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  • 1.
    Abrate, Matteo
    et al.
    CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Bacciu, Clara
    CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Hast, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Marchetti, Andrea
    CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Minutoli, Salvatore
    CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Tesconi, Maurizio
    CNR Natl Res Council, Inst Informat & Telemat, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Geomemories - A Platform for Visualizing Historical, Environmental and Geospatial Changes of the Italian Landscape2013In: ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. Special issue: Geospatial Monitoring and Modelling of Environmental Change, ISSN 2220-9964, Vol. 2, no 2, 432-455 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The GeoMemories project aims at publishing on the Web and digitally preserving historical aerial photographs that are currently stored in physical form within the archives of the Aerofototeca Nazionale in Rome. We describe a system, available at http://www.geomemories.org, that lets users visualize the evolution of the Italian landscape throughout the last century. The Web portal allows comparison of recent satellite imagery with several layers of historical maps, obtained from the aerial photos through a complex workflow that merges them together. We present several case studies carried out in collaboration with geologists, historians and archaeologists, that illustrate the great potential of our system in different research fields. Experiments and advances in image processing technologies are envisaged as a key factor in solving the inherent issue of vast amounts of manual work, from georeferencing to mosaicking to analysis.

  • 2. Adinugroho, Sigit
    et al.
    Vallot, Dorothée
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Westrin, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Calving events detection and quantification from time-lapse images in Tunabreen glacier2015In: Proc. 9th International Conference on Information & Communication Technology and Systems, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE , 2015, 61-65 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ziemke, Tom
    User experience in social human–robot interaction2017In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence (IJACI), ISSN 1941-6237, E-ISSN 1941-6245, Vol. 8, no 2, 12-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Methods for 2D and 3D Quantitative Microscopy of Biological Samples2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New microscopy techniques are continuously developed, resulting in more rapid acquisition of large amounts of data. Manual analysis of such data is extremely time-consuming and many features are difficult to quantify without the aid of a computer. But with automated image analysis biologists can extract quantitative measurements and increases throughput significantly, which becomes particularly important in high-throughput screening (HTS). This thesis addresses automation of traditional analysis of cell data as well as automation of both image capture and analysis in zebrafish high-throughput screening. 

    It is common in microscopy images to stain the nuclei in the cells, and to label the DNA and proteins in different ways. Padlock-probing and proximity ligation are highly specific detection methods that  produce point-like signals within the cells. Accurate signal detection and segmentation is often a key step in analysis of these types of images. Cells in a sample will always show some degree of variation in DNA and protein expression and to quantify these variations each cell has to be analyzed individually. This thesis presents development and evaluation of single cell analysis on a range of different types of image data. In addition, we present a novel method for signal detection in three dimensions. 

    HTS systems often use a combination of microscopy and image analysis to analyze cell-based samples. However, many diseases and biological pathways can be better studied in whole animals, particularly those that involve organ systems and multi-cellular interactions. The zebrafish is a widely-used vertebrate model of human organ function and development. Our collaborators have developed a high-throughput platform for cellular-resolution in vivo chemical and genetic screens on zebrafish larvae. This thesis presents improvements to the system, including accurate positioning of the fish which incorporates methods for detecting regions of interest, making the system fully automatic. Furthermore, the thesis describes a novel high-throughput tomography system for screening live zebrafish in both fluorescence and bright field microscopy. This 3D imaging approach combined with automatic quantification of morphological changes enables previously intractable high-throughput screening of vertebrate model organisms.

    List of papers
    1. A detailed analysis of 3D subcellular signal localization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A detailed analysis of 3D subcellular signal localization
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Cytometry Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, Vol. 75A, no 4, 319-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Detection and localization of fluorescent signals in relation to other subcellular structures is an important task in various biological studies. Many methods for analysis of fluorescence microscopy image data are limited to 2D. As cells are in fact 3D structures, there is a growing need for robust methods for analysis of 3D data. This article presents an approach for detecting point-like fluorescent signals and analyzing their subnuclear position. Cell nuclei are delineated using marker-controlled (seeded) 3D watershed segmentation. User-defined object and background seeds are given as input, and gradient information defines merging and splitting criteria. Point-like signals are detected using a modified stable wave detector and localized in relation to the nuclear membrane using distance shells. The method was applied to a set of biological data studying the localization of Smad2-Smad4 protein complexes in relation to the nuclear membrane. Smad complexes appear as early as 1 min after stimulation while the highest signal concentration is observed 45 min after stimulation, followed by a concentration decrease. The robust 3D signal detection and concentration measures obtained using the proposed method agree with previous observations while also revealing new information regarding the complex formation.

    Keyword
    3D image analysis, fluorescence signal segmentation, subcellular positioning, Smad detection
    National Category
    Computer and Information Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-98014 (URN)10.1002/cyto.a.20663 (DOI)000264513800006 ()
    Available from: 2009-02-05 Created: 2009-02-05 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Single-cell A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation load assays for segregation analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-cell A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation load assays for segregation analysis
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 55, no 11, 1159-1166 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important underlying pathogenic factor in mtDNA mutation accumulation in mitochondrial diseases and aging, but the molecular mechanisms of mtDNA segregation are elusive. Lack of high-throughput single-cell mutation load assays lies at the root of the paucity of studies in which, at the single-cell level, mitotic mtDNA segregation patterns have been analyzed. Here we describe development of a novel fluorescence-based, non-gel PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism method for single-cell A3243G mtDNA mutation load measurement. Results correlated very well with a quantitative in situ Padlock/rolling circle amplification–based genotyping method. In view of the throughput and accuracy of both methods for single-cell A3243G mtDNA mutation load determination, we conclude that they are well suited for segregation analysis.

    Keyword
    A3243G mtDNA, Aging, Heteroplasmy, Mitochondrial diseases, Mutation load, Padlock probing, PCR-RFLP, Segregation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-12658 (URN)10.1369/jhc.7A7282.2007 (DOI)000250320100009 ()17679731 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-01-09 Created: 2008-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. BlobFinder, a tool for fluorescence microscopy image cytometry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>BlobFinder, a tool for fluorescence microscopy image cytometry
    2009 (English)In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 94, no 1, 58-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Images can be acquired at high rates with modern fluorescence microscopy hardware, giving rise to a demand for high-speed analysis of image data. Digital image cytometry, i.e., automated measurements and extraction of quantitative data from images of cells, provides valuable information for many types of biomedical analysis. There exists a number of different image analysis software packages that can be programmed to perform a wide array of useful measurements. However, the multi-application capability often compromises the simplicity of the tool. Also, the gain in speed of analysis is often compromised by time spent learning complicated software. We provide a free software called BlobFinder that is intended for a limited type of application, making it easy to use, easy to learn and optimized for its particular task. BlobFinder can perform batch processing of image data and quantify as well as localize cells and point like source signals in fluorescence microscopy images, e.g., from FISH, in situ PLA and padlock probing, in a fast and easy way.

    Keyword
    Image cytometry, Single cell analysis, FISH, Software
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Analysis
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-87971 (URN)10.1016/j.cmpb.2008.08.006 (DOI)000264282400006 ()18950895 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-01-22 Created: 2009-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Robust signal detection in 3D fluorescence microscopy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Robust signal detection in 3D fluorescence microscopy
    2010 (English)In: Cytometry. Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, Vol. 77A, no 1, 86-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Robust detection and localization of biomolecules inside cells is of great importance to better understand the functions related to them. Fluorescence microscopy and specific staining methods make biomolecules appear as point-like signals on image data, often acquired in 3D. Visual detection of such point-like signals can be time consuming and problematic if the 3D images are large, containing many, sometimes overlapping, signals. This sets a demand for robust automated methods for accurate detection of signals in 3D fluorescence microscopy. We propose a new 3D point-source signal detection method that is based on Fourier series. The method consists of two parts, a detector, which is a cosine filter to enhance the point-like signals, and a verifier, which is a sine filter to validate the result from the detector. Compared to conventional methods, our method shows better robustness to noise and good ability to resolve signals that are spatially close. Tests on image data show that the method has equivalent accuracy in signal detection in comparison to Visual detection by experts. The proposed method can be used as an efficient point-like signal detection tool for various types of biological 3D image data.

    National Category
    Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-98015 (URN)10.1002/cyto.a.20795 (DOI)000273384700011 ()
    Available from: 2009-02-05 Created: 2009-02-05 Last updated: 2011-11-04Bibliographically approved
    5. High-throughput in vivo optical projection tomography of small vertebrates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-throughput in vivo optical projection tomography of small vertebrates
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159203 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-09-25 Created: 2011-09-25 Last updated: 2011-11-04
    6. Fully automated cellular-resolution vertebrate screening platform with parallel animal processing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fully automated cellular-resolution vertebrate screening platform with parallel animal processing
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 4, 711-716 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The zebrafish larva is an optically-transparent vertebrate model with complex organs that is widelyused to study genetics, developmental biology, and to model various human diseases. In this article, wepresent a set of novel technologies that significantly increase the throughput and capabilities of ourpreviously described vertebrate automated screening technology (VAST). We developed a robustmulti-thread system that can simultaneously process multiple animals. System throughput is limitedonly by the image acquisition speed rather than by the fluidic or mechanical processes. We developedimage recognition algorithms that fully automate manipulation of animals, including orienting andpositioning regions of interest within the microscope’s field of view. We also identified the optimalcapillary materials for high-resolution, distortion-free, low-background imaging of zebrafish larvae.

    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159202 (URN)10.1039/c1lc20849g (DOI)000299380800007 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-25 Created: 2011-09-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    7. Image based measurements of single cell mtDNA mutation load MTD 2007
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Image based measurements of single cell mtDNA mutation load MTD 2007
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2007, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Cell cultures as well as cells in tissue always display a certain degree of variability,and measurements based on cell averages will miss important information contained in a heterogeneous population. These differences among cells in a population may be essential to quantify when looking at, e.g., protein expression and mutations in tumor cells which often show high degree of heterogeneity.

    Single nucleotide mutations in the mithochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can accumulate and later be present in large proportions of the mithocondria causing devastating diseases. To study mtDNA accumulation and segregation one needs to measure the amount of mtDNA mutations in each cell in multiple serial cell culture passages. The different degrees of mutation in a cell culture can be quantified by making measurements on individual cells as an alternative to looking at an average of a population. Fluorescence microscopy in combination with automated digital image analysis provides an efficient approach to this type of single cell analysis.

    Image analysis software for these types of applications are often complicated and not easy to use for persons lacking extensive knowledge in image analysis, e.g., laboratory personnel. This paper presents a user friendly implementation of an automated method for image based measurements of mtDNA mutations in individual cells detected with padlock probes and rolling-circle amplification (RCA). The mitochondria are present in the cell’s cytoplasm, and here each cytoplasm has to be delineated without the presence of a cytoplasmic stain. Three different methods for segmentation of cytoplasms are compared and it is shown that automated cytoplasmic delineation can be performed 30 times faster than manual delineation, with an accuracy as high as 87%. The final image based measurements of mitochondrial mutation load are also compared to, and show high agreement with, measurements made using biochemical techniques.

    National Category
    Other Computer and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-12745 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-01-11 Created: 2008-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    8. Increasing the dynamic range of in situ PLA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the dynamic range of in situ PLA
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 8, no 11, 892-893 p.Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159199 (URN)10.1038/nmeth.1743 (DOI)000296891800004 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-25 Created: 2011-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    9. High-throughput cellular-resolution in vivo vertebrate screening
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-throughput cellular-resolution in vivo vertebrate screening
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Proc. 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159201 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-09-25 Created: 2011-09-25 Last updated: 2011-11-04
  • 5.
    Allalou, Amin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Curic, Vladimir
    Pardo-Martin, Carlos
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Approaches for increasing throughput andinformation content of image-based zebrafishscreens2011In: Proceeding of SSBA 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microscopy in combination with image analysis has emerged as one of the most powerful and informativeways to analyze cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) samples in experiments designed to uncover novel drugs and drug targets. However, many diseases and biological pathways can be better studied in whole animals, particularly diseases and pathways that involve organ systems and multicellular interactions, such as organ development, neuronal degeneration and regeneration, cancer metastasis, infectious disease progression and pathogenesis. The zebrafish is a wide-spread and popular vertebrate model of human organfunction and development, and it is unique in the sense that large-scale in vivo genetic and chemical studies are feasible due in part to its small size, optical transparency,and aquatic habitat. To improve the throughput and complexity of zebrafish screens, a high-throughput platform for cellular-resolution in vivo chemical and genetic screens on zebrafish larvae has been developed at Yanik lab at Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, USA. The system loads live zebrafish from reservoirs or multiwell plates, positions and rotates them for high-speed confocal imaging of organs,and dispenses the animals without damage. We present two improvements to the described system, including automation of positioning of the animals and a novel approach for brightfield microscopy tomographic imaging of living animals.

  • 6.
    Allalou, Amin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Wu, Yuelong
    Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa
    Eimon, Peter M.
    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih
    Automated deep-phenotyping of the vertebrate brain2017In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 6, e23379Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Arne W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tschirner, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Recognizing complexity: Visualization for skilled professionals in complex work situations2014In: Building Bridges: HCI, Visualization, and Non-formal Modeling / [ed] Achim Ebert, Gerrit C. van den Veer, Gitta Domik, Nahum D. Gershon, & Inga Scheler, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, 47-66 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Arne W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tschirner, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Recognizing complexity: Visualization for skilled professionals in complex work situations2013In: Building Bridges: HCI, Visualization, and Cognitive Ergonomics, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Arne W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tschirner, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Framtida tågtrafikstyrning: Sammanfattande forskningsrapport. Slutrapport från FOT-projektet2015Report (Other academic)
  • 10. Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Coşkun, Aykut
    Fjeld, Morten
    Obaid, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Defining gestural interactions for large vertical touch displays2017In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2017: Part I, Springer, 2017, 36-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    Billing, Erik
    Lowe, Robert
    Affective touch in human–robot interaction: Conveying emotion to the Nao robot2018In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Arweström Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Towards a distributed cognition perspective of the Swedish train traffic system2017In: Proceedings of the 13th SweCog Conference, Högskolan i Skövde , 2017, 37-39 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Thorvald, Peter
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap.
    Tool use and collaborative work of dock assembly in practice2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, 164-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deepen the understanding of the intrinsic interactions and interplay between humans, tools, and environment from a systems perspective, research in the wild (RITW) approaches have gained traction during recent decades as they provide a higher ecological validity of findings. This paper presents a RITW study, investigating how assembly, in this case dock assembly of forwarders, was done in practice. As our theoretical foundation, we used the framework of distributed cognition, which is one of the main pillars of RITW. The findings are presented in narrative form, describing and highlighting that the workers achieve an efficient production outcome by being integral parts of the whole production process and doing so through coordination of activities benefitting the shared goal of the distributed socio-technical system.

  • 14. Arvidsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sarve, Hamid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques2015In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 103, no 1, 12-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based CT (SRCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p<0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 12-20, 2015.

  • 15.
    Arweström Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Vad är det trafikledarna gör som automationen inte klarar?: Tågtrafikstyrning med människan i centrum2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Arweström Jansson, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Axelsson, AntonUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.Andreasson, RebeccaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.Billing, ErikUniversity of Skövde.
    Proceedings of the 13th SweCog Conference2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Between Insanity and Love2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick, 2015, 154-158 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology has opened up more opportunities to find bet- ter partners, especially via online dating sites . In addition, technology related to love and sex currently goes far beyond online dating sites. Technology influences our intimate life more and more. Media started to pick up romantic rela- tionship between human beings and digital characters of- ten. Furthermore, today, many wearable devices to experi- ence virtual sex have come into the market. And also robots designed for having a sex with human beings are being de- veloped rapidly. Some might claim having a sex without love or without reproduction is just totally pointless. Or, having a sex with robots is totally “insane”. But apparently there are big market needs, and modern technology seems to be able to satisfy them. This paper explores how it is possible for us to feeling love or sexual desire for non-organic objects by conducting the interview survey, and also considers why people want to have technology for satisfying sexual desire from a philosophical perspective. 

