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  • 1.
    Age, Lars-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eklinder-Frick, Jens Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Goal-oriented balancing: happy-happy negotiations beyond win-win situations2017In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 525-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to suggest a dynamic model incorporating the important dimensions that exist in negotiation processes. Design/methodology/approach - To produce a general and conceptual theory of negotiation, the grounded theory methodology is deployed. Findings - The core process in this model is dubbed "goal-oriented balancing" and describes how he negotiator is continuously balancing opposing, and seemingly contrasting, forces in a situation specific and dynamic manner to reach agreements. Based on these findings, this study also suggests a concept to describe negotiations that is focused on collaboration and that is not an oxymoron as is the concept of "win-win". Practical implications - This conceptual model can be used by managers and practitioners to navigate in a negotiation process. Originality/value - This is the first grounded theory study in negotiation research and attempt to describe negotiation processes as dynamic events in which different dimensions are managed simultaneously.

  • 2.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Åge, Lars-Johan
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eklinder-Frick, Jens Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Two decades of business negotiation research: an overview and suggestions for future studies2017In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 487-504Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to present a review of articles on business negotiation published between 1995 and 2015.

    Design/methodology/approach - This literature review is based on 490 articles on business negotiation.

    Findings - When analyzing the conceptual underpinnings of this field, two paradigms emerge as dominant. The most prominent paradigm is a cognitive, psychological approach, typically relying on experiments and statistical testing of findings. The second dominating paradigm is a behavioral one, largely concerned with mathematical modeling and game-theoretical models.

    Practical implications - Besides offering a description of the characteristics adhered to the business negotiation field, this paper will also suggest recommendations for further research and specify areas in which the research field needs further conceptual and empirical development.

    Originality/value - This literature review serves to be the first representation of the characteristics adhered to the budding research field of business negotiation.

  • 3. Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri
    et al.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Hannover: Sidelining the Bicyclist2016In: Cycling Cities: The European Experience: Hundred Years of Policy and Practice / [ed] Oldenziel, Ruth; Emanuel, Martin, Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri; Veraart, Frank, Eindhoven: Foundation for the History of Technology , 2016, p. 113-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ciabuschi, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Leach, Ross
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Infect Control Program, Geneva, Switzerland; Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Morel, Chantal M.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Infect Control Program, Geneva, Switzerland; Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland; London Sch Econ & Polit Sci, London, England.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Exploring the obstacles to implementing economic mechanisms to stimulate antibiotic research and development: a mulit-actor and system-level analysis2016In: American Journal of Law & Medicine, ISSN 0098-8588, Vol. 42, p. 451-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Article examines the potential stakeholder-related obstacles hindering the implementation of mechanisms to re-ignite the development of novel antibiotics. Proposed economic models and incentives to drive such development include: Public Funding of Research and Development (R&D), Tax Incentives, Milestone Prizes, End Payments, Intellectual Property (IP) and Exclusivity Extensions, Pricing and Reimbursement Incentives, Product Development Partnerships (PDPs), and the Options Market for Antibiotics model. Drawing on personal experience and understanding of the antibiotic field, as well as stakeholder consultation and numerous expert meetings within the DRIVE-AB project and Uppsala Health Summit 2015, the Authors identify obstacles attributable to the following actors: Universities and Research Institutes, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), Large Pharmaceutical Companies, Marketing Approval Regulators, Payors, Healthcare Providers, National Healthcare Authorities, Patients, and Supranational Institutions. The analysis also proposes a characterization and ranking of the difficulty associated with implementing the reviewed mechanisms. Public Funding of R&D, Pricing and Reimbursement Incentives, and PDPs are mechanisms expected to meet highly systemic barriers (i.e., obstacles across the entire antibiotic value chain), imposing greater implementation challenges in that they require convincing and involving several motivationally diverse actors in order to have much effect.

