combining S-PBN with DSG, whereas immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of infiltrated CD4+, but not TCR+, cells. S-PBN treatment alone had no impact on graft survival compared to untreated rats (3 vs. 3 days). No differences were seen in ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression or in morphology between the groups. Conclusion: The combination of S-PBN and DSG treatment increases xenograft survival. The main effect of S-PBN appears to be in direct connection with the transplantation. Because of its low toxicity, S-PBN could become useful in combination with other immunosuppressants to reduce cell-mediated xenograft rejection.

  • 44.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Wadström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Desensitization With Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption Interferes With Complement in ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation2012In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Complement activation was characterized during and after desensitization treatment in 19 consecutive patients receiving ABO-incompatible (ABOi) living donor kidney transplants to assess the effect of desensitization protocol including antigen-specific immunoadsorption (IA) on complement activation.

    METHODS:

    All patients received rituximab- and tacrolimus-based triple treatment. Anti-A/B antibodies were removed by IA. Serial determinations of C3, C3a, the C3a/C3 ratio, and sC5b-9 were carried out between day -30 and postoperative day 30. C1q was measured on day -30 and the day before the transplantation. In two recipients, eluates from immunoadsorbent columns were analyzed for C3a, C1q, and immunoglobulins by western blotting. Same complement analysis was performed in eluate from a control column after in vitro perfusion of AB-plasma.

    RESULTS:

    Patient and graft survival were 100% for a median follow-up of 40 months (range, 12-60 months). There were no humoral rejections based on ABO-antigen-antibody interactions. C3a and the C3a/C3 ratio declined with the start of IA treatment, and this decline was maintained postoperatively. C1q declined from day -30 to a lower value on the day before transplantation (P<0.05). In eluates from both patient and control, immunoadsorbent column immunoglobulins together with C3a and C1q were detected.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The current protocol including antigen-specific IA interferes with the complement system; this effect may be partially responsible for the absence of humoral rejection resulting from ABO-antigen-antibody interactions and the excellent outcomes obtained after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

  • 45.
    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    von Zur-Mühlen, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Wagner, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Prompt reversal of a severe complement activation by eculizumab in a patient undergoing intentional ABO-incompatible pancreas and kidney transplantation2011In: Transplant International, ISSN 0934-0874, E-ISSN 1432-2277, Vol. 24, no 8, p. e61-e66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the presumably first intentional ABO-incompatible deceased-donor kidney and pancreas transplantation with a severe antibody-mediated rejection during a rebound of isoagglutinins. Rejection was successfully treated with eculizumab, which inhibits the terminal pathway of complement. Complement analysis (C3, C3d,g, and a modified assay of classical complement-related hemolytic function) documented complement activation and confirmed that eculizumab completely blocked complement function. At 6 months, the patient had normal kidney and pancreas function, and histological evaluations revealed no evidence of sustained graft damage. This successful transplantation suggests that ABO barriers can safely be overcome without extensive preconditioning, when the complement inhibitor eculizumab is included.

  • 46.
    Billström, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Poromaa, Inger Sundström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Hellberg, Dan
    Socioeconomic characteristics, housing conditions and criminal behavior in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) between 1960 and 20062012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 68-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Billström, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Hellberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Socioeconomic characteristics, housing conditions and criminal offences among women with cervical neoplasia2013In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 92, no 8, p. 888-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the association between cervical neoplasia and socioeconomic factors, housing conditions and criminal offences. Design. Longitudinal observational study. Setting. Falun county hospital, Sweden. Population. A total of 1331 women diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I-III or cervical cancer between 1967 and 1978 were compared with 2604 age-matched controls from the same geographical area in Sweden. Methods. The Population and Housing Censuses were used for information about civil status, education, housing conditions, employment and socioeconomic status. The Swedish Register of Conviction Decisions was used to access information on criminal offences. Main outcome measures. Socioeconomic status, housing conditions, criminal offences. Results. Women with cervical neoplasia had a lower socioeconomic status and a lower educational level than their age-matched controls. They were more often divorced and did not own their home as often as controls. A significant association with criminal offences was observed, and it persisted after adjustment for socioeconomic status. Differences in socioeconomic factors between women with cervical neoplasia and their controls had not diminished in the younger, compared with the older, part of the study population. Conclusions. The results indicate that women with cervical neoplasia belong to a socioeconomically disadvantaged group. Furthermore, the study provides information about an association with criminal offences.