  • 18.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing "Open Education": How does the ICT-based system function as a new medium of participation for sustainability?2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 33-36 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has developed and deployed rapidly since 1980’s. Until now ICT has been considered as one of the most important infrastructures in living in the present globalized society. Along with diffusion of personal computers and highly leveraging information on the web, the way of learning has been changing gradually. Hundreds universities, institutes and companies constructs and releases the “open education” platform based on ICT, for example iTunes U, TakingITGlobal and so on. These open education platforms are basically open for everyone who wants to learn by using contents on the website for free in so far as they can access the Internet. And the movement toward the construction and use of ICT-based education platform is supported by international organizations, such as the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) in OECD and UNESCO’s project “the Virtual University and e-learning”.

  • 19.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Globalization and the change of employment system2011In: Management systems / [ed] Japanese Association of Management Systems, Tokyo: Nippon Hyoronsha , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT professionalism and gender2011In: Management quality science / [ed] Hiroshi Yamashita, Tokyo: Chuokeizaisha , 2011, 181-184 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    New form of social ties through communicating in social media (Sosharu media ga tukuru atarashii kizuna no katachi)2012In: Information and Management  64th Conferenceedings Spring / [ed] Japan Society for Information and Management, 2012, 141-144 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Research in Computer/Information Ethics: A Gender Gap Analysis and Consequences2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Universidade Autonoma de Lisboa , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology democratization enforces a never-ending process of risk/responsibility harmonization through with ethical assumptions. However, it is crucial to debate the gender gap within our community (reasons) and explore the potential “outcome” of female contribution. This panel does not promote a direct hit with the sessions, although the intention is to be controversial and influencer concerning a latent problem inside our community. 

  • 23.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rethinking ICT's contribution to sustainability and education2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, 232-235 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open education system based on Information and communication technology (ICT) can provide great opportunities for people to learn regardless of resident area, language, gender, age and so on. Currently people use it actively and build up new social networks as learning communities or study groups on the Internet. Shared knowledge and the process of sharing knowledge established through online communication are considered as key elements in the context of strengthen the individual and the country. In other words, creating the open education platform and content plays a role of designing a culture and society. However, it is not easy to realize the ideal concept of “open education” because people have many differences in language, culture, political system, ideology, thought, deployment of ICT et cetera. In order to create the open education system, which has a high degree of usability and effectiveness, we need to closely examine social roles and difficulties of the ICT-based education system in designing sustainable societies. And also the ICT-based educational system is established through the continuous human-computer interaction. Therefore, all participants get involved with developing the open education and each of them assumes a responsibility for making the open educational contents more abundant.

  • 24.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Influence on Cooperation and Coordination2013In: ICT-ethics: Sweden and Japan, Linköping: LiU Tryck , 2013, 24-30 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) creates novel products and services and promotes innovation in the whole of global society, and the amount of data, which we can gather and use, or even just see, is increasing dramatically. Searching and checking information on the Internet is our ordinary way of doing, people enjoy online shopping commonly and sometime look for their partners through the Internet. Internet, mobile networks and social media have flourished greatly in our daily lives, ICT has developed and deployed very dynamic and diverse as well. Particulary our communication patterns are greatly affected by permeation of social media into our daily life.

  • 25.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, 44-50 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as Informal Public Spheres2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, 2012, 3- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative networks via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Existing media such as TV and newspapers didn’t work well, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. And some users opened their opinions about governments’ policies or their discontent with the government through social media and discuss with others online. Through this discussing process, it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media affects social capital processes, by giving a few examples of using social media under critical social situations.

  • 27.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media Supporting Democratic Dialogue2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Autónoma University , 2013, 36-43 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term of “social media” appears in newspapers and magazines everyday and the huge number of people use social media actively in daily life. Nowadays, in the highly Information and Communication Technology (ICT) developed country Japan, Japanese people enroll in social media and evolve a new way of communicating with others based on the “virtual” social distance between them. Among social media, Twitter has been focusing on its strong power as the tool for political change recent years. While Twitter has of-expressed problems as well as the “traditional” social media, it is characterized by the limited number of characters, strong propagation and optional reciprocity. Those characteristics stimulate people’s communication online and bring about opportunities for social interaction and democratic dialogue. On the other hand, in the deluge of information, we need to nurture skills to utilize critical and rational way of thinking through dialogue not only between others also between themselves internally. This study explores characteristics of social media and differences between “traditional” social media and Twitter, and how the difference affects people’s information behavior in Japan.