  • 5.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Gregori, Gian Luca
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Applied Mathematics.
    Network evolution and the embedding of complex technical solutions: The case of the Leaf House network2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 838-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the connection between network evolution and technology embedding. To this end, we performed an exploratory case study of the network surrounding an eco-sustainable technology, Leaf House, Italy's first zero-carbon emission house. We apply theories on technological development within industrial networks, with a specific focus on their resource layer and on the three settings involved in embedding an innovation: “developing”, “producing”, and “using”. Our results contribute to these theories by developing four propositions on the connections between network evolution and embedding: first, technology embedding entails both downstream network expansion and upstream restrictions. Secondly, conflicts among actors increase as technology embedding approaches the producing and using settings. Third and fourth, the more the shapes a technology can assume, and the more each of these shapes involves actors acting in different settings, the easier it is to embed it. The paper concludes with managerial implications and suggestions for further research.

  • 6.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Gressetvold, Espen
    Trondheim Business School, HiST, Trondheim, Norge.
    Harrison, Debbie
    Dept of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norge.
    Resource interaction in inter-organizational networks: Introduction to the special issue2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 123-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Hadjikhani, AmjadUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    IMP 2008 – An Interactive Perspective on Business in Practice2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ingemansson Havenvid, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Identifying new dimensions of business incubation: a multi-level analysis of Karolinska Institute’s incubation system2016In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 50-51, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relying on an in-depth case study of the incubator related to the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institute's (KI), this paper identifies new analytical and strategic dimensions of incubation. Departing from the current literature's prevalent focus on incubators as organizations performing a predefined set of activities for incubatees (facility renting, coaching, training and connecting), we perform a multilevel analysis embracing, next to the organizational and the project-specific levels, also the broader institutional and inter-organizational level. Our analysis relies on seven key components of incubation, namely its time, place, sources, resources, control/governance, activities/services and outcomes. Further, we view incubators as strategic actors engaged in value creation on a broader arena than the strict incubation context, even an international arena, where incubators' choices and interactions can be analyzed with the help of concepts from various streams in the business strategy literature. The specific strategic drivers of business incubation that we identify in the KI incubator's case are six: positioning in the value chain, risk taking/time perspective, revenue model, governance/control, internationalization, and cooperation/competition. The paper concludes with managerial implications urging incubators to take more of a strategic perspective rather than focussing only on the established components of their operations.

  • 9.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Projetcs as an attempt to make science into business: Embedding commercialization projects into business networks2013In: IMP Conference Atlanta 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how science is transformed into business by means of commercialization projects, and especially the interfaces these projects create with the surrounding network. We also aim specifically at identifying which different types of interfaces can be pivotal from project to project. Our methodology relies on four comparative case studies, centered each on a specific project selected from the commercialization efforts of Karolinska Institute (Sweden). Our findings stress that, except in one case, interfaces with users/potential buyers do not play a major role in setting the commercial direction (target markets) of these projects. Instead, in the absence of a strong interface to users, the most decisive interface for setting the commercial direction is the one with financiers, which further binds all projects to Karolinska’s innovation-supporting system. Moreover, we find that the interface with the project team is never pivotal for the four analyzed project, as the human resources directly employed in the project are kept to a minimum in all of Karolinska Institute’s commercialization projects. This makes commercialization projects extremely dependent on external resources and largely unable to control their long-term development.

  • 10.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Launberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Controlling the commercialisation of science across inter-organisational borders: Four cases from two major Swedish universities2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 382-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse howdifferent types of control are applied in different mechanisms for commercialisingscience, according to the inter-organisational interactions involved. To achievethis purpose, we followed a multiple-case study design and selected four casesfrom Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institutet that provided variationin the commercialisation mechanisms (PET Centre, Ångström Materials Academy,Actar, and Karolinska Development). We find that action and resultcontrols dominate in linear ‘spin-out’ funnel mechanisms, while interactive mechanismsentail a combination of action, result and personalcontrols. However, the inter-organisational interactions also impact whichcontrols are applied in a commercialisation mechanism: conflicting goals between a few closely related organisations or limited external interactions are associated with result controls, whileaction controls dominate in the absence of external interactions if timeand efficiency are key goals. Result controls also assume very different roles, depending on the inter-organisational context of a specific commercialisation mechanism.