  • 48.
    Birgisson, Helgi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Wallin, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Påhlman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Kultima, Hanna Göransson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mayrhofer, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundström, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Microsatellite instability and mutations in BRAF and KRAS are significant predictors of disseminated disease in colon cancer2015In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 15, article id 125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Molecular alterations are well studied in colon cancer, however there is still need for an improved understanding of their prognostic impact. This study aims to characterize colon cancer with regard to KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, microsatellite instability (MSI), and average DNA copy number, in connection with tumour dissemination and recurrence in patients with colon cancer. Methods: Disease stage II-IV colon cancer patients (n = 121) were selected. KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status was assessed by pyrosequencing and MSI was determined by analysis of mononucleotide repeat markers. Genome-wide average DNA copy number and allelic imbalance was evaluated by SNP array analysis. Results: Patients with mutated KRAS were more likely to experience disease dissemination (OR 2.75; 95% CI 1.28-6.04), whereas the opposite was observed for patients with BRAF mutation (OR 0.34; 95% 0.14-0.81) or MSI (OR 0.24; 95% 0.09-0.64). Also in the subset of patients with stage II-III disease, both MSI (OR 0.29; 95% 0.10-0.86) and BRAF mutation (OR 0.32; 95% 0.16-0.91) were related to lower risk of distant recurrence. However, average DNA copy number and PIK3CA mutations were not associated with disease dissemination. Conclusions: The present study revealed that tumour dissemination is less likely to occur in colon cancer patients with MSI and BRAF mutation, whereas the presence of a KRAS mutation increases the likelihood of disseminated disease.

  • 49. Borssen, Magnus
    et al.
    Cullman, Inger
    Noren-Nystrom, Ulrika
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Porwit, Anna
    Forestier, Erik
    Roos, Göran
    hTERT promoter methylation and telomere length in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: associations with immunophenotype and cytogenetic subgroup2011In: Experimental Hematology, ISSN 0301-472X, E-ISSN 1873-2399, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1144-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomere maintenance, important for long-term cell survival and malignant transformation, is directed by a multitude of factors, including epigenetic mechanisms, and has been implicated in outcomes for patients with leukemia. In the present study, the objective was to investigate the biological and clinical significance of telomere length and promoter methylation of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A cohort of 169 childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemias was investigated for telomere length, human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter methylation status, genomic aberrations, immunophenotype, and clinical outcomes. Methylation of the core promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was demonstrated in 24% of diagnostic samples, with a significant difference between B-cell precursor (n = 130) and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 17) cases (18% and 72%, respectively; p < 0.001). No remission sample demonstrated hTERT promoter methylation (n = 40). Within the B-cell precursor group, t(12;21)(p13;q22) [ETV6/RUNX1] cases (n = 19) showed a much higher frequency of hTERT methylation than high-hyperdiploid (51 61 chromosomes) ALL (n = 44) (63% and 7%, respectively; p < 0.001). hTERT messenger RNA levels were negatively associated with methylation status and, in the t(12;21) group, methylated cases had shorter telomeres (p = 0.017). In low-risk B-cell precursor patients (n = 101), long telomeres indicated a worse prognosis. The collected data from the present study indicate that the telomere biology in childhood ALL has clinical implications and reflects molecular differences between diverse ALL subgroups.

  • 50.
    Botling, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Lohr, Miriam
    Hellwig, Birte
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Lambe, Mats
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ekman, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    König, André
    Fernandes, Oswaldo
    Karlsson, Mats
    Helenius, Gisela
    Karlsson, Christina
    Rahnenführer, Jörg
    Hengstler, Jan G
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Biomarker discovery in non-small cell lung cancer: integrating gene expression profiling, meta-analysis and tissue microarray validation2013In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 194-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Global gene expression profiling has been widely used in lung cancer research to identify clinically relevant molecular subtypes as well as to predict prognosis and therapy response. So far, the value of these multi-gene signatures in clinical practice is unclear and the biological importance of individual genes is difficult to assess as the published signatures virtually do not overlap

    Methods:

    Here we describe a novel single institute cohort, including 196 non-small lung cancers (NSCLC) with clinical information and long-term follow-up. Gene expression array data was used as a training set to screen for single genes with prognostic impact. The top 450 probe sets identified using a univariate Cox regression model (significance level p<0.01) were tested in a meta-analysis including five publicly available independent lung cancer cohorts (n=860).

    RESULTS:

    The meta-analysis revealed 14 genes that were significantly associated with survival (p<0.001) with a false discovery rate <1%. The prognostic impact of one of these genes, the cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), was confirmed by use of immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays from two independent NSCLC cohorts, altogether including 617 NSCLC samples. Low CADM1 protein expression was significantly associated with shorter survival, with particular influence in the adenocarcinoma patient subgroup.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Using a novel NSCLC cohort together with a meta-analysis validation approach, we have identified a set of single genes with independent prognostic impact. One of these genes, CADM1, was further established as an immunohistochemical marker with a potential application in clinical diagnostics.

1234567 1 - 50 of 373
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf