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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin G. I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Catalán, Núria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. ICRA, Catalan Institute of Water Research, Girona, Spain.
    Rahman, Zeeshanur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Delhi.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Effects of sterilization on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) composition and bacterial utilization of DOC from lakes2018In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 199-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sterilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an essential step in research on interactions between DOC and organisms, for example where the effect of different microbial communities on DOC is studied or vice versa. However, few studies have gone beyond acknowledging that sterilization of DOC influences its characteristics. Here, we aimed to provide further knowledge that enables scientists to better tailor their sterilization methods to their research question. To meet this aim, we conducted a sterilization experiment with DOC from 4 boreal lakes treated with 4 sterilization methods, i.e. 2 filtrations (0.2 µm, 0.1 µm) and 2 autoclaving approaches (single and double autoclaving with a single pH adjustment). Quantity and spectroscopic properties of DOC, before and after sterilization, were studied, and DOC was further tested as a substrate for bacterial growth. We found that the filtration methods better preserved the different DOC measures. In contrast, autoclaving caused major inconsistent shifts in both qualitative and quantitative measures of DOC, as well as an increase of the maximum abundance of bacteria in growth experiments. Nonetheless, there remains a trade-off between retaining the quality of DOC and achieving sterile conditions. Therefore, the sterilization method of choice should be guided by the scientific question at hand.

  • 2.
    Attermeyer, Katrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Andersson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Catalán, Núria
    Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Girona, Spain.
    Einarsdóttir, Karólina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Groeneveld, Marloes M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Szekely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Potential terrestrial influence on transparent exopolymer particle (TEP) concentrations in boreal freshwaters2019In: Journal of limnology, ISSN 1129-5767, E-ISSN 1723-8633, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 2455-2466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems and contribute, for example, to sedimentation of organic matter in oceans and freshwaters. Earlier studies indicate that the formation of TEP is related to the in situ activity of phytoplankton or bacteria. However, terrestrial sources of TEP and TEP precursors are usually not considered. We investigated TEP concentration and its driving factors in boreal freshwaters, hypoth- esizing that TEP and TEP precursors can enter freshwaters via terrestrial inputs. In a field survey, we measured TEP concentrations and other environmental factors across 30 aquatic ecosystems in Sweden. In a mesocosm experi- ment, we further investigated TEP dynamics over time after manipulating terrestrial organic matter input and light conditions. The TEP concentrations in boreal freshwaters ranged from 83 to 4940 μg Gum Xanthan equivalent L−1, which is comparable to other studies in freshwaters. The carbon fraction in TEP in the sampled boreal freshwaters is much higher than the phytoplanktonic carbon, in contrast to previous studies in northern temperate and Medi- terranean regions. Boreal TEP concentrations were mostly related to particulate organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and optical indices of terrestrial influence but less influenced by bacterial abundance, bacterial production, and chlorophyll a. Hence, our results do not support a major role of the phytoplankton community or aquatic bac- teria on TEP concentrations and dynamics. This suggests a strong external control of TEP concentrations in boreal freshwaters, which can in turn affect particle dynamics and sedimentation in the recipient aquatic ecosystem.

  • 3.
    Attermeyer, Katrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. WasserCluster Lunz, Lunz Am See, Austria.
    Catalan, Nuria
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.
    Einarsdóttir, Karólina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Freixa, Anna
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.
    Groeneveld, Marloes M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Organic Carbon Processing During Transport Through Boreal Inland Waters: Particles as Important Sites2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 123, no 8, p. 2412-2428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degradation and transformation of organic carbon (C) in inland waters result in significant CO2 emissions from inland waters. Even though most of the C in inland waters occurs as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), studies on particulate organic carbon (POC) and how it influences the overall reactivity of organic C in transport are still scarce. We sampled 30 aquatic ecosystems following an aquatic continuum including peat surface waters, streams, rivers, and lakes. We report DOC and POC degradation rates, relate degradation patterns to environmental data across these systems, and present qualitative changes in dissolved organic matter and particulate organic matter during degradation. Microbial degradation rates of POC were approximately 15 times higher compared to degradation of DOC, with POC half-lives of only 17 +/- 3 (mean +/- SE) days across all sampled aquatic ecosystems. Rapid POC decay was accompanied by a shift in particulate C: N ratios, whereas dissolved organic matter composition did not change at the time scale of incubations. The faster degradation of the POC implies a constant replenishment to sustain natural POC concentrations. We suggest that degradation of organic matter transported through the inland water continuum might occur to a large extent via transition of DOC into more rapidly cycling POC in nature, for example, triggered by light. In this way, particles would be a dominant pool of organic C processing across the boreal aquatic continuum, partially sustained by replenishment via flocculation of DOC.