  • 11.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Launberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Governance and control of the commercialization of science. Examples from two major Swedish universities2011In: Uppsala Public Management Seminar, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses four episodes of commercialization of science taken from the innovation practices of two major Swedish universities, Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University. The four mini-cases (PET center, Ångström Materials Academy, Actar AB, and Karolinska Development) were selected to provide variation in the commercialization mechanisms and goals. Our purpose is to relate the patterns of control and governance in each episode with its goal and commercialization mechanism. In doing this we also discuss the impact that the number and typology of actors involved, as well as their relationships, have on how control is exerted in each commercialization episode.

  • 12.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Nadin, Giancarlo
    “Network Process Re-engineering” in a home textile network: the importance of business relationships and actor bonds2011In: Fashion supply chain management: industry and business analysis / [ed] Tsan-Ming Choi, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2011, p. 212-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter relies on a case study featuring the business network around Stella, an Italian home textile manufacturer, to illustrate the challenging issue of engaging other firms into complex “Network Process Re-engineering” (NPR) projects. While the strict technological dimension of selecting, developing, and implementing ICT solutions is certainly very important and poses several challenges to this type of projects, this chapter focuses on other types of challenges, namely those pertaining to the nature and quality of relationships between the actors taking part in a NPR project. We stress the importance of the connection between the specific inter-organizational activities that need to be redesigned and coordinated in better ways, on the one hand, and the bonds existing among the actors, on the other hand. We suggest that very advanced and complex coordination tasks, entailing sensitive communication patterns, can be tackled only if supported by strong, integrative relationships characterized by high trust and commitment between the involved parties. We conclude by discussing how the pivotal firms or the “strategic centers” of a network can support and facilitate complex change projects like NPR by carefully combining different strategies, whereby they both exert coercive power and make concessions to their counterparts in the network.

  • 13.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    “Betting on Science or Muddling Through the Network”: Two Universities and one Innovation Commission2011In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 172-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the mid 1990s the OECD, the EU and many national innovation policies have pointed to universities as the most important direct providers of solutions to use as sources of innovations for growth and societal welfare. Also, through their respective governments, universities are exposed to rather detailed requirements on how to fulfil the increased direct utilisation of research results. This paper takes a closer look at how two internationally recognised universities from the same country, namely Sweden, addressed the innovation commission. A case study investigates how the Karolinska Institute and Uppsala University interpreted and implemented the Swedish government’s commission on an increased utilisation of publicly funded research for innovation. The main finding is that both universities’ ways of fulfilling this commission are more directed towards ‘betting’ on potential innovations than on ‘muddling through’ the context of innovation.

  • 14.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Conscious use of others’ interface knowledge: how IKEA can keep the price of the Lack table constant over decades2007In: Knowledge and innovation in business and industry: the importance of using others / [ed] Håkan Håkansson and Alexandra Waluszewski, London: Routledge, 2007, p. 79-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Information Technology at IKEA: an “Open Sesame” Solution or just Another Type of Facility?2005In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1251-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology and such business applications as IT systems create great expectations to solve most problems a company faces. However, these expectations are seldom fulfilled. This article treats IT and IT systems simply as a facility among many other resources (products, facilities, business units and relationships) in business networks. By making use of a case study centred around Product Information Assistance (PIA), one of IKEA’s key IT systems for product information administration, the analytical part extracts a series of interactions patterns between IT facilities and the surrounding resources. Being IT systems also embedded into other resources implies that

    their effects seldom turn out to be as expected or simply defined by their technical potentials.