  • 28.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology as Mask2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    情報倫理研究におけるジェンダーの射程 (The range of gender perspective in computer ethics research)2014In: 経営情報学会誌 (The Japan Society of Management Information (JASMIN) Journal), ISSN 0918-7324, Vol. 23, no 2, 158-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    情報通信技術(Information and CommunicationTechnology: ICT)は現代社会において必要不可欠なものであり,ICT なくしては私達の日常生活は成り立たない.一方で,ICT を利用するがゆえにかつては予想されなかった新たな社会的問題ないし社会的リスクが引き起こされている.顕著な例としては,監視社会,ソーシャル・エンジニアリングあるいはサイバーセキュリティなどが挙げられよう.これらの問題は互いに複雑に入り組み合い,より大きな社会的問題へと発展してきた.またICT が普及し人々のライフスタイルが変化するなかでは,セックスやジェンダーといった性にまつわる事象もICT からの影響を免れることは難しく,性別に基づくデジタル・デバイドや,サイバーストーキング,ポルノグラフィ,出会い系サイトなどICT と性との関係性における倫理的問題が議論されるに至る.本稿では,ICT が性に与える影響と,その影響をジェンダーの視角からどのように考察することが可能かについて検討する.

  • 30.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    男女共同参画社会って何だろう? (What is "gender equal society"?): 日本とスウェーデンの現状から 考える私たちの「ライフスタイル」 (Think about our life-style together)2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [ja]

    世界有数の福祉国家として知られ、また、ワーク・ライフ・バランスの実現度が高い国としても知られているスウェーデン。セミナー講師が住むスウェーデンでは、育児休業中の所得保障を受けるため、両親がともに育児休業を取らなければならないといった制度が整っています。福祉を実現するため高い税金が課税されていることは有名な話ですが、その税金によって全ての福祉施策 を充実させているわけではないことなど、さまざまな日本との違いを学びます。

  • 31.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Balancing between the conflicting interests of different stakeholders in research2017In: European Business Ethics Network: Research / [ed] Ioannis Filos, Athens: Deree, American College of Greece College , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We in academia produce a lot of research in the form of papers, technologies, methods, medicines and so on. All those outcomes are of great importance for society and people. On the other hand, there are many stakeholders in the process of producing research outcomes nowadays. Researchers themselves are of course the main stakeholders because their career is dependent on research. However, when research projects are connected to various political goals or affect profits for industries, many other stakeholders like politicians and business people get involved to research activities as well. Especially industries offer a lot of research funds to academic projects, and actually today many collaborative research projects between industry and academia are in progress. Thus, research environments are very complex and morally challenging since many different and conflicting interests interfere. Many academic researchers believe that what they produce belongs to society, and that their work is there mainly to satisfy the interests and needs of society and people. But, at the same time, they need to fulfill the demands coming from research supporters who offer funds and research opportunities. In producing research of good quality, it is unavoidable and very important for researchers to make a fair choice between the quality of scientific research and the satisfaction of stakeholders’ demands. This paper explores how researchers make justice between these conflicting interests, what kind of ethical dilemmas and problems they face in their daily research activities, and how they solve the ethical problems. This study is the first step of a research project that focuses on how scientific research activities and outcomes become 'social' and 'valuable'.

  • 32.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Do social media generate social capital?2012In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] Gunilla Bradley, Diane Whitehouse and Angela Lin, Lisbon: IADIS Press , 2012, 133-136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? This study is triggered by those simple questions. From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative network via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Under the critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, TV, radio and newspapers didn’t work, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This paper reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media influences social capital by giving a few examples of social media and social issues, more specifically, the political turmoil in Tunisia and big earthquake disasters in Japan.

  • 33.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ethical Competence and Social Responsibility in Scientific Research using ICT Tools2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, 345-347 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how to improve and support researchers'ethical competence in scientic research and how to conduct research ethically, especially in research activities using Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Refining research ethics relating to ICT is unavoidable in the highly technological society of today, for example big data is used in different scientic research activities, and systems which support our daily lives are constructed based on the existing systems. In other words, technology reproduces technology itself. And almost all research activities need to use ICT through the whole research process. Moreover, researchers are required to be able to participate and react sensibly in ethical dialogues with society and citizens. Seen in that light, this study could be applicable not only to computer science and technology but also to a broad spectrum of research areas as the constructive notions of ethics, liberty and responsibility in research activity.

  • 34.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 37-41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 35.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Regulation of potentially harmful contents on minors2012In: Equity, integrity and beauty in information law and ethics / [ed] Maria Botti, Kerkyra, Greece: Ionian Academy , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In democratic societies, freedom of expression is the indispensable right and duty of citizens. Although there are a few exceptions, it is generally considered that governments should not intervene and regulate this right. Both in digital and analog environments, sexual and violent descriptions are usually regulated by self-censorship of participants. However, trying to protect minors from potentially harmful contents by controlling and regulating them is very difficult. The definition of what is “potentially harmful contents on minors” varies depending on the values and on the culture of each social group. Moreover, along with the rapid spread of mobile phones and smartphones, it becomes more difficult for parents and teachers to control children’s access to harmful contents; something that might have been easier regarding the use of personal computers. Access to the Internet provides huge opportunities not only of visiting websites but also of participating in online communication such as Social Networking Service (SNS). An incredible surge of SNS evokes some issues in considering juvenile access to SNS, categorized roughly into three types. One is the very old and new problem in accessing the Internet, which is how to shield minors from harmful contents. Second is how to block inappropriate contact with a pedophile. Third is cyber bullying. SNS is a very new medium and its market and technology are evolving drastically and are constantly changing. Thus the agent of taking the lead in making and enforcing rules or self-regulation is still absent. Additionally, SNS services utilize the function of social graph actively, and third parties can provide contents and applications using open API. In response to these situations, European Commission implemented Safer Social Networking Principle for the EU, and United States released the guideline for SNS users and worked on SNS companies and users to promote voluntary efforts for using SNS properly. In Japan, mobile contents companies built the Content Evaluation and Monitoring Association (EMA) as a voluntary reviewing entity. However those measures don’t include any severe legal penalty. Those remain self-regulation relying on voluntary activities of private sectors. On the other hand, self-regulation itself is regulated by laws, social norms, market conditions and technological architectures. In this paper we discuss the conditions of regulation and self-regulation, and we explore some ideas about what would be the best way to regulate SNS.