  • 4. Bravo, Andrea G.
    et al.
    Kothawala, Dolly
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Attermeyer, Katrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Tessier, Emmanuel
    Bodmer, Pascal
    Ledesma, José L.J.
    Audet, Joachim
    Casas-Ruiz, Joan Pere
    Catalán, Núria
    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie
    Colls, Miriam
    Deininger, Anne
    Evtimova, Vesela V.
    Fonvielle, Jérémy A.
    Fuß, Thomas
    Gilbert, Peter
    Herrero Ortega, Sonia
    Liu, Liu
    Mendoza-Lera, Clara
    Monteiro, Juliana
    Mor, Jordi-René
    Nagler, Magdalena
    Niedrist, Georg H.
    Nydahl, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Pastor, Ada
    Pegg, Josephine
    Gutmann Roberts, Catherine
    Pilotto, Francesca
    Portela, Ana Paula
    González-Quijano, Clara Romero
    Romero, Ferran
    Rulík, Martin
    Amouroux, David
    The interplay between total mercury, methylmercury and dissolved organic matter in fluvial systems: A latitudinal study across Europe2018In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, Vol. 144, p. 172-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale studies are needed to identify the drivers of total mercury (THg) and monomethyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. Studies attempting to link dissolved organic matter (DOM) to levels of THg or MeHg are few and geographically constrained. Additionally, stream and river systems have been understudied as compared to lakes. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of DOM concentration and composition, morphological descriptors, land uses and water chemistry on THg and MeHg concentrations and the percentage of THg as MeHg (%MeHg) in 29 streams across Europe spanning from 41°N to 64 °N. THg concentrations (0.06–2.78 ng L−1) were highest in streams characterized by DOM with a high terrestrial soil signature and low nutrient content. MeHg concentrations (7.8–159 pg L−1) varied non-systematically across systems. Relationships between DOM bulk characteristics and THg and MeHg suggest that while soil derived DOM inputs control THg concentrations, autochthonous DOM (aquatically produced) and the availability of electron acceptors for Hg methylating microorganisms (e.g. sulfate) drive %MeHg and potentially MeHg concentration. Overall, these results highlight the large spatial variability in THg and MeHg concentrations at the European scale, and underscore the importance of DOM composition on mercury cycling in fluvial systems.

  • 5.
    Catalán, Núria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.
    Casas-Ruiz, J. P.
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Dept Biol Sci, Grp Rech Interuniv Limnol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Arce, M. I.
    Ctr Edafol & Apply Biol Segura CEBAS CSIC, Murcia, Spain.
    Abril, M.
    Univ Vic Cent Univ Catalonia, Aquat Ecol Grp, BETA Technol Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bravo, A. G.
    CSIC, Inst Environm Assessment & Water Res IDAEA, Dept Environm Chem, Barcelona, Spain.
    del Campo, R.
    Univ Murcia, Fac Biol, Dept Ecol & Hydrol, Reg Campus Int Excellence Campus Mare Nostrum, Murcia, Spain.
    Estevez, E.
    Univ Cantabria, Environm Hydraul Inst, Santander, Spain.
    Freixa, A.
    Gimenez-Grau, P.
    CREAF CSIC, Cerdanyola Del Valles, Spain.
    Gonzalez-Ferreras, A. M.
    Univ Cantabria, Environm Hydraul Inst, Santander, Spain.
    Gomez-Gener, Ll.
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Lupon, A.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, Umea, Sweden.
    Martinez, A.
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Dept Plant Biol & Ecol, Lab Stream Ecol, Bilbao, Spain.
    Palacin-Lizarbe, C.
    CREAF CSIC, Cerdanyola Del Valles, Spain.
    Poblador, S.
    Univ Barcelona, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Evolut Ecol & Ciencies Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rasines-Ladero, R.
    Univ Alcala De Henares, Parque Cient Tecnol, iMdea Water Inst, De Henares, Spain.