  • 16.
    Bygballe, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Public Policy and Industry Views on Innovation in Construction2011In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 157-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several countries, governmental agencies have long expressed their concerns about the construction industry's performance, its low productivity and inability to innovate. At the same time public funding of construction-related research and development (R&D) has been reduced, and the responsibility for improving performance transferred to the industry. Drawing on a study on the Swedish and Norwegian construction industries, this paper investigates public policy and industry views on construction innovation, and compares these views with recent theoretical conceptions of innovation, from a network perspective. The findings reveal that the governmental bodies facilitating and funding construction R&D, and the construction industry itself, display partly different views on innovation, both in terms of what innovation actually means and what spurs innovation in this particular setting. The contribution of the paper is twofold: firstly, it reveals different views and discusses their implications for innovative behaviour, and secondly, it suggests some key policy and managerial implications of the study from a network perspective of the business landscape.

  • 17.
    Bygballe, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    The Logic of Innovation in Construction2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 512-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates the logic of innovation in construction by addressing four questions: What is actually being renewed in construction? How is it being done? Who is involved? Why do or do not the companies innovate? The paper draws on a combination of an industrial network perspective and the exploration–exploitation dichotomy to analyze data from a study of innovation in the Norwegian and Swedish construction industries. The findings show that construction companies are increasingly working more systematically to turn project-level ideas into company-wide knowledge. This indicates an innovation logic that is oriented towards exploitation of new combinations through the internal network. The companies are also increasingly concerned with establishing closer connections to customers and users, which have traditionally been weak. This has led to an orientation towards exploitation through the external network, at least on the customer side. In turn, this may lead to more innovative behavior and renewal in the industry as a whole. However, it requires that not only the customer relationships must change, but also relationships on the supply side. Companies in the construction industry should be conscious about their innovation logic, in terms of whether they base their innovation behavior on a biased orientation towards exploitation or exploration and towards the internal or external network. A balance is needed.

  • 18. Cochoy, Franck
    et al.
    Hagberg, Johan
    Normark, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Ducourant, Hélène
    Holmberg, Ulrika
    Calvignac, Cédric
    Bicycles, cyclists and loads: a comparative analysis of cycling practices in Gothenburg and Toulouse2017In: Applied Mobilities, ISSN 2380-0127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a video-based analysis of bicycling practices in Gothenburg and Toulouse. It is based on actor-network theory, an approach that studies human and non-human entities and their contributions to social action equally. The paper examines bicycles and their interactions with cyclists and loads in the transport of people and goods. Accordingly, this paper presents methodological, theoretical and empirical contributions to the study of bicycle transportation as a possible method for developing sustainable urban environments. This paper also presents an innovative way to study ordinary social practices and describes how these practices shape associated societal issues.

  • 19.
    Cochoy, Franck
    et al.
    Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès, CERTOP-CNRS, Toulouse, France.
    Normark, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Hagberg, Johan
    Univeristy of Gothenburg.
    Ducourant, Hélène
    Université Paris Est, Paris, France.
    Funny bikes: A symmetrical study of urban space, vehicular units and mobility through thevoyeuristic spokesperson of a video-lens2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a video analysis of a biker’s practices in Gothenburg and Toulouse. Itshows how bike-rental stations, bikers, bikes and loads interact, in order to seize theforgotten determinants of sustainable urban logistics. Video recording pays as muchattention to the properties of bikes as to the characteristics of people; it takes into accountthe pragmatic and situated dimension and thus allows a generalized symmetry. From there,we submit the collected material to a double treatment. First, quantitative analysis ofobserved bikes - both “sociographic” and “demographic. Second, through a qualitativeethnomethodological analysis of bike rental sequences we see how processes and systemchannel, standardize and reconfigure behavior.To understand the challenges of our method, we present it in analogy with a famous filmequivalent, Michael Haneke's film(s) Funny games. Despite objectives and content are atodds to one another, the Funny games film(s) and our own videos share at least fiveinteresting features. Empirically the our study focus on the possible reconciliation between sustainability objectives and logistical constraints.