  • 36.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Responsibility and Competence in Political Ethics2014In: Proceedings International Political Science Association, 23rd World Congress of Political Science, 2014: Challenges of contemporay governance, Montreal, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, our society is globalized, chaotic, changing, and also highly affected by individualization. That is, it is more difficult for out society to reach goals or conclusions collectively as one nation or one society. Under the situation, society needs political leaders to gather individual values, interests and opinions, and to take a lead in making collective decisions in the proper manner. Political leaders are required to have ability of making decisions and acting in the best way for society. Their responsibility is high even for future generations. According to Weber there are two categories of ethics pertaining to politics and to political leaders. One is the "ethic of ultimate ends" and the other is the "ethic of responsibility". "Ethic of responsibility" of political leaders is considered as a critical element. It is perceived as a kind of ability to consider possible social options and their impact, and also to take responsibility of their consequences in the future. In this context, it is very well compatible to the idea of ethical competence. It binds together philosophy and modern empirical research on ethical decision making, opening up for interventions like training and education for political leaders. 

  • 37.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots as companions in feelings and discussions2017In: Retfærdighed – Justice, Robophilosophy / [ed] Martin Mose Bentzen, Copenhagen, 2017, 42-42 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are used in emotional relationships. On the other hand, it is not very common to think that robots can be used as partners in a philosophical dialog. It would be challenging to find the conditions under which a robot can be one of the parts in an emotional relationship or in a Socratic dialog. Robots usable as emotional or philosophical companions need probably to function well at both dimensions, providing continuous and interchanging support for feelings and reasoning. Our aim here is not to investigate the technical possibilities for such a machine but the theoretical requirements and ethical conditions for its creation and use.

  • 38.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social movement and social media2012In: Critique, democracy and philosophy in 21st century information society: Towards critical theories of social media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, 76-77 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media affect the process of building a democratic society? Information and communication technology (ICT) made it possible for people to communicate beyond national borders and other obstacles. Social media in particular play an important role in creating a place where people communicate with each other, for example Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and so on. In other words, under these circumstances, social media function as the third place in addition to home and workplaces, which contributes not only to unite people in commu- nities but also to the resolution of various problems and crises. Therefore, the third place nurtures relationships and mutual trust under internet access conditions, and it is open for free discussions, and becomes a ground for democracy.

    In face-to-face communication, participants’ behavior is affected by social context cues, and users let their behavior adjust to particular communication manners. However, in online communicati- on, it is more difficult for participants to understand static and dynamic cues surrounding other participants compared to face-to-face communication. Because, in many cases, whereas social media makes it possible for users to communicate with others easily regardless of physical dis- tance, national boundaries and time difference, it limits the number of characters and the amount of data that they can post and use. However, participation in online communication, especially in social media, is seen as the key element in the recent trend toward democratization. In fact, millions of users send and receive a huge amount of information via social media in order to cultivate a relationship with others and strengthen mutual exchange beyond borders. Generally it is recognized that social media advance participation through exchanging information with minimal social context cues.

    However, communication through social media has some problems. Firstly, exchanged informa- tion via social media minimizes social context cues under severe restricted or censored internet access conditions; because simplified messages can be more understandable and impressive for other users in communicating. Therefore information tends to be extreme, and it could evoke a risk of group polarization. Secondly, in social media, information receivers gather fragmented information in borderless cyberspace, for any purpose. Following this they try to transform infor- mation into something they can understand, something closer to their own experience, or they try to perceive the feelings and experience of the senders of information. Through this process, users develop a sense of solidarity and share expectations and norms, which bring them together as one community. Therefore, social norms have a considerable influence on users in particular communities and advance self-stereotyping among them as solidarity and social identity are en- hanced. This situation carries the social risk of exclusion of others. Some people call Middle-east political change “Facebook revolution” or “twitter revolution” on the internet. Is this naming really pertinent? Indeed, social media has played an important role as “hub for information” and as the third place in political change. Still, social media has to contribute to the development of skills for dialog in order to achieve a really democratic society. 

  • 39.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 40.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Virtue as ethical competence2011In: EBEN Annual Conference 2011 / [ed] Luc Van Liedekerke, Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations active in an environment of increasing internal and external diversity and change need the guidance of suitable moral values. This implies many challenges. However, focus on processes is unavoidable and necessary. Particularly, regarding ethical aspects this is the only possible way for the construction and applicationof right values. In achieving that, skills and processes are very helpful because they provide a good base for the promotion of personal and organizational ethical competence, a competence referring to the ability using the right ways to handle ethical issues and which is not constrained by normative aspects. Since it is not possible to create moral values once and for all, in the diverse and changing conditions of today, continuous moral value creation and interpretation is the only way. Consequently, the focus must be on the process itself, and on the skills and structures behind this process, i.e. on personal and organizational ethical competence. Ethical competence is therefore a virtue.

