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  • 1.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Helmer, Charlotte Sahlen
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Orebro Univ, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ, Ctr Hlth Care Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Alice Lee Ctr Nursing Studies, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linkoping Univ, Div Psychol, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents' sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents' sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis: A randomised intervention study with two arms-intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents' gender.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89-31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Falk, Megan W.
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden; Linköping Univ, Crown Princess Victorias Child & Youth Hosp, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden; Dalen Hosp, Capio Palliat Care Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Childhood Canc Res Unit, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychological symptoms in widowed parents with minor children, 2-4 years after the loss of a partner to cancer2021In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1112-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to explore psychological symptoms in widowed parents with minor children, 2–4 years after the death of their partner. A second aim was to examine the associations between psychological symptoms and nonmodifiable and modifiable illness and healthcare-related factors.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional survey study on widowed parents with minor children after the loss of a partner to cancer. In total, 42 parents completed an online questionnaire including instruments for assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, grief rumination, prolonged grief, and posttraumatic stress. Descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation coefficients, Mann–Whitney U tests and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used to analyze differences in symptomology based on modifiable and nonmodifiable factors.

    Results

    Parents reported moderate–severe symptoms of anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and depression. Reporting having received more information during the partner's illness regarding how the illness could affect the partner's somatic and psychological health and where to turn for support were associated with fewer psychological symptoms.

    Conclusions

    A substantial proportion of widowed parents with minor children reported a moderate–severe symptom burden regarding depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, and less so with prolonged grief symptoms. This study also highlighted the value of receiving information from healthcare personnel regarding the somatic and psychological effects of a partner's illness and where widowed parents can turn for support.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Linköping, Sweden.;Edith Cowan Univ, Sch Nursing & Midwifery, Joondalup, WA, Australia..
    Olsson, Emma
    Örebro Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Örebro, Sweden.;Univ Hosp Örebro, Dept Pediat, Örebro, Sweden..
    Sahlen Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping Univ, Crown Princess Victorias Child & Youth Hosp, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    External barriers for including parents of preterm infants in a randomised clinical trial in the neonatal intensive care unit in Sweden: a descriptive study2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e040991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Performing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in neonatal intensive care is challenging in many ways. While restrictive inclusion criteria or busy study protocols are obvious barriers, external barriers leading to termination of a study are seldom discussed. The aim of this study was to describe barriers for inclusion of families in neonatal intensive care in an RCT aiming to evaluate the effects of continuous skin-to-skin contact on mood and sleep quality in parents of preterm infants, as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Design: A descriptive study.

    Setting: Three out of seven tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Sweden participated in a two-arm RCT that was terminated because of low inclusion rate.

    Participants: Before termination of the study, 11 out of 242 families assessed for eligibility were included for participation. Results The major barriers for inclusion in this RCT were external due to (1) lack of intensive care beds in the neonatal ward, causing medically stable infants to be transferred back to the referring hospital quicker than expected, (2) moving directly from the delivery room to a family room without passing an open bay intensive care room or (3) transferring from one neonatal ward to another with the same care level to increase availability of intensive care beds where needed. Other barriers were the inclusion criteria 'single-birth' and 'Swedish-speaking parent'.

    Conclusions: The major barriers for including participants were external constituted by transferals between neonatal wards and cities due to lack of intensive care beds. This is a multifactorial issue related to organisational structures. However, since this affects the possibilities to perform research this study highlights some suggestions to consider when planning prospective intervention studies within a neonatal setting.

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    FULLTEXT01
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