  • 20.
    Eizuldeen, Bahashty
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Berglund, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Soltanpour, Abtin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Hur Internet of Things förändrar affärsmodeller: En fallstudie på Regal Components AB2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Internet of Things is an emerging technology that is expected to completely change the way that physical objects interact with each other. It is based on physical objects embedded with sensors and network connectivity that allows these objects to collect data and information. By gathering and analysing this data, it allows companies to use the information to create new business opportunities. This thesis aims to study how businesses will have to change their business models in order to adapt to the new Internet of Things mind-set. To help answer the research questions, a business case at Regal Components has been conducted.

    The data was gathered through interviews with researchers and companies working with Internet of Things solutions. The empirical data was analysed by the theoretical tools: business model canvas, value proposition canvas, pricing strategies and SWOT analysis.

    The conclusion of this study shows that companies similar to Regal needs to make big changes in their organisation in order to enter the Internet of Things market. Companies will need to invest in platforms to be able to make analysis with data gathered from their sensors. For companies far back in the value chain it is even more difficult to make a profit, some kind of partnership is therefore a must-do. By adapting the business model to an Internet of Things based business model, it will allow companies to create new business opportunities.

  • 21.
    Eklinder-Frick, Jens Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Clustering or interacting for knowledge?: Towards an entangled view of knowledge in regional growth policy2016In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 221-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The European Union has an ambition to become the world's most competitive and knowledge-based economy, which entails investments in cluster initiatives. Most researchers, however find that such investments have had limited impact. The notion of creating industrial clusters is influenced by the discourse within new economic geography in which research interests are geared toward facilitating knowledge exchange between industry, university and government. In order to understand how knowledge is created and enacted within a cluster initiative the purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactions between actors participating in a specific innovation process. Design/methodology/approach - The studied cluster initiative is one of the 55 clusters designated as demonstrating highly sophisticated cluster management by European Union officials, making it an interesting case study for knowledge creation in such environments. The case study entails semi-structured in-depth interviews of 24 respondents. Findings - The cluster approach encourages a "disentangled" view of knowledge where knowledge is seen as universal and cognitive and therefore possible to disentangle from the context in which it was initially produced. However, my findings suggest that in practice knowledge is "entangled" in the specific context in which it is enacted and produced. Originality/value - Thus, in practice knowledge is a contextually limited and practical activity that is being enacted when heterogeneous resources interact in producer-user interfaces. This mismatch between strategy and outcome may subsequently help to explain the limited impact of policy on regional growth.

  • 22.
    Eklinder-Frick, Jens Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Universita' Politecnica delle Marche.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Regional Policy Investments in a Globalized World - The policy idea of proximity and the firm reality of border-crossing2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Eklinder-Frick, Jens Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Åge, Lars-Johan
    Gavle Univ, Fac Educ & Business Studies, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Perspectives on regional innovation policy - From new economic geography towards the IMP approach2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 61, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union has the aim of becoming the world's most competitive and knowledge-based economy, which entails investments in industry agglomeration. However, these investments have had limited impact. This conceptual paper problematizes the new economic geography terminology used in policy and, more specifically, the way that the key concepts of "industry agglomeration," "social capital," "knowledge," and "innovation" are conceptualized. By adding the perspective of the industrial network or industrial marketing and purchasing (IMP) approach, this paper contributes to a more nuanced understanding of how to facilitate innovation within regional policy. Since the IMP approach offers an organizational-level perspective, including such a perspective will help make the EU's policies more practically applicable. We propose that regional policy should pay more attention to the socio-material resource interaction between the actors involved in the cluster initiatives. This would shift the focus away from creating spillover effects of knowledge towards viewing knowledge as a performative construct that is inseparable from the specific resource interaction in which it is embedded. Also, the definition of innovation within policy could benefit from being reconceptualized as the processual use within producer-user relationships.