  • 41.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The revival of natural and cultural identity through social media2011In: The computational turn: Past, presents, futures? / [ed] Charles Ess and Ruth Hagengruber, Münster: MV-Wissenschaft , 2011, 329-331 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has played an important role as hub for information in political change. It can contribute to the development och psychological and social preconditions for dialog and democracy.

  • 42.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    The holding function of robots in highly technological society2015In: Proceedings of Japan Society for Infomation and Management 70th Annual Conference, 2015, Vol. 70, 65-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Asplund, Teo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Luengo, Cris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thurley, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    A New Approach to Mathematical Morphology on One Dimensional Sampled Signals2016In: IEEE Proceedings, International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR 2016), Cancun, Mexico, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new approach to approximate continuous-domain mathematical morphology operators. The approach is applicable to irregularly sampled signals. We define a dilation under this new approach, where samples are duplicated and shifted according to the flat, continuous structuring element. We define the erosion by adjunction, and the opening and closing by composition. These new operators will significantly increase precision in image measurements. Experiments show that these operators indeed approximate continuous-domain operators better than the standard operators on sampled one-dimensional signals, and that they may be applied to signals using structuring elements smaller than the distance between samples. We also show that we can apply the operators to scan lines of a two-dimensional image to filter horizontal and vertical linear structures.

  • 44.
    Asplund, Teo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Luengo, Cris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thurley, Matthew
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Mathematical Morphology on Irregularly Sampled Signals2016In: Proceedings of Workshop on Discrete Geometry and Mathematical Morphology for Computer Vision In conjunction with ACCV 2016, Taipei, Taiwan, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a new operator that can be used to approximate continuous-domain mathematical morphology on irregularly sampled surfaces. We define a new way of approximating the continuous domain dilation by duplicating and shifting samples according to a flat continuous structuring element. We show that the proposed algorithm can better approximate continuous dilation, and that dilations may be sampled irregularly to achieve a smaller sampling without greatly compromising the accuracy of the result.

  • 45.
    Asplund, Teo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.
    Flagship Biosci Inc, Westminster, CO 80021 USA.
    A Faster, Unbiased Path Opening by Upper Skeletonization and Weighted Adjacency Graphs2016In: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, ISSN 1057-7149, E-ISSN 1941-0042, Vol. 25, no 12, 5589-5600 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The path opening is a filter that preserves bright regions in the image in which a path of a certain length L fits. A path is a (not necessarily straight) line defined by a specific adjacency relation. The most efficient implementation known scales as O(min(L, d, Q)N) with the length of the path, L, the maximum possible path length, d, the number of graylevels, Q, and the image size, N. An approximation exists (parsimonious path opening) that has an execution time independent of path length. This is achieved by preselecting paths, and applying 1D openings along these paths. However, the preselected paths can miss important structures, as described by its authors. Here, we propose a different approximation, in which we preselect paths using a grayvalue skeleton. The skeleton follows all ridges in the image, meaning that no important line structures will be missed. An H-minima transform simplifies the image to reduce the number of branches in the skeleton. A graph-based version of the traditional path opening operates only on the pixels in the skeleton, yielding speedups up to one order of magnitude, depending on image size and filter parameters. The edges of the graph are weighted in order to minimize bias. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm scales linearly with image size, and that it is often slightly faster for longer paths than for shorter paths. The algorithm also yields the most accurate results- as compared with a number of path opening variants-when measuring length distributions.

  • 46. Astruc, Marine
    et al.
    Malm, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kumar, Rajesh
    Bengtsson, Ewert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Cluster detection and field-of-view quality rating: Applied to automated Pap-smear analysis2013In: Proc. 2nd International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods, SciTePress, 2013, 355-364 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated cervical cancer screening systems require high resolution analysis of a large number of epithelial cells, involving complex algorithms, mainly analysing the shape and texture of cell nuclei. This can be a very time consuming process. An initial selection of relevant fields-of-view in low resolution images could limit the number of fields to be further analysed at a high resolution. In particular, the detection of cell clusters is of interest for nuclei segmentation improvement, and for diagnostic purpose, malignant and endometrial cells being more prone to stick together in clusters than other cells. In this paper, we propose methods aiming at evaluating the quality of fields-of-view in bright-field microscope images of cervical cells. The approach consists in the construction of neighbourhood graphs using the nuclei as the set of vertices. Transformations are then applied on such graphs in order to highlight the main structures in the image. The methods result in the delineation of regions with varying cell density and the identification of cell clusters. Clustering methods are evaluated using a dataset of manually delineated clusters and compared to a related work.

  • 47.
    Avenel, Christophe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Carlbom, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Blur detection and visualization in histological whole slide images2015In: Proc. 10th International Conference on Mass Data Analysis of Images and Signals, Leipzig, Germany: IBaI , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital pathology holds the promise of improved workflow and also of the use of image analysis to extract features from tissue samples for quantitative analysis to improve current subjective analysis of, for example, cancer tissue. But this requires fast and reliable image digitization. In this paper we address image blurriness, which is a particular problem with very large images or tissue micro arrays scanned with whole slide scanners, since autofocus methods may fail when there is a large variation in image content. We introduce a method to detect, quantify and dis-play blurriness from whole slide images (WSI) in real-time. We describe a blurriness measurement based on an ideal high pass filter in the frequency domain. In contrast with other method our method does not require any prior knowledge of the image content, and it produces a continuous blurriness map over the entire WSI. This map can be displayed as an overlay of the original data and viewed at different levels of magnification with zoom and pan features. The computation time for an entire WSI is around 5 minutes on an average workstation, which is about 180 times faster than existing methods.