    Reyes, M.
    Eawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Aquat Ecol, Dubendorf, Switzerland.
    Rodriguez-Castillo, T.
    Univ Cantabria, Environm Hydraul Inst, Santander, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Lozano, P.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Environm Sci Policy & Management, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Sanpera-Calbet, I.
    Univ Barcelona, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Evolut Ecol & Ciencies Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain.
    Tornero, I.
    Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain.
    Pastor, A.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Behind the Scenes: Mechanisms Regulating Climatic Patterns of Dissolved Organic Carbon Uptake in Headwater Streams2018In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1528-1541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large variability in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) uptake rates has been reported for headwater streams, but the causes of this variability are still not well understood. Here we assessed acetate uptake rates across 11 European streams comprising different ecoregions by using whole-reach pulse acetate additions. We evaluated the main climatic and biogeochemical drivers of acetate uptake during two seasonal periods. Our results show a minor influence of sampling periods but a strong effect of climate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition on acetate uptake. In particular, mean annual precipitation explained half of the variability of the acetate uptake velocities (Vf(Acetate)) across streams. Temperate streams presented the lowest Vf(Acetate), together with humic-like DOM and the highest stream respiration rates. In contrast, higher Vf(Acetate) were found in semiarid streams, with protein-like DOM, indicating a dominance of reactive, labile compounds. This, together with lower stream respiration rates and molar ratios of DOC to nitrate, suggests a strong C limitation in semiarid streams, likely due to reduced inputs from the catchment. Overall, this study highlights the interplay of climate and DOM composition and its relevance to understand the biogeochemical mechanisms controlling DOC uptake in streams. Plain Language Summary Headwater streams receive and degrade organic carbon and nutrients from the surrounding catchments. That degradation can be assessed by measuring the uptake of simple compounds of carbon or nitrogen such as acetate or nitrate. Here we determine the variability in acetate and nitrate uptake rates across headwater streams and elucidate the mechanisms behind that variability. The balance between nutrients, the composition of the organic materials present in the streams, and the climatic background is at interplay.

  • 6. Frassl, Marieke A.
    et al.
    Hamilton, David P.
    Denfeld, Blaize A.
    de Eyto, Elvira
    Hampton, Stephanie E.
    Keller, Philipp S.
    Sharma, Sapna
    Lewis, Abigail S. L.
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    O'Reilly, Catherine M.
    Lofton, Mary E.
    Catalán, Núria
    Ten simple rules for collaboratively writing a multi-authored paper2018In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 14, no 11, article id e1006508Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science is increasingly done in large teams, making it more likely that papers will be written by several authors from different institutes, disciplines, and cultural backgrounds. A small number of “Ten simple rules” papers have been written on collaboration and on writing but not on combining the two. Collaborative writing with multiple authors has additional challenges, including varied levels of engagement of coauthors, provision of fair credit through authorship or acknowledgements, acceptance of a diversity of work styles, and the need for clear communication. Miscommunication, a lack of leadership, and inappropriate tools or writing approaches can lead to frustration, delay of publication, or even the termination of a project.

    To provide insight into collaborative writing, we use our experience from the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) to frame 10 simple rules for collaboratively writing a multi-authored paper. We consider a collaborative multi-authored paper to have three or more people from at least two different institutions. A multi-authored paper can be a result of a single discrete research project or the outcome of a larger research program that includes other papers based on common data or methods. The writing of a multi-authored paper is embedded within a broader context of planning and collaboration among team members. Our recommended rules include elements of both the planning and writing of a paper, and they can be iterative, although we have listed them in numerical order. It will help to revisit the rules frequently throughout the writing process. With the 10 rules outlined below, we aim to provide a foundation for writing multi-authored papers and conducting exciting and influential science.

  • 7.
    Herrero Ortega, Sonia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries I, Dept Expt Limnol, Stechlin, Germany.
    Catalán, Núria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.
    Björn, Erik
    Gröntoft, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hilmarsson, Torfi Geir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Pianpian
    Bishop, Kevin
    Levanoni, Oded
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    High methylmercury formation in ponds fueled by fresh humic and algal derived organic matter2018In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 63, no S1, p. S44-S53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurotoxic methylmercury causes adverse effects to ecosystem viability and human health. Previous studies have revealed that ponding alters natural organic matter (NOM) composition and increase methylmercury concentrations in rivers, especially in the first years after flooding. Here, we investigate the influence of NOM composition (i.e., sources and degradation status) on mercury methylation rate constants in nine boreal beaver ponds of different ages across Sweden.We show that increased methylmercury concentrations in surface waters is a consequence of enhanced mercury methylation in the pond sediments. Moreover, our results reveal that during the first years after the initial flooding, mercury methylation rates are fueled by the amount of fresh humic substances released from the flooded soils and by an increased production of algal-derived NOM triggered by enhanced nutrient availability. Our findings indicate that impoundment-induced changes in NOM composition control mercury methylation processes, causing the raise in MeHg levels in ponds.

  • 8.
    Mantzouki, Evanthia
    et al.
    Univ Geneva, Dept FA Forel Environm & Aquat Sci, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lurling, Miquel
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Fastner, Jutta
    German Environm Agcy, Unit Drinking Water Resources & Water Treatment, Correnspl 1, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Domis, Lisette de Senerpont
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Wilk-Wozniak, Elzbieta
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Koreiviene, Judita
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Seelen, Laura
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Teurlincx, Sven
    Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Aquat Ecol, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Verstijnen, Yvon
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Krzton, Wojciech
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Walusiak, Edward
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Nat Conservat, PL-31120 Krakow, Poland.
    Karosiene, Jurate
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Kasperoviciene, Jurate
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Savadova, Ksenija
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Vitonyte, Irma
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Bot, LT-08412 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Cillero-Castro, Carmen
    3Edata, R&D Dept Environm Engn, Lugo 27004, Spain.
    Budzynska, Agnieszka
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Goldyn, Ryszard
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kozak, Anna
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Rosinska, Joanna
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Szelag-Wasielewska, Elzbieta
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Domek, Piotr
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Water Protect, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kwasizur, Kinga
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Messyasz, Beata
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Pelechata, Aleksandra
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Pelechaty, Mariusz
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Kokocinski, Mikolaj
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-61614 Poznan, Poland.
    Garcia-Murcia, Ana
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Real, Monserrat
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Romans, Elvira
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Noguero-Ribes, Jordi
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Parreno Duque, David
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Fernandez-Moran, Elisabeth
    AECOM URS, Dept Limnol & Water Qual, Barcelona 08036, Spain.
    Karakaya, Nusret
    Abant Izzet Baysal Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-14280 Bolu, Turkey.
    Haggqvist, Kerstin
    Abo Akad Univ, Dept Sci & Engn, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.
    Demir, Nilsun
    Ankara Univ, Dept Fisheries & Aquaculture, TR-6100 Ankara, Turkey.
    Beklioglu, Meryem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Filiz, Nur
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Levi, Eti E.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Iskin, Ugur
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Bezirci, Gizem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Tavsanoglu, Ulku Nihan
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol, TR-6800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Ozhan, Koray
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Oceanog, Inst Marine Sci, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Gkelis, Spyros
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Bot, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece.
    Panou, Manthos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Bot, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece.
    Fakioglu, Ozden
    Ataturk Univ, Dept Basic Sci, TR-25240 Erzurum, Turkey.
    Avagianos, Christos
    Athens Water Supply & Sewerage Co, Water Qual Dept, Athens 11146, Greece.
    Kaloudis, Triantafyllos
    Athens Water Supply & Sewerage Co, Water Qual Dept, Athens 11146, Greece.
    Celik, Kemal
    Balikesir Univ, Dept Biol, TR-10145 Balikesir, Turkey.
    Yilmaz, Mete
    Bursa Tech Univ, Dept Bioengn, TR-16310 Bursa, Turkey.
    Marce, Rafael
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona 17003, Spain.
    Catalán, Núria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona 17003, Spain.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Colom-Montero, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mustonen, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Pierson, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Yang, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Raposeiro, Pedro M.
    Univ Azores, Fac Sci & Technol, InBIO Associated Lab, Res Ctr Biodivers & Genet Resources CIBIO Azores, P-9501801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal.
    Goncalves, Vitor
    Univ Azores, Fac Sci & Technol, InBIO Associated Lab, Res Ctr Biodivers & Genet Resources CIBIO Azores, P-9501801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal.
    Antoniou, Maria G.
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Dept Environm Sci & Technol, CY-3036 Lemesos, Cyprus.
    Tsiarta, Nikoletta
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Dept Environm Sci & Technol, CY-3036 Lemesos, Cyprus.
    McCarthy, Valerie
    Dundalk Inst Technol, Ctr Freshwater & Environm Studies, Dundalk A91 K584, Ireland.
    Perello, Victor C.
    Dundalk Inst Technol, Ctr Freshwater & Environm Studies, Dundalk A91 K584, Ireland.
    Feldmann, Tonu
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Laas, Alo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Panksep, Kristel
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Tuvikene, Lea
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Gagala, Ilona
    Polish Acad Sci, European Reg Ctr Ecohydrol, PL-90364 Lodz, Poland.
    Mankiewicz-Boczek, Joana
    Polish Acad Sci, European Reg Ctr Ecohydrol, PL-90364 Lodz, Poland.
    Yagci, Meral Apaydin
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Cinar, Sakir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Capkin, Kadir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Yagci, Abdulkadir
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Cesur, Mehmet
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Bilgin, Fuat
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Bulut, Cafer
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Uysal, Rahmi
    Republ Turkey Minist Food Agr, Fisheries Res Inst, TR-32500 Isparta, Turkey.
    Obertegger, Ulrike
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Boscaini, Adriano
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Flaim, Giovanna
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Salmaso, Nico
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Cerasino, Leonardo
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Dept Sustainable Ecosyst & Bioresources, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Richardson, Jessica
    Univ Stirling, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland.
    Visser, Petra M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Dept Freshwater & Marine Ecol, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.
    Univ Amsterdam, Dept Freshwater & Marine Ecol, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Karan, Tunay
    Gaziosmanpasa Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, TR-60250 Merkez, Turkey.
    Soylu, Elif Neyran
    Giresun Univ, Dept Biol, TR-28100 Giresun, Turkey.
    Maraslioglu, Faruk
    Hitit Univ, Dept Biol, TR-19040 Corum, Turkey.
    Napiorkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka
    Inland Fisheries Inst, Dept Icthyol Hydrobiol & Aquat Ecol, PL-10719 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Ochocka, Agnieszka
    Natl Res Inst, Dept Freshwater Protect, Inst Environm Protect, PL-01692 Warsaw, Poland.
    Pasztaleniec, Agnieszka
    Natl Res Inst, Dept Freshwater Protect, Inst Environm Protect, PL-01692 Warsaw, Poland.
    Antao-Geraldes, Ana M.
    Inst Politecn Braganca, Ctr Invest Montanha, Campus Santa Apolonia, P-5300253 Braganca, Portugal.
    Vasconcelos, Vitor
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Morais, Joao
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Vale, Micaela
    Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal;Univ Porto, P-4450208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
    Koker, Latife
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Akcaalan, Reyhan
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Albay, Meric
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Aquat Sci, Dept Freshwater Resource & Management, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Maronic, Dubravka Spoljaric
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Stevic, Filip
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Pfeiffer, Tanja Zuna
    Josip Juraj Strossmayer Univ Osijek, Dept Biol, Osijek 31000, Croatia.
    Fonvielle, Jeremy
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany.
    Straile, Dietmar
    Univ Konstanz, Limnol Inst, Dept Biol, D-78464 Constance, Germany.
    Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto
    Univ Konstanz, Limnol Inst, Dept Biol, D-78464 Constance, Germany.
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Urrutia Cordero, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Blaha, Ludek
    Masaryk Univ, RECETOX, Fac Sci, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.
    Geris, Rodan
    Morava Board Author, Dept Hydrobiol, Brno 60200, Czech Republic.
    Frankova, Marketa
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Lab Paleoecol, Brno 60200, Czech Republic.
    Kocer, Mehmet Ali Turan
    Mediterranean Fisheries Res Prod & Training Inst, Dept Environm & Resource Management, TR-7090 Antalya, Turkey.
    Alp, Mehmet Tahir
    Mersin Univ, Fac Aquaculture, TR-33160 Mersin, Turkey.
    Remec-Rekar, Spela
    Slovenian Environm Agcy, Water Qual Dept, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia.
    Elersek, Tina
    Natl Inst Biol, Dept Genet Toxicol & Canc Biol, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia.
    Triantis, Theodoros
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Zervou, Sevasti-Kiriaki
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Hiskia, Anastasia
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Attiki 15341, Greece.
    Haande, Sigrid
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Dept Freshwater Ecol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.
    Skjelbred, Birger
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Dept Freshwater Ecol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway.
    Madrecka, Beata
    Poznan Univ Tech, Inst Environm Engn, PL-60965 Poznan, Poland.
    Nemova, Hana
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Drastichova, Iveta
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Chomova, Lucia
    Publ Hlth Author Slovak Republ, Natl Reference Ctr Hydrobiol, Bratislava 82645, Slovakia.
    Edwards, Christine
    Robert Gordon Univ, Sch Pharm & Life Sci, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ, Scotland.
    Sevindik, Tugba Ongun
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    Tunca, Hatice
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    OEnem, Burcin
    Sakarya Univ, Dept Biol, TR-54187 Sakarya, Turkey.
    Aleksovski, Boris
    SS Cyril & Methodius Univ, Fac Nat Sci & Math, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Krstic, Svetislav
    SS Cyril & Methodius Univ, Fac Nat Sci & Math, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Vucelic, Itana Bokan
    Teaching Inst Publ Hlth Primorje Gorski Kotar Cty, Dept Ecotoxicol, Rijeka 51000, Croatia.
    Nawrocka, Lidia
    State Univ Appl Sci, Inst Technol, PL-82300 Elblag, Poland.
    Salmi, Pauliina
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Jyvaskyla 40014, Finland.
    Machado-Vieira, Danielle
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Dept Sistemat & Ecol, BR-58059970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    de Oliveira, Alinne Gurjao
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Dept Sistemat & Ecol, BR-58059970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Delgado-Martin, Jordi
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Garcia, David
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Cereijo, Jose Luis
    Univ A Coruna, Dept Civil Engn, La Coruna 15192, Spain.
    Goma, Joan
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Trapote, Mari Carmen
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Vegas-Vilarrubia, Teresa
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Obrador, Biel
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Grabowska, Magdalena
    Univ Bialystok, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-15245 Bialystok, Poland.
    Karpowicz, Maciej
    Univ Bialystok, Dept Hydrobiol, PL-15245 Bialystok, Poland.
    Chmura, Damian
    Univ Bielsko Biala, Inst Environm Protect & Engn, PL-43309 Bielsko Biala, Poland.
    Ubeda, Barbara
    Univ Cadiz, Dept Biol, Puerto Real 11510, Spain.
    Angel Galvez, Jose
    Univ Cadiz, Dept Biol, Puerto Real 11510, Spain.
    Ozen, Arda
    Univ Cankiri Karatekin, Dept Forest Engn, TR-18200 Cankiri, Turkey.
    Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Freshwater Biol Lab, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Warming, Trine Perlt
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Freshwater Biol Lab, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kobos, Justyna
    Univ Gdansk, Dept Marine Biotechnol, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland.
    Mazur-Marzec, Hanna
    Univ Gdansk, Dept Marine Biotechnol, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland.
    Perez-Martinez, Carmen
    Univ Granada, Dept Ecol, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Ramos-Rodriguez, Eloisa
    Univ Granada, Dept Ecol, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Arvola, Lauri
    Univ Helsinki, Lammi Biol Stn, Lammi 16900, Finland.
    Alcaraz-Parraga, Pablo
    Univ Jaen, Dept Anim Biol Plant Biol & Ecol, Jaen 23701, Spain.
    Toporowska, Magdalena
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Niedzwiecki, Michal
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Peczula, Wojciech
    Univ Life Sci Lublin, Dept Hydrobiol & Protect Ecosyst, PL-20262 Lublin, Poland.
    Leira, Manel
    Univ Lisbon, Inst Dom Luiz, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Hernandez, Armand
    CSIC, ICTJA, Inst Earth Sci Jaume Almera, Barcelona 08028, Spain.
    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Maria Blanco, Jose
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Rodriguez, Valeriano
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Juan Montes-Perez, Jorge
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Palomino, Roberto L.
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Perez, Estela
    Univ Malaga, Dept Ecol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain.
    Carballeira, Rafael
    Univ A Coruna, Fac Ciencias, CICA, La Coruna 15071, Spain.