  • 24.
    Eklund, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Science Policy in a Socially Embedded Economy2013In: Transformations in Research, Higher education and the Academic market: The Breakdown of Scientific Thought / [ed] Sharon Rider, Ylva Hasselberg & Alexandra Waluszewski, Springer, 2013, p. 111-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Eklund, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    The diversity of systemic thinking: The underpinnings of NIS and IMP and the different assessment of an industry2015In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 26-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Eklund, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Two rebelling approaches but only one embraced by policy: On the different policy advices of NIS and IMP2017In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 417-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is twofold, first, to shed light on the different patterns in which international marketing and purchasing (IMP) and national innovation system (NIS) were embedded into the Swedish policy context, where the first approach must be regarded as a relative failure and the second a success, second, to compare their analytical lenses and policy implications through the study of a number of seminal texts of the two approaches.

    Design/methodology/approach – First, a Swedish case is selected since it provides an example of a policy context where both approaches have been considered and used as sources of inspiration for the design of policy measures. Second, the authors study a selection of the seminal texts of the two approaches in order to identify their basic theoretical assumptions. The emphasis here lies on how the schools view the importance of relations between companies, how they perceive the innovation process, their attitude towards the neoclassical market model and the explicit and implicit implications of their theoretical assumptions for policy.

    Findings – IMP and its notion of the heterogeneity of resources can provide a much more context grounded analysis than is possible within the NIS/Lundvall framework. However, it requires deep contextual knowledge of individual companies, industries and national and international settings to understand the value of these resources. IMP is “tied to the ground” and radically critical of the atomistic abstractions characterising the neoclassical market view. NIS, on the other hand, requires contextual knowledge on a more superficial level and can co-exist with neoclassical economics.

    Research limitations/implications – While the authors mainly focus on IMP and NIS, which date back to the 1980s, a later wave of concepts from the 1990s and onwards involve clusters (Porter, 1990), and triple helix (Etzkowitz and Leidesdorff, 1998). However, these latecomers share with NIS the ability to co-exist with neoclassical economics.

    Practical implications – IMP requires high demands on any policy maker that would adopt it, in terms of acquiring deep contextual knowledge and giving up established views on how the economy works

    Originality/value – The paper reveal that while both IMP and NIS like to present themselves as rebels radically departing from neoclassical economics and the linear model, NIS can still co-exist with neoclassical economics. Furthermore, IMP places high demands on any policy maker that would adopt it, in terms of acquiring deep contextual knowledge and giving up established views on how the economy works. NIS, on the other hand, requires contextual knowledge on a more superficial level.