  • 48.
    Avenel, Christophe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Fortin, Pierre
    Gouicem, Mourad
    Zaidi, Samia
    Solving the Table Maker's Dilemma on current SIMD architectures2016In: Scalable Computing: Practice and Experience, ISSN 1895-1767, E-ISSN 1895-1767, Vol. 17, no 3, 237-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Axelsson, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Context: The abstract term for the concrete2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the term 'context' and the aim has been to reason about the term in order to see whether it is possible to reach a satisfactory understanding of the concept. But the thesis is also a journey into human reasoning and conveys a certain view of human cognition. It aims to synthesise results of studies within psychology, cognitive science, anthropology, and human-computer interaction. My understanding is that context is not something we are a part of, but rather something we create mentally in relation a specific goal. Determination of something ambiguous thus comes from top-down processes related to a goal. I believe context has been wrongly interpreted in HCI as that which a user is situated in and which a product is being used in. I suggest instead a separation between the user environment and the user context.

    List of papers
    1. Scaffolding executive function capabilities via play-&-learn software for preschoolers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scaffolding executive function capabilities via play-&-learn software for preschoolers
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 108, no 7, 969-981 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Educational software in the form of games or so called "computer assisted intervention" for young children has become increasingly common receiving a growing interest and support. Currently there are, for instance, more than 1,000 iPad apps tagged for preschool. Thus, it has become increasingly important to empirically investigate whether these kinds of software actually provide educational benefits for such young children. The study presented in the present article investigated whether preschoolers have the cognitive capabilities necessary to benefit from a teachable-agent-based game of which pedagogical benefits have been shown for older children. The role of executive functions in children's attention was explored by letting 36 preschoolers (3;9-6;3 years) play a teachable-agent-based educational game and measure their capabilities to maintain focus on pedagogically relevant screen events in the presence of competing visual stimuli. Even though the participants did not succeed very well in an inhibition pretest, results showed that they nonetheless managed to inhibit distractions during game-play. It is suggested that the game context acts as a motivator that scaffolds more mature cognitive capabilities in young children than they exhibit during a noncontextual standardized test. The results further indicate gender differences in the development of these capabilities.

    Keyword
    inhibition; attention; teachable agents; eye tracking; learning by teaching
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Learning
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275524 (URN)10.1037/edu0000099 (DOI)000385436300005 ()
    Projects
    Cognition, Communication, and Learning (CCL)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 437-2014-6735
    Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    2. Collegial verbalisation — the value of an independent observer: an ecological approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collegial verbalisation — the value of an independent observer: an ecological approach
    2015 (English)In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 16, no 5, 474-494 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-249009 (URN)10.1080/1463922X.2015.1027322 (DOI)
    Available from: 2015-04-07 Created: 2015-04-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Eliciting strategies in revolutionary design: Exploring the hypothesis of predefined strategy categories
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eliciting strategies in revolutionary design: Exploring the hypothesis of predefined strategy categories
    2018 (English)In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 19, no 1, 101-117 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing automation in a human-machine system changes the tasks performed by human operators. It is difficult to analyse systems for which there are no experienced operators. This issue emerged within a project with the aim to develop a human–machine interface for a highly automated long-haul vehicle. To handle the problem, a formative strategies analysis method with promises to enable desktop analyses through predefined strategy categories was adopted. The method was used to investigate strategies for controlling the future long haul vehicle by conducting workshops with today's drivers. The method was shown to be a valuable asset in eliciting strategies for revolutionary design.

    Keyword
    Cognitive work analysis, strategies analysis, automation, revolutionary systems design, long haul trucks
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292799 (URN)10.1080/1463922X.2017.1278805 (DOI)
    Projects
    MODAS
    Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 50.
    Axelsson, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Andersson, Richard
    IT Univ Copenhagen, Eye Informat Grp, Copenhagen, Denmark; Lund Univ, Lund Univ Cognit Sci, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund Univ, Lund Univ Cognit Sci, S-22100 Lund, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Comp & Informat Sci, Cognit & Interact Res Grp, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Scaffolding executive function capabilities via play-&-learn software for preschoolers2016In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 108, no 7, 969-981 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational software in the form of games or so called "computer assisted intervention" for young children has become increasingly common receiving a growing interest and support. Currently there are, for instance, more than 1,000 iPad apps tagged for preschool. Thus, it has become increasingly important to empirically investigate whether these kinds of software actually provide educational benefits for such young children. The study presented in the present article investigated whether preschoolers have the cognitive capabilities necessary to benefit from a teachable-agent-based game of which pedagogical benefits have been shown for older children. The role of executive functions in children's attention was explored by letting 36 preschoolers (3;9-6;3 years) play a teachable-agent-based educational game and measure their capabilities to maintain focus on pedagogically relevant screen events in the presence of competing visual stimuli. Even though the participants did not succeed very well in an inhibition pretest, results showed that they nonetheless managed to inhibit distractions during game-play. It is suggested that the game context acts as a motivator that scaffolds more mature cognitive capabilities in young children than they exhibit during a noncontextual standardized test. The results further indicate gender differences in the development of these capabilities.

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