    Camacho, Antonio
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Picazo, Antonio
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Rochera, Carlos
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Santamans, Anna C.
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Ferriol, Carmen
    Univ Valencia, Cavanilles Inst Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, Paterna Valencia 46980, Spain.
    Romo, Susana
    Univ Valencia, Dept Microbiol & Ecol, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain.
    Miguel Soria, Juan
    Univ Valencia, Dept Microbiol & Ecol, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain.
    Dunalska, Julita
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Sienska, Justyna
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Szymanski, Daniel
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Water Protect Engn, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kruk, Marek
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Dept Tourism Recreat & Ecol, PL-10720 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kostrzewska-Szlakowska, Iwona
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Biol, PL-02096 Warsaw, Poland.
    Jasser, Iwona
    Univ Warsaw, Dept Plant Ecol & Environm Conservat, Fac Biol, PL-02089 Warsaw, Poland.
    Zutinic, Petar
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Udovic, Marija Gligora
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Plenkovic-Moraj, Andelka
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.
    Frak, Magdalena
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Environm Improvement, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Bankowska-Sobczak, Agnieszka
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Hydraul Engn, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Wasilewicz, Michal
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Dept Hydraul Engn, PL-02787 Warsaw, Poland.
    Ozkan, Korhan
    Middle East Tech Univ, Inst Marine Sci Marine Biol & Fisheries, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Maliaka, Valentini
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6700 Wageningen, Netherlands;Soc Protect Prespa, Agios Germanos 53077, Greece;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Inst Water & Wetland Res, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kangro, Kersti
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia;Univ Tartu, Fac Sci & Technol, Tartu Observ, EE-61602 Tartu, Estonia.
    Grossart, Hans-Peter
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Expt Limnol, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany;Univ Potsdam, Inst Biochem & Biol, D-14469 Potsdam, Germany.
    Paerl, Hans W.
    Univ N Carolina, Inst Marine Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 28557 USA.
    Carey, Cayelan C.
    Virginia Tech, Dept Biol Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Ibelings, Bas W.
    Univ Geneva, Dept FA Forel Environm & Aquat Sci, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins2018In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.

  • 9.
    Obrador, Biel
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Av Diagonal 643, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain..
    von Schiller, Daniel
    Univ Girona, Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Sci & Technol Pk,Emili Grahit 101, Girona 17003, Spain.;Univ Basque Country, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Plant Biol & Ecol, Apdo 644, Bilbao 48080, Spain..
    Marce, Rafael
    Univ Girona, Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Sci & Technol Pk,Emili Grahit 101, Girona 17003, Spain..
    Gomez-Gener, Lluis
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Av Diagonal 643, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.;Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Linnaeus Vag 6, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Koschorreck, Matthias
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Lake Res, Bruckstr 3a, D-39114 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Borrego, Carles
    Univ Girona, Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Sci & Technol Pk,Emili Grahit 101, Girona 17003, Spain.;Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, Grp Mol Microbial Ecol, Campus Montilivi, Girona 17071, Spain..
    Catalan, Nuria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Univ Barcelona, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Av Diagonal 643, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Girona, Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Sci & Technol Pk,Emili Grahit 101, Girona 17003, Spain..
    Dry habitats sustain high CO2 emissions from temporary ponds across seasons2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the increasing understanding of the magnitude and drivers of carbon gas emissions from inland waters, the relevance of water fluctuation and associated drying on their dynamics is rarely addressed. Here, we quantified CO2 and CH4 fluxes from a set of temporary ponds across seasons. The ponds were in all occasion net CO2 emitters irrespective of the presence or absence of water. While the CO2 fluxes were in the upper range of emissions for freshwater lentic systems, CH4 fluxes were mostly undetectable. Dry habitats substantially contributed to these emissions and were always a source of CO2, whereas inundated habitats acted either as a source or a sink of atmospheric CO2 along the year. Higher concentrations of coloured and humic organic matter in water and sediment were linked to higher CO2 emissions. Composition of the sediment microbial community was related both to dissolved organic matter concentration and composition, but we did not find a direct link with CO2 fluxes. The presence of methanogenic archaea in most ponds suggested the potential for episodic CH4 production and emission. Our results highlight the need for spatially and temporally inclusive approaches that consider the dry phases and habitats to characterize carbon cycling in temporary systems.

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