  • 27.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Copenhagen: Branding the Cycling City2016In: Cycling Cities: The European Experience: Hundred Years of Policy and Practice / [ed] Oldenziel, Ruth; Emanuel, Martin, Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri; Veraart, Frank, Eindhoven: Foundation for the History of Technology , 2016, p. 77-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Cyclists’ Right to the American road: Lost battles and missed opportunities: Review of James Longhurst, Bike Battles: A History of Sharing the American Road (Seattle/London: University of Washington Press, 2015)2017In: Transfers, ISSN 2045-4813, E-ISSN 2045-4821, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Cykelstad Malmö 1870-20002014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Cyklandets berg- och dalbana i Stockholm2013In: Stockholm på väg / [ed] Ulf Sörenson, Stockholm: Balkong , 2013, p. 158-167Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Designing Signals, Mediating Mobility: Traffic Management and Mobility Practices in Interwar Stockholm2017In: Mobilising Design / [ed] Justin Spinney, Philip Pinch, Suzanne Reimer, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 103-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Malmö: A Center of Cycling Innovation2016In: Cycling Cities: The European Experience: Hundred Years of Policy and Practice / [ed] Oldenziel, Ruth; Emanuel, Martin, Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri; Veraart, Frank, Eindhoven: Foundation for the History of Technology , 2016, p. 137-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Monuments of Unsustainability: Planning, Path Dependence, and Cycling in Stockholm2015In: Cycling and Recycling: Histories of Sustainable Practices / [ed] Ruth Oldenziel and Helmuth Trischler, New York/Oxford: Berghahn Books , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Principer i klinch: Öresundsbron och cykelorganisationerna2015In: Med varm hand: Texter tillägnade Arne Kaijser / [ed] Wormbs, Nina & Kaiserfeld, Thomas, Stockholm: KTH, Avd. för historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö, KTH , 2015, p. 23-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    På cykel genom tid och rum2014In: Gränsløs: Tidskrift för Öresundsregionens historia, kultur och samhälsliv, ISSN 2001-4961, no 4, p. 120-136Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Seeking adventure and authenticity: Swedish bicycle touring in Europe during the interwar period2017In: Journal of Tourism History, ISSN 1755-182X, E-ISSN 1755-1838, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 44-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Stockholm: Where Public Transit Eclipses Cycling2016In: Cycling Cities: The European Experience: Hundred Years of Policy and Practice / [ed] Oldenziel, Ruth; Emanuel, Martin, Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri; Veraart, Frank, Eindhoven: Foundation for the History of Technology , 2016, p. 149-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Emanuel, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Veraart, Frank
    Cox, Peter
    Manchester: Cycling at a Standstill2016In: Cycling Cities: The European Experience: Hundred Years of Policy and Practice / [ed] Oldenziel, Ruth; Emanuel, Martin, Albert de la Bruhèze, Adri; Veraart, Frank, Eindhoven: Foundation for the History of Technology , 2016, p. 101-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ford, David
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Gadde, Lars-Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Håkansson, Håkan
    Norwegian School of Manegement, BI.
    Snehota, Ivan
    University of Lugano.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Analysing Business Interaction2010In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Hakansson, Hakan
    et al.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    A never ending story: Interaction patterns and economic development2013In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 443-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial marketing and purchasing is an interesting phenomenon. On the surface it appears as very mundane, a simple day-to-day activity performed by purchasers, sales personnel, and technical specialists; i.e. most often by professions representing 'middle management'. As such, it is not surrounded with any of the greater prestige ascribed to more hyped business activities, such as financing and strategy. Furthermore, industrial marketing and purchasing is seldom recognised as being of any greater importance for society at large. In policy circles, for example the UN, OECD and EU, where they stress the importance of innovation, productivity and growth, industrial marketing and purchasing is rarely mentioned as a related phenomenon. Behind the scenes, however, an empirical, much more challenging view is outlined. When the content and the effects of industrial marketing and purchasing processes are scrutinised empirically, these activities appear as perhaps the most important source for business development, industrial renewal, efficiency and innovation. From this perspective, industrial marketing and purchasing seems to be a critical phenomenon for creating prosperity for both companies and communities and for general economic growth. It is this role of industrial marketing and purchasing that we highlight and discuss in this article. Based on extensive empirical research results, we argue that interaction is the main ingredient in these processes. This implies that the supplier-customer interaction has a central development function for efficiency and innovativeness, for companies as well as for the economy at large. Thus, there is a strong need to include and consider this key engine for dynamics (and its role in developing materialised structures as well as ideas) in any theoretical study of economic development.

  • 41. Harrison, Debbie
    et al.
    Waluszewski, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    The Development of a User Network as a Way to Re-launch an Unwanted Product2008In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 115-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common situation in product development is that of product failure and the need for re-launch. This paper presents findings regarding how one firm successfully re-launched a product through the ex-post development of a user network. The producer, Biacore, had to re-launch its biosensor product or lose a €50 million investment. The firm identified and interacted with multiple potential lead-users in order to generate new use applications. The firm benefited from the successful development of a set of new applications, innovative users, and sales. As sales of the product increased, Biacore created marketing channels as diffusion mechanisms for the encouragement of direct and indirect user-to-user interaction. These were a way to spread the costs of user support when the firm standardised how it interacted with users. Some follower-users were able to benefit from lead-users who became lead teachers; other follower-users became non-users of the product. This paper illustrates three main roles for the firm in developing a user network: creating lead-users, organising directed applications development and facilitating user-to-user interaction.

  • 42.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Att skapa ett ämne: Entreprenörskap, sparande och svensk ekonomisk historia2014In: Svensk snillrikhet?: Nationella föreställningar om entreprenörer och teknisk begåvning 1800-2000 / [ed] Bergwik, Staffan; Godhe, Michael; Houltz, Anders; Rodell, Magnus, Nordic Academic Press, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Bertil Boëthius: Ekonomihistoriker och tidig miljöhistoriker med bredd och kunnande2009In: Svenska Historiker: Från medeltid till våra dagar / [ed] Ragnar Björk och Alf W. Johansson, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2009, p. 415-422Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Brante, Thomas, 2014. Den professionella logiken. Hur vetenskap och praktik förenas i det moderna kunskapssamhället. Stockholm: Liber.2015In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Demand or discretion?: the market model applied to science and its core values and institutions2012In: Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics, ISSN 1863-5415, E-ISSN 1611-8014, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the hypothetical consequences of applying the rationality of the market model to the core activities of science, viz. reading, writing texts, and posing and answering scientific questions. What would happen to science and to our ideas and norms regarding science if we ascribed to the individual scientist the rationality of ‘economic man’? The starting point is a discussion of scientific norms and driving forces in the sociology of science. A central conclusion is that science has until now been perceived as being judgment driven, and that scientific judgment historically has been formed in a setting where intersubjectivity has been central. This analysis bridges the gap between classical Mertonian sociology of science and science and technology studies. What then happens to discretionary decision making if we introduce economic rationality into science? Economics tends to treat science from a Mertonian viewpoint, presupposing a value-based rationality, and when economic rationality (the supply/demand mechanism) is introduced, these values are not affected. However, the conclusion of this article is that this would indeed deeply affect scientific rationality. Discretionary decision making would be downplayed, as focus would shift from the text as a means of communicating the result, to the text as a commodity in a market of publication. This would disembed the credibility cycle, and it would alter the character of scientific work and undermine intersubjectivity. Consumption would be disembedded from the context of use and from the norms regarding the use of texts and their value. The knowledge base necessary for intersubjectivity would decrease.

  • 46.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Drowning by numbers: On reading, writing and bibliometrics2013In: Confero. Essays on education, philosophy and politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 19-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this text is manifold. The primary purpose is to look into the effects of marketization of academia on the reading habits of academics, which also demands a problematization of reading and its role in the process of creating new knowledge. The second purpose is to discuss and problematize the citation as a sign of intellectual debt. And the third, but not least important, purpose is to write a text that demands the reader to read in a manner that is necessary to learn, instead of writing it in a manner that is adapted to promoting "citability". And so of course, what I would like more than anything to teach the reader is that the only possible way forward, the only method of reproducing real scholarship in a commodified setting, is to live it yourself. This way of writing a text is my way of living eal scholarship. If this does not agree with you – don't bother citing me.

  • 47.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    En personlig historia2011In: Aktörer och marknader i omvandling.: Studier i företagandets historia tillägnade Kersti Ullenhag / [ed] Lars Fälting, Mats Larsson, Tom Petersson & Karin Ågren, Uppsala: Uppsala Universitet , 2011, p. 29-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    In defence of discretion2013In: Transformations in Research, Higher education and the Academic market: The Breakdown of Scientific Thought / [ed] Sharon Rider, Ylva Hasselberg & Alexandra Waluszewski, Springer, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Karl-Gustaf Hildebrand: Framstående ekonomhistoriker och poet2009In: Svenska Historiker: Från medeltid till våra dagar / [ed] Ragnar Björk och Alf W. Johansson, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2009, p. 584-593Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Hasselberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Komma överens2013In: Vågar du sticka ut hakan?: Texter om strukturellt betingad feghet i kultur och utbildning, Nationella Dramaturgiatet , 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1234 1 - 50 of 